×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UM - BUS 206 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UM - BUS 206 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UM / Business / BUS 206 / Why do companies engage in international business?

Why do companies engage in international business?

Why do companies engage in international business?

Description

Kayla Gardner


Why do companies engage in international business?



BUS 206­UY Study Guide 

Exam I 

Week 2: Globalization

● Globalization Arguments (Pick 2 of each)

○ For:

■ It creates more jobs in all economies.

■ It creates better jobs in less developed countries. 

■ There is more foreign direct investment (FDI) and 

economic growth.

■ It provides greater consumer choice.

○ Against:

■ It creates both winners and losers – both in 

absolute and relative terms – growing income inequalities, both between  and within countries.

■ It threatens national sovereignty.

■ It can dilute the local culture.

■ It makes corporate monitoring and holding 


Why do companies engage in international business?



companies accountable more difficult.

■ It can create environmental stress.

● Why do companies engage in international business?

○ To Expand Sales

■ Pursuing international sales increases the potential 

market and potential profits.

○ To Diversify or Reduce Risks

■ International operations may reduce operating risk 

by smoothing sales and profits, preventing competitors from gaining 

advantage.

○ To Acquire Resources

■ This may give companies lower costs, new and 

better products, additional operating knowledge.

Week 3: Political Risks

● Types of Political Risks (In order from least to most destructive):


What is kinesics?



Don't forget about the age old question of chm umd
We also discuss several other topics like comp sci 1010br study guide

REMEMBER: Special Products Destroy Cats

1. Systemic

○ Risks that affect all firms in that particular country, e.g. a change 

in public policy. 

Kayla Gardner

2. Procedural

○ Reflects the costs of getting things done because of such 

problems as government corruption, labor disputes, and/or a partisan judicial  system.

3. Distributive

○ Reflects revisions in such items as tax codes, regulatory structure,

and monetary policy imposed by governments in order to capture greater  benefits from the activities of foreign firms. 

4. Catastrophic

○ Includes those random political developments that adversely 

affect the operations of all firms in a country.   We also discuss several other topics like the sonata form design grew as a reaction to the music of the baroque.

● Ways to Manage Political Risks (Know All 4):

○ Avoidance

■ Avoid investment or withdraw investment from a 

risky location.

○ Adaptation

■ Accommodate the risk 

■ Examples: Equity sharing, participative 

management, localization, & development assistance 

○ Dependency

■ Keep the subsidiary and host nation dependent on 

the parent firm

■ Examples: Input control, market control, position 

control, & staged contribution

○ Hedging

■ Minimize losses

■ Examples: use political risk insurance and/or local 

debt financing

Week 5: Hofstede’s Cultural Value Dimensions

Know all five dimensions.

● Five Dimensions If you want to learn more check out iowa state eln

1. Power Distance

a. The extent to which the less powerful members of a

society accept and expect that power is distributed unequally.

b. AKA how a society handles inequalities among 

people.

i. High:

Kayla Gardner

1. Leadership Style: 

Authoritarian, with close supervision

2. Evaluation/Promotion:

Compliance, trustworthiness

ii. Low:

1. Leadership Style: 

Participative; less direct supervision

2. Evaluation/Promotion:

Performance

2. Individualism v. Collectivism

a. Individualism: A preference for a loosely­knit social 

framework in which individuals are expected to take care of themselves  and their immediate families only.

b. Collectivism: A preference for a tightly­knit  Don't forget about the age old question of a third party insurance program pays for only a 14 day supply of skelaxin. if the directions for use read "i - ii tabs po tid-qid", what is the maximum allowed quantity to be dispensed?

framework in society in which individuals can expect their relatives or  members of a particular in­group to look after them in exchange for  unquestioning loyalty.

i. High:

1. Leadership Style: 

Appeals to duty and commitment

2. Evaluation/Promotion:

Slow, with group, based on seniority

ii. Low:

1. Leadership Style: 

Individual rewards/ punishment based on performance

2. Evaluation/Promotion:

Based on individual performance

3. Uncertainty Avoidance

a. The extent to which the members of a society feel 

uncomfortable with uncertainty and ambiguity.

i. High:

1. Leadership Style: 

Individual performance, job switching for promotions

2. Evaluation/Promotion:

Seniority, expertise, loyalty We also discuss several other topics like geog 4540 textbook notes

ii. Low:

1. Leadership Style: 

Nondirective; person­oriented; flexible

2. Evaluation/Promotion:

Individual performance, job switching for promotions

4. Masculinity versus Femininity

a. Masculinity: a preference in society for 

achievement, heroism, assertiveness and material reward for success.  Society at large is more competitive.

