×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Tulane - ACCN 3010 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Tulane - ACCN 3010 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

TULANE / OTHER / ACCN 3010 / in external financial reports, factory utilities costs may be included

in external financial reports, factory utilities costs may be included

in external financial reports, factory utilities costs may be included

Description

School: Tulane University
Department: OTHER
Course: Managerial Accounting
Professor: Ben zachry
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: Coast and Accounting
Cost: 50
Name: Chapter 1,2,3,4
Description: Managerial Accounts, Job order costing, Process order costing
Uploaded: 02/08/2017
39 Pages 205 Views 0 Unlocks
Reviews



At the end of August, in what account would the direct material cost assigned to Job #045391 be located?




What document is used to determine the actual amount of direct labor to record on a job cost sheet?




Which one of the following costs should NOT be considered a direct cost of serving a particular customer who orders a customized personal computer by phone directly from the manufacturer?



True / False Questions 1. Direct material costs are generally variaWe also discuss several other topics like california fsc study guide
Don't forget about the age old question of ivy tech solutions inc
We also discuss several other topics like finance 3000 uga
We also discuss several other topics like david daniel jmu
Don't forget about the age old question of which of the following structures is not found in an endospore?
Don't forget about the age old question of What Is the definition of Treatment Option?
ble costs. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­01 Identify and give examples of each of the three basic manufacturing cost categories Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Easy 2. Property taxes and insurance premiums paid on a factory building are examples of  manufacturing overhead. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­01 Identify and give examples of each of the three basic manufacturing cost categories Level: Easy 3. Manufacturing overhead combined with direct materials is known as conversion cost. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­01 Identify and give examples of each of the three basic manufacturing cost categories Level: Easy4. All costs incurred in a merchandising firm are considered to be period costs. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Level: Easy 5. Depreciation is always considered a product cost for external financial reporting  purposes in a manufacturing firm. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Level: Medium 6. In external financial reports, factory utilities costs may be included in an asset account  on the balance sheet at the end of the period. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Level: Hard 7. Advertising costs are considered product costs for external financial reports because  they are incurred in order to promote specific products. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Level: Medium8. Selling and administrative expenses are product costs under generally accepted  accounting principles. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Level: Easy 9. A variable cost is a cost whose cost per unit varies as the activity level rises and falls. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Easy 10. When the level of activity increases, total variable cost will increase. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Easy 11. A decrease in production will ordinarily result in an increase in fixed production costs per unit. TRUE AACSB: Analytic AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Easy12. Automation results in a shift away from variable costs toward more fixed costs. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Easy 13. In order for a cost to be variable it must vary with either units produced or units sold. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Medium 14. The concept of the relevant range does not apply to fixed costs. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Easy 15. Indirect costs, such as manufacturing overhead, are always fixed costs. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Medium16. Discretionary fixed costs arise from annual decisions by management to spend in  certain fixed cost areas. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Easy 17. Even if operations are interrupted or cut back, committed fixed costs remain largely  unchanged in the short term because the costs of restoring them later are likely to be far  greater than any short­run savings that might be realized. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Easy 18. Committed fixed costs are fixed costs that are not controllable. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Hard 19. A mixed cost is partially variable and partially fixed. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Easy20. Traditional format income statements are prepared primarily for external reporting  purposes. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­05 Prepare income statements for a merchandising company using the traditional and contribution formats Level: Easy 21. In a contribution format income statement, sales minus cost of goods sold equals the  gross margin. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­05 Prepare income statements for a merchandising company using the traditional and contribution formats Level: Easy 22. In a traditional format income statement for a merchandising company, the cost of  goods sold reports the product costs attached to the merchandise sold during the period. