×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to ASU - CSE 110 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to ASU - CSE 110 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

ASU / COMPSCI / CSE 110 / What are the input of a computer?

What are the input of a computer?

What are the input of a computer?

Description

School: Arizona State University
Department: COMPSCI
Course: Principles of PROgramming (Java)
Professor: Mutsumi nakamura
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: basic java, study, guide, Study Guide, java, programming, cse110, Java basics, Exam 1, exam, and 1
Cost: 50
Name: CSE110, Intro. to Java Programming, Study Guide, Exam 1
Description: These notes cover the following topics; Computer Hardware, Computer Memory (RAM, Secondary), Input/Output (I/O) devices, Data types, Binary to Decimal conversion, Data conversions, Classes and Objects, "Data, Variables, and Arithmetic Expressions", String Concatenation, Comments (Single-line, Multi-line), Identifier rules, Variable types
Uploaded: 02/14/2017
5 Pages 84 Views 3 Unlocks
Reviews


CSE110 Exam 1 Study Guide


What are the input of a computer?



Computer Hardware:

Central Processing Unit (CPU): The CPU is composed of millions of registers (small storage areas), it’s the  arithmetic/logic unit (performs calculations and makes decisions), and it’s the control unit of the computer  Memory:

Main Memory – (dependent on electricity) this holds both program instructions and data, but this data is erased  when the computer/program is turned off (it’s volatile), this is also known as the Random Access Memory  (RAM)

Interjection:

Random vs.

Sequential Access

Random access refers to being able to access data in a random matter,  whereas sequential is the opposite. For example, random can go from  point A to C while sequential needs to go from A­B­C. 


What is output in computer?



If you want to learn more check out How do i sound like a native english speaker?

Secondary Memory – (these are not dependent on electricity) this memory comes in a variety of media such  as: CDs (optical), Hard Drives (magnetic), USBs (flash), etc. This particular memory type does not erase its  memory when the program stops running, or the computer is turned off (i.e. it’s non­volatile)  Input and Output (I/O) Devices  We also discuss several other topics like Why are electric field lines important?

Input Devices – these are the devices which allow the user to send (“input”) data into the comp. ex) mouse, keyboard, microphone, scanner, etc. 

Output Devices – these are the devices which allow the user to get data from the comp. ex) printer, monitor, fax, projector, etc.

Data Types (Bit, Byte, and Word)

Machine language uses Binary Number System in order to represent data (i.e. bit, binary digit, “0” and “1”). 

bit

(binary digit)

0 or 1

byte 

(8 consecutive bits)

01010000  8 bits, 1 byte

word

(4 consecutive bytes)

0111011000110111…32 bits, 4 bytes, 1 word


What is one byte of data also called?



If you want to learn more check out What challenges exist that can make your analysis inadmissible in court?
Don't forget about the age old question of Conspiracy theories are the theory of what?

Binary to Decimal – 

Binary

Decimal

In a decimal system 5857 5∗103+8∗102+5∗101+7∗100 

* 10010  the subset of “10” indicates this is decimal representation

In a binary system 1101101 1∗26+1∗25+0∗24+1∗23+1∗22+0∗21+1∗21 * 11011012  the subset of “2” indicates this is a binary representation

Decimal  Binary

­ Divide by 2

­ Determine if the remainder is 1 or 0

­ Continue to divide by 2 until the quotient is 0 

­ See the below example

Binary  Decimal

­ Put down the binary representation

­ Each “1” and “0” from left to right represents a  2n(starts from 0 to n­1)  ­ n = the number of digits

­ See the below example

0

0

1

1

10

2

11

3

100

4

101

5

110

6

We also discuss several other topics like What is the content of thompson’s thought experiments?
Don't forget about the age old question of Who are the big names and their big ideas for the history of evolutionary thought?

Decimal  Binary

Binary  Decimal

15610 

156/2 = 78, R 0

78/2   = 39, R 0

39/2   = 19, R 1

19/2   =   9, R 1

  9/2   =   4, R 1

  4/2   =   2, R 0

  2/2   =   1, R 0

  1/2   =   0, R 1

Representation = 1 00111002 

*Start from the bottom to the top

*The remainders are the binary representation

100110112 

27+26+25+24+23+22+21+20 

27+24+23+21+20=15510 

*The 2’s associated with 1’s need to be added  to equal the decimal representation 

*A compiler translates a program into machine code

Unicode/ASCII

These 2 types of code can translate special cases, upper­/lower­case letters to numbers (representing txt digitally) ­ ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) defines correspondence between some  characters and their numbers.

­ But Java can express more characters other than alphabetical letters.

­ Java uses Unicode which uses 16 bits (65,536 characters). ASCII is a subset of Unicode.

