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OSU / Psychology / PSYCH 5870 / What happens in the synapse?

What happens in the synapse?

What happens in the synapse?

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School: Ohio State University
Department: Psychology
Course: Neuroeconomics and Decision Neuroscience
Professor: Ian krabjich
Term: Spring 2017
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: Neuro Economics, Study Guide
Description: Study Guide For Exam 1
Uploaded: 02/14/2017
3 Pages 306 Views 0 Unlocks
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-How do you calculate expected value?




-What is the relationship between utility function and preference?




-What is a utility function?



Econ/Psych 5870: Neuroeconomics Things to know for Exam 1: Lectures: Normative decision making to Simple Choice (Lecture 2 to 10) Chapters: 1, 3, 5, 6, 8  Problem Sets: 1, 2 The format will have multiple choice questions, some terms to define, and a couple of problems similar  to the ones on the recent problem sets. You should knWe also discuss several other topics like transactions involving items produced in the past, such as the sale of a 5-year-old automobile by a used car dealership or the purchase of an antique rocking chair by a person at a yard sale, are
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Don't forget about the age old question of What is the role of the Securities and Exchange commission?
ow the key result(s) from each study we’ve  discussed in class, but I won’t ask for minute details or for you to remember the experiment based on  the author names. For those kinds of questions I will always describe the experiment and then ask  you what was the key finding from that experiment. Things to know from normative decision making: -What is a utility function? -What is the relationship between utility function and preference? -How do you calculate expected value? -How do you calculate expected utility? -What is the difference between increasing and decreasing marginal utility? What  are some examples of both? -What are the four axioms of expected utility theory, and what do they mean? -What are the counterexamples to the axioms? Things to know from experiments in decision making: -What is the preference reversal phenomenon? -What is the difference between correlation and causation? -What are some differences between Psychology and Economics experiments? -What are some differences between lab and field experiments? -What is the effect of paying subjects all rounds versus just a random round? -What did we learn from the Sokol-Hessner study on “thinking like a trader”? -What did we learn from the Hayden & Platt study on risky decisions? Things to know from multi-attribute choice: -Difference between compensatory vs. noncompensatory strategies? -Difference between alternative-based vs. attribute-based strategies? -Difference between exhaustive vs. non-exhaustive strategies? -What does it mean for a strategy to be adaptive? -How do you apply MAUT to solve a decision problem? -What is the lexicographic rule? When is it used? What are its weaknesses? -What is satisficing? When is it used? What are its weaknesses? -What is elimination by aspects? When is it used? What are its weaknesses? -What did we learn from the Caplin, Dean, Martin paper on satisficing? -What are the attraction, similarity, and compromise effects? Things to know from sequential sampling models (speed-accuracy tradeoff): -What is the speed-accuracy tradeoff? -In sequential sampling models, how does changing the decision threshold affect decision speed? When would you want a high or low threshold? -In what way is the flat threshold rule “optimal”?-How does the strength of the preference or evidence affect choice  consistency/accuracy and decision speed? Things to know from introduction to neuroscience: -How many connections between neurons? How many neurons in the brain? -Anatomy of a neuron: dendrites, cell body, axon, axon terminal, myelin, synapse,  neurotransmitters. -What are in the inputs and outputs of a neuron? How does one neuron communicate  to another? -What is an action potential?  -What happens in the synapse? -What’s the difference between excitatory, inhibitory and neuromodulatory  neurotransmitters? -What are agonists and antagonists? -What are the four lobes of the brain? -What do anterior/posterior/dorsal/ventral/lateral/medial mean when referring to the  location of brain regions? -What is white/gray matter? -What is a sulcus vs. gyrus? -What’s the difference between cortex and sub-cortex? -What does it mean that the brain is “modular”? Things to know from methods of neuroscience: -Methods for measuring brain activity? -Methods for manipulating brain activity? -What are the three major tradeoffs between neuroscience techniques? Answer: time  resolution, spatial resolution, and invasiveness.  -What are we measuring with fMRI?  -What are the main advantages and drawbacks of fMRI? -What are the two primary methods for analyzing fMRI data? How do they differ? -What is a voxel? -What are the advantages/disadvantages of PET? -What does EEG measure? What are its advantages/disadvantages? -What does MEG measure? What are its advantages/disadvantages? -What is an event related potential? -What is electrophysiological recording? What are its advantages/disadvantages? -What does TMS do? What are its advantages/disadvantages? -What does tDCS do? What are its advantages/disadvantages? Things to know from simple choice: -What are stimulus value, action cost, and action value? -What are the different ways to measure stimulus value, and what are their advantages  and disadvantages? -What are prediction errors? -What is salience? -According to the Litt et al. study, where in the brain correlates with stimulus value? -According to the Litt et al. study, where in the brain correlates with salience? -According to the Litt et al. study, where in the brain correlates with both? -According to the Hare et al. (2008) study, where in the brain correlates with stimulus  value, action value, and prediction error?-What brain area appears to consistently correlate with stimulus value across the  various studies we’ve looked at? -What did we learn from the Padoa-Schioppa & Assad (2006) study? -What is the difference between DDM and the attentional DDM? -What is the usual finding on the correlation between choice probability and stimulus  value difference? -What is the usual finding on the correlation between stimulus value difference and  reaction time (RT)? -What is the usual finding on the correlation between relative looking time and choice  probability? -What did we learn in the Lim et al. (2011) study? -What did we learn in the Armel et al. (2008) study? -In the Hare et al. (2009) study, what brain area showed a difference between  successful and unsuccessful dieters? What was that difference?

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