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­05 Prepare income statements for a merchandising company using the traditional and contribution formats Level: Easy23. Although the contribution format income statement is useful for external reporting  purposes, it has serious limitations when used for internal purposes because it does not  distinguish between fixed and variable costs. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­05 Prepare income statements for a merchandising company using the traditional and contribution formats Level: Easy 24. In a contribution format income statement for a merchandising company, cost of  goods sold is a variable cost that gets included in the "Variable expenses" portion of the  income statement. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­05 Prepare income statements for a merchandising company using the traditional and contribution formats Level: Easy 25. The traditional format income statement is used as an internal planning and decision making tool. Its emphasis on cost behavior aids cost­volume­profit analysis, management performance appraisals, and budgeting. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­05 Prepare income statements for a merchandising company using the traditional and contribution formats Level: Easy26. The following would typically be considered indirect costs of manufacturing a  particular Boeing 747 to be delivered to Singapore Airlines: electricity to run production  equipment, the factory manager's salary, and the cost of the General Electric jet engines  installed on the aircraft. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­06 Understand the differences between direct and indirect costs Level: Medium 27. The following costs should be considered direct costs of providing delivery room  services to a particular mother and her baby: the costs of drugs administered in the  operating room, the attending physician's fees, and a portion of the liability insurance  carried by the hospital to cover the delivery room. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­06 Understand the differences between direct and indirect costs Level: Hard 28. The following costs should be considered by a law firm to be indirect costs of  defending a particular client in court: rent on the law firm's offices, the law firm's  receptionist's wages, the costs of heating the law firm's offices, and the depreciation on  the personal computer in the office of the attorney who has been assigned the client. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­06 Understand the differences between direct and indirect costs Level: Hard29. In any decision making situation, sunk costs are irrelevant and should be ignored. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Decision Making Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­07 Understand cost classifications used in making decisions: differential costs; opportunity costs; and sunk  costs Level: Easy Multiple Choice Questions 30. For a lamp manufacturing company, the cost of the insurance on its vehicles that  deliver lamps to customers is best described as a: A. prime cost. B. manufacturing overhead cost. C. period cost. D. differential (incremental) cost of a lamp. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­01 Identify and give examples of each of the three basic manufacturing cost categories Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Learning Objective: 02­07 Understand cost classifications used in making decisions: differential costs; opportunity costs; and sunk  costs Level: Hard31. The cost of leasing production equipment is classified as: A. Option A B. Option B C. Option C D. Option D AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­01 Identify and give examples of each of the three basic manufacturing cost categories Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Level: Medium 32. The wages of factory maintenance personnel would usually be considered to be: A. Option A B. Option B C. Option C D. Option D AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­01 Identify and give examples of each of the three basic manufacturing cost categories Learning Objective: 02­06 Understand the differences between direct and indirect costs Level: Medium33. Manufacturing overhead consists of: A. all manufacturing costs. B. indirect materials but not indirect labor. C. all manufacturing costs, except direct materials and direct labor. D. indirect labor but not indirect materials. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­01 Identify and give examples of each of the three basic manufacturing cost categories Level: Medium 34. Which of the following should NOT be included as part of manufacturing overhead at a company that makes office furniture? A. Sheet steel in a file cabinet made by the company. B. Manufacturing equipment depreciation. C. Idle time for direct labor. D. Taxes on a factory building. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­01 Identify and give examples of each of the three basic manufacturing cost categories Level: Medium 35. Which of the following costs would not be included as part of manufacturing  overhead? A. Insurance on sales vehicles. B. Depreciation of production equipment. C. Lubricants for production equipment. D. Direct labor overtime premium. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­01 Identify and give examples of each of the three basic manufacturing cost categories Level: Easy36. Conversion cost consists of which of the following? A. Manufacturing overhead cost. B. Direct materials and direct labor cost. C. Direct labor cost. D. Direct labor and manufacturing overhead cost. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­01 Identify and give examples of each of the three basic manufacturing cost categories Level: Easy 37. The advertising costs that Pepsi incurred to air its commercials during the Super Bowl can best be described as a: A. variable cost. B. fixed cost. C. product cost. D. prime cost. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Medium 38. Each of the following would be a period cost except: A. the salary of the company president's secretary. B. the cost of a general accounting office. C. depreciation of a machine used in manufacturing. D. sales commissions. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Level: Easy39. Which of the following costs is an example of a period rather than a product cost? A. Depreciation on production equipment. B. Wages of salespersons. C. Wages of production machine operators. D. Insurance on production equipment. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Level: Easy 40. Which of the following would be considered a product cost for external financial  reporting purposes? A. Cost of a warehouse used to store finished goods. B. Cost of guided public tours through the company's facilities. C. Cost of travel necessary to sell the manufactured product. D. Cost of sand spread on the factory floor to absorb oil from manufacturing machines. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Level: Medium 41. Which of the following would NOT be treated as a product cost for external financial  reporting purposes? A. Depreciation on a factory building. B. Salaries of factory workers. C. Indirect labor in the factory. D. Advertising expenses. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Level: Easy42. The salary of the president of a manufacturing company would be classified as which  of the following? A. Product cost B. Period cost C. Manufacturing overhead D. Direct labor AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Level: Easy 43. Conversion costs do NOT include: A. depreciation. B. direct materials. C. indirect labor. D. indirect materials. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­02 Distinguish between product costs and period costs and give examples of each Level: Medium Source: CMA, adapted 44. Last month, when 10,000 units of a product were manufactured, the cost per unit was  $60. At this level of activity, variable costs are 50% of total unit costs. If 10,500 units are  manufactured next month and cost behavior patterns remain unchanged the: A. total variable cost will remain unchanged. B. fixed costs will increase in total. C. variable cost per unit will increase. D. total cost per unit will decrease. AACSB: Analytic AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Hard45. Variable cost: A. increases on a per unit basis as the number of units produced increases. B. remains constant on a per unit basis as the number of units produced increases. C. remains the same in total as production increases. D. decreases on a per unit basis as the number of units produced increases. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Medium 46. Which of the following statements regarding fixed costs is incorrect? A. Expressing fixed costs on a per unit basis usually is the best approach for decision  making. B. Fixed costs expressed on a per unit basis will decrease with increases in activity. C. Total fixed costs are constant within the relevant range. D. Fixed costs expressed on a per unit basis will increase with decreases in activity. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Medium 47. The salary paid to the production manager in a factory is: A. a variable cost. B. part of prime cost. C. part of conversion cost. D. both a variable cost and a prime cost. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Hard48. Within the relevant range, variable cost per unit will: A. increase as the level of activity increases. B. remain constant. C. decrease as the level of activity increases. D. none of these. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Easy 49. The term "relevant range" means the range of activity over which: A. relevant costs are incurred. B. costs may fluctuate. C. production may vary. D. the assumptions about fixed and variable cost behavior are reasonably valid. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Easy 50. An example of a committed fixed cost is: A. a training program for salespersons. B. executive travel expenses. C. property taxes on the factory building. D. new product research and development. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Easy51. In describing the cost formula equation Y = a + bX, which of the following  statements is correct? A. "X" is the dependent variable. B. "a" is the fixed component. C. In the high­low method, "b" equals change in activity divided by change in costs. D. As "X" increases "Y" decreases. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­03 Understand cost behavior patterns including variable costs; fixed costs; and mixed costs Level: Hard 52. Which one of the following costs should NOT be considered a direct cost of serving a particular customer who orders a customized personal computer by phone directly from  the manufacturer? A. The cost of the hard disk drive installed in the computer. B. The cost of shipping the computer to the customer. C. The cost of leasing a machine on a monthly basis that automatically tests hard disk  drives before they are installed in computers. D. The cost of packaging the computer for shipment. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­06 Understand the differences between direct and indirect costs Level: Hard53. The term differential cost refers to: A. a difference in cost which results from selecting one alternative instead of another. B. the benefit forgone by selecting one alternative instead of another. C. a cost which does not involve any dollar outlay but which is relevant to the decision making process. D. a cost which continues to be incurred even though there is no activity. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Decision Making Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 02­07 Understand cost classifications used in making decisions: differential costs; opportunity costs; and sunk  costs Level: Medium54. Which of the following costs is often important in decision making, but is omitted  from conventional accounting records? A. Fixed cost. B. Sunk cost. C. Opportunity cost. D. Indirect cost. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Decision Making Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­07 Understand cost classifications used in making decisions: differential costs; opportunity costs; and sunk  costs Level: Easy 55. When a decision is made among a number of alternatives, the benefit that is lost by  choosing one alternative over another is the: A. realized cost. B. opportunity cost. C. conversion cost. D. accrued cost. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Decision Making Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 02­07 Understand cost classifications used in making decisions: differential costs; opportunity costs; and sunk  costs Level: Easy Source: CMA, adapted03 Job­Order Costing Answer Key True / False Questions 1. The use of predetermined overhead rates in a job­order cost system makes it possible  to estimate the total cost of a given job as soon as production is completed. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­01 Compute a predetermined overhead rate Level: Easy 2. A job cost sheet is used to accumulate costs charged to a job. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­03 Compute the total cost and average cost per unit of a job Level: Easy3. The following journal entry would be made to apply overhead cost to jobs in a job order costing system: FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 03­02 Apply overhead cost to jobs using a predetermined overhead rate Learning Objective: 03­04 Understand the flow of costs in a job­order costing system and prepare appropriate journal entries to  record costs Level: Medium4. Under a job­order cost system the Work in Process account is debited with the cost of  materials purchased. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 03­04 Understand the flow of costs in a job­order costing system and prepare appropriate journal entries to  record costs Level: Medium 5. The process of assigning overhead cost to jobs is known as overhead application. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­02 Apply overhead cost to jobs using a predetermined overhead rate Level: Easy 6. The cost of a completed job in a job­order costing system typically consists of the  actual direct materials cost of the job, the actual direct labor cost of the job, and the actual manufacturing overhead cost of the job. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 03­02 Apply overhead cost to jobs using a predetermined overhead rate Level: Medium7. A debit balance in the Manufacturing Overhead account at the end of the year means  that manufacturing overhead is overapplied. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 03­05 Use T­accounts to show the flow of costs in a job­order costing system Learning Objective: 03­07 Compute underapplied or overapplied overhead cost and prepare the journal entry to close the balance in  Manufacturing Overhead to the appropriate accounts Level: Medium 8. Period costs are expensed as incurred, rather than going into the Work in Process  account. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 03­05 Use T­accounts to show the flow of costs in a job­order costing system Level: Medium 9. Advertising costs should be charged to the Manufacturing Overhead account. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­05 Use T­accounts to show the flow of costs in a job­order costing system Level: Easy10. When a job has been completed, the goods are transferred from the production  department to the finished goods warehouse and the journal entry would include a credit  to Work in Process. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­05 Use T­accounts to show the flow of costs in a job­order costing system Level: Easy11. Underapplied or overapplied manufacturing overhead represents the difference  between actual overhead costs and applied overhead costs. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­07 Compute underapplied or overapplied overhead cost and prepare the journal entry to close the balance in  Manufacturing Overhead to the appropriate accounts Level: Easy 12. Top management salaries should not go into the Manufacturing Overhead account. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­04 Understand the flow of costs in a job­order costing system and prepare appropriate journal entries to  record costs Level: Easy 13. If manufacturing overhead applied exceeds the actual manufacturing overhead costs  of the period, then manufacturing overhead is overapplied. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 03­07 Compute underapplied or overapplied overhead cost and prepare the journal entry to close the balance in  Manufacturing Overhead to the appropriate accounts Level: Easy Multiple Choice Questions 14. In computing its predetermined overhead rate, Marple Company inadvertently left its indirect labor costs out of the computation. This oversight will cause: A. Manufacturing Overhead to be overapplied. B. The Cost of Goods Manufactured to be understated. C. The debits to the Manufacturing Overhead account to be understated. D. The ending balance in Work in Process to be overstated.AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 03­01 Compute a predetermined overhead rate Learning Objective: 03­05 Use T­accounts to show the flow of costs in a job­order costing system Level: Hard 15. Which of the following is the correct formula to compute the predetermined overhead rate? A. Estimated total units in the allocation base divided by estimated total manufacturing  overhead costs. B. Estimated total manufacturing overhead costs divided by estimated total units in the  allocation base. C. Actual total manufacturing overhead costs divided by estimated total units in the  allocation base. D. Estimated total manufacturing overhead costs divided by actual total units in the  allocation base. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­01 Compute a predetermined overhead rate Level: Easy16. Which of the following would probably be the least appropriate allocation base for  allocating overhead in a highly automated manufacturer of specialty valves? A. Machine­hours B. Power consumption C. Direct labor­hours D. Machine setups AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­01 Compute a predetermined overhead rate Level: Hard 17. What document is used to determine the actual amount of direct labor to record on a  job cost sheet? A. Time ticket B. Payroll register C. Production order D. Wages payable account AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­03 Compute the total cost and average cost per unit of a job Level: Easy18. A proper journal entry to close overapplied manufacturing overhead to Cost of Goods Sold would be: A. B. C. D. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 03­04 Understand the flow of costs in a job­order costing system and prepare appropriate journal entries to  record costs Learning Objective: 03­07 Compute underapplied or overapplied overhead cost and prepare the journal entry to close the balance in  Manufacturing Overhead to the appropriate accounts Level: Medium 19. In a job­order costing system, direct labor cost is ordinarily debited to: A. Manufacturing Overhead. B. Cost of Goods Sold. C. Finished Goods. D. Work in Process. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 03­04 Understand the flow of costs in a job­order costing system and prepare appropriate journal entries to  record costs Level: Medium20. In a job­order costing system, the use of direct materials that have been previously  purchased is recorded as a debit to: A. Raw Materials inventory. B. Work in Process inventory. C. Finished Goods inventory. D. Manufacturing Overhead. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­04 Understand the flow of costs in a job­order costing system and prepare appropriate journal entries to  record costs Level: Easy 21. The journal entry to record the incurrence of indirect labor costs is: A. B. C. D. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­04 Understand the flow of costs in a job­order costing system and prepare appropriate journal entries to  record costs Level: Easy22. Which of the following accounts is debited when direct labor is recorded? A. Work in process B. Salaries and wages expense C. Salaries and wages payable D. Manufacturing overhead AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­04 Understand the flow of costs in a job­order costing system and prepare appropriate journal entries to  record costs Level: Easy 23. The balance in the Work in Process account equals: A. the balance in the Finished Goods inventory account. B. the balance in the Cost of Goods Sold account. C. the balances on the job cost sheets of uncompleted jobs. D. the balance in the Manufacturing Overhead account. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­05 Use T­accounts to show the flow of costs in a job­order costing system Level: Easy 24. In a job­order costing system, indirect materials that have been previously purchased  and that are used in production are recorded as a debit to: A. Work in Process inventory. B. Manufacturing Overhead. C. Finished Goods inventory. D. Raw Materials inventory. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­05 Use T­accounts to show the flow of costs in a job­order costing system Level: Easy25. Martinez Aerospace Company uses a job­order costing system. The direct materials  for Job #045391 were purchased in July and put into production in August. The job was  not completed by the end of August. At the end of August, in what account would the  direct material cost assigned to Job #045391 be located? A. Raw materials inventory B. Work in process inventory C. Finished goods inventory D. Cost of goods manufactured AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 03­05 Use T­accounts to show the flow of costs in a job­order costing system Level: Easy 26. Which terms will make the following statement true? When manufacturing overhead  is overapplied, the Manufacturing Overhead account has a __________ balance and  applied manufacturing overhead is greater than __________ manufacturing overhead. A. debit, actual B. credit, actual C. debit, estimated D. credit, estimated AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 03­07 Compute underapplied or overapplied overhead cost and prepare the journal entry to close the balance in  Manufacturing Overhead to the appropriate accounts Level: Medium CHAPTER 4 True / False Questions 1. The following journal entry would be made in a processing costing system when units  that have been completed with respect to the work done in Processing Department Z are  transferred from Processing Department Z to Processing Department Y:TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 04­01 Record the flow of materials; labor; and overhead through a process costing system Level: Easy 2. In a process costing system, overhead costs are traced to units of product as they are  incurred. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 04­01 Record the flow of materials; labor; and overhead through a process costing system Level: Easy 3. A process cost system would be used to account for the cost of manufacturing an oil  tanker. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Industry AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 04­01 Record the flow of materials; labor; and overhead through a process costing system Level: Easy4. A process costing system would be best suited for production of a large quantity of a  homogeneous product. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Industry AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 04­01 Record the flow of materials; labor; and overhead through a process costing system Level: Easy 5. In process costing, costs are accumulated in processing departments, rather than by  job. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 04­01 Record the flow of materials; labor; and overhead through a process costing system Level: Easy 6. Process costing would be used by companies producing the following items: bricks,  bolts, pharmaceutical items, natural gas, and electricity. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Industry AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 04­01 Record the flow of materials; labor; and overhead through a process costing system Level: Easy 7. The job cost sheet is used in both job­order and process costing. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 04­01 Record the flow of materials; labor; and overhead through a process costing system Level: Easy8. In process costing, the equivalent units computed for materials is generally the same as that computed for direct labor. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 04­02 Compute the equivalent units of production using the weighted­average method Level: Medium 9. The weighted­average method of process costing can only be used if materials are  added at the beginning of the production process. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 04­02 Compute the equivalent units of production using the weighted­average method Level: Medium 10. Under the weighted­average method, the cost of materials in the beginning work in  process inventory is not used in the computation of the cost per equivalent unit for  materials. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 04­03 Compute the cost per equivalent unit using the weighted­average method Level: Medium11. When computing the cost per equivalent unit, it is not necessary to consider the  percentage completion of the units in beginning inventory under the weighted­average  method. TRUE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 04­03 Compute the cost per equivalent unit using the weighted­average method Level: Medium 12. When assigning costs to partially completed units in the ending work in process  inventory, it is not necessary to consider the percentage completion of the units under the  weighted­average method. FALSE AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 04­04 Assign costs to units using the weighted­average method Level: Medium Multiple Choice Questions 13. In a process costing system, manufacturing overhead applied is usually recorded as a  debit to: A. Finished goods. B. Work in process. C. Manufacturing overhead. D. Cost of goods sold. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 04­01 Record the flow of materials; labor; and overhead through a process costing system Level: Easy14. A company has two processing departments: A and B. Which of the following entries or sets of journal entries would be used to record the transfer between processing  departments and from the final processing department to finished goods? A. B. C. D. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 04­01 Record the flow of materials; labor; and overhead through a process costing system Level: Medium 15. A process costing system: A. uses a separate Work in Process account for each processing department. B. uses a single Work in Process account for the entire company. C. uses a separate Work in Process account for each type of product produced. D. does not use a Work in Process account in any form. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 04­01 Record the flow of materials; labor; and overhead through a process costing system Level: Medium16. A company should use process costing, rather than job order costing, if: A. production is only partially completed during the accounting period. B. the product is manufactured in batches only as orders are received. C. the product is composed of mass­produced homogeneous units. D. the product goes through several steps of production. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 04­01 Record the flow of materials; labor; and overhead through a process costing system Level: Easy 17. Which of the following characteristics applies to process costing, but does not apply  to job order costing? A. The need for averaging. B. The use of equivalent units of production. C. Separate, identifiable jobs. D. The use of predetermined overhead rates. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 04­01 Record the flow of materials; labor; and overhead through a process costing system Level: Easy18. Equivalent units for a process costing system using the weighted­average method  would be equal to: A. units completed during the period and transferred out. B. units started and completed during the period plus equivalent units in the ending work  in process inventory. C. units completed during the period less equivalent units in the beginning inventory,  plus equivalent units in the ending work in process inventory. D. units completed during the period plus equivalent units in the ending work in process  inventory. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Comprehension Learning Objective: 04­02 Compute the equivalent units of production using the weighted­average method Level: Medium19. The cost of beginning inventory under the weighted­average method is: A. added in with current period costs in determining costs per equivalent unit for a given  period. B. ignored in determining the costs per equivalent unit for a given period. C. considered separately from costs incurred during the current period. D. subtracted from current period costs in determining costs per equivalent unit for a  given period. AACSB: Reflective Thinking AICPA BB: Critical Thinking AICPA FN: Measurement Bloom's: Knowledge Learning Objective: 04­03 Compute the cost per equivalent unit using the weighted­average method Level: Easy

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here