×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UA - HY 104 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UA - HY 104 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UA / History / HY 104 / john meintz

john meintz

john meintz

Description

School: University of Alabama - Tuscaloosa
Department: History
Course: American Civilization Since 1865
Professor: David beito
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: history
Cost: 50
Name: HY 104 Midterm Study Guide
Description: This 21 page study guide covers what the professor expects us to know for the test plus all of my class notes, picture ID notes, and a timeline of events. Everything you need to know for the test can be found in this study guide!
Uploaded: 03/02/2017
44 Pages 14 Views 11 Unlocks
Reviews


HY 104 Midterm Study Guide


when did The Civil War ended?



 There will be one essay worth 100 points on the test  There will also be 3 picture IDs worth 30 points (10 each)

 If a word or phrase is underlined, it is an important term

 Page 2: Potential Essay Topics

 Page 3: Potential Picture IDs

 Page 4: Picture ID Class Notes

 Pages 5 ­ 17: Class Notes

 Pages 18 ­ 21: Timeline of Events

Potential Essay Topics

(From professor’s study guide)

∙ The Civil War ended in 1865­­or did it? How dramatic were the differences­­and  tensions­­between North and South from 1865 to 1945? You might consider race  relations, politics, economics, labor, culture, and/or other issues as you craft an  argument about the nature and degree of sectional differences after 1865. To what extent were the North and South two separate, distinctive societies in these  decades? Use assigned books, films, and lectures for support, using multiple,  specific examples to make your case.


what are the Reconstruction plans before Johnson?



∙ The role and reach of the federal government expanded greatly between 1865 and  1945. What was the specific nature of that expansion, and how significantly did it  affect Americans? What areas of American life­­political, economic, social,  cultural, labor conditions, and so on­­were most affected by new government  roles and responsibilities? Use assigned book, films, and lectures for support,  using multiple, specific examples of government actions and their consequences  for ordinary people. If you want to learn more check out Paleo diet means what?

Potential Picture IDs (#1 ­ #16)

(From professor’s study guide)

Picture ID Notes from Class


who killed abraham lincoln?



We also discuss several other topics like o Why do young males masturbate more often versus young girls?

∙ Lecture 01/11/17 

o Freedmen voting across class #1 

o Republican legislators in South Carolina

∙ Lecture 01/18/17

o Redemption in 1874 #2 

 Retaking of the southern government

o 1,700 blacks lynched in the South #5 

∙ Lecture 01/23/17

o Triangle Shirtwaist fire in NYC in 1911 #6 

o Ford Motor Company had a skit with its workers #8 

 They came out in their home country outfits and then changed into  American outfits

 Taught to be strictly American as immigrants

∙ Lecture 01/25/17

o Railroad reform #7 

 New York Graphic, 1873

∙ Lecture 01/30/17

o Child laborer #10 

o 18th Amendment #9 

 1919­1933

 Prohibit the sale, manufacture, and distribution of alcohol 

∙ Lecture 02/01/17

o Spain was blamed for the sinking of the U.S.S. Maine #11 

o Teddy Roosevelt and the Rough Riders #12 

∙ Lecture 02/06/17

o Enlist Advertisement for WWI #3 

 “Help Crush the Menace of the Seas”

∙ Lecture 02/08/17

o John Meintz #4 

 Tarred and feathered in Minnesota for not supporting war bond  drives

 1917

∙ Lecture 02/13/17

o Babe Ruth #13 

 Advertisement for Bedrock Cola 

∙ Lecture 02/15/17

o Female KKK members in Washington, D.C. #14 

∙ Lecture 02/20/17 Don't forget about the age old question of poking fun at a respected subject is a

o Soup kitchen #15 

 Opened in Chicago by Al Capone

 1931

∙ Lecture 02/27/17

o Life Magazine #16 

 1943, woman writing soldier back while looking at German skull Class Notes

∙ 01/11/17 ­ The Reconstruction Era

o Andrew Johnson’s Plans for Reconstruction 

 Reconstruction plans before Johnson

∙ Lincoln’s plan was to offer a general amnesty to white 

southerners who should pledge an oath of loyalty to the 

government and accept slavery abolition (1865)

∙ Once ten percent of the state’s voters took the oath, they 

could set up their state government and only three southern 

states reestablished their governments (Louisiana, 

Arkansas, and Tennessee)

∙ Radical republicans opposed and formed the Wade­Davis 

Bill which called for the president to appoint governor for 

each state

∙ The Wade­Davis Bill would abolish slavery but it left the 

black’s political rights up to the states so eventually 

Lincoln pocket vetoed it

 Lincoln’s Death

∙ Killed by John Wilkes Booth in Ford Theater on April 14, 

1865

∙ Andrew Johnson then became President

 Andrew Johnson’s Restoration Plans (1867)

∙ Offered amnesty to southerners who took the oath

∙ Mostly resembled Wade­Davis Bill

o President appointed governors Don't forget about the age old question of fshn uiuc

o Abolish slavery and ratify 13th Amendment

 Black Codes

∙ State legislatures passed these laws in 1865­1866

∙ They detained African Americans who did not have jobs, 

fined them for it, and then sent them to private employers 

so they could pay for the fines

∙ Congress responded by extending the Freedmen’s Bureau 

to nullify the work agreements

∙ Congress then passed the Civil Rights Act in April of 1866 

to appoint African Americans as full citizens, which gave 

them power in the state 

o Radical Reconstruction

 Johnson v. Thaddeus Stevens (Rep. of Penn.) and Charles Sumner  (Senator of Mass.)

          14th   Amendment  

∙ Congress approved in early summer of 1866 

∙ It defined American citizenship

o Everyone born in the U.S.

o Everyone naturalized

o Entitled to all privileges of the Constitution

∙ If southern states accepted this amendment, they would be  readmitted (only TN accepted) If you want to learn more check out marx on imperialism

 The Congressional Plan

∙ Tennessee was readmitted

  ∙          1st   Reconstruction Act Don't forget about the age old question of vapirin

o All of the other confederate states were conjoined 

into 5 military districts

o Kept confederate leaders from voting

o Each district had a military commander who 

registered voters to elect state constitutions and then

elect state governments

o Gave freedmen the right to vote

o Required southern states to ratify the 14th 

Amendment

o By 1870, all states were readmitted 

∙     15th   Amendment ­ forbade states and federal government to deny suffrage to citizens 

∙ Tenure of Office Act (1867) ­ prohibited the president,  without Senate consent, to remove civil officials 

∙ Command of the Army Act ­ prohibited the president, 

except through commanding general, U.S. Grant, to issue 

military orders

o The South in Reconstruction

 Reconstruction Governments

∙ Scalawags ­ former Whigs or farmers in remote areas

∙ Carpetbaggers ­ white men from the North

∙ African Americans started holding public offices

∙ Democratic redeemers ­ political coalition in the south 

during reconstruction who wanted to overthrow radical 

republican coalition of freedmen 

 Landownership 

∙ Southern plantation owners in 1865 started wanting their  land back that now belonged to ex­slaves and President 

Johnson helped return their land

∙ Sharecropping ­ tenants of white landowners who had their  own plots and paid the landlords in either rent or a share of  crops

      Crop­lien system  

∙ Blacks and poor white suffered through this system

∙ Credit system centered in local stores

∙ They had no competition so they had interest rates up to 

60%

∙ Farmers become imprisoned in debt 

 Furnishing merchants ­ the hub of the new system of agriculture        Ku Klux Klan 

∙ Frightened African Americans from voting

∙ Made of the Knights of the White Camellia and others

∙ Worked to form a larger democratic party

∙ 01/18/17 ­ The South After Reconstruction

  o   The New South  

 Railroads

∙    Expansion 1870­1890

∙    Towns were isolated so when traveling by railroad became 

popular, it changed people’s character 

 Southern population loss from 1880­1901

∙    Whites ­ 1,243,000

∙    Blacks ­ 537,000

 Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) 