Kayla Gardner

i. Leadership Style: Authoritarian

ii. Evaluation/Promotion: Continual 

gender­tracking

i. Femininity: a preference for cooperation, modesty, 

caring for the weak and quality of life. Society at large is more consensus oriented.

1. Leadership Style: Participative

2. Evaluation/Promotion: Job 

performance, with less gender­based assignments

5. Long­term orientation v. Short­term Orientation

a. Long­term: People are more willing to delay 

gratification by investing; long­term relationships; strong social norms

i. Leadership Style: Build social 

obligations

ii. Evaluation/Promotion: Slow; develop

skills; based on loyalty

5. Long­term orientation v. Short­term Orientation (CONT)

b. Short­term: Making a “quick buck”; change; 

opportunism 

i. Leadership Style: Use incentives for 

economic advancement

ii. Evaluation/Promotion: Fast; based 

on current skill contributions

Week 6: Nonverbal Communication

● Kinesics: communication through body movement—e.g., posture, gestures, and  facial expressions

○ Problems: Shaking of the head does not always mean “No” in all 

cultures. E.g. India and Bulgaria it can be ambiguous, left to interpretation  depending on context

● Proxemics: The way people use physical space to convey meaning.

○ Problems: Personal space in the US may be at a personal 

distance, while in Latin America personal space may be at an intimate distance. ● Haptics: touching during communication.

○ Problems: Asian cultures usually emphasize non­touching 

behavior, while Latin American cultures tend to emphasize the importance of  touching. Ex: kissing on the cheek as a greeting.

● Chronemics: The way time is used in a culture

○ Monochronic: Things are done in a linear fashion and schedules 

matter

■ USA, UK, Northern Europe, Canada, Australia

Kayla Gardner

○ Polychronic: Personal involvement more important than getting  things done on time, keeping to schedule is less important than personal  relations.

■ Latin America, Middle­East

● More Effective Cross­Cultural Communication:

○ Develop cultural sensitivity: anticipate the likely meaning a 

receiver will attach to a message by internalizing honest cultural empathy with  that person

○ Careful encoding: Use words, pictures, and gestures; avoid slang,  idioms, regional sayings

○ Selective transmission: Face­to­face relationships often are best  for relationship­building. Personal interaction also allows for immediate verbal  and visual feedback

○ Careful decoding of feedback: Get feedback from multiple parties,  improve listening and observation skills

○ Follow­up actions: To keep lines of communication open, 

managers must follow through with what has been discussed and agreed upon

Kayla Gardner

BUS 206­UY Study Guide 

Exam I 

Week 2: Globalization

● Globalization Arguments (Pick 2 of each)

○ For:

■ It creates more jobs in all economies.

■ It creates better jobs in less developed countries. 

■ There is more foreign direct investment (FDI) and 

economic growth.

■ It provides greater consumer choice.

○ Against:

■ It creates both winners and losers – both in 

absolute and relative terms – growing income inequalities, both between  and within countries.

■ It threatens national sovereignty.

■ It can dilute the local culture.

■ It makes corporate monitoring and holding 

companies accountable more difficult.

■ It can create environmental stress.

● Why do companies engage in international business?

○ To Expand Sales

■ Pursuing international sales increases the potential 

market and potential profits.

○ To Diversify or Reduce Risks

■ International operations may reduce operating risk 

by smoothing sales and profits, preventing competitors from gaining 

advantage.

○ To Acquire Resources

■ This may give companies lower costs, new and 

better products, additional operating knowledge.

Week 3: Political Risks

● Types of Political Risks (In order from least to most destructive):

REMEMBER: Special Products Destroy Cats

1. Systemic

○ Risks that affect all firms in that particular country, e.g. a change 

in public policy. 

Kayla Gardner

2. Procedural

○ Reflects the costs of getting things done because of such 

problems as government corruption, labor disputes, and/or a partisan judicial  system.

3. Distributive

○ Reflects revisions in such items as tax codes, regulatory structure,

and monetary policy imposed by governments in order to capture greater  benefits from the activities of foreign firms. 

4. Catastrophic

○ Includes those random political developments that adversely 

affect the operations of all firms in a country.  

● Ways to Manage Political Risks (Know All 4):

○ Avoidance

■ Avoid investment or withdraw investment from a 

risky location.

