×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UGA - LEGL 2700 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup
Get Full Access to UGA - LEGL 2700 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UGA / Legal Studies / LEGL 2700 / Differntiate Real Property from Personal Property.

Differntiate Real Property from Personal Property.

Differntiate Real Property from Personal Property.

Description

School: University of Georgia
Department: Legal Studies
Course: Legal and Regulatory Environment of Business
Professor: Lara grow
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: Legal, business, property, Mortgage, securityinterest, Contract, Fraud, torts, trademark, patent, tradesecret, Copyright, negligence, and posession
Cost: 50
Name: Legal & Regulatory Environment of Business EXAM 2 STUDY GUIDE
Description: EXAM 2 STUDY GUIDE containing Lecture notes, PPT notes, and Textbook notes including: property, private vs. public, ownership, fee simple, leasehold estate, concurrent ownership, possession, security interest, mortgage, foreclosure, secured transactions, intellectual property, zoning, trade secrets, patents, trademark, copyrights, contracts, offer, fraud, breach of contract, torts, negligence, adv
Uploaded: 02/15/2017
28 Pages 336 Views 0 Unlocks
Reviews


1LEGAL Exam 2 Study Guide Property – “Legal right to exclude from resources originally possessed or acquired w/o force, theft or fraud” ∙ Property is absolute but not infinite, & its boundaries can be ambiguous ∙ “Absolute” – you can legally seek police/courts to protect a resource that you cannot ∙ “Not Infinite” – the uses legally protected don’t go on forever (limitations: can’t harm others’ property) ∙ Right to Exclude – right to posses, control, use, transfer, & gain income from property  ∙ Foundation of a “free” market & a private enterprise system  2 Divisions of Property: Real Property:  Land & interests in land such as mining rights or leases (more formal rules) ∙ Land ownership is also called real estate/ realty Personal Property:  Moveable resources, or things that people don’t annex to the land ∙ Tangible Property – physical “goods” that if sold must comply with Uniform Commercial Code ∙ Intangible Property – “intellectual property” (patent, copyright, TM, trade secret, securities) Prerequisites of a Private Property System: Enforcement mechanisms Transparency Equity / Social Contract Theory Rationales for a Private Property System: (1)  The Problem of Limited Resources (2 legal frameworks)  ∙ Private Property System:  individuals decide how to best own, use, & transfer resources  o State’s role is to legally recognize & enforce exclusive property rights o Legal limitations exist on how owners can use their resources (can’t harm others) o Produces more for whole society & people are more free than in a state planning system  o To function effectively & promote prosperity, laws must apply generally & equally to all ∙ State Planning System:  state decides how resources should be allocated (Communism)  The difference between these 2 frameworks is a matter of degree (2)  Property Promotes Prosperity ∙ Creates incentives for individuals by allowing people to keep & benefit from what they produce o Establishes maximum conditions for wealth creation through promoting incentive ∙ Provides for capital formation / investment, refers to the quality of resources that produce  new/different resources.  Ex: property enables people to borrow money at a reasonable cost  o Mortgages (agreement puts up one’s house to secure a loan) & Stock o Property law guarantees:   1) a borrower’s house is on an identifiable piece of land by state,              2) state recognizes borrower’s claim to house,  3) state permits lenders to enforce mortgage  agreement through the courts & sell a borrower’s house to satisfy a loan if fail to pay 2  ∙        Divisibility –property allows resources to be broken up into parts & used in diff ways while owners still retain a property interest in each part… allows resources to be subdivided “If society’s goal is to produce more of what people need/want (to increase total amount of limited resources)… a property system produces more for society than a state planning system”  Consequentialist “If freedom is measured as individual autonomy & the absence of state coercion, then a property system also makes people more free”  Formalist Critiques of Private Property System: Fails to account for inherent inequalities  +  Consolidates capital over time Types of Ownership Fee Simple – The maximum estate allowed under law Owner has the fullest legal rights & powers to possess, use & transfer the land Estate: bundle of rights/powers of land ownership


Consideration – legal mechanism for evaluating an existing incentive/inducement for a party’s promise Court’s cannot enforce contractual promises unless they’re supported by consideration… ∙ Ask: what is the party/ parties making the promise getting in exchange?



Don't forget about the age old question of university of toledo astronomy

“Absolute” has no limitations or conditions attached  vs.  “Defeasible” has conditional contract Life Estate – Grants an ownership in land for the lifetime of a specific person (present estate! .. not future)  “Reversion” if person dies the land reverts back to original owner  vs.   “Remainder” interest to someone else Leasehold Estate – property right granted to tenants by a landlord  ∙ Tenant – have a qualified possession, use & transfer of land (can’t waste the land or reduce value)  o The rights owned by tenants can be capitalized by transfer to someone else ∙ Landlord – may lease land for a definite duration of time (2 yrs) or an indefinite time (at will)  Concurrent Ownership – 1+ people can own a same thing:  Joint Tenants vs. Tenants in Common Joint Tenants – tenants own equal shares A = 25%  B = 25%  C = 25% D = 25% ∙ Each Tenant owns an equal share ∙ “Four Unities” – possession, interest, time, title ∙ Joint Tenancy may include a “Right of Survivorship” o If a joint tenant died, automatically goes to the other joint tenants  o Ex: if A dies, B + C + D each will own 33%; outside of will process A B C D


o “Direct” cause… how do we decide if a cause is direct?



Don't forget about the age old question of the milky way is a _____ galaxy

o Spouses may do this not to go through a legal property process after the death of the other ∙ If one tenant sells, a “tenancy in common” is created  doctrine of partition Tenancy in Common – tenants can own unequal shares of a property A = 50% B= 25% C = 12.5% D = 12.5% ∙ Each tenant owns a specific percentage that can be different ∙ No “Right of Survivorship”… If one tenant sells, no effect on other tenants A B C D