∙ Louisiana law case for segregated seating on railroads

∙ In 1892, a black man named Plessy refused to sit in a Jim 

Crow car which broke the law 

o Jim Crow Laws ­ state and local laws that enforced segregation (settling  someone apart from other people) in the south 

 Disfranchisement ­ the state of being deprived of a right or 

privilege 

 Segregation of Accommodations

∙ Justice John Marshall

 In the 1890s there were an average of 187 lynchings every year of  African Americans 

 Redeemers ­ political coalition in the south who pursued 

redemption (wanting to rid of the radical republicans)

∙ 01/23/17 ­ Industry, Immigrants, and Urban America

o Growth in the City

 Transportation

∙ Walking cities ­ where everything you needed was in 

walking distance

∙ Cable car ­ created a cause for suburbs 

o Electric trolley track mileage

 1890 ­ 1,300

 1902 ­ 22,000

 People moving to the city

∙ Urban populations:

o 1880: 26%

o 1900: 40%

o 1920: 51%

∙ Mostly Whites and African Americans coming out of 

slavery

 Immigration

∙ Made up 76% of New York City in 1920

∙ Made up 72% in Cleveland, Boston, and Chicago

∙ Made up 64% in Detroit, San Fran., and Minneapolis 

∙ From 1870 to 1920, 26 million immigrants entered the U.S. through Ellis Island, NY

o 1880­1889: 2/3 came from England, Ireland, and 

Germany (old immigration) 

o 1900­1910: 2/3 came from Italy, Austria­Hungary, 

and Russia (new immigration) 

o Sources of Industrial Growth

 Steel and iron production soared as railroad production increased  Gasoline and engine inventions made way for the automobile ∙ Henry Ford 

o Made first famous car in 1895 

o Also created the assembly line

 The wright brothers flew the first airplane

o Capitalist Conservatism 

 Social Darwinism ­ theory that individuals either succeeded or fell  due to their fitness and virtues

 Gospel of wealth ­ theory that wealthy people were most powerful ∙ Horatio Alger wrote many novels about rags to riches

 The American Socialist Party was formed in 1901 when a group of people from De Leon’s party strove after organized labor

o Ordeal of the Worker

 Immigrants coming to America extended the industrial workforce   Child Labor

∙ Factory work

∙ Coal mines

∙ Working at home

 Knights of Labor ­ run by Terence Powderly to form a power  structure where workers get betters wages but more ownership  The American Federation of Labor ­ run by Samuel Gompers for  shorter work days and better wages

o Living in the City

 Immigrants were forced to learn to language and lose the accent  Majority of people lived in dumbbell tenements 

∙ 01/25/17 ­ Dissent and Depression in the 1890s

o Politics

 Democrats in the late 1900s were more conservative

∙ Consisted of mostly southern small government whites and 

northern white workers

∙ A lot of Jews and Catholics were democratic

      Interstate Commerce Act (1887) 

∙ Created commission from interstate commerce

∙ Had weak enforcement provisions

∙ Prohibited rebates, pools, and race discrimination

∙ Weakened by the Supreme Court in 1897

o Agricultural Issues

 Farmer’s Alliances in 1889

∙ Plains Alliance (2 million members)

∙ Southern Alliance (2 million members)

∙ Colored Farmers’ National Alliance (1 million members)

 Populist Concerns

∙ Work to change nature of ownership and economic 

exchange

∙ Persuade federal government to have bigger role in 

economy

∙ Proposals:

o Abolish private banks

o Federal ownership of railroads and telegraph

o Direct election of U.S. senators

o Federal control over currency (expand money 

supply)

o Shorter work days

o Election of 1896

 McKinley vs. Bryan

∙ William McKinley was the governor of Ohio and won with 

61% in the electoral vote (Republican)

∙ William Jennings Bryan ­ Congressman from Nebraska 

(Democrat)

o “Cross of Gold” speech ­ he supported free silver 

and thought it would help bring the nation 

prosperity

∙ 01/30/17 ­ Progressivism I: The Search for Order

o Four Pillars of Progression

 End abuses of power

 Reform social institutions

 Bring scientific principles and efficiency to a chaotic world

 Make industrialization humane

o Reform

 Muckrakers ­ reform­minded journalists

 Government:

∙ Recall ­ allow voters to remove officials and judges from 

office

∙ Initiative ­ allow voters to propose laws themselves

∙ Referendum ­ enables voters to accept or reject laws­

 Labor ­ child labor was a problem

 Prohibition of alcohol called for     18th   Amendment 

∙ 1919­1933

∙ Prohibited the sale, manufacture, and distribution of 

alcohol 

 Eugenics ­ distribution of European Races

∙ Madison Grant

∙ The higher up you were in Europe geographically, the 

better you were

o Race and Gender Reform

 Booker T. Washington 

∙ Tuskegee Institute ­ school in Alabama for blacks to teach 

them about jobs and industry

∙ Studied social problems and created institutions to help

 Du Bois

∙ “The way for a people to gain their reasonable rights is not 

by voluntarily throwing them away.”

 New Feminism

∙ Jane Addams ­ set up Hull House in Chicago to help 

mothers and teach people

∙     19th   Amendment (Jan. of 1920)

o Equality ­ ended woman suffrage 

o Gave women the right to vote

∙ 02/01/17 ­ Progressivism II: Politics and Foreign Policy

o Imperialism 

 Spanish­American War

∙ McKinley’s reasons for war:

o “Cause of humanity”

o “Very serious injury to the commerce, trade, and 

business of our people”

o “Constant menace to our peace” 

∙ Sinking of the U.S.S. Maine (Feb. 15, 1898)

o Teddy Roosevelt ­ President from 1901­1909

 Roosevelt Corollary (1904) ­ addition to Monroe Doctrine to  exercise military force in Latin America

o 1912 Election

 Taft was inaugurated in 1909

 Roosevelt’s New Nationalism

∙ “The effort at prohibiting all combinations has substantially

failed. The way out lies… in completely controlling them.”

∙ Heavily tax big business and the wealthy

∙ Create a modern welfare state

 Wilson’s New Freedom

∙ Claims individual freedom is threatened by trusts

∙ Proposes to break up trusts aggressively

o Underwood Tariff (1913)

 Lowers tariff on incoming goods

 Establishes graduated federal income tax

 For regulating business costs

∙ 02/06/17 ­ American Entrance into World War I

o European Conflict in 1914

 American was concerned about the German­Americans in the U.S.  Bosnian terrorists killed Ferdinand with the help of Serbia 

 Serbia looked to Russia from threats of Germany and Austria Hungary

 Germany declares war on Russia and France

 Triple Alliance ­ Germany, Austria­Hungary, and Italy

 Triple Entente ­ Russia, France, and UK

o American Entrance

 U­boat Warfare

∙ Undersea boats (submarines)

∙ Surrounded British isles so British could torpedo them

∙ Lusitania ­ sunk by submarine which resulted in 1,260 dead

 Wilson’s Reasons for War

∙ Freedom to travel the seas

∙ Economic repercussions of maritime rights

∙ Germany’s reckless antagonism

∙ Desire for seat at the peace table

 Drafting into the War

∙ Selective Service Act (1917) ­ to raise army for American 

entry into WWI

∙ 48 million served in military

∙ 2 million served in France

∙ Women worked for Red Cross or served coffee to 

doughboys

o War Experiences

 Poison Gas Attacks

∙ Used by both sides

∙ Now not allowed

 Captured several German troops

 Germans asked for peace in November of 1918

 WWI Casualties:

∙ U.S.