Comments

Single­Line: “//” for a single­line comment

Multi­Line: “*/” – “*/” for a multi­line comment

Identifiers  

Rules: 

Can use A~Z, a~z, 0~9, “_”, $

They are case­sensitive 

Cannot start with a number, and no spaces either

No reserved names

Conventional: identifiers for classes start with uppercase letters, use CamelHump for identifiers Reserved Words

int, double, String, final, static, void, null, etc. //words which can’t be used because they have a purpose in Java White Spaces

\t ­ inserts a tab 

\b ­ inserts a backspace

\n ­ inserts a new line

\\ ­ inserts a backslash (escapes next character)

\ ­ basically escapes the following character

String Concatenation (Print Outputs)

The definition of string concatenation appending two or more strings together, see below examples; System.out.println(“Stuff” + 8+7); //the result of this is, Stuff87

System.out.println(); //automatically moves everything inside () to next line

System.out.println(8+2); //the result is 10

System.out.println(“The answer is: “+(8+12)); //the result is, The answer is: 20

Data, Variables, and Arithmetic Expressions

Primitive Data Types

Data type

Storage

Description

byte

8 bits

a # between ­128 to 127

short

16 bits

a # between ­32768 to 32767

int

32 bits

a # between ­2147483648 to 2147483647

long

64 bits

a # between ­ 9∗1018  to  9∗1018

float 

32 bits

a # between  −3.4∗1038  to  3.4∗1038  (with 7 significant digits)

double

64 bits

a # between  −1.7∗10308  to  1.7∗10308  (with 13 significant digits)

char

16 bits

a single character from the Unicode character set enclosed with ‘ ‘ (single  quotations)

Boolean

a value which is either True or False

Variables

A variable is a name for a location in memory

A variable must be declared by specifying the variable’s name and type of the information that it will hold <variable type> <variable identifier> = <value>;

“=” is the assignment operator, this operator gives the variable a value

Constants

“final” use this before the variable type to declare a constant variable

If you try to change the value of a constant, then there will be an error (syntax error)

Arithmetic Operators  

Precedence Level

Operator

Operation

Associates

0

(double)/(int)

Casting

Left to Right

1

+

Unary plus

Right to Left

1

­

Unary minus

Right to Left

2

*

Multiplication

Left to Right

2

/

Division

Left to Right

2

%

Modulus (Remainder)

Left to Right

3

+

Addition

Left to Right

3

­

Subtraction

Left to Right

4

=

Assignment

Left to Right

*Casting takes precedence over all arithmetic operators

*Parenthesis can forcedly change the evaluation order

*A unary operator is basically saying whether something is positive of negative

*Assignment is takes the last precedence over all arithmetic operators

First, the expression on the right hand of the “=” is evaluated and then afterward that value is assigned to the  variable on the left side 

Assignment Operators

+=, ­=, /=, %=, *=

total *= 7;  is equivalent to:  total = total*7;

total ­= (sum + 5)/ count;  is equivalent to: total = total ­ (sum + 5)/count;

Increment (Prefix, and Postfix)

Place:

Prefix (+)

Postfix (+)

Prefix (­)

Postfix (­)

Statement:

total = ++count;

total = count++;

total = ­­count;

total = count­­;

Equivalence:

count = count + 1; total = count;

total = count;

count = count + 1;

count = count ­ 1; total = count;

total = count;

count = count – 1;

With the prefix you do the arithmetic first and the assignment after, 

With the postfix you do the assignment first and the assignment after

Data Conversion

There are two types of data conversion; widening conversion, and narrowing conversion Widening conversion, this is when you take a small data type (like byte, or double) and make it bigger Narrowing conversion, this is when you take a bigger data type (like int, or long) and make it smaller,  this data type is more dangerous though because you could lose information by “narrowing” that data type, like  when you drop all the decimal places when you change from double to int (no rounding in this circumstance btw)

Widening conversion; smallbig Narrowing conversion; bigsmall

double to int  int to double

There are three ways to convert data; assignment conversion, arithmetic conversion, and casting

Assignment Conversion

Arithmetic Promotion

Casting

This occurs when a value of one  type is assigned to the value of  another

(Only widening conversion can  occur this way)

This happens automatically when  operators in expression convert  their operands

This is a manual conversion 

basically which the programmer  must do intentionally (with code)

int num1 = 2;

double num2 = num1;

//Then the int (2)  a double (2.0)

int num3 = 2;

double num4 = 5.7+num3;

//This automatically converts the int 2 into a double 2.0

double num5 = 35.67;

int num6 = (int) num5;// = 35 //There is no rounding in casting  you just drop the decimal

Advanced Example:

double num5 = 34.74;

double num7;

num7 = (int) num5 + 3.26; //(int) num5 is evaluated first

System.out.println(num7); //37.26 will be printed

int num8;

num8 = (int) (num5 + 3.26);

System.out.println(num8); //38 will be printed

Using Classes and Objects

Introduction

An “object” is something which can interact with a program. This object can do a variety of tasks and these tasks  are called “methods”. These methods are part of the “class” which the object is defined upon. A “class” is a  concept and that concept is embodied through the object (the object is like a representation of the class and the  object can perform tasks defined within the class) – a class can create multiple objects btw.  How to Use a Class (Scanner)

First, you need to import the java package (located within the API library) that the class is held within.  import java.

Second, you make an object from the scanner class (see below format)

Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);

Third, you implement the Scanner object uses methods from the Scanner class (for examples see below) in.next()  for Strings

in.nextInt()     for integers

in.nextDouble()                 for doubles

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here