If you want to learn more check out uconn work study

 3How Resources may be Acquired: 1. Exchange of Resources (most common, buy something in exchange for cash)    o   Contract – rules under which people exchange resources in a property system 2. Possession o “    Rule of 1st   Possession” – 1st person to reduce previously unowned things to possession becomes their owner, measures intent (ex: meteorite tenant’s possession bc it hit her first)    o   Lost Items are claimed by finder after a specific period of time allowed for owner to claim o Mislaid items are different bc law assumes owner might come back to reclaim 3. Adverse Possession – gives ownership of land to finder as long as 5 conditions are satisfied:  o Open & notorious – can’t be hiding and then pop out saying this is mine o Actual & Exclusive – can’t claim it and then leave for 5 years then come back o Continuous – can’t leave and come back every few days o Wrongful – u must be not allowed to be there, not permitted to be there o For a prescribed period of time – typically like 10­20 years o EX:  NY artist moved to Alphabet City UESide in 80s free, now very nice “squatter” o Squatters is good way to distribute land in poor areas bc they capitalize on unused land 4. Confusion – fungible goods (identical goods) if goods are accidentally mixed up= equal share o Boundaries are key in the concept of property 5. Accession – when someone ‘adds’ something to a found item to add value (doesn’t apply to thief)  o If someone applies efforts/ingenuity to someone else’s raw materials and changed the nature into  a different finished product, then they own the finished product.   6. Gift:  1) intent to make the gift   2) delivery of the gift  (constructive delivery ex: giving car keys)  o Testamentary Gift – gift made through a will.  Criticized bc it doesn’t stimulate economy Security Interest – property interest by pact/operation of law over assets to ensure obligation (debt payment) Deeds of Trust – similar to mortgages, borrower signs note showing debt to lender Whose then granted a security interest in the building & land put up to secure the loan Mortgages (major way small businesses raise $ to startup) ∙ Mortgagor – debtor/ borrower vs.   Mortgagee – creditor/ lender (bank) ∙ Recording Statutes – Banks record mortgage so public can see their security interest in a property  4∙ Foreclosure – exercise of the secured property interest where the creditor must go through the court system to ensure procedures are properly followed before debtor looses their home/land (less costly)  ∙ Deficiency – Anti­Deficiency Judgment Statute prevents mortgages from obtaining anything else from mortgages once the land has been foreclosed and auctioned ∙ Right of Redemption – Sometimes 6­12 months after sale; before the actual foreclosure, this allows  the mortgagor to get back the land upon payment of the full amount of debt (all interest + costs) Secured Transactions Law of Secured Transactions – very technical/complex involves creditor who has sold something on credit  or made a loan to debtor who agrees to give the creditor a security interest in a valuable object ~ collateral ∙ Attachment – security interest in goods arises when it attaches when: o Secured party (lender; bank) has given value o Debtor owns the collateral o Debtor gives a security agreement (in writing, signed & with description of collateral)  ∙ Perfection – arises when a security interest has attached & creditor completes all proper steps o Makes security agreement effective against 3rd parties o UCC Article 9;  Ex: Financing Statement is general way of perfecting a security interest o Purchase Money Security Interest (PMSI) type of security interest perfected by an attachment  alone, meaning a security interest secures the purchase price of goods bought for personal use Restrictions on Property Rights Generally, owners prohibited to use resources in ways harmful to others resources…  ∙ Nuisance o Public Nuisance – land use causing damage / inconvenience to public (by public official) Sriracha factory in Cali shut down as ‘public nuisance’ bc people complained of health (Side 7.11)  o Private Nuisance – Character / extent / duration of harm to plaintiff weighted vs. social utility of  defendant’s activity, location, “unreasonable use of ones’ property interfering with others pleasure” ∙ Zoning – ordinance laws that divide counties or municipalities into use districts designated residential,  commercial or industrial.  Zoning limits the use to which land can be put to that specified  o Variance allows use of land in ways not permitted under a zoning ordinance (ex: for more $$) ∙ Duration –limitations of property ensure inventions & creativeness enter public for common good o Rule Against Perpetuities – limits all exercise of property over resources to a duration of 21+…  owners can’t control resources in many future generations through trust arrangements so a trust can’t  extend control of an owner over 21 years of the death of someone who is alive at the time ∙ Taxation – taxes support gov. services limit the right of private property and suggest that property’s claim  to promoting the common good is not absolute… 16th amendment permits ‘indirect taxes’ 5Intellectual Property (4 IP Rights:  Trade Secrets,  Patent,  TM,  Copyright) Intangible Creations of Intellect… (Design, invention, process, art, TM, chemical compound, codes) Trade Secrets:  “any form of knowledge or info with economic value from not being generally known to  others, or readily ascertainable by property means & has been the subject of reasonable efforts by owners to  maintain secrecy”  (formula, plan, report, manual, research, knowledge of client/ supplier) 2 elements of a trade secret claim: 1) Establish that a trade secret exists    ∙ Information is actually secret ∙ Business must take reasonable steps to keep the information secret ∙ Physical segregation,  firewalls/ encryption,  employee confidentiality  2) Demonstrate a misappropriation ∙ Theft ∙ Disclosure in violation of confidentiality duty (ex: employment relations/ contractual agreement)  ∙ But not:  independent creation or reverse engineering Al Minor & Associates, Inc. vs. Martin: Martin was a pension analyst at AMA (made retirement plans).  Martin  started his own firm & solicited 15 AMA clients from memory…        Ohio SC:  misappropriation of a trade secret Prevention:  Confidentiality (NDAs) & Non­Compete Agreements Civil Enforcement:  injunctions & monetary damages Criminal Enforcement:  Economic Espionage Act (EEA) Patents:  confer a right to exclude others form making, using, selling or importing a covered invention Types:  Utility Patents (20 years),      Design Patent (14 years),        Plant Patent (20 years) How:  apply to the US Patent & Trademark Office (PTO)  ∙ Explain how to make and use the basic invention ∙ Show why the invention is different from previous, related inventions ∙ Precisely detail the subject matter that is the invention (“the claims”)  Patentable Subject Must be      Novel,   Nonobvious,  Have Utility NOT: Natural Phenomena  or  Mathematical Formulas Note: patent  isn’t for a  product, it’s


Consideration – legal mechanism for evaluating an existing incentive/inducement for a party’s promise Court’s cannot enforce contractual promises unless they’re supported by consideration… ∙ Ask: what is the party/ parties making the promise getting in exchange?



We also discuss several other topics like suppose that canada produces two goods: lumber 'y' and fish 'x'. it has 18 million workers, each of whom can cut 10 feet of lumber or catch 20 fish each day.