o 112,000 killed

o 50,000 in combat and other half from disease

∙ Europe

o 10 million soldiers

o 6.6 million civilians

o 21.3 million people wounded

∙ 02/08/17 ­ Mobilizing the Home Front in World War I

o Nation at War

 Business and Government Cooperation

∙ Food propaganda ­ one day they would go without a certain

food

∙ War Bonds ­ buying a $25 investment to help fund the war

 Labor during War Times

∙ Work had a patriotic meaning

∙ Strike was not tolerated

∙ Women had to fill in for men at war and do manual labor

      Great Migration 

∙ 1910 to 1920: 500,000 blacks moved up north

∙ Black populations that increased:

o Cleveland ­ 300%

o Detroit ­ 600%

o Chicago ­ 150%

o Fight on Civil Liberty

 WWI propaganda ­ determined to demonize enemy (George Creel)  Espionage Act (1917) ­ forbade “false statements” meant to 

impede the draft or subvert the military; banned “treasonous” mail  Sedition Act (1918) ­ forbade obstructing the sale of war bonds  and using “disloyal, profane, scurrilous, or abusive” language to  describe the government

 Frank Little

∙ Murdered in Butte, MT in August of 1917

∙ A leader for Industrial Workers of the World

∙ Murdered for belonging to radical union

 Red Scare of 1919

∙ A. Mitchell Palmer and J. Edgar Hoover

∙ Seizure of Communist Party literature in Cambridge, Mass.

of November 1919

o Uncertain Peace

      Big Four 

∙ David Lloyd George ­ England

∙ Vittorio Orlando ­ Italy

∙ Georges Clemenceau ­ France

∙ Woodrow Wilson ­ United States

 League of Nations

∙ Article 10 ­ obligates members of the League to come to 

the defense of each other in the case of “external 

aggression”

 Significance of WWI

∙ Foreshadows expansion of the modern state

∙ U.S. emerges as world power

∙ Ends progressivism; big business dominates 1920s

∙ 02/13/17 ­ Society, Politics, and Culture in the 1920s

o Big Business

 Big business and government formed partnership in 1920s

 Oligopolies ­ small set of companies that dominate certain 

industries

 Presidents of 1920s:

  ∙        Warren Harding 

  ∙        Calvin Coolidge 

∙ Herbert Hoover 

 “New lobbying” ­ influencing actions or policies in daily life  Welfare Capitalism ­ practice of businesses providing welfare to  employees

 Gross National Product ­ total value of goods produced and the  services provided during a year

o Agricultural Problems

 Boom and bust cycle

 Urbanization:

∙ 6 million Americans left farms for cities in the 1920s

∙ 1.5 million of them were African American

o Consumerism and Wealth

 John Dos Passos ­ wrote The Big Money in 1936 about buying  things on credit

 Automobile in 1923: 3.5 million sold and 80% bought on credit  Advertisements and Radio

∙ People’s wealth and popularity depended upon types of 

things they would buy

∙ Most people had a radio by the 1920s

o Entertainment

 Sports

∙ Babe Ruth ­ baseball player

∙ Jack Dempsey ­ boxer

 Movies

∙ 1922 ­ 40 million viewers per week

∙ 1930 ­ 100 million viewers per week (total population of 

120 million)

∙ Chicago Theatre ­ opened in 1921

∙ Charlie Chaplin ­ filmmaker and actor

 Night Life

∙ Al Capone ­ “Prohibition is a business. All I do is supply a 

public demand.”

∙ Flappers ­ short skirts, no corsets, no censorship of movies, 

attractive clothes, good times, etc.

∙ Feminine beauty ads in the 1920s ­ image of mass culture

∙ 02/15/17 ­ Race, Religion, and Nativism in the 1920s

o Harlem Renaissance

 Shuffle Along play on Broadway (1921) started it

∙ One of the first major productions written and preformed 

by African Americans

 Writers during the time:

  ∙        Langston Hughes 

  ∙        Claude McKay 

  ∙        Zora Neale Hurston  

o Jazz Age

 Louis Armstrong

 Kid Ory

 Bessie Smith

o Black Nationalism

 Universal Negro Improvement Association ­ run by Marcus  

Garvey, fraternal organization founded in 1914

  o   Ku Klux Klan 

      William J. Simmons 

 1920s KKK

∙ Native, white, Protestant supremacy

∙ Northern and urban and not just southern and rural

∙ Women seen as guardians of national morality

o Nativism 

 1880 ­ 1889

∙ 2/3 of immigrants come from England, Ireland, and 

Germany

∙ “Old immigration”

 1900 ­ 1910

∙ 2/3 of immigrants come from Italy, Austria­Hungary, and 

Russia

∙ “New immigration”

 National Origins Act (1924)

∙ Limited all European immigration to 150,000 per year

∙ Each nation’s yearly quota was determined by figuring 2% 

of that country’s representation in the US in 1890 (before 

the “new immigration”

∙ No limits on immigration from Western Hemisphere 

(Canada, Mexico, Latin America)

∙ Asians barred completely

∙ 02/20/17 ­ The Crash and Great Depression

o Election of 1928

      Herbert Hoover 

∙ President from 1929­1933

∙ Republican

∙ He was apart of the government as it was going good, so he

had it going for him to win

∙ American individualism ­ pull themselves up by “their boot

straps” and not depend on the government

      Al Smith 

∙ Democratic

∙ First Catholic to run for president

 Election Results

∙ Hoover won electoral at 33.5% with Smith had 16.5%

∙ Hoover won popular at 58% while Smith had 41%

∙ Smith won southern states only

o Causes of the Great Depression

 Stock market in 1929 there was a serious decline in the index of  common stock prices and the volume of sales on the New York 

Stock Exchange 

 International Economy flow:  American Banks [Postwar Loans]   Germany [WWI Reparations]  Allies (France, England) [War  debts] 

 Partnership of big business and government in the 1920s

o The Great Depression

 First three years (1929­1932)

∙ GNP falls from $104 billion to $59 billion

∙ Farm prices, already low, drop 60%

∙ 5,500 banks close

∙ 25% of workers are unemployed by 1933; approximately 

11 million workers jobless

 Farmers and Workers Decline

∙ Walked the roads looking for jobs

∙ Sharecroppers were starved and very poor

∙ Dust Bowl ­ there was no rain in the Great Plains and “dust 

fell like snow”

∙ 02/22/17 ­ The New Deals

o First New Deal Strategies ­ relief, economic planning and recovery, and  long­term security

  o   Franklin Delano Roosevelt 

 1931 Election v. Hoover

 Rode around in wheelchair but did not want to be seen in it due to  “de­masculinization”

 Fireside Chats (1933) ­ his way of communicating with the country o NRA (National Recovery Administration) ­ sharecroppers were evicted o Second New Deal

 Workers progress administration ­ government money raised  through taxation redistributed for people to do work 

 Labor relations ­ Wagner Act (1935) ­ guarantees workers the right to organize and bargain collectively 

 Social Security Act of 1935 

∙ Establishes federal pension system ­ workers pay monthly 

tax, matched by employers, to fund retirement benefits

∙ Creates cooperative federal­state unemployment insurance

∙ Created aid to dependent children, welfare system for 

children without fathers present

∙ 02/27/17 ­ Isolationism and the Coming of War

o Isolationism

 Benito Mussolini (Italy)

 Adolf Hitler (Germany)

 American Isolationism (1930s) ­ wanted to stay out of war

 Franklin Roosevelt hated war 

o American Entrance

 Axis ­ Germany, Italy, and Japan

 Allies ­ U.S., Britain, Soviet Union

 War in Europe

∙ June 6, 1944 ­ Beach of Normandy Fight (D­Day) 

∙ May 7, 1945 ­ Hitler kills himself

 American Casualties

∙ Dead or missing ­ 405,400

∙ Wounded ­ 607,800

∙ Captured ­ 139,700

∙ Psychological disorders ­ 1,300,00

∙ 03/01/17 ­ Home Front USA

o Censorship 

 Ernie Pyle said “These are the things that you at home do not even  try to understand. To you at home they are columns or figures, or  he is a near one who went away and just didn’t come back. You  didn’t see him lying so grotesque and pasty beside the gravel road  in France. We saw him, saw him by the multiple thousands. That’s  the difference”

 1943 ­ Bataan by Robert Taylor

o Propaganda

 1944 ­ war time bonds

 Life Magazine (September 1945) ­ amputee from war

 Four Freedoms: speech, worship, want, and fear

o Women during war times

 Rosie the Riveter ­ “We Can Do It!”