○ Adaptation

■ Accommodate the risk 

■ Examples: Equity sharing, participative 

management, localization, & development assistance 

○ Dependency

■ Keep the subsidiary and host nation dependent on 

the parent firm

■ Examples: Input control, market control, position 

control, & staged contribution

○ Hedging

■ Minimize losses

■ Examples: use political risk insurance and/or local 

debt financing

Week 5: Hofstede’s Cultural Value Dimensions

Know all five dimensions.

● Five Dimensions

1. Power Distance

a. The extent to which the less powerful members of a

society accept and expect that power is distributed unequally.

b. AKA how a society handles inequalities among 

people.

i. High:

Kayla Gardner

1. Leadership Style: 

Authoritarian, with close supervision

2. Evaluation/Promotion:

Compliance, trustworthiness

ii. Low:

1. Leadership Style: 

Participative; less direct supervision

2. Evaluation/Promotion:

Performance

2. Individualism v. Collectivism

a. Individualism: A preference for a loosely­knit social 

framework in which individuals are expected to take care of themselves  and their immediate families only.

b. Collectivism: A preference for a tightly­knit 

framework in society in which individuals can expect their relatives or  members of a particular in­group to look after them in exchange for  unquestioning loyalty.

i. High:

1. Leadership Style: 

Appeals to duty and commitment

2. Evaluation/Promotion:

Slow, with group, based on seniority

ii. Low:

1. Leadership Style: 

Individual rewards/ punishment based on performance

2. Evaluation/Promotion:

Based on individual performance

3. Uncertainty Avoidance

a. The extent to which the members of a society feel 

uncomfortable with uncertainty and ambiguity.

i. High:

1. Leadership Style: 

Individual performance, job switching for promotions

2. Evaluation/Promotion:

Seniority, expertise, loyalty

ii. Low:

1. Leadership Style: 

Nondirective; person­oriented; flexible

2. Evaluation/Promotion:

Individual performance, job switching for promotions

4. Masculinity versus Femininity

a. Masculinity: a preference in society for 

achievement, heroism, assertiveness and material reward for success.  Society at large is more competitive.

Kayla Gardner

i. Leadership Style: Authoritarian

ii. Evaluation/Promotion: Continual 

gender­tracking

i. Femininity: a preference for cooperation, modesty, 

caring for the weak and quality of life. Society at large is more consensus oriented.

1. Leadership Style: Participative

2. Evaluation/Promotion: Job 

performance, with less gender­based assignments

5. Long­term orientation v. Short­term Orientation

a. Long­term: People are more willing to delay 

gratification by investing; long­term relationships; strong social norms

i. Leadership Style: Build social 

obligations

ii. Evaluation/Promotion: Slow; develop

skills; based on loyalty

5. Long­term orientation v. Short­term Orientation (CONT)

b. Short­term: Making a “quick buck”; change; 

opportunism 

i. Leadership Style: Use incentives for 

economic advancement

ii. Evaluation/Promotion: Fast; based 

on current skill contributions

Week 6: Nonverbal Communication

● Kinesics: communication through body movement—e.g., posture, gestures, and  facial expressions

○ Problems: Shaking of the head does not always mean “No” in all 

cultures. E.g. India and Bulgaria it can be ambiguous, left to interpretation  depending on context

● Proxemics: The way people use physical space to convey meaning.

○ Problems: Personal space in the US may be at a personal 

distance, while in Latin America personal space may be at an intimate distance. ● Haptics: touching during communication.

○ Problems: Asian cultures usually emphasize non­touching 

behavior, while Latin American cultures tend to emphasize the importance of  touching. Ex: kissing on the cheek as a greeting.

● Chronemics: The way time is used in a culture

○ Monochronic: Things are done in a linear fashion and schedules 

matter

■ USA, UK, Northern Europe, Canada, Australia

Kayla Gardner

○ Polychronic: Personal involvement more important than getting  things done on time, keeping to schedule is less important than personal  relations.

■ Latin America, Middle­East

● More Effective Cross­Cultural Communication:

○ Develop cultural sensitivity: anticipate the likely meaning a 

receiver will attach to a message by internalizing honest cultural empathy with  that person

○ Careful encoding: Use words, pictures, and gestures; avoid slang,  idioms, regional sayings

○ Selective transmission: Face­to­face relationships often are best  for relationship­building. Personal interaction also allows for immediate verbal  and visual feedback

○ Careful decoding of feedback: Get feedback from multiple parties,  improve listening and observation skills

○ Follow­up actions: To keep lines of communication open, 

managers must follow through with what has been discussed and agreed upon

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here