Association for Molecular Pathology vs. Myriad Genetics, Inc:  Myriad identified & sought patents for 2  genes related to breast & ovarian cancer.  Court rejected patent claims as “discovery of natural phenomena”…      BUT method of discovery or alteration of the genes may be patentable 2 Responses to Patent Infringement: Invention is different,     Patent is invalid Patent Trolls – companies that file & receive a patent, but don’t take the next step to produce or sell 6∙ Troll comes & offers to buy it, then sues people who’ve produced/sold similar stuff; legal but bad Trademark: marks that indicate a specific product or business ∙ Forms:  words, pictures, designs, logos ∙ Value:  distinguish the reputation & goodwill of a particular business from all other businesses ∙ Types:  trademark, service marks, certification marks, collective marks, trade dress (NFL) How to Protect a Trademark:  Use it, Register it; after 6 years, owner must notify PTO that TM still in use,  renew every 10 years (if comes down to a lawsuit, party that uses it the most & for longest wins) Disqualifiers:  Same/Similar to a TM on a similar good,   Merely descriptive,  Generic,    Contains prohibited names/designs (US Flag, immoral names, dead presidents) Kraft Foods LLC  vs.  Cracker Barrel Old Country Story, Inc. Both have TM: Kraft sells a cheese called Cracker Barrel; Store wants to start selling non­cheese products  (ham) in stores… Kraft doesn’t want products to be confused if ham makes people sick (if confusion) Defenses to Trademark Infringement:   ∙ Mark is not distinctive and/or has become generic ∙ Little chance of confusion… ex: Cracker Barrel may say “we sell ham, not cheese” ∙ Use is “fair use” – discussion, criticism, or parody of a trademark ~ protected under the law Claim for Trademark Dilution: Blurring – defendants use of TM name “blurs” the distinctive use of the TM (ex: Google Lawn Service, while  Google doesn’t think there’s confusion, they think the lawn service weakens their name’s distinctiveness)  Tarnishment – defendant uses TM name in a way that creates a negative impression among consumers Copyrights – confers a property right in creative expression, rather than invention… Work must be: ∙ Original ∙ Fixed in some tangible medium ∙ Show some creative expression ∙ Automatic protection ∙ No registration required – but must register in order to bring an infringement case ∙ “Works for hire” Enforcement in case of “Infringement” ∙ Reproduction ∙ Creation of derivative works ∙ Distribution ∙ Performance ∙ Display “Fair Use” for:  criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, and scholarship, research ∙ Purpose & character of use 7∙ Nature of copyrighted work ∙ Amount used ∙ Effect of use on market for work Contracts – legally enforceable promise to do/not do something, subject to consequences (written/oral)  Side 8.1 ~ “Confidentiality Agreement” requires (ex/) employees from disclosing sensitive information Voidable Contract:  agreement when 1+ parties has the right to withdraw from the promise made without  incurring any legal liability.  That party has the power to end the enforcement of a voidable contract Executed Contract – parties have performed promises     vs. Executory Contract – not yet performed Source of Contract Law:  State Law Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) Legislative/ Statutes  Common Law (Judge­made Law) 2 Types of Contracts Bilateral Contract:  agreement containing mutual promises (most common, ex: employee contract)  ∙ Ex: Paul promises to sell his laptop to Pearl for $1000 (2 way promise)  VS. Unilateral Contract:  agreement with only one promise (promise on one side, performance on the other) ∙ Company promises salesperson Amy $1000 bonus if she sells 50 shirts in May (Amy doesn’t promise shit) Express Contracts: parties actually discuss the terms of the agreement (ex: land purchase)  VS. Implied­in­Fact Contract: terms are implied based on the conduct of the parties ∙ Ex:  Patient goes to the doctor, receives treatment and receives a bill from the doctor later Montz vs. Pilgrim Films & TV, inc. (case 8.1)  – Montz proposed a paranormal activity TV show.  NBC  Universal had no interest until they paired with Pilgrim Films to produce similar show, “Ghost Busters”  ∙ Montz Claim:  he disclosed his idea for sale & expected reasonable compensation for the idea as defendants  (NBC) knew the conditions on which the idea was offered ∙ NBC Claim: really a copyright claim, so state law contract claim is preempted by fed copyright law ∙ Court:  no idea’s aren’t protected by copyright & another element is there was an implied payment Implied­in­Fact Agreement: one party doesn’t get benefit of contract w/o compensating the other.   ∙ They must contain the same elements as express contracts, including the acceptance & consideration ∙ If agreement concerns ‘expressive’ ideas courts must differ contract claims vs. copyright claims Implied­in­Law / Quasi­Contracts – No actual or even implied agreement ∙ Prevents one party from being unjustly enriched at the expense of the other ∙ Ex: Overpayment ~ if someone’s accidentally overpaid, they probs can’t keep the $ bc court claims Quasi­Contract 8Elements of an Enforceable Contact (5 factors must be present) Offer – contains specific promise & specific demand that the other party do something… Definite terms! o Ex: Charleston Wholesale offers to sell Bulldog 500 shirts for $2,000  o If Charleston Wholesale offers 500 shirts for “a reasonable price” not definite = not valid!  o So if Bulldog sends $20 back for 500 shirts, Charleston can’t do anything bc contract not enforceable Offer Termination: ∙ Revocation – when offeror retracts the offer before the acceptance ∙ Rejection – when the offeree rejects the offer ∙ Counteroffer – when offeree makes a counterproposal.  Due to ‘mirror image rule’ a counteroffer has  the effect of rejecting the original offer & sending back a new offer for a different contract ∙ Lapse of time – when offeree fails to accept by deadline defined in an offer or after reasonable time Automatic Termination – when something happens outside of the party’s control before the acceptance: ∙ Subject matter destruction – when object of the contract is destroyed or legally eliminated ∙ Incapacity of offeror – when offeror no longer has capacity to make the offer ∙ Change in law – when change in law renders the agreement illegal, acceptance no longer possible Acceptance – of an offer is necessary to create a valid, enforceable contract  Bilateral Contract:  Promise       vs.       Unilateral Contract:  Performance ∙ Mirror Image Rule – for an acceptance to create a binding contract, standard contract law requires that the  acceptance must ‘mirror’ the offer, or match it exactly  ∙ UCC 2­207 Battle of the Forms new terms become part of the contract unless:  o Offer expressly limited acceptance to original terms o Proposed terms materially alter the contract o Offeror rejects the proposed terms ∙ Silence isn’t acceptance – can’t say, if I don’t hear from you in 24 hrs, taken as acceptance ∙ Mailbox rule – the acceptance usually binds parties when the offeree dispatches it.  Since the offeree  historically would have mailed the acceptance, it becomes binding when ‘deposited’ in post office… aka.   “Deposited Acceptance Rule”.   Once offeree has accepted, cannot be revoked.  Consideration – legal mechanism for evaluating an existing incentive/inducement for a party’s promise  Court’s cannot enforce contractual promises unless they’re supported by consideration…  ∙ Ask:  what is the party/ parties making the promise getting in exchange? … compare to a gift Bilateral Contact:  promise + promise  vs. Unilateral Contract:  promise + performance ∙ Must be bargained­for but may be of any value Forms of Consideration: ∙ May take the form of the receipt of a legal benefit or the suffering of a legal detriment ∙ Promise to do something one is not obligated to do (ex: employee agreement)  9∙ Promise to refrain from doing something one has a right to do (ex: non­compete, release of claims) ∙ Money ∙ Option Invalid: ∙ Pre­existing obligation  (contractor can’t say I want $5,000 more to complete this work mid­job) ∙ Prior consideration  (performance made before the parties discuss their agreement doesn’t count) ∙ Promise to make a gift (not binding) o Promissory Estoppel:  “detrimental reliance” exception to rule requiring consideration to support  a promise.  Arises if a promise justifiably relies on a promisor’s promise to their economic injury Other elements…  Capacity – person’s ability to be bound by a contract.  ∙ As a matter of law, one has the mental capacity to enter into a contract (if they don’t, it’s not enforceable)  ∙ Minors (infants)  Intoxicated people Mentally incompetent people Legality – lawful purpose or legality of purpose to validate a contract.  The following are not enforceable: ∙ Illegal activity contracts (ex: a contract to kill someone isn’t valid or enforceable)  ∙ Contracts in restraint of trade (some Covenants Not to Compete are illegal after certain # years) Defenses to enforcement: Contracts based on Fraud or Misrepresentation  lack mutual agreement Fraud – an intentional misstatement of fact inducing another to enter a contract they wouldn’t otherwise.  The specific elements that must be demonstrated to establish fraud or deceit: ∙ Misrepresentation of fact (as opposed to opinion, must be of material fact)  ∙ Intent to deceive ∙ Justified reliance (on misstatement by innocent party, must have been relying on their interpretation) ∙ Injury resulting from reliance Innocent misrepresentation  Mutual mistake Duress Undue Influence Rules of Interpretation:  questions of law informed by facts Key rules: ∙ Common words are given their usual meaning ∙ Handwritten terms  >  typed terms  >  pre­printed terms ∙ Ambiguous terms construed against the drafter  Parol Evidence Rules: influence the form of contracts ∙ Evidence of oral agreements made prior to, or contemporaneous with, written agreements are not  admissible for purpose of changing meaning/terms of contract o Ex1: no mention of warranty in contract but plaintiff claims defendant promised him a warrant ∙ Exception: evidence of oral agreement merely explaining the written terms without changing them 10o EX2:  contract says, “seller shall give its standard warranty to buyer”  And subsequent oral modification may be enforceable Side 9.1 – Macys vs. Martha Stewart & JC Penny:  Stand­Alone Store? ‘06 – MS contracted w Macy’s to sell her brand in stores, with exclusive products only sold in Macy’s (with the exception of her own store if she ever made one, even though they didn’t exist at the time) ‘11 – MS announced she would open a stand­alone­store inside of JCPenny.  Macy’s objected & sued MS for ‘breach of contract’.  Before court decided, JCPenny stopped selling the products (ex of unclear lingo) Performance – what parties promised to do under contract (usually just pay $, deliver goods, perform services)  Duty of Performance between both parties is desired.  When they perform, the obligations of the  contract are discharged (when that party is relieved from all further responsibility of performance)  Conditions of Performance: Condition Precedent:  where something must take place in the future, before party has a duty to perform Condition Subsequent:  excuses contractual performance if some future event takes place  ∙ Ex:  Insurance Notification: a marine insurance policy might terminate coverage for any loss ‘if war declared’ ∙ Ex:  “Fore Majeure” Clause (French “secure your”) St. Louis Produce Market vs. Hughes: Separation Agreement “as a condition precedent to company’s obligations (pension), employee agrees to return all  company­owned property”  Hughes doesn’t return hard­drive, charger, comp etc. bc he says he wasn’t  rightfully paid.  However, bc he didn’t fulfill his conditions, company had no duty to fulfill theirs Levels of Performance: ∙ Substantial Performance – middle ground between full performance & breach due to nonperformance ∙ Complete Performance – contracting party has fulfilled each duty required by contract  ∙ Material Breach – below what’s reasonably accepted.  