 1940 ­ 14 million women workers

 1944 ­ 19 million women workers

 72% of increase was married women

o Racial Tensions

 Zoot Suit (1943)

∙ Government told factories that lapels needed to be thinner

∙ Zoot suit riots in LA where people were getting beaten up 

and arrested over these suits

 Americans feared Japanese Americans after Pearl Harbor so they  were sent into concentration camps in Manzanar, CA

     442nd 

   Regimental Combat Team ­ all Japanese troop to fight Nazis

 78% of African Americans served with service and not in combat o When soldiers come home

 Worried about crime wave coming after the war

 GI Bill (1944) ­ new deal for veterans that provided housing,  education, and health care

 The New Yorker (1945) ­ “He’s Not Celebrating”

Timeline of Events from Ch. 15 ­ Ch. 26

Chapter 15: 

1863 ­ Lincoln announces Reconstruction plan

1864 ­ Lincoln vetoes Wade­Davis Bill

1865 ­ Confederacy surrenders, Lincoln’s assassination, Johnson becomes President,  Freedmen’s Bureau, and Joint Committee on Reconstruction 

1866 ­ Republicans gain in congressional elections

1867 ­ Congressional Reconstruction begins

1868 ­ Johnson impeached and acquitted, 14th Amendment ratified, and Grant is elected  President

1869 ­ Congress passes 15th Amendment

1872 ­ Grant is reelected

1873 ­ Panic and Depression

1877 ­ Hayes win disputed election and Compromise of 1877 ends Reconstruction 1883 ­ Supreme Court upholds segregation 

1890’s ­ Jim Crow laws in South

1895 ­ Atlanta Compromise

1896 ­ Plessy v. Ferguson 

Chapter 17: 

1859 ­ First oil well drilled

1866 ­ National Labor Union founded and First transatlantic cable

1870 ­ Rockefeller founds Standard Oil

1873 ­ Carnegie Steel founded Economic panic

1876 ­ Bell invents telephone

1877 ­ Nationwide railroad strike

1879 ­ Edison invents electric light bulb

1881 ­ American Federation of Labor founded

1886 ­ Haymarket bombing

1888 ­ Bellamy’s Looking Backward

1892 ­ Homestead steel strike

1893 ­ Depression begins

1894 ­ Pullman strike

1901 ­ Carnegie publishes The Gospel of Wealth 

1903 ­ Wright brothers’ airplane flight

1914 ­ Ford introduces factory assembly lines 

Chapter 18: 

1869 ­ First intercollegiate football game

1870 ­ NYC opens first elevated railroads

1871 ­ Boston and Chicago fires

1872 ­ Boss Tweed convicted

1876 ­ Baseball’s National League founded

1882 ­ Congress restricts Chinese immigration

1884 ­ First “skyscraper” in Chicago

1890 ­ Riis’s How the Other Half Lives

1891 ­ Basketball invented

1894 ­ Immigration Restriction

1897 ­ Boston opens first subway in America

1899 ­ Chopin’s The Awakening

1901 ­ Baseball’s American League founded

1903 ­ First World Series

Chapter 19: 

1867 ­ National Grange founded

1876 ­ Hayes elected president

1880 ­ Garfield elected president

1881 ­ Garfield assassinated and Arthur becomes president

1884 ­ Cleveland elected president 

1887 ­ Interstate Commerce Act and U.S. gains base at Pearl Harbor 1888 ­ Benjamin Harrison elected president

1890 ­ Sherman Antitrust Act, Sherman Silver Purchase Act, and McKinley Tariff 1892 ­ Cleveland elected president again and People’s Party formed 1893 ­ Revolution in Hawaii, Economic depression begins, Sherman Silver Purchase Act  repealed

1894 ­ Coxey’s Army marches on Washington, D.C.

1896 ­ McKinley elected president 

1898 ­ War with Spain, Treaty of Paris, and U.S. annexed Hawaii and Puerto Rico and  Philippines

1891­1902 ­ Philippines revolt

1899 ­ Open Door notes

1900 ­ Boxer Rebellion and McKinley reelected

1901 ­ Platt Amendment

Chapter 20: 

1873 ­ Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) founded

1889 ­ Jane Addams open Hull House in Chicago

1893 ­ Anti­Saloon League founded

1900 ­ Galveston, Texas establishes commission government

1901 ­ McKinley assassinated and Theodore Roosevelt becomes president 1902 ­ Northern Securities antitrust case

1906 ­ Hepburn Railroad Regulation Act and Meat Inspection Act

1907 ­ Financial panic and recession

1908 ­ Taft elected president

1909 ­ NAACP formed and Pinchot­Ballinger dispute

1911 ­ Triangle Shirtwaist Company fire

1912 ­ Roosevelt forms Progressive Party and Woodrow Wilson elected president 1913 ­ 16th Amendment (income tax), 17th Amendment (direct popular election of U.S.  senators), and Federal Reserve Act 

1914 ­ Federal Trade Commission Act and Clayton Antitrust Act

1919 ­ 18th Amendment (prohibition) 

1920 ­ 19th Amendment (woman suffrage)

Chapter 21:

1914 ­ World War I begins and the Panama Canal is opened

1915 ­ U.S. troops in Haiti, Lusitania torpedoed, and Wilson supports preparedness 1916 ­ Wilson reelected and U.S. troops in Mexico

1917 ­ German unrestricted submarine warfare, U.S. enters World War I, Selective  Service Act, and War Industries Board created

1918 ­ Sedition Act, Wilson’s fourteen Points, Armistice ends war, and Paris Peace  Conference 

1919 ­ Senate rejects Treaty of Versailles, Race riots in Chicago and other cities, and  Steel strike and other labor actions

1920 ­ Palmer raids and Red Scare and Harding is elected president 1927 ­ Sacco and Vanzetti executed

Chapter 22: 

1914­1920 ­ Great Migration of blacks to the North

1920 ­ Prohibition begins and Harding elected president

1922 ­ Lewis’s Bobbitt

1923 ­ Harding dies; Coolidge becomes president and Harding administration scandals  revealed 

1924 ­ National Origins Act passed, Coolidge elected president, and KKK membership  peaks

1925 ­ Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and Scopes trial 

1927 ­ First sound motion picture, The Jazz Singer

1928 ­ Hoover elected president

Chapter 23: 

Chapter 24: 

Chapter 25: 

1924 ­ Dawes Plan

1928 ­ Kellogg­Briand Pact

1931­ Japan invades Manchuria

1933 ­ U.S. recognizes Soviet Union, Good Neighbor Policy

1937 ­ Roosevelt’s “quarantine” speech

1938 ­ Munich Conference

1939 ­ Nazi­Soviet nonaggression pact, Germany invades Poland

1940 ­ Tripartite Pact, America First Committee founded, Roosevelt reelected,  Destroyers­for­bases deal

1941 ­ Lend­lease plan, Atlantic Charter, Japan attacks Pearl Harbor, U.S. enters WWII Chapter 26:

