×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Texas A&M - PSYC 210 - Study Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Texas A&M - PSYC 210 - Study Guide

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

TEXAS A&M / Psychology / PSYC 210 / What is the significance of the Brock Turner case in studying human se

What is the significance of the Brock Turner case in studying human se

What is the significance of the Brock Turner case in studying human se

Description

School: Texas A&M University
Department: Psychology
Course: Human Sexuality
Professor: Isaac sabat
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: Psychology, Human, sexuality, Reproductive, and system
Cost: 50
Name: EXAM 1 STUDY GUIDE
Description: This is the study guide for the first exam.
Uploaded: 02/13/2017
17 Pages 44 Views 2 Unlocks
Reviews


16


What is the toxic shock syndrome ?



PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

CHAPTER 1 

Human Sexuality in the news 

∙ Brock Turner case

∙ Prominence of drag queens/transsexuality in media

∙ Legal debates (bathroom bills, employment, discrimination, marriage law, pregnancy  leave)

o It is still legal to refuse service to someone who is known or perceived to be  LGBT+

∙ Fertility: World’s first baby born with three parent embryo

∙ Access to birth control (repeal of ACA)

o ACA­Affordable Care Act

∙ PrEp

∙ Cover Girl and Maybelline both having male spokesmodels 


What is the role of testosterone?



We also discuss several other topics like Gene flow exchanges what?

∙ Hanne Gaby mode comes out as intersex 

o Intersex­ person is born with a reproductive or sexual anatomy that doesn’t seem  to fit the typical definitions of female or male

Why this class is important? 

∙ Sex is an important part of people’s lives 

∙ It is difficult for people to understand their own sexuality

∙ Understand sexual dysfunction and infertility

∙ Learn the bases of social attitudes regarding sex 

What is Sexuality? 

∙ All of the sexual attitudes, feelings, and behaviors associated with being human ∙ Does sexuality=sex?

o Do you have to be sexually active to have sexuality?


Puberty means?



∙ What is normal?

o Common­ethic value judgement 

o Right­Context dependent

 Culture plays a big role in what sexuality is seen as right (or moral) or  even what is sexual at all

Zambia Tribe 

∙ Men children have initiation 

o Children drink semen of their elders (3­5 years old) this is completely normal 

Gay Marriage 

∙ Attitudes change over time Don't forget about the age old question of Who was martin luther?

What is common? 

∙ Statistically more frequent

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

o What is typical depends on age, biological sex, race, history/time period, culture,  religiosity, education

∙ Frequency of sex acts

o Men: 

 Less than high school­59%

 High school graduates­75%

 Some College­ 80%

 College Graduates­84%

o Women:

 Less than high school­41%

 High school graduates­60%

 Some College­ 78%

 College Graduates­79%

SOCIALIZATION AND SEXUALITY 

Where did you learn/develop your attitudes towards sex?

Socializing Agents 

∙ Socialization: 

o Process of internalizing society’s beliefs

o Manner in which s society shapes individual behaviors and expectations of  behaviors 

∙ Socializing agents

o The social influences that shape behaviors 

Sexual socialization: Cause and Effect? 

∙ Half of American teens actively seek out sexual content in media:3/4  ∙ The more sexual media content consumed, the earlier teens have sex and the more likely  teens are to get [someone] pregnant  If you want to learn more check out In astronomy, the sun is a star at the center of which system?

o Note that this is a correlation 

∙ Teens who just watched a show with lots of sexual content have more positive ratings to  casual sex that teens who did not just watch those programs 

o Note that this is an experiment 

Frequent Consumption of Television Sexual Content Leads to… 

∙ Overestimation of prevalence of sexual activities among population (i.e. think something  is more common or typical than it is)

∙ Disinhibition

∙ Increased interest in sexual issues

∙ Learning 

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10) Don't forget about the age old question of What is the definition of lithification?
We also discuss several other topics like In markets, prices move toward balance because of what?