Party that’s materially breached a contract  cannot sue the other party for performance & is liable for damages arising form the breach Excuses for Nonperformance: Impossibility – the impossibility must be objective and apply to any party in similar circumstances ∙ EX:  property to be purchased is destroyed  or  person to perform services becomes incapacitated Commercial Impracticability (for contracts for goods) ∙ EX:  manufacturer loses source for raw materials Waiver:  when a party intentionally relinquishes a right to performance = waiver (post­nonperformance) ∙ When a party announces the other party doesn’t have to perform as promised = release ∙ EX:  a landlord owed a late fee Release:  when a party decides the other party doesn’t have to perform as promised (pre­nonperformance) ∙ EX:  Borrower will miss a payment 11Breach of Contract – 5 factors present if party has failed to perform & causes damages to other ∙ Compensatory Damages – puts plaintiff in same position as if contract had been performed  o Ex:  contract price, market difference ∙ Consequential Damages – (must be foreseeable) ∙ Liquidated Damages – (pre­determined) ∙ Duty to Mitigate – victim of contract breach must mitigate damages when possible, requiring them  to take reasonable steps to reduce the.  Mitigate = purposeful reduction of damages by victim Equitable Relief: ∙ Specific Performance:  where subject matter of the contract is unique ∙ Rescission:  each party must return consideration to the other (ex: fraud, mistake cases) ∙ Injunction:  court order to refrain from doing something (ex:  IP infringement)  Side 9.5 – a mortgage is essentially a contract that works well in good economy & bad in poor economy Third Party Rights (3rd­party Beneficiaries) Only 3rd party beneficiaries have right to sue where they were an intended beneficiary of a contract ∙ Creditor Beneficiary – Carl owes Terry $10 for job already done.  Carl does job for Chris & contracts  Chris to Pay Terry.  Terry = creditor beneficiary of Chris/Carl contract & can sue Chris for payment owed ∙ Donee Beneficiary – when performance under a contract is meant as a gift to 3rd party.  They can sue the  party who owes them performance under a breached contract, but can’t sue the party who contracted the gift Assignments:  Law of Assignment is a transfer (sale) of rights under a contract ∙ Notice of assignment ∙ Restrictions (if it increases the burden of performance to the obligor can’t be assigned) ∙ Anti­Assignment Clauses ∙ Novations – a 3+ party contract wherein the original contracting parties agree to relieve the obligor  from liability by substituting an assignee in the place of this party     Torts – civil wrong based on common law or legislation, not on a contract Intentional Torts­ Deliberate actions causing injury, include when action’s result is “substantially likely” Fraud:   1)  Material misrepresentation 2)   Intentionally made to induce reliance    3)  Justifiably relied upon 4)   Injury as a result of that reliance 12∙ Ex1:  Misrepresenting company’s financial condition to investors ∙ Ex2:  Material omissions; omitting liabilities on a mortgage application Inference with Business (contractual) Relations:  inference with contractual relations, another common  business tort (ex:  employee poaching/ raiding)   ∙        Injurious falsehood: or “Trade Disparagement” is a common business tort where the publication of  untrue statements disparage a business or product’s quality, must prove actual damage Invasion of Privacy: appropriation of person’s name or likeness for one’s own use (video game / college athletes) Case 10.2:  Ehling vs. Monmouth­Ocean Hospital Service Corp:  employer reports “private” employee  FB post to State Agency.  Employee sues for invasion of privacy and employer moves to dismiss NJ Invasion of Privacy Claim: 1) Solitude, seclusion or private affairs were intentionally infringed upon       2) This infringement would highly offend a reasonable person Generally, no exception of privacy where info is publicly available, but there is a  reasonable expectation where info is password protected…. FB friends? ∙ Court: good enough for Ehling to survive a motion to dismiss.  Employer wins on summary judgment o No invasion of privacy bc employer didn’t improperly access employee’s private page.  o “Friend” willingly shared page with employer Assault: placing of another in immediate apprehension for his/her physical safety Battery:  illegal touching, done without justification or consent ∙ Infliction of Mental Distress is a battery of the emotions, victim should prove physical stress Case 10.1:  Harper vs. Winston County:  employee Harper alleged employer Wright grabber her, jerked  her arm, & forced Harper to accompany her.  AL Battery Statute:  1)  defendant touched plaintiff 2)  defendant intended to touch plaintiff 3) touching was conducted in harmful or offensive manner ∙ Defendant granted summary judgment & plaintiff appealed False Imprisonment:  the intentional unjustified confinement (for a reasonable time) of non­consenting  people, most frequently from shoplifting ∙ Malicious Prosecution or “False Arrest” arises from causing someone to arrest criminally without  proper grounds.  Ex: criminally arresting someone simply to harass them  Trespass:  entering/ remaining on another’s land without consent or after being asked to leave ∙ Ex: particles of pollution placed on another’s land without consent ~ crossing boundaries Conversion:  wrongful exercise of control/power over another’s resources.  Deprives owners of their  lawful right to exclude others from such resources (even purchasing something that’s stolen)  Defamation: publication (known to 3rd parties) of untrue statements about another that holds up that  individual’s character or reputation to contempt or ridicule…      if oral: “slander”     if written: “libel” 13Defenses to Defamation: ∙ Truth – an absolute defense ∙ Privileged Communications – positive statements made by officials in lawsuits are privileged ∙ Public Figures & 1st Amendment: defamation only where “malice” or “reckless disregard for truth” o Due to 1st amendment, media isn’t liable for defamatory untruths printed about public figures  unless plaintiffs can prove that the untruths were published with ‘malice’  Negligence Negligence Claim Basis:  defendant has duty to act reasonably but instead acts carelessly & causes plaintiff injury 5 Elements to a Negligence Claim: 1. Existence of a Duty of Care o Existence of a duty care owed by the defendant to the plaintiff o When someone is acting:  duty to act reasonably o When someone is not acting:  no duty to take affirmative action (unless special relationship)…  Iannelli vs. Burger King  ex case of “special relationship”, duty to foresee  Negligence of professionals  Malpractice 2. Breach of that Duty o Unreasonable behavior by the defendant that breaches that duty o Was defendant’s conduct reasonable? o Essentially a cost­benefit analysis done after­the­fact o Examples:  National Car Rental (didn’t want to pay overtime to mop floor, someone falls and they get sued)…  Wal­Mart, WTC…  o Theme:  financial interest of defendants o Form of aggravated negligence: Willful & Wanton Negligence:  doesn’t show intent but  does show an extreme lack of due care (drunk driving)  more extreme cases 3. Causation in Fact o Before someone’s liable for negligent injury, the person’s failure to use reasonable care must  actually have ‘caused’ the injury o Was defendant’s carelessness a substantial, material factor in bringing about plaintiff’s  injury?  Ex: Roadside Motorist  “jointly & severally” liable if 2 careless people fault 4. Proximate Cause (causation) (foreseeability)  o  “Direct” cause… how do we decide if a cause is direct?  We ask, was the risk foreseeable? o Palsgraf  5. An Actual Injury  Defenses: Contributory Negligence & Assumption of Risk are both affirmative defenses meaning the defendant must  specifically raise these defenses to take advantage of them Contributory Negligence: an absolute defense, totally ‘bars recovery’  ∙ Comparative Responsibility/Fault:  Apportion liability by % (ex: roadside motorist) … used to  offset the harshness of contributory negligence…. Does not ‘bar recovery’  14Assumption of Risk:  risk must be apparent  &   assumption must be voluntary  ∙ If you go to a hockey game,  it’s your duty to be careful of flying hockey pucks Two or more defendants:  Joint  &  Several Liability Torts: Damages Compensatory Damages:  past & future:  1) medical expenses  2) economic loss  3) pain & suffering Punitive Damages:  motive and/or conscious disregard & Deterrence goal  ∙ Punitive Damages:  policy considerations o Windfall to plaintiffs/attorneys o Punishes shareholders, not management o Insurance o Quasi­Criminal w/o protections o Only in USA o Courts punish defendants for committing intentional torts & for negligent behavior  considered ‘gross’ or ‘willful & wanton’  o Key to the award is the defendant’s motive (must be malicious or fraudulent or evil)  o Sometimes called Exemplary Damages as to make an example of the defendant 1LEGAL Exam 2 Study Guide Property – “Legal right to exclude from resources originally possessed or acquired w/o force, theft or fraud” ∙ Property is absolute but not infinite, & its boundaries can be ambiguous ∙ “Absolute” – you can legally seek police/courts to protect a resource that you cannot ∙ “Not Infinite” – the uses legally protected don’t go on forever (limitations: can’t harm others’ property) ∙ Right to Exclude – right to posses, control, use, transfer, & gain income from property  ∙ Foundation of a “free” market & a private enterprise system  2 Divisions of Property: Real Property:  Land & interests in land such as mining rights or leases (more formal rules) ∙ Land ownership is also called real estate/ realty Personal Property:  Moveable resources, or things that people don’t annex to the land ∙ Tangible Property – physical “goods” that if sold must comply with Uniform Commercial Code ∙ Intangible Property – “intellectual property” (patent, copyright, TM, trade secret, securities) Prerequisites of a Private Property System: Enforcement mechanisms Transparency Equity / Social Contract Theory Rationales for a Private Property System: (1)  The Problem of Limited Resources (2 legal frameworks)  ∙ Private Property System:  individuals decide how to best own, use, & transfer resources  o State’s role is to legally recognize & enforce exclusive property rights o Legal limitations exist on how owners can use their resources (can’t harm others) o Produces more for whole society & people are more free than in a state planning system  o To function effectively & promote prosperity, laws must apply generally & equally to all ∙ State Planning System:  state decides how resources should be allocated (Communism)  The difference between these 2 frameworks is a matter of degree (2)  Property Promotes Prosperity ∙ Creates incentives for individuals by allowing people to keep & benefit from what they produce o Establishes maximum conditions for wealth creation through promoting incentive ∙ Provides for capital formation / investment, refers to the quality of resources that produce  new/different resources.  Ex: property enables people to borrow money at a reasonable cost  o Mortgages (agreement puts up one’s house to secure a loan) & Stock o Property law guarantees:   1) a borrower’s house is on an identifiable piece of land by state,              2) state recognizes borrower’s claim to house,  3) state permits lenders to enforce mortgage  agreement through the courts & sell a borrower’s house to satisfy a loan if fail to pay 2  ∙        Divisibility –property allows resources to be broken up into parts & used in diff ways while owners still retain a property interest in each part… allows resources to be subdivided “If society’s goal is to produce more of what people need/want (to increase total amount of limited resources)… a property system produces more for society than a state planning system”  Consequentialist “If freedom is measured as individual autonomy & the absence of state coercion, then a property system also makes people more free”  Formalist Critiques of Private Property System: Fails to account for inherent inequalities  +  Consolidates capital over time Types of Ownership Fee Simple – The maximum estate allowed under law Owner has the fullest legal rights & powers to possess, use & transfer the land Estate: bundle of rights/powers of land ownership