1942 ­ Battle of Midway, Campaign in North Africa, Japanese Americans interned,  Manhattan Project begins, CORE founded

1943 ­ Americans capture Guadalcanal, Allied invasion of Italy, Soviet victory at  Stalingrad

1944 ­ Allies invade Normandy, Roosevelt reelected, Americans capture Philippines 1945 ­ Roosevelt dies; Truman becomes president, Germany surrenders, U.S. drops  atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan surrenders

HY 104 Midterm Study Guide

 There will be one essay worth 100 points on the test  There will also be 3 picture IDs worth 30 points (10 each)

 If a word or phrase is underlined, it is an important term

 Page 2: Potential Essay Topics

 Page 3: Potential Picture IDs

 Page 4: Picture ID Class Notes

 Pages 5 ­ 17: Class Notes

 Pages 18 ­ 21: Timeline of Events

Potential Essay Topics

(From professor’s study guide)

∙ The Civil War ended in 1865­­or did it? How dramatic were the differences­­and  tensions­­between North and South from 1865 to 1945? You might consider race  relations, politics, economics, labor, culture, and/or other issues as you craft an  argument about the nature and degree of sectional differences after 1865. To what extent were the North and South two separate, distinctive societies in these  decades? Use assigned books, films, and lectures for support, using multiple,  specific examples to make your case.

∙ The role and reach of the federal government expanded greatly between 1865 and  1945. What was the specific nature of that expansion, and how significantly did it  affect Americans? What areas of American life­­political, economic, social,  cultural, labor conditions, and so on­­were most affected by new government  roles and responsibilities? Use assigned book, films, and lectures for support,  using multiple, specific examples of government actions and their consequences  for ordinary people.

Potential Picture IDs (#1 ­ #16)

(From professor’s study guide)

Picture ID Notes from Class

∙ Lecture 01/11/17 

o Freedmen voting across class #1 

o Republican legislators in South Carolina

∙ Lecture 01/18/17

o Redemption in 1874 #2 

 Retaking of the southern government

o 1,700 blacks lynched in the South #5 

∙ Lecture 01/23/17

o Triangle Shirtwaist fire in NYC in 1911 #6 

o Ford Motor Company had a skit with its workers #8 

 They came out in their home country outfits and then changed into  American outfits

 Taught to be strictly American as immigrants

∙ Lecture 01/25/17

o Railroad reform #7 

 New York Graphic, 1873

∙ Lecture 01/30/17

o Child laborer #10 

o 18th Amendment #9 

 1919­1933

 Prohibit the sale, manufacture, and distribution of alcohol 

∙ Lecture 02/01/17

o Spain was blamed for the sinking of the U.S.S. Maine #11 

o Teddy Roosevelt and the Rough Riders #12 

∙ Lecture 02/06/17

o Enlist Advertisement for WWI #3 

 “Help Crush the Menace of the Seas”

∙ Lecture 02/08/17

o John Meintz #4 

 Tarred and feathered in Minnesota for not supporting war bond  drives

 1917

∙ Lecture 02/13/17

o Babe Ruth #13 

 Advertisement for Bedrock Cola 

∙ Lecture 02/15/17

o Female KKK members in Washington, D.C. #14 

∙ Lecture 02/20/17

o Soup kitchen #15 

 Opened in Chicago by Al Capone

 1931

∙ Lecture 02/27/17

o Life Magazine #16 

 1943, woman writing soldier back while looking at German skull Class Notes

∙ 01/11/17 ­ The Reconstruction Era

o Andrew Johnson’s Plans for Reconstruction 

 Reconstruction plans before Johnson

∙ Lincoln’s plan was to offer a general amnesty to white 

southerners who should pledge an oath of loyalty to the 

government and accept slavery abolition (1865)

∙ Once ten percent of the state’s voters took the oath, they 

could set up their state government and only three southern 

states reestablished their governments (Louisiana, 

Arkansas, and Tennessee)

∙ Radical republicans opposed and formed the Wade­Davis 

Bill which called for the president to appoint governor for 

each state

∙ The Wade­Davis Bill would abolish slavery but it left the 

black’s political rights up to the states so eventually 

Lincoln pocket vetoed it

 Lincoln’s Death

∙ Killed by John Wilkes Booth in Ford Theater on April 14, 

1865

∙ Andrew Johnson then became President

 Andrew Johnson’s Restoration Plans (1867)

∙ Offered amnesty to southerners who took the oath

∙ Mostly resembled Wade­Davis Bill

o President appointed governors

o Abolish slavery and ratify 13th Amendment

 Black Codes

∙ State legislatures passed these laws in 1865­1866

∙ They detained African Americans who did not have jobs, 

fined them for it, and then sent them to private employers 

so they could pay for the fines

∙ Congress responded by extending the Freedmen’s Bureau 

to nullify the work agreements

∙ Congress then passed the Civil Rights Act in April of 1866 

to appoint African Americans as full citizens, which gave 

them power in the state 

o Radical Reconstruction

 Johnson v. Thaddeus Stevens (Rep. of Penn.) and Charles Sumner  (Senator of Mass.)

          14th   Amendment  

∙ Congress approved in early summer of 1866 

∙ It defined American citizenship

o Everyone born in the U.S.

o Everyone naturalized

o Entitled to all privileges of the Constitution

∙ If southern states accepted this amendment, they would be  readmitted (only TN accepted)

 The Congressional Plan

∙ Tennessee was readmitted

  ∙          1st   Reconstruction Act 

o All of the other confederate states were conjoined 

into 5 military districts

o Kept confederate leaders from voting

o Each district had a military commander who 

registered voters to elect state constitutions and then

elect state governments

o Gave freedmen the right to vote

o Required southern states to ratify the 14th 

Amendment

o By 1870, all states were readmitted 

∙     15th   Amendment ­ forbade states and federal government to deny suffrage to citizens 

∙ Tenure of Office Act (1867) ­ prohibited the president,  without Senate consent, to remove civil officials 

∙ Command of the Army Act ­ prohibited the president, 

except through commanding general, U.S. Grant, to issue 

military orders

o The South in Reconstruction

 Reconstruction Governments

∙ Scalawags ­ former Whigs or farmers in remote areas

∙ Carpetbaggers ­ white men from the North

∙ African Americans started holding public offices

∙ Democratic redeemers ­ political coalition in the south 

during reconstruction who wanted to overthrow radical 

republican coalition of freedmen 

 Landownership 

∙ Southern plantation owners in 1865 started wanting their  land back that now belonged to ex­slaves and President 

Johnson helped return their land

∙ Sharecropping ­ tenants of white landowners who had their  own plots and paid the landlords in either rent or a share of  crops

      Crop­lien system  

∙ Blacks and poor white suffered through this system

∙ Credit system centered in local stores

∙ They had no competition so they had interest rates up to 

60%

∙ Farmers become imprisoned in debt 

 Furnishing merchants ­ the hub of the new system of agriculture        Ku Klux Klan 

∙ Frightened African Americans from voting

∙ Made of the Knights of the White Camellia and others

∙ Worked to form a larger democratic party

∙ 01/18/17 ­ The South After Reconstruction

  o   The New South  

 Railroads

∙    Expansion 1870­1890

∙    Towns were isolated so when traveling by railroad became 

popular, it changed people’s character 

 Southern population loss from 1880­1901

∙    Whites ­ 1,243,000

∙    Blacks ­ 537,000

 Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) 

∙ Louisiana law case for segregated seating on railroads

∙ In 1892, a black man named Plessy refused to sit in a Jim 

Crow car which broke the law 

o Jim Crow Laws ­ state and local laws that enforced segregation (settling  someone apart from other people) in the south 