Media and the cumulative effect

∙ Across media and exposure, media has a huge cumulative impact on the development of  sexuality

o Influences our personal understandings of sexual scripts

∙ Mass media has been called “a kind of sexual super peer” by communication experts  ∙ Mass media has a clear, overwhelming socialization effect

THE SCIENCE OF SEX 

Populations and samples 

∙ Population­ complete set of observations that you are trying to predict  ∙ Sample­subset of that population

∙ Random Sample­ randomly pick people from the population as a whole ∙ Stratified Random Sample­ subgroups are randomly selected in the same proportion as  they exist in the population 

∙ Convenience Sample­ sampling the people who are easy to get to your study (e.g. people  in line at Panda Express)

∙ Volunteer Bias­ those who would volunteer to participate in a sexuality study may have  different predispositions than those who would not 

Methods of Human Sexuality 

Surveys We also discuss several other topics like What is the role of the tangent line?

∙ Surveys 

∙ Challenge of writing good survey questions

∙ Correlations

 Direct Observation 

∙ Direct Observations

o Naturalistic

o Laboratory

o Participant­observer

∙ Observer

∙ Volunteer effect

Case Studies  

∙ Case studies

∙ Labor­ initiative 

∙ Observer bias 

Experiment  

∙    Experiments 

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

∙    Independent variable 

∙    Dependent variable 

∙    Pros and Cons 

CHAPTER 2­Sexual and Reproductive Anatomy 

Genitals  

∙ Vulva is the term used to refer to the external female genitalia, including the mons  veneris, labia majora, labia minora, clitoris, vaginal opening and urethral opening. ∙ The vagina is a specific structure that is not even part of the vulva.

o The vaginal opening is part of the vulva

∙ The urethral opening and the anus are not considered part of the genitals, but because  they are in close proximity to the genitals and can be impacted by sexual activity they are included here

FEMALE EXTERNAL ANATOMY

∙ Mons Veneris­ fatty tissue where the pubic bones come together, very sensitive to  touch/many women find gentle stimulation here pleasurable 

∙ Perineum­ between the anus and the vulva the pelvic “floor”

∙ Labia majora­ outer lips that cover the sensitive inner tissue

∙ Labia minora­ located between and sometimes protrude beyond the labia majora hairless  part in the vagina

∙ Bartholin’s Glands­sperm­friendly lubricators located at the bottom of the labia minora ∙ Clitoral hood (prepuce)­where the labia minora meet at the top to form a touch­sensitive  covering for the clitoris 

∙ Clitoris­ a glans developed from the same embryonic tissue as the penis, but twice as  many nerve endings 

∙ Urethra­ passageway from the bladder to the exterior of the body

∙ Urethral opening­ between clitoris and vagina, rarely noticed

∙ Vestibular area­ the area between the two labia minora 

∙ Bulbocavernous muscle­ a ring of sphincter muscles that surrounds the vagina; opening  in women, or the root of the penis in men

∙ Hymen­ the thin membrane that partially covers the vagina; opening which may have one or more opening that allow menstrual flow 

FEMALE INTERNAL ANATOMY

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

∙ Pubococcygeus (PC) muscle surrounds the vagina­ practice your Kegel exercises for  sexual satisfaction and urinary control

∙ The vaginal opening is very sensitive to touch, but the inner 2/3 has very nerve endings ∙ The “G­spot” exception­a highly sensitive area on the anterior (front) wall of the vagina,  about 1/3 of the way into the vagina, found in about 10% of women studied ∙ The vagina is self­cleaning and has a very delicate and important balance of helpful  bacteria and the vagina is naturally acidic

o Advisers of products such as douches and vaginal sprays have convinced women  that the normal vagina is somehow unclean.

o Women who douche are more likely to have infections, such as bacterial  vaginosis, and are also more likely to have ectopic pregnancies 

∙ Uterus

∙ Cervix­the narrow end of the uterus projecting into the back of the vagina  ∙ Endometrium­innermost layer that grows thicker between menstrual periods and sloughs off at menstruation; fertilized egg implants into and gets nourished from the endometrial  layer during the first says of pregnancy

∙ Myometrium­strong muscled middle layer; capable of powerful contractions  ∙ Perimetrium­the outer layer 

OVARIES

∙ Female gonads produce OVA (eggs) and hormones (estrogen and progesterone) ∙ At birth, ovaries already contain all of a woman’s 300k­400k immature ova ∙ Only about 400 will ever fully mature

∙ From primary follicle to Graafian follicle to ovulation 

EGG TRAVELOGUE 

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1- CH.1-3,6,7,10)

Ovary  

(Primary  

follicle)

Ovary  

(Graafain  follicle)