We also discuss several other topics like according to texas regulations who must demonstrate knowledge of foodborne illness prevention

“Absolute” has no limitations or conditions attached  vs.  “Defeasible” has conditional contract Life Estate – Grants an ownership in land for the lifetime of a specific person (present estate! .. not future)  “Reversion” if person dies the land reverts back to original owner  vs.   “Remainder” interest to someone else Leasehold Estate – property right granted to tenants by a landlord  ∙ Tenant – have a qualified possession, use & transfer of land (can’t waste the land or reduce value)  o The rights owned by tenants can be capitalized by transfer to someone else ∙ Landlord – may lease land for a definite duration of time (2 yrs) or an indefinite time (at will)  Concurrent Ownership – 1+ people can own a same thing:  Joint Tenants vs. Tenants in Common Joint Tenants – tenants own equal shares A = 25%  B = 25%  C = 25% D = 25% ∙ Each Tenant owns an equal share ∙ “Four Unities” – possession, interest, time, title ∙ Joint Tenancy may include a “Right of Survivorship” o If a joint tenant died, automatically goes to the other joint tenants  o Ex: if A dies, B + C + D each will own 33%; outside of will process A B C D

o Spouses may do this not to go through a legal property process after the death of the other ∙ If one tenant sells, a “tenancy in common” is created  doctrine of partition Tenancy in Common – tenants can own unequal shares of a property A = 50% B= 25% C = 12.5% D = 12.5% ∙ Each tenant owns a specific percentage that can be different ∙ No “Right of Survivorship”… If one tenant sells, no effect on other tenants A B C D

Don't forget about the age old question of Differentiate the Rates of Chemical Reaction.