 Disfranchisement ­ the state of being deprived of a right or 

privilege 

 Segregation of Accommodations

∙ Justice John Marshall

 In the 1890s there were an average of 187 lynchings every year of  African Americans 

 Redeemers ­ political coalition in the south who pursued 

redemption (wanting to rid of the radical republicans)

∙ 01/23/17 ­ Industry, Immigrants, and Urban America

o Growth in the City

 Transportation

∙ Walking cities ­ where everything you needed was in 

walking distance

∙ Cable car ­ created a cause for suburbs 

o Electric trolley track mileage

 1890 ­ 1,300

 1902 ­ 22,000

 People moving to the city

∙ Urban populations:

o 1880: 26%

o 1900: 40%

o 1920: 51%

∙ Mostly Whites and African Americans coming out of 

slavery

 Immigration

∙ Made up 76% of New York City in 1920

∙ Made up 72% in Cleveland, Boston, and Chicago

∙ Made up 64% in Detroit, San Fran., and Minneapolis 

∙ From 1870 to 1920, 26 million immigrants entered the U.S. through Ellis Island, NY

o 1880­1889: 2/3 came from England, Ireland, and 

Germany (old immigration) 

o 1900­1910: 2/3 came from Italy, Austria­Hungary, 

and Russia (new immigration) 

o Sources of Industrial Growth

 Steel and iron production soared as railroad production increased  Gasoline and engine inventions made way for the automobile ∙ Henry Ford 

o Made first famous car in 1895 

o Also created the assembly line

 The wright brothers flew the first airplane

o Capitalist Conservatism 

 Social Darwinism ­ theory that individuals either succeeded or fell  due to their fitness and virtues

 Gospel of wealth ­ theory that wealthy people were most powerful ∙ Horatio Alger wrote many novels about rags to riches

 The American Socialist Party was formed in 1901 when a group of people from De Leon’s party strove after organized labor

o Ordeal of the Worker

 Immigrants coming to America extended the industrial workforce   Child Labor

∙ Factory work

∙ Coal mines

∙ Working at home

 Knights of Labor ­ run by Terence Powderly to form a power  structure where workers get betters wages but more ownership  The American Federation of Labor ­ run by Samuel Gompers for  shorter work days and better wages

o Living in the City

 Immigrants were forced to learn to language and lose the accent  Majority of people lived in dumbbell tenements 

∙ 01/25/17 ­ Dissent and Depression in the 1890s

o Politics

 Democrats in the late 1900s were more conservative

∙ Consisted of mostly southern small government whites and 

northern white workers

∙ A lot of Jews and Catholics were democratic

      Interstate Commerce Act (1887) 

∙ Created commission from interstate commerce

∙ Had weak enforcement provisions

∙ Prohibited rebates, pools, and race discrimination

∙ Weakened by the Supreme Court in 1897

o Agricultural Issues

 Farmer’s Alliances in 1889

∙ Plains Alliance (2 million members)

∙ Southern Alliance (2 million members)

∙ Colored Farmers’ National Alliance (1 million members)

 Populist Concerns

∙ Work to change nature of ownership and economic 

exchange

∙ Persuade federal government to have bigger role in 

economy

∙ Proposals:

o Abolish private banks

o Federal ownership of railroads and telegraph

o Direct election of U.S. senators

o Federal control over currency (expand money 

supply)

o Shorter work days

o Election of 1896

 McKinley vs. Bryan

∙ William McKinley was the governor of Ohio and won with 

61% in the electoral vote (Republican)

∙ William Jennings Bryan ­ Congressman from Nebraska 

(Democrat)

o “Cross of Gold” speech ­ he supported free silver 

and thought it would help bring the nation 

prosperity

∙ 01/30/17 ­ Progressivism I: The Search for Order

o Four Pillars of Progression

 End abuses of power

 Reform social institutions

 Bring scientific principles and efficiency to a chaotic world

 Make industrialization humane

o Reform

 Muckrakers ­ reform­minded journalists

 Government:

∙ Recall ­ allow voters to remove officials and judges from 

office

∙ Initiative ­ allow voters to propose laws themselves

∙ Referendum ­ enables voters to accept or reject laws­

 Labor ­ child labor was a problem

 Prohibition of alcohol called for     18th   Amendment 

∙ 1919­1933

∙ Prohibited the sale, manufacture, and distribution of 

alcohol 

 Eugenics ­ distribution of European Races

∙ Madison Grant

∙ The higher up you were in Europe geographically, the 

better you were

o Race and Gender Reform

 Booker T. Washington 

∙ Tuskegee Institute ­ school in Alabama for blacks to teach 

them about jobs and industry

∙ Studied social problems and created institutions to help

 Du Bois

∙ “The way for a people to gain their reasonable rights is not 

by voluntarily throwing them away.”

 New Feminism

∙ Jane Addams ­ set up Hull House in Chicago to help 

mothers and teach people

∙     19th   Amendment (Jan. of 1920)

o Equality ­ ended woman suffrage 

o Gave women the right to vote

∙ 02/01/17 ­ Progressivism II: Politics and Foreign Policy

o Imperialism 

 Spanish­American War

∙ McKinley’s reasons for war:

o “Cause of humanity”

o “Very serious injury to the commerce, trade, and 

business of our people”

o “Constant menace to our peace” 

∙ Sinking of the U.S.S. Maine (Feb. 15, 1898)

o Teddy Roosevelt ­ President from 1901­1909

 Roosevelt Corollary (1904) ­ addition to Monroe Doctrine to  exercise military force in Latin America

o 1912 Election

 Taft was inaugurated in 1909

 Roosevelt’s New Nationalism

∙ “The effort at prohibiting all combinations has substantially

failed. The way out lies… in completely controlling them.”

∙ Heavily tax big business and the wealthy

∙ Create a modern welfare state

 Wilson’s New Freedom

∙ Claims individual freedom is threatened by trusts

∙ Proposes to break up trusts aggressively

o Underwood Tariff (1913)

 Lowers tariff on incoming goods

 Establishes graduated federal income tax

 For regulating business costs

∙ 02/06/17 ­ American Entrance into World War I

o European Conflict in 1914

 American was concerned about the German­Americans in the U.S.  Bosnian terrorists killed Ferdinand with the help of Serbia 

 Serbia looked to Russia from threats of Germany and Austria Hungary

 Germany declares war on Russia and France

 Triple Alliance ­ Germany, Austria­Hungary, and Italy

 Triple Entente ­ Russia, France, and UK

o American Entrance

 U­boat Warfare

∙ Undersea boats (submarines)

∙ Surrounded British isles so British could torpedo them

∙ Lusitania ­ sunk by submarine which resulted in 1,260 dead

 Wilson’s Reasons for War

∙ Freedom to travel the seas

∙ Economic repercussions of maritime rights

∙ Germany’s reckless antagonism

∙ Desire for seat at the peace table

 Drafting into the War

∙ Selective Service Act (1917) ­ to raise army for American 

entry into WWI

∙ 48 million served in military

∙ 2 million served in France

∙ Women worked for Red Cross or served coffee to 

doughboys

o War Experiences

 Poison Gas Attacks

∙ Used by both sides

∙ Now not allowed

 Captured several German troops

 Germans asked for peace in November of 1918

 WWI Casualties:

∙ U.S.