Fimbria Fallopian  

Outside the

tube Uterus

∙ Ovaries­similar to testicles/gonads

∙ Fallopian Tubes­where eggs are fertilized

o Finger like fimbria brush against the ovary to “find” the egg at ovulation o Fallopian tubes are the site of fertilization of the egg by the sperm Cilia within the tube move the egg toward the uterus 

∙ Ectopic (tubal) pregnancies

∙ Tubal ligation sterilization 

∙ Pelvic exam: If you want to be tested for STIs, be sure to make that clear when you make  your appointment. The Pap smear will test for the presence of abnormal cells, but does  not test for common STIs such as HPV, chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, and HIV. o Pap smear to detect cancerous cells 

∙ Cervical cancer is caused by certain types of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV), spread  during sexual activity.

o Most cervical cancer related deaths are in women who do not get regular Pap  tests.

∙ Testing for HPV directly has become more common, as it is more effective than testing  for abnormal cells via the Pap test.

o Detected early, most abnormal cervical cells can be treated effectively and do not  develop into cancer.  There is no cure for HPV, which causes almost all cervical  cancers, but the body’s immune system clears most HPVs. Also there is now a  vaccine for some forms of HPV that are linked to cervical cancer. (Gardasil)

∙ Breast self­exam—breast cancer

o If you do notice a lump in your breast, don’t panic.  8 out of 10 lumps found are  non­cancerous. Bring any lump you discover to the attention of your physician  right away.

o Incidence: 1 in 8 women will develop breast cancer; men can develop breast  cancer too, but this is a different type of cancer because men do not have  mammary glands.

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

o Risk factors:

 Family history of breast cancer (although the majority of women who  develop breast cancer have no family history)

 Being older than 50

 Early menstruation and/or late menopause 

 Long­term hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women  increases the risk.

 BC pills do not appear to increase the risk.  

o Protective factors include 

 bearing children

 breastfeeding

 exercising regularly

 96% survival rate; positive attitude and reassurance by one’s sex partner  are very helpful.

MALE ANATOMY 

RIGHT SIDE

What causes the penis to become erect? 

∙ The three chambers (2 corpora cavernosa and corpus spongiosum) fill with blood and  cause erection. 

∙ There is no bone in the penis and erection is also not a result of muscle contractions.  (erection video on right)

LEFT SIDE

Penis—reproductive, urinary and sexual

Average size flaccid—3.75 inches x 1.2 inches

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

Average size erect—4.5 to 6 inches erect

∙ The foreskin protects the glans penis from abrasions and dryness. 

o This protection, however, is removed in infants who are circumcised. ∙ The scrotum holds the testicles outside of the body cavity for optimal sperm  development. 

o Sperm develop best at temperatures several degrees below average body  temperature of 98.6.

∙ Testicle­male gonads that create sperm and male hormones

∙ Epididymis­where sperm mature and are stored until ejaculation

∙ Vas Deferens­from testicle, up and over the bladder and through the prostate gland ∙ Vasectomy disconnects the vas deferens so that sperm cannot get into the ejaculatory  duct

o Has no impact of seminal fluids which make up 99% of ejaculate?

o Ejaculatory duct­taking the sperm out to the urethra 

o Urethra­ one passageway for two functions 

∙ Seminal vesicles provide 70% of the seminal fluid and prostate gland provides the other  30%

∙ The Cowper’s gland secretes a bit of alkaline fluid before ejaculation, which neutralizes  the acidity of the urethra 

Urethra

Ejaculator

Testicl es

Epididy mis

Vas  

Deferens

y ducts

∙ Testicular self-exam: The most common sign is a painless small lump or enlargement of one testicle.  

o Only you will know if your testicles change from month to month o Examine yourself after a warm shower or bath

∙ Prostate: 1 in 7 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer by age 85. o Two suspected risk factors are high testosterone levels and  high intake of animal fat in the diet.

∙ Diagnosis via PSA blood test and rectal exam.

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

o If detected and treated early, 90% survival for at least 15 years. Most men with prostate cancer die of some other cause.

∙ Prostatitis (inflammation of the prostate) may result from untreated  STIs.

o Benign prostatic hyperplasia affects up to 80% of men over age 60,  causing frequent and difficult urination. This is not the same as  cancer.