 3How Resources may be Acquired: 1. Exchange of Resources (most common, buy something in exchange for cash)    o   Contract – rules under which people exchange resources in a property system 2. Possession o “    Rule of 1st   Possession” – 1st person to reduce previously unowned things to possession becomes their owner, measures intent (ex: meteorite tenant’s possession bc it hit her first)    o   Lost Items are claimed by finder after a specific period of time allowed for owner to claim o Mislaid items are different bc law assumes owner might come back to reclaim 3. Adverse Possession – gives ownership of land to finder as long as 5 conditions are satisfied:  o Open & notorious – can’t be hiding and then pop out saying this is mine o Actual & Exclusive – can’t claim it and then leave for 5 years then come back o Continuous – can’t leave and come back every few days o Wrongful – u must be not allowed to be there, not permitted to be there o For a prescribed period of time – typically like 10­20 years o EX:  NY artist moved to Alphabet City UESide in 80s free, now very nice “squatter” o Squatters is good way to distribute land in poor areas bc they capitalize on unused land 4. Confusion – fungible goods (identical goods) if goods are accidentally mixed up= equal share o Boundaries are key in the concept of property 5. Accession – when someone ‘adds’ something to a found item to add value (doesn’t apply to thief)  o If someone applies efforts/ingenuity to someone else’s raw materials and changed the nature into  a different finished product, then they own the finished product.   6. Gift:  1) intent to make the gift   2) delivery of the gift  (constructive delivery ex: giving car keys)  o Testamentary Gift – gift made through a will.  Criticized bc it doesn’t stimulate economy Security Interest – property interest by pact/operation of law over assets to ensure obligation (debt payment) Deeds of Trust – similar to mortgages, borrower signs note showing debt to lender Whose then granted a security interest in the building & land put up to secure the loan Mortgages (major way small businesses raise $ to startup) ∙ Mortgagor – debtor/ borrower vs.   Mortgagee – creditor/ lender (bank) ∙ Recording Statutes – Banks record mortgage so public can see their security interest in a property  4∙ Foreclosure – exercise of the secured property interest where the creditor must go through the court system to ensure procedures are properly followed before debtor looses their home/land (less costly)  ∙ Deficiency – Anti­Deficiency Judgment Statute prevents mortgages from obtaining anything else from mortgages once the land has been foreclosed and auctioned ∙ Right of Redemption – Sometimes 6­12 months after sale; before the actual foreclosure, this allows  the mortgagor to get back the land upon payment of the full amount of debt (all interest + costs) Secured Transactions Law of Secured Transactions – very technical/complex involves creditor who has sold something on credit  or made a loan to debtor who agrees to give the creditor a security interest in a valuable object ~ collateral ∙ Attachment – security interest in goods arises when it attaches when: o Secured party (lender; bank) has given value o Debtor owns the collateral o Debtor gives a security agreement (in writing, signed & with description of collateral)  ∙ Perfection – arises when a security interest has attached & creditor completes all proper steps o Makes security agreement effective against 3rd parties o UCC Article 9;  Ex: Financing Statement is general way of perfecting a security interest o Purchase Money Security Interest (PMSI) type of security interest perfected by an attachment  alone, meaning a security interest secures the purchase price of goods bought for personal use Restrictions on Property Rights Generally, owners prohibited to use resources in ways harmful to others resources…  ∙ Nuisance o Public Nuisance – land use causing damage / inconvenience to public (by public official) Sriracha factory in Cali shut down as ‘public nuisance’ bc people complained of health (Side 7.11)  o Private Nuisance – Character / extent / duration of harm to plaintiff weighted vs. social utility of  defendant’s activity, location, “unreasonable use of ones’ property interfering with others pleasure” ∙ Zoning – ordinance laws that divide counties or municipalities into use districts designated residential,  commercial or industrial.  Zoning limits the use to which land can be put to that specified  o Variance allows use of land in ways not permitted under a zoning ordinance (ex: for more $$) ∙ Duration –limitations of property ensure inventions & creativeness enter public for common good o Rule Against Perpetuities – limits all exercise of property over resources to a duration of 21+…  owners can’t control resources in many future generations through trust arrangements so a trust can’t  extend control of an owner over 21 years of the death of someone who is alive at the time ∙ Taxation – taxes support gov. services limit the right of private property and suggest that property’s claim  to promoting the common good is not absolute… 16th amendment permits ‘indirect taxes’ 5Intellectual Property (4 IP Rights:  Trade Secrets,  Patent,  TM,  Copyright) Intangible Creations of Intellect… (Design, invention, process, art, TM, chemical compound, codes) Trade Secrets:  “any form of knowledge or info with economic value from not being generally known to  others, or readily ascertainable by property means & has been the subject of reasonable efforts by owners to  maintain secrecy”  (formula, plan, report, manual, research, knowledge of client/ supplier) 2 elements of a trade secret claim: 1) Establish that a trade secret exists    ∙ Information is actually secret ∙ Business must take reasonable steps to keep the information secret ∙ Physical segregation,  firewalls/ encryption,  employee confidentiality  2) Demonstrate a misappropriation ∙ Theft ∙ Disclosure in violation of confidentiality duty (ex: employment relations/ contractual agreement)  ∙ But not:  independent creation or reverse engineering Al Minor & Associates, Inc. vs. Martin: Martin was a pension analyst at AMA (made retirement plans).  Martin  started his own firm & solicited 15 AMA clients from memory…        Ohio SC:  misappropriation of a trade secret Prevention:  Confidentiality (NDAs) & Non­Compete Agreements Civil Enforcement:  injunctions & monetary damages Criminal Enforcement:  Economic Espionage Act (EEA) Patents:  confer a right to exclude others form making, using, selling or importing a covered invention Types:  Utility Patents (20 years),      Design Patent (14 years),        Plant Patent (20 years) How:  apply to the US Patent & Trademark Office (PTO)  ∙ Explain how to make and use the basic invention ∙ Show why the invention is different from previous, related inventions ∙ Precisely detail the subject matter that is the invention (“the claims”)  Patentable Subject Must be      Novel,   Nonobvious,  Have Utility NOT: Natural Phenomena  or  Mathematical Formulas Note: patent  isn’t for a  product, it’s