o 112,000 killed

o 50,000 in combat and other half from disease

∙ Europe

o 10 million soldiers

o 6.6 million civilians

o 21.3 million people wounded

∙ 02/08/17 ­ Mobilizing the Home Front in World War I

o Nation at War

 Business and Government Cooperation

∙ Food propaganda ­ one day they would go without a certain

food

∙ War Bonds ­ buying a $25 investment to help fund the war

 Labor during War Times

∙ Work had a patriotic meaning

∙ Strike was not tolerated

∙ Women had to fill in for men at war and do manual labor

      Great Migration 

∙ 1910 to 1920: 500,000 blacks moved up north

∙ Black populations that increased:

o Cleveland ­ 300%

o Detroit ­ 600%

o Chicago ­ 150%

o Fight on Civil Liberty

 WWI propaganda ­ determined to demonize enemy (George Creel)  Espionage Act (1917) ­ forbade “false statements” meant to 

impede the draft or subvert the military; banned “treasonous” mail  Sedition Act (1918) ­ forbade obstructing the sale of war bonds  and using “disloyal, profane, scurrilous, or abusive” language to  describe the government

 Frank Little

∙ Murdered in Butte, MT in August of 1917

∙ A leader for Industrial Workers of the World

∙ Murdered for belonging to radical union

 Red Scare of 1919

∙ A. Mitchell Palmer and J. Edgar Hoover

∙ Seizure of Communist Party literature in Cambridge, Mass.

of November 1919

o Uncertain Peace

      Big Four 

∙ David Lloyd George ­ England

∙ Vittorio Orlando ­ Italy

∙ Georges Clemenceau ­ France

∙ Woodrow Wilson ­ United States

 League of Nations

∙ Article 10 ­ obligates members of the League to come to 

the defense of each other in the case of “external 

aggression”

 Significance of WWI

∙ Foreshadows expansion of the modern state

∙ U.S. emerges as world power

∙ Ends progressivism; big business dominates 1920s

∙ 02/13/17 ­ Society, Politics, and Culture in the 1920s

o Big Business

 Big business and government formed partnership in 1920s

 Oligopolies ­ small set of companies that dominate certain 

industries

 Presidents of 1920s:

  ∙        Warren Harding 

  ∙        Calvin Coolidge 

∙ Herbert Hoover 

 “New lobbying” ­ influencing actions or policies in daily life  Welfare Capitalism ­ practice of businesses providing welfare to  employees

 Gross National Product ­ total value of goods produced and the  services provided during a year

o Agricultural Problems

 Boom and bust cycle

 Urbanization:

∙ 6 million Americans left farms for cities in the 1920s

∙ 1.5 million of them were African American

o Consumerism and Wealth

 John Dos Passos ­ wrote The Big Money in 1936 about buying  things on credit

 Automobile in 1923: 3.5 million sold and 80% bought on credit  Advertisements and Radio

∙ People’s wealth and popularity depended upon types of 

things they would buy

∙ Most people had a radio by the 1920s

o Entertainment

 Sports

∙ Babe Ruth ­ baseball player

∙ Jack Dempsey ­ boxer

 Movies

∙ 1922 ­ 40 million viewers per week

∙ 1930 ­ 100 million viewers per week (total population of 

120 million)

∙ Chicago Theatre ­ opened in 1921

∙ Charlie Chaplin ­ filmmaker and actor

 Night Life

∙ Al Capone ­ “Prohibition is a business. All I do is supply a 

public demand.”

∙ Flappers ­ short skirts, no corsets, no censorship of movies, 

attractive clothes, good times, etc.

∙ Feminine beauty ads in the 1920s ­ image of mass culture

∙ 02/15/17 ­ Race, Religion, and Nativism in the 1920s

o Harlem Renaissance

 Shuffle Along play on Broadway (1921) started it

∙ One of the first major productions written and preformed 

by African Americans

 Writers during the time:

  ∙        Langston Hughes 

  ∙        Claude McKay 

  ∙        Zora Neale Hurston  

o Jazz Age

 Louis Armstrong

 Kid Ory

 Bessie Smith

o Black Nationalism

 Universal Negro Improvement Association ­ run by Marcus  

Garvey, fraternal organization founded in 1914

  o   Ku Klux Klan 

      William J. Simmons 

 1920s KKK

∙ Native, white, Protestant supremacy

∙ Northern and urban and not just southern and rural

∙ Women seen as guardians of national morality

o Nativism 

 1880 ­ 1889

∙ 2/3 of immigrants come from England, Ireland, and 

Germany

∙ “Old immigration”

 1900 ­ 1910

∙ 2/3 of immigrants come from Italy, Austria­Hungary, and 

Russia

∙ “New immigration”

 National Origins Act (1924)

∙ Limited all European immigration to 150,000 per year

∙ Each nation’s yearly quota was determined by figuring 2% 

of that country’s representation in the US in 1890 (before 

the “new immigration”

∙ No limits on immigration from Western Hemisphere 

(Canada, Mexico, Latin America)

∙ Asians barred completely

∙ 02/20/17 ­ The Crash and Great Depression

o Election of 1928

      Herbert Hoover 

∙ President from 1929­1933

∙ Republican

∙ He was apart of the government as it was going good, so he

had it going for him to win

∙ American individualism ­ pull themselves up by “their boot

straps” and not depend on the government

      Al Smith 

∙ Democratic

∙ First Catholic to run for president

 Election Results

∙ Hoover won electoral at 33.5% with Smith had 16.5%

∙ Hoover won popular at 58% while Smith had 41%

∙ Smith won southern states only

o Causes of the Great Depression

 Stock market in 1929 there was a serious decline in the index of  common stock prices and the volume of sales on the New York 

Stock Exchange 

 International Economy flow:  American Banks [Postwar Loans]   Germany [WWI Reparations]  Allies (France, England) [War  debts] 

 Partnership of big business and government in the 1920s

o The Great Depression

 First three years (1929­1932)

∙ GNP falls from $104 billion to $59 billion

∙ Farm prices, already low, drop 60%

∙ 5,500 banks close

∙ 25% of workers are unemployed by 1933; approximately 

11 million workers jobless

 Farmers and Workers Decline

∙ Walked the roads looking for jobs

∙ Sharecroppers were starved and very poor

∙ Dust Bowl ­ there was no rain in the Great Plains and “dust 

fell like snow”

∙ 02/22/17 ­ The New Deals

o First New Deal Strategies ­ relief, economic planning and recovery, and  long­term security

  o   Franklin Delano Roosevelt 

 1931 Election v. Hoover

 Rode around in wheelchair but did not want to be seen in it due to  “de­masculinization”

 Fireside Chats (1933) ­ his way of communicating with the country o NRA (National Recovery Administration) ­ sharecroppers were evicted o Second New Deal

 Workers progress administration ­ government money raised  through taxation redistributed for people to do work 

 Labor relations ­ Wagner Act (1935) ­ guarantees workers the right to organize and bargain collectively 

 Social Security Act of 1935 

∙ Establishes federal pension system ­ workers pay monthly 

tax, matched by employers, to fund retirement benefits

∙ Creates cooperative federal­state unemployment insurance

∙ Created aid to dependent children, welfare system for 

children without fathers present

∙ 02/27/17 ­ Isolationism and the Coming of War

o Isolationism

 Benito Mussolini (Italy)

 Adolf Hitler (Germany)

 American Isolationism (1930s) ­ wanted to stay out of war

 Franklin Roosevelt hated war 

o American Entrance

 Axis ­ Germany, Italy, and Japan

 Allies ­ U.S., Britain, Soviet Union

 War in Europe

∙ June 6, 1944 ­ Beach of Normandy Fight (D­Day) 

∙ May 7, 1945 ­ Hitler kills himself

 American Casualties

∙ Dead or missing ­ 405,400

∙ Wounded ­ 607,800

∙ Captured ­ 139,700

∙ Psychological disorders ­ 1,300,00

∙ 03/01/17 ­ Home Front USA

o Censorship 

 Ernie Pyle said “These are the things that you at home do not even  try to understand. To you at home they are columns or figures, or  he is a near one who went away and just didn’t come back. You  didn’t see him lying so grotesque and pasty beside the gravel road  in France. We saw him, saw him by the multiple thousands. That’s  the difference”

 1943 ­ Bataan by Robert Taylor

o Propaganda

 1944 ­ war time bonds

 Life Magazine (September 1945) ­ amputee from war

 Four Freedoms: speech, worship, want, and fear

o Women during war times

 Rosie the Riveter ­ “We Can Do It!”