CHAPTER 3­HORMONES AND SEXUALITY 

Glands and Hormones

∙ ENDOCRINE SYSTEM

o Network of ductless glands that secrete their chemical substances (hormones)  directly into the bloodstream where they are carried to other parts of the body  They exert their influence on other glans or target organs 

o Glands (pituitary)

 Located beneath the brain’s hypothalamus is part of the Endocrine System o Hormones (Gonadotropins)

 GnRH­targets the gonads

 In the case of the menstrual cycle, the target is the ovaries 

GENERAL SEX HORMONE PROCESS

∙ Pituitary gland­under control of gonadotropin­releasing hormone (GnRH) ∙ GnRH­produced in brain’s hypothalamus and released directly into pituitary gland  ∙ Hormones secreted by ductless glands directly into bloodstream 

∙ Carried to other parts of body and influence other glands or target organs  ∙ Feedback loop from these other glands

o Changes across the menstrual cycle cause changes in pituitary and hypothalamus  secretions. (feedback loop) Same happens in male bodies, it’s just not cyclic in  the same way. 

PITUITARY GLAND HORMONES

∙ Follicle­stimulating hormone (FSH)

o Governs the production of ova in women and sperm in men

∙ Luteinizing hormone (LH)

o Triggers ovulation in women and the production of androgens (male hormones)  in men

∙ Prolactin

o Stimulates milk production in the breasts

∙ Oxytocin

o Associated with milk release, labor, orgasmic contractions, and erotic attachment 

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

SEX AND REPRODUCTIVE HORMONES­RELEASED BY GONADS & ADRENAL  GLANDS

∙ Testosterone

o Produced in the male testes (also in small amounts in female ovaries and the  adrenal glands of both sexes)

∙ Estrogen

o Produced in the female ovaries (also in small amounts in male testes and the  adrenal glands of both sexes)

∙ Progesterone

o Produced by the ovaries after ovulation; prepares the endometrium to nourish a  fertilized egg

∙ Inhibin

o Produced by the testes and ovaries; inhibits release of FSH from the pituitary  OVA (EGGS)

∙ Ovum

o Surrounded by cells which form a protective “follicle”

∙ Birth

o Each ovary has about 300k­400k primordial (immature) follicles

∙ Puberty

o FHS will allow one or more follicle to fully develop each month (menstrual cycle) o Uterus thickens and fills with blood in preparation for the implantation of a  fertilized egg

o If egg is not fertilized, the endometrial tissues are discharged from body, this  causes bleeding

CHANGES ACROSS THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE

∙ Increased progesterone from the ovary and from the corpus luteum cause the uterine  lining to thicken in anticipation of possible implantation of a fertilized egg o If this doesn’t happen, estrogen levels drop­> menstruation occurs

o Triggers hypothalamus to begin cycle again

o “first day” of cycle is really the END of the previous cycle  

RHYTHM METHOD

∙ Women are most fertile five days before and one day after ovulation

∙ Male semen can last five days in the fallopian tubes

∙ Ovum can last 24 hours

IMPORTANT

∙ 28­day cycle (typical cycle)

o There is variation between women, and women over time

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

 Usually more variation in length of pre­ovulation stage rather than post ovulation stage

∙ What impacts these cycles?

o 2­5 years after a girl’s first menstruation 

o Before a woman’s menopause 

o Stress, nutrition, illness, drugs, other women cycles

o Male pheromones (increase regularity)

MENSTRUAL PHASE (DAYS 1­4)

∙ Decreased levels of estrogen and progesterone can’t sustain endometrium ∙ Lining disintegrates ad is discharged 

∙ Menstrual flow is composed of

o Blood from endometrium

o Endometrial tissue

o Cervical + vaginal mucus

∙ Flow can last for 5 days (typically small)

o 2­3 ounces

∙ Menstrual Phase (Days 1­4)Pre­ovulatory phase (Days 5­13)OVULATIONPost ovulatory phase (Days 14­28)

ATTITUDES TOWARDS MENSTRUATION

∙ Historical Perspective

o ­­­

∙ Current Attitudes

o ¾ of women said menstruation made them have negative feelings about  themselves (1997)

∙ Embarrassment

o Should women feel embarrassed/ashamed?