Association for Molecular Pathology vs. Myriad Genetics, Inc:  Myriad identified & sought patents for 2  genes related to breast & ovarian cancer.  Court rejected patent claims as “discovery of natural phenomena”…      BUT method of discovery or alteration of the genes may be patentable 2 Responses to Patent Infringement: Invention is different,     Patent is invalid Patent Trolls – companies that file & receive a patent, but don’t take the next step to produce or sell 6∙ Troll comes & offers to buy it, then sues people who’ve produced/sold similar stuff; legal but bad Trademark: marks that indicate a specific product or business ∙ Forms:  words, pictures, designs, logos ∙ Value:  distinguish the reputation & goodwill of a particular business from all other businesses ∙ Types:  trademark, service marks, certification marks, collective marks, trade dress (NFL) How to Protect a Trademark:  Use it, Register it; after 6 years, owner must notify PTO that TM still in use,  renew every 10 years (if comes down to a lawsuit, party that uses it the most & for longest wins) Disqualifiers:  Same/Similar to a TM on a similar good,   Merely descriptive,  Generic,    Contains prohibited names/designs (US Flag, immoral names, dead presidents) Kraft Foods LLC  vs.  Cracker Barrel Old Country Story, Inc. Both have TM: Kraft sells a cheese called Cracker Barrel; Store wants to start selling non­cheese products  (ham) in stores… Kraft doesn’t want products to be confused if ham makes people sick (if confusion) Defenses to Trademark Infringement:   ∙ Mark is not distinctive and/or has become generic ∙ Little chance of confusion… ex: Cracker Barrel may say “we sell ham, not cheese” ∙ Use is “fair use” – discussion, criticism, or parody of a trademark ~ protected under the law Claim for Trademark Dilution: Blurring – defendants use of TM name “blurs” the distinctive use of the TM (ex: Google Lawn Service, while  Google doesn’t think there’s confusion, they think the lawn service weakens their name’s distinctiveness)  Tarnishment – defendant uses TM name in a way that creates a negative impression among consumers Copyrights – confers a property right in creative expression, rather than invention… Work must be: ∙ Original ∙ Fixed in some tangible medium ∙ Show some creative expression ∙ Automatic protection ∙ No registration required – but must register in order to bring an infringement case ∙ “Works for hire” Enforcement in case of “Infringement” ∙ Reproduction ∙ Creation of derivative works ∙ Distribution ∙ Performance ∙ Display “Fair Use” for:  criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, and scholarship, research ∙ Purpose & character of use 7∙ Nature of copyrighted work ∙ Amount used ∙ Effect of use on market for work Contracts – legally enforceable promise to do/not do something, subject to consequences (written/oral)  Side 8.1 ~ “Confidentiality Agreement” requires (ex/) employees from disclosing sensitive information Voidable Contract:  agreement when 1+ parties has the right to withdraw from the promise made without  incurring any legal liability.  That party has the power to end the enforcement of a voidable contract Executed Contract – parties have performed promises     vs. Executory Contract – not yet performed Source of Contract Law:  State Law Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) Legislative/ Statutes  Common Law (Judge­made Law) 2 Types of Contracts Bilateral Contract:  agreement containing mutual promises (most common, ex: employee contract)  ∙ Ex: Paul promises to sell his laptop to Pearl for $1000 (2 way promise)  VS. Unilateral Contract:  agreement with only one promise (promise on one side, performance on the other) ∙ Company promises salesperson Amy $1000 bonus if she sells 50 shirts in May (Amy doesn’t promise shit) Express Contracts: parties actually discuss the terms of the agreement (ex: land purchase)  VS. Implied­in­Fact Contract: terms are implied based on the conduct of the parties ∙ Ex:  Patient goes to the doctor, receives treatment and receives a bill from the doctor later Montz vs. Pilgrim Films & TV, inc. (case 8.1)  – Montz proposed a paranormal activity TV show.  NBC  Universal had no interest until they paired with Pilgrim Films to produce similar show, “Ghost Busters”  ∙ Montz Claim:  he disclosed his idea for sale & expected reasonable compensation for the idea as defendants  (NBC) knew the conditions on which the idea was offered ∙ NBC Claim: really a copyright claim, so state law contract claim is preempted by fed copyright law ∙ Court:  no idea’s aren’t protected by copyright & another element is there was an implied payment Implied­in­Fact Agreement: one party doesn’t get benefit of contract w/o compensating the other.   ∙ They must contain the same elements as express contracts, including the acceptance & consideration ∙ If agreement concerns ‘expressive’ ideas courts must differ contract claims vs. copyright claims Implied­in­Law / Quasi­Contracts – No actual or even implied agreement ∙ Prevents one party from being unjustly enriched at the expense of the other ∙ Ex: Overpayment ~ if someone’s accidentally overpaid, they probs can’t keep the $ bc court claims Quasi­Contract 8Elements of an Enforceable Contact (5 factors must be present) Offer – contains specific promise & specific demand that the other party do something… Definite terms! o Ex: Charleston Wholesale offers to sell Bulldog 500 shirts for $2,000  o If Charleston Wholesale offers 500 shirts for “a reasonable price” not definite = not valid!  o So if Bulldog sends $20 back for 500 shirts, Charleston can’t do anything bc contract not enforceable Offer Termination: ∙ Revocation – when offeror retracts the offer before the acceptance ∙ Rejection – when the offeree rejects the offer ∙ Counteroffer – when offeree makes a counterproposal.  Due to ‘mirror image rule’ a counteroffer has  the effect of rejecting the original offer & sending back a new offer for a different contract ∙ Lapse of time – when offeree fails to accept by deadline defined in an offer or after reasonable time Automatic Termination – when something happens outside of the party’s control before the acceptance: ∙ Subject matter destruction – when object of the contract is destroyed or legally eliminated ∙ Incapacity of offeror – when offeror no longer has capacity to make the offer ∙ Change in law – when change in law renders the agreement illegal, acceptance no longer possible Acceptance – of an offer is necessary to create a valid, enforceable contract  Bilateral Contract:  Promise       vs.       Unilateral Contract:  Performance ∙ Mirror Image Rule – for an acceptance to create a binding contract, standard contract law requires that the  acceptance must ‘mirror’ the offer, or match it exactly  ∙ UCC 2­207 Battle of the Forms new terms become part of the contract unless:  o Offer expressly limited acceptance to original terms o Proposed terms materially alter the contract o Offeror rejects the proposed terms ∙ Silence isn’t acceptance – can’t say, if I don’t hear from you in 24 hrs, taken as acceptance ∙ Mailbox rule – the acceptance usually binds parties when the offeree dispatches it.  Since the offeree  historically would have mailed the acceptance, it becomes binding when ‘deposited’ in post office… aka.   “Deposited Acceptance Rule”.   Once offeree has accepted, cannot be revoked.  Consideration – legal mechanism for evaluating an existing incentive/inducement for a party’s promise  Court’s cannot enforce contractual promises unless they’re supported by consideration…  ∙ Ask:  what is the party/ parties making the promise getting in exchange? … compare to a gift Bilateral Contact:  promise + promise  vs. Unilateral Contract:  promise + performance ∙ Must be bargained­for but may be of any value Forms of Consideration: ∙ May take the form of the receipt of a legal benefit or the suffering of a legal detriment ∙ Promise to do something one is not obligated to do (ex: employee agreement)  9∙ Promise to refrain from doing something one has a right to do (ex: non­compete, release of claims) ∙ Money ∙ Option Invalid: ∙ Pre­existing obligation  (contractor can’t say I want $5,000 more to complete this work mid­job) ∙ Prior consideration  (performance made before the parties discuss their agreement doesn’t count) ∙ Promise to make a gift (not binding) o Promissory Estoppel:  “detrimental reliance” exception to rule requiring consideration to support  a promise.  Arises if a promise justifiably relies on a promisor’s promise to their economic injury Other elements…  Capacity – person’s ability to be bound by a contract.  ∙ As a matter of law, one has the mental capacity to enter into a contract (if they don’t, it’s not enforceable)  ∙ Minors (infants)  Intoxicated people Mentally incompetent people Legality – lawful purpose or legality of purpose to validate a contract.  The following are not enforceable: ∙ Illegal activity contracts (ex: a contract to kill someone isn’t valid or enforceable)  ∙ Contracts in restraint of trade (some Covenants Not to Compete are illegal after certain # years) Defenses to enforcement: Contracts based on Fraud or Misrepresentation  lack mutual agreement Fraud – an intentional misstatement of fact inducing another to enter a contract they wouldn’t otherwise.  The specific elements that must be demonstrated to establish fraud or deceit: ∙ Misrepresentation of fact (as opposed to opinion, must be of material fact)  ∙ Intent to deceive ∙ Justified reliance (on misstatement by innocent party, must have been relying on their interpretation) ∙ Injury resulting from reliance Innocent misrepresentation  Mutual mistake Duress Undue Influence Rules of Interpretation:  questions of law informed by facts Key rules: ∙ Common words are given their usual meaning ∙ Handwritten terms  >  typed terms  >  pre­printed terms ∙ Ambiguous terms construed against the drafter  Parol Evidence Rules: influence the form of contracts ∙ Evidence of oral agreements made prior to, or contemporaneous with, written agreements are not  admissible for purpose of changing meaning/terms of contract o Ex1: no mention of warranty in contract but plaintiff claims defendant promised him a warrant ∙ Exception: evidence of oral agreement merely explaining the written terms without changing them 10o EX2:  contract says, “seller shall give its standard warranty to buyer”  And subsequent oral modification may be enforceable Side 9.1 – Macys vs. Martha Stewart & JC Penny:  Stand­Alone Store? ‘06 – MS contracted w Macy’s to sell her brand in stores, with exclusive products only sold in Macy’s (with the exception of her own store if she ever made one, even though they didn’t exist at the time) ‘11 – MS announced she would open a stand­alone­store inside of JCPenny.  