 1940 ­ 14 million women workers

 1944 ­ 19 million women workers

 72% of increase was married women

o Racial Tensions

 Zoot Suit (1943)

∙ Government told factories that lapels needed to be thinner

∙ Zoot suit riots in LA where people were getting beaten up 

and arrested over these suits

 Americans feared Japanese Americans after Pearl Harbor so they  were sent into concentration camps in Manzanar, CA

     442nd 

   Regimental Combat Team ­ all Japanese troop to fight Nazis

 78% of African Americans served with service and not in combat o When soldiers come home

 Worried about crime wave coming after the war

 GI Bill (1944) ­ new deal for veterans that provided housing,  education, and health care

 The New Yorker (1945) ­ “He’s Not Celebrating”

Timeline of Events from Ch. 15 ­ Ch. 26

Chapter 15: 

1863 ­ Lincoln announces Reconstruction plan

1864 ­ Lincoln vetoes Wade­Davis Bill

1865 ­ Confederacy surrenders, Lincoln’s assassination, Johnson becomes President,  Freedmen’s Bureau, and Joint Committee on Reconstruction 

1866 ­ Republicans gain in congressional elections

1867 ­ Congressional Reconstruction begins

1868 ­ Johnson impeached and acquitted, 14th Amendment ratified, and Grant is elected  President

1869 ­ Congress passes 15th Amendment

1872 ­ Grant is reelected

1873 ­ Panic and Depression

1877 ­ Hayes win disputed election and Compromise of 1877 ends Reconstruction 1883 ­ Supreme Court upholds segregation 

1890’s ­ Jim Crow laws in South

1895 ­ Atlanta Compromise

1896 ­ Plessy v. Ferguson 

Chapter 17: 

1859 ­ First oil well drilled

1866 ­ National Labor Union founded and First transatlantic cable

1870 ­ Rockefeller founds Standard Oil

1873 ­ Carnegie Steel founded Economic panic

1876 ­ Bell invents telephone

1877 ­ Nationwide railroad strike

1879 ­ Edison invents electric light bulb

1881 ­ American Federation of Labor founded

1886 ­ Haymarket bombing

1888 ­ Bellamy’s Looking Backward

1892 ­ Homestead steel strike

1893 ­ Depression begins

1894 ­ Pullman strike

1901 ­ Carnegie publishes The Gospel of Wealth 

1903 ­ Wright brothers’ airplane flight

1914 ­ Ford introduces factory assembly lines 

Chapter 18: 

1869 ­ First intercollegiate football game

1870 ­ NYC opens first elevated railroads

1871 ­ Boston and Chicago fires

1872 ­ Boss Tweed convicted

1876 ­ Baseball’s National League founded

1882 ­ Congress restricts Chinese immigration

1884 ­ First “skyscraper” in Chicago

1890 ­ Riis’s How the Other Half Lives

1891 ­ Basketball invented

1894 ­ Immigration Restriction

1897 ­ Boston opens first subway in America

1899 ­ Chopin’s The Awakening

1901 ­ Baseball’s American League founded

1903 ­ First World Series

Chapter 19: 

1867 ­ National Grange founded

1876 ­ Hayes elected president

1880 ­ Garfield elected president

1881 ­ Garfield assassinated and Arthur becomes president

1884 ­ Cleveland elected president 

1887 ­ Interstate Commerce Act and U.S. gains base at Pearl Harbor 1888 ­ Benjamin Harrison elected president

1890 ­ Sherman Antitrust Act, Sherman Silver Purchase Act, and McKinley Tariff 1892 ­ Cleveland elected president again and People’s Party formed 1893 ­ Revolution in Hawaii, Economic depression begins, Sherman Silver Purchase Act  repealed

1894 ­ Coxey’s Army marches on Washington, D.C.

1896 ­ McKinley elected president 

1898 ­ War with Spain, Treaty of Paris, and U.S. annexed Hawaii and Puerto Rico and  Philippines

1891­1902 ­ Philippines revolt

1899 ­ Open Door notes

1900 ­ Boxer Rebellion and McKinley reelected

1901 ­ Platt Amendment

Chapter 20: 

1873 ­ Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) founded

1889 ­ Jane Addams open Hull House in Chicago

1893 ­ Anti­Saloon League founded

1900 ­ Galveston, Texas establishes commission government

1901 ­ McKinley assassinated and Theodore Roosevelt becomes president 1902 ­ Northern Securities antitrust case

1906 ­ Hepburn Railroad Regulation Act and Meat Inspection Act

1907 ­ Financial panic and recession

1908 ­ Taft elected president

1909 ­ NAACP formed and Pinchot­Ballinger dispute

1911 ­ Triangle Shirtwaist Company fire

1912 ­ Roosevelt forms Progressive Party and Woodrow Wilson elected president 1913 ­ 16th Amendment (income tax), 17th Amendment (direct popular election of U.S.  senators), and Federal Reserve Act 

1914 ­ Federal Trade Commission Act and Clayton Antitrust Act

1919 ­ 18th Amendment (prohibition) 

1920 ­ 19th Amendment (woman suffrage)

Chapter 21:

1914 ­ World War I begins and the Panama Canal is opened

1915 ­ U.S. troops in Haiti, Lusitania torpedoed, and Wilson supports preparedness 1916 ­ Wilson reelected and U.S. troops in Mexico

1917 ­ German unrestricted submarine warfare, U.S. enters World War I, Selective  Service Act, and War Industries Board created

1918 ­ Sedition Act, Wilson’s fourteen Points, Armistice ends war, and Paris Peace  Conference 

1919 ­ Senate rejects Treaty of Versailles, Race riots in Chicago and other cities, and  Steel strike and other labor actions

1920 ­ Palmer raids and Red Scare and Harding is elected president 1927 ­ Sacco and Vanzetti executed

Chapter 22: 

1914­1920 ­ Great Migration of blacks to the North

1920 ­ Prohibition begins and Harding elected president

1922 ­ Lewis’s Bobbitt

1923 ­ Harding dies; Coolidge becomes president and Harding administration scandals  revealed 

1924 ­ National Origins Act passed, Coolidge elected president, and KKK membership  peaks

1925 ­ Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and Scopes trial 

1927 ­ First sound motion picture, The Jazz Singer

1928 ­ Hoover elected president

Chapter 23: 

Chapter 24: 

Chapter 25: 

1924 ­ Dawes Plan

1928 ­ Kellogg­Briand Pact

1931­ Japan invades Manchuria

1933 ­ U.S. recognizes Soviet Union, Good Neighbor Policy

1937 ­ Roosevelt’s “quarantine” speech

1938 ­ Munich Conference

1939 ­ Nazi­Soviet nonaggression pact, Germany invades Poland

1940 ­ Tripartite Pact, America First Committee founded, Roosevelt reelected,  Destroyers­for­bases deal

1941 ­ Lend­lease plan, Atlantic Charter, Japan attacks Pearl Harbor, U.S. enters WWII Chapter 26:

1942 ­ Battle of Midway, Campaign in North Africa, Japanese Americans interned,  Manhattan Project begins, CORE founded

1943 ­ Americans capture Guadalcanal, Allied invasion of Italy, Soviet victory at  Stalingrad

1944 ­ Allies invade Normandy, Roosevelt reelected, Americans capture Philippines 1945 ­ Roosevelt dies; Truman becomes president, Germany surrenders, U.S. drops  atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan surrenders

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here