MENSTRUAL PROBLEMS

∙ Absence of menstruation for 3 months lead to Osteo and other cardiovascular diseases ∙ PMS (premenstrual syndrome)

o Group of physical/emotional changes that many women experience in the last 3­ 14 days before the start of their menstrual period (postovulatory/luteal phase)  May include swelling. Swollen hands and feet, weight gain, constipation  and headaches 

 75% of women with regular menstrual cycles report some symptoms  o Symptoms must regularly occur in a cyclic fashion before menstruation and must  end within a few days after the start of menstruation 

∙ PMDD (severe symptoms of PMS)

o Symptoms must markedly interfere with social relations, work, education (3­8%  of women) 

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

o TREATMENT: 

 Antidepressant medications

 Physical symptoms often relieve by combating water retention and 

improving diet and exercise 

∙ Menorrhagia

o Severe bleeding (5% of women seek medical help)

o Sometimes happens before menopause, can occur at any age

o Lead to anemia, birth control and IUDS are often prescribed 

∙ Endometriosis

o 5­10% of women of reproductive age

o Blood doesn’t drain normally and leads to severe cramps

o Treated by hormone therapy

∙ Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS)

o Caused by toxins produced by bacterium

o Can be mistaken by flu and be fatal

o 85% of TSS can be related to menstruation

o 200 cased reported each year

o Women are advised to switch their tampons 3X/day and switch to sanitary  napkins at night 

MALE HORMONE REGULATION 

∙ GnRH from hypothalamus causes release of FSH from pituitary to the testicles to  produce SPERM

∙ GnRH from the hypothalamus caused the release of LH from pituitary to the testicles to  produce TESTOSTERONE 

∙ Hormone levels remain relatively stable in men

∙ Diurnal Rhythm

o Higher levels of testosterone production during the day than at night  ∙ Testosterone seem to have linear relationship w/ sexual desire

∙ Loss of estrogen and progesterone at menopause does not reduce sexual desire in most  women 

∙ Testosterone­ role in sexual desire in women (produce less than men)

CHAPTER 10­LIFESPAN SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT 

AGES 

∙ Infancy (0­1)

∙ Early childhood (2­6)

∙ School age (7­11)

∙ Adolescence (12­17)

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

∙ Emerging adulthood (18­25)

∙ Young adulthood (26­39)

∙ Middle Age (40­59)

∙ Elderly (60+)

SEXUALITY (DOES NOT) HAVING SEXUAL INTERCOURSE

INFANCY (touch from caregivers)

∙ Babies explore their own bodies (normal)

∙ Babies love their toes 

EARLY CHILDHOOD (self­exploration, other exploration, interest in differences between boys  and girls, constraining sexual behavior)

∙ They are curious how their bodies work, why their bodies look different ∙ Engage in sexual exploration games, touching self and other, talking about sex ∙ Interest in genitals is very common in this age group

∙ Sexualized behaviors peak between the ages of 3 and 5 and then decrease until puberty  (looking and touching others)

∙ Aggressive sexual behaviors may be indicative of abuse and should be investigated ∙ Sexual exploration games (same­sex) are normal and only become harmful when a  parent’s response frightens or shames the child

∙ Socialize children for privacy, rather than punishing

o Distract child rather than scolding 

SCHOOL AGE (Freud’s theory, cultural differences in sex play)

∙ Oral­anal­phallic­latent­genital

∙ School age kids are in latent stage

o In other cultures, children continue sex play

o In our own children learn that sex play should be hidden from adults

∙ Sexual play may decrease, curiosity does not

∙ Girls tend to be treated more harshly than boys 

PUBERTY (process of reproductive and sexual maturation that occurs over several years)

∙ A process of reproductive and sexual maturation lasting several years ∙ ADRENARCHE (ages 6­8) adrenal glands secrete androgen hormone DHEAconverts  to testosterone and estrogen

∙ GONADARCHE (several years later)­in which the pituitary gland (FSH and LH), testes  (sperm and testosterone) and ovaries (ova, estrogen, and progesterone) mature  ∙ SECODNARY SEX CHARACTERISTICS APPEAR

o Pubertal changes in brainincrease sexual desire and make sexual risj­taking  behaviors more likely

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

o 1st sexual attractions around age 10, after ADRENARCHE but before  GONADARCHE

o MASTURBATION TO ORGASM IS NOT UNCOMMON

o By age 15, 72.7% of boys and 43.3% of girls had masturbated (roughly 75% of  both by age 18).

o Sexual attractionsexual fantasysexual exploration games

o These have more erotic content than early childhood exploration games (spin the  bottle)

PUBERTAL CHANGES IN GIRLS (first sign, other changes, menarche)