Macy’s objected & sued MS for ‘breach of contract’.  Before court decided, JCPenny stopped selling the products (ex of unclear lingo) Performance – what parties promised to do under contract (usually just pay $, deliver goods, perform services)  Duty of Performance between both parties is desired.  When they perform, the obligations of the  contract are discharged (when that party is relieved from all further responsibility of performance)  Conditions of Performance: Condition Precedent:  where something must take place in the future, before party has a duty to perform Condition Subsequent:  excuses contractual performance if some future event takes place  ∙ Ex:  Insurance Notification: a marine insurance policy might terminate coverage for any loss ‘if war declared’ ∙ Ex:  “Fore Majeure” Clause (French “secure your”) St. Louis Produce Market vs. Hughes: Separation Agreement “as a condition precedent to company’s obligations (pension), employee agrees to return all  company­owned property”  Hughes doesn’t return hard­drive, charger, comp etc. bc he says he wasn’t  rightfully paid.  However, bc he didn’t fulfill his conditions, company had no duty to fulfill theirs Levels of Performance: ∙ Substantial Performance – middle ground between full performance & breach due to nonperformance ∙ Complete Performance – contracting party has fulfilled each duty required by contract  ∙ Material Breach – below what’s reasonably accepted.  Party that’s materially breached a contract  cannot sue the other party for performance & is liable for damages arising form the breach Excuses for Nonperformance: Impossibility – the impossibility must be objective and apply to any party in similar circumstances ∙ EX:  property to be purchased is destroyed  or  person to perform services becomes incapacitated Commercial Impracticability (for contracts for goods) ∙ EX:  manufacturer loses source for raw materials Waiver:  when a party intentionally relinquishes a right to performance = waiver (post­nonperformance) ∙ When a party announces the other party doesn’t have to perform as promised = release ∙ EX:  a landlord owed a late fee Release:  when a party decides the other party doesn’t have to perform as promised (pre­nonperformance) ∙ EX:  Borrower will miss a payment 11Breach of Contract – 5 factors present if party has failed to perform & causes damages to other ∙ Compensatory Damages – puts plaintiff in same position as if contract had been performed  o Ex:  contract price, market difference ∙ Consequential Damages – (must be foreseeable) ∙ Liquidated Damages – (pre­determined) ∙ Duty to Mitigate – victim of contract breach must mitigate damages when possible, requiring them  to take reasonable steps to reduce the.  Mitigate = purposeful reduction of damages by victim Equitable Relief: ∙ Specific Performance:  where subject matter of the contract is unique ∙ Rescission:  each party must return consideration to the other (ex: fraud, mistake cases) ∙ Injunction:  court order to refrain from doing something (ex:  IP infringement)  Side 9.5 – a mortgage is essentially a contract that works well in good economy & bad in poor economy Third Party Rights (3rd­party Beneficiaries) Only 3rd party beneficiaries have right to sue where they were an intended beneficiary of a contract ∙ Creditor Beneficiary – Carl owes Terry $10 for job already done.  Carl does job for Chris & contracts  Chris to Pay Terry.  Terry = creditor beneficiary of Chris/Carl contract & can sue Chris for payment owed ∙ Donee Beneficiary – when performance under a contract is meant as a gift to 3rd party.  They can sue the  party who owes them performance under a breached contract, but can’t sue the party who contracted the gift Assignments:  Law of Assignment is a transfer (sale) of rights under a contract ∙ Notice of assignment ∙ Restrictions (if it increases the burden of performance to the obligor can’t be assigned) ∙ Anti­Assignment Clauses ∙ Novations – a 3+ party contract wherein the original contracting parties agree to relieve the obligor  from liability by substituting an assignee in the place of this party     Torts – civil wrong based on common law or legislation, not on a contract Intentional Torts­ Deliberate actions causing injury, include when action’s result is “substantially likely” Fraud:   1)  Material misrepresentation 2)   Intentionally made to induce reliance    3)  Justifiably relied upon 4)   Injury as a result of that reliance 12∙ Ex1:  Misrepresenting company’s financial condition to investors ∙ Ex2:  Material omissions; omitting liabilities on a mortgage application Inference with Business (contractual) Relations:  inference with contractual relations, another common  business tort (ex:  employee poaching/ raiding)   ∙        Injurious falsehood: or “Trade Disparagement” is a common business tort where the publication of  untrue statements disparage a business or product’s quality, must prove actual damage Invasion of Privacy: appropriation of person’s name or likeness for one’s own use (video game / college athletes) Case 10.2:  Ehling vs. Monmouth­Ocean Hospital Service Corp:  employer reports “private” employee  FB post to State Agency.  Employee sues for invasion of privacy and employer moves to dismiss NJ Invasion of Privacy Claim: 1) Solitude, seclusion or private affairs were intentionally infringed upon       2) This infringement would highly offend a reasonable person Generally, no exception of privacy where info is publicly available, but there is a  reasonable expectation where info is password protected…. FB friends? ∙ Court: good enough for Ehling to survive a motion to dismiss.  Employer wins on summary judgment o No invasion of privacy bc employer didn’t improperly access employee’s private page.  o “Friend” willingly shared page with employer Assault: placing of another in immediate apprehension for his/her physical safety Battery:  illegal touching, done without justification or consent ∙ Infliction of Mental Distress is a battery of the emotions, victim should prove physical stress Case 10.1:  Harper vs. Winston County:  employee Harper alleged employer Wright grabber her, jerked  her arm, & forced Harper to accompany her.  AL Battery Statute:  1)  defendant touched plaintiff 2)  defendant intended to touch plaintiff 3) touching was conducted in harmful or offensive manner ∙ Defendant granted summary judgment & plaintiff appealed False Imprisonment:  the intentional unjustified confinement (for a reasonable time) of non­consenting  people, most frequently from shoplifting ∙ Malicious Prosecution or “False Arrest” arises from causing someone to arrest criminally without  proper grounds.  Ex: criminally arresting someone simply to harass them  Trespass:  entering/ remaining on another’s land without consent or after being asked to leave ∙ Ex: particles of pollution placed on another’s land without consent ~ crossing boundaries Conversion:  wrongful exercise of control/power over another’s resources.  Deprives owners of their  lawful right to exclude others from such resources (even purchasing something that’s stolen)  Defamation: publication (known to 3rd parties) of untrue statements about another that holds up that  individual’s character or reputation to contempt or ridicule…      if oral: “slander”     if written: “libel” 13Defenses to Defamation: ∙ Truth – an absolute defense ∙ Privileged Communications – positive statements made by officials in lawsuits are privileged ∙ Public Figures & 1st Amendment: defamation only where “malice” or “reckless disregard for truth” o Due to 1st amendment, media isn’t liable for defamatory untruths printed about public figures  unless plaintiffs can prove that the untruths were published with ‘malice’  Negligence Negligence Claim Basis:  defendant has duty to act reasonably but instead acts carelessly & causes plaintiff injury 5 Elements to a Negligence Claim: 1. Existence of a Duty of Care o Existence of a duty care owed by the defendant to the plaintiff o When someone is acting:  duty to act reasonably o When someone is not acting:  no duty to take affirmative action (unless special relationship)…  Iannelli vs. Burger King  ex case of “special relationship”, duty to foresee  Negligence of professionals  Malpractice 2. Breach of that Duty o Unreasonable behavior by the defendant that breaches that duty o Was defendant’s conduct reasonable? o Essentially a cost­benefit analysis done after­the­fact o Examples:  National Car Rental (didn’t want to pay overtime to mop floor, someone falls and they get sued)…  Wal­Mart, WTC…  o Theme:  financial interest of defendants o Form of aggravated negligence: Willful & Wanton Negligence:  doesn’t show intent but  does show an extreme lack of due care (drunk driving)  more extreme cases 3. Causation in Fact o Before someone’s liable for negligent injury, the person’s failure to use reasonable care must  actually have ‘caused’ the injury o Was defendant’s carelessness a substantial, material factor in bringing about plaintiff’s  injury?  Ex: Roadside Motorist  “jointly & severally” liable if 2 careless people fault 4. Proximate Cause (causation) (foreseeability)  o  “Direct” cause… how do we decide if a cause is direct?  We ask, was the risk foreseeable? o Palsgraf  5. An Actual Injury  Defenses: Contributory Negligence & Assumption of Risk are both affirmative defenses meaning the defendant must  specifically raise these defenses to take advantage of them Contributory Negligence: an absolute defense, totally ‘bars recovery’  ∙ Comparative Responsibility/Fault:  Apportion liability by % (ex: roadside motorist) … used to  offset the harshness of contributory negligence…. Does not ‘bar recovery’  14Assumption of Risk:  risk must be apparent  &   assumption must be voluntary  ∙ If you go to a hockey game,  it’s your duty to be careful of flying hockey pucks Two or more defendants:  Joint  &  Several Liability Torts: Damages Compensatory Damages:  past & future:  1) medical expenses  2) economic loss  3) pain & suffering Punitive Damages:  motive and/or conscious disregard & Deterrence goal  ∙ Punitive Damages:  policy considerations o Windfall to plaintiffs/attorneys o Punishes shareholders, not management o Insurance o Quasi­Criminal w/o protections o Only in USA o Courts punish defendants for committing intentional torts & for negligent behavior  considered ‘gross’ or ‘willful & wanton’  o Key to the award is the defendant’s motive (must be malicious or fraudulent or evil)  o Sometimes called Exemplary Damages as to make an example of the defendant
Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here