∙ Breast buds­1st sign of puberty (avg. age 10)

∙ Growth spurt begins at around age 12 and finishes at around age 16

∙ Fatty deposists are formed near the hips and buttocks

∙ Pubic hair, and after a few years, underarm hair (testosterone)

∙ Sweat and sebaceous glandsacne (testosterone)

∙ Menarche­first period (avg. 12­13)

PUBERTAL CHANGES IN BOYS (first sign, other changes, nocturnal emissions)

∙ Testicles/scrotum growth­1st sign of ouberty

∙ Testosterone then stimulates growth of the penis, prostate gland, and seminal vesicles o Genital growth (and pubic hair) begins around ages 11­12; finished about age 15;  ejaculation possible about a year after penis begins growing

∙ Other changes include:

o Nocturnal emissions

o Voice deepening

∙ Temporary gynecomastia (enlarged breasts) due to estrogen (disappears by mid­teens) ∙ Underarm and facial hair, sweat and sebaceous glands (acne, facial hair) appear 2 years  after pubic hair

PRECOCIOUS & DELAYED PUBERTY 

∙ Puberty in children is now starting at an earlier age (10.14 years in boys, 13.5 years in  girls)

∙ Precocious­before age 8 in girls and before 9 in boys;

o Premature activation of pituitary hormones perhaps due to early weight gain,  hormones in meat/milk, chemical pollutants 

∙ Delayed­when secondary sex characteristics and physical growth do not begin in early  adolescence.

o Treatment with gonadotropin­releasing hormone or androgens

∙ Boys are treated, why not girls

ADOLESCENCE (non­industrialized countries, self­identity, body image)

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

∙ In non­industrialized countries, individuals become adults immediately following puberty ∙ Development of self­identity; intense body awareness as the teen’s body becomes a  symbol of self­worth

∙ Strong relationship between body image and overall quality of life, especially among  girls

∙ Broader­based sense of self­esteem based upon accomplishments and quality of life  develops later

EMERGING ADULTHOOD (18­25) (“full” adulthood delayed, hooking up/FWB, serial  monogamy “secondary abstinence”, becoming more guided by own self)

∙ EMERGING: marriage for women is 26 and 28 for men (not true in all cultures) ∙ By age 20, 75% of emerging adults are sexually experienced and having sex regularly ∙ Hooking up­2/3 of young adults have had sex with somebody they aren’t dating  ∙ Serial monogamy also common­ people partner up and have sex with only one person  while that relationship is on

∙ ~10% of sexually active college students choose “secondary abstinence” ∙ Most people gradually become less influenced by peer pressure and gain better self understanding 

YOUNG ADULTHOOD (long­term monogamous relationships, sexually experienced, marriage, cohabitation, sex frequency, outcomes of Marriage, extra­marital sex)

∙ YOUNG

o Nearly all younger adults have had sex and most (95%) have had premarital sex.  Long­lasting monogamy is norm for most adults aged 25 and older (80% of  straight men and 90% of straight women have only had one sec partner in the past year)

∙ MARRIAGE

o 81% of men and 86% have been married at least once by age 40 (which is later  than previous generations).

o ~2/3 of all first marriages begin as cohabitation, which represents a 700%  increase since then 1970 census

∙ COHABITATION:

o Ppl who have cohabitated with multiple partners before getting married, or ppl  who have children while cohabitating were slightly more likely to get divorced.  First time cohabitators were equally likely to divorce 

o Frequency of sexual intercourse in the 1st year of marriage is usually high; about  15 times per month. 30s is the most sexy decade. Sexual frequency is highest for  married couples in their 20s and 30s

o Marrieds report more satisfying sex than singles 

∙ EXTRA­MARITAL AFFAIRS

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1-

CH.1-3,6,7,10)

o Survey of ppl in their 50s: 37% of men and 12.4% of women had been unfaithful  at least once

o In their 30s: 27.6% of men and 26.2 of women

o Emotional affairs add another 20%

o 90% of ppl think it’s wrong

MIDDLE AGE

∙ Private and hesitate topics with their children

∙ Victorian era­ sex only for procreation not enjoymentolder adults are nonsexual ∙ Decrease in sexual activity (30­60)

∙ Many couples remain sexually active after 60, and satisfying sexually and emotionally  ∙

16

PSYC 210- HUMAN SEXUALITY (EXAM 1- CH.1-3,6,7,10)

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here