×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UA - MUTH 102 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UA - MUTH 102 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UA / MUTH / MUTH 102 / How is the interaction described among the elements and principles of

How is the interaction described among the elements and principles of

How is the interaction described among the elements and principles of

Description

School: University of Alabama - Tuscaloosa
Department: MUTH
Course: Applied Design
Professor: Kissinger
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: CTD
Cost: 50
Name: CTD 102 Study Guide Test 2- Kissinger
Description: These notes include the KEY concepts from the book for chapters 3-6.
Uploaded: 03/06/2017
4 Pages 42 Views 1 Unlocks
Reviews


CTD Study Guide 


What is the interaction among the elements and principles of design that creates an aesthetic result?



Chapter 3: Line 

∙    Line is a matter of human perception.

∙    Page 48 and 49 pictures

∙    We start at a point with our drawing instrument on the surface and extend to make lines. ∙    When our lines are joined, they become shapes, delineating space.

∙    In architectural and industrial design, line is a matter of draftsmanship—clean precise  and crucial to conveying accurately the information from which buildings or equipment  can be constructed.

∙ It is the interaction among the elements and principles of design that creates an aesthetic result 


What is the original definition for the word “texture”?



∙ The direction of a line has a certain degree of symbolism.

∙ The quality of a line tells us all We also discuss several other topics like What are the components of innate immunity?

∙ Thickness of line can also tell us a lot about the subject.

∙ Movement can be a result of line in a different way, conveying motion that is violent or  dramatic.

∙ Ingres’s drawings­classicism Rueben’s drawings­romanticism (look at drawings on page  56 and 57)

∙ The repetition and spacing of line can be an effective device in achieving design quality. ∙ Hatching­ when a designer uses closely spaced lines. And the application of a second set  of lines is called cross­hatching. (Kenojuak. Birds and Woman Face pg.57) ∙ In both Egyptian and Chinese language the characters are ideographic. (pg 59)


What is an important factor in any use of tactile texture?



Don't forget about the age old question of How many feature films were created during the nazi era?

Chapter 4: Space 

∙    Space is neither applied or created by a designer. It is there, in infinite abundance. ∙ Visual Design is concerned primarily with three types of space: pictoral, illusionistic, and actual

∙ Pictoral Design­ design related to a flat surface (lemon pg.65)

∙ Illusionistic Space: Depth and two dimensional designs­accomplished by overlapping,  tiering, size, and perspective.

∙ Actual Space: concerns 3 dimensional works in which space is a real and tangible part of  the design. Ex: pottery, sculpture, and architecture. 

∙ Time is important in appreciating art like houses, the viewer must experience the space. THIS CHAPTER SHOULD DEFINITELY BE READ! If you want to learn more check out What is the meaning of slavs?

Chapter 5: Shape and Form 

∙ Shapes  are   categorized   in   one   of   four   ways:  natural,   geometric,   abstract,   and nonobjective.

∙ Natural shapes are those deriving from anything in the natural environment, including a human figure.

∙ Many geometric shapes occur in nature and are not only made by human beings. ∙ Yet, human construction is dominated by geometric shapes.  We also discuss several other topics like What gave the east india tea company a monopoly on tea imported into the colonies?
We also discuss several other topics like How do we learn new words?

∙ An  abstract shape  happens when a natural shape has been altered to emphasize its essential qualities without reference to realistic depiction.

∙ Another term for this is stylization.

∙ Nonobjective shapes do not originate in any recognizable shape or object  ∙ Human perception tends to make out shapes even when the artist did not intend for them ∙ Biomorphic shapes seem organic as though they are part of some living thing. ∙ FORM: Although we think of form as structural, it can sometimes be fluid and changing. Ex: wave Don't forget about the age old question of What is the meaning of anomie theories?

Chapter 6:

∙ An awareness of the textures in nature offers a treasure of possibilities for a designer ∙ The original definition for the word “texture” related to textiles and the surface interest resulting from weaving in various fibers.

∙ Light is in an important factor in any use of tactile texture.

∙ Haut Relief­ carving that stands relatively high above its background ∙ The Batik (pg. 103) has a strong visual texture composed of varied elements: rhythmic lines, open spaces, and areas of pattern.

∙ When  motifs  are repeated at regular intervals to create an orderly overall  design, the design becomes a pattern.

∙ In drawing, painting, or printmaking, the structure of the ground is important because it influences the work upon it. 

∙ Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso experimented and they created collage (a new form of art).

∙ An area of texture carries emotional impact just as a spot of color does. ∙

CTD Study Guide 

Chapter 3: Line 

∙    Line is a matter of human perception.

∙    Page 48 and 49 pictures

∙    We start at a point with our drawing instrument on the surface and extend to make lines. ∙    When our lines are joined, they become shapes, delineating space.

∙    In architectural and industrial design, line is a matter of draftsmanship—clean precise  and crucial to conveying accurately the information from which buildings or equipment  can be constructed.

∙ It is the interaction among the elements and principles of design that creates an aesthetic result 

∙ The direction of a line has a certain degree of symbolism.

∙ The quality of a line tells us all

∙ Thickness of line can also tell us a lot about the subject.

∙ Movement can be a result of line in a different way, conveying motion that is violent or  dramatic.

∙ Ingres’s drawings­classicism Rueben’s drawings­romanticism (look at drawings on page  56 and 57)

∙ The repetition and spacing of line can be an effective device in achieving design quality. ∙ Hatching­ when a designer uses closely spaced lines. And the application of a second set  of lines is called cross­hatching. (Kenojuak. Birds and Woman Face pg.57) ∙ In both Egyptian and Chinese language the characters are ideographic. (pg 59)

Chapter 4: Space 

∙    Space is neither applied or created by a designer. It is there, in infinite abundance. ∙ Visual Design is concerned primarily with three types of space: pictoral, illusionistic, and actual

∙ Pictoral Design­ design related to a flat surface (lemon pg.65)

∙ Illusionistic Space: Depth and two dimensional designs­accomplished by overlapping,  tiering, size, and perspective.

∙ Actual Space: concerns 3 dimensional works in which space is a real and tangible part of  the design. Ex: pottery, sculpture, and architecture. 

∙ Time is important in appreciating art like houses, the viewer must experience the space. THIS CHAPTER SHOULD DEFINITELY BE READ! 

Chapter 5: Shape and Form 

∙ Shapes  are   categorized   in   one   of   four   ways:  natural,   geometric,   abstract,   and nonobjective.

∙ Natural shapes are those deriving from anything in the natural environment, including a human figure.

∙ Many geometric shapes occur in nature and are not only made by human beings. ∙ Yet, human construction is dominated by geometric shapes. 

∙ An  abstract shape  happens when a natural shape has been altered to emphasize its essential qualities without reference to realistic depiction.

∙ Another term for this is stylization.

∙ Nonobjective shapes do not originate in any recognizable shape or object  ∙ Human perception tends to make out shapes even when the artist did not intend for them ∙ Biomorphic shapes seem organic as though they are part of some living thing. ∙ FORM: Although we think of form as structural, it can sometimes be fluid and changing. Ex: wave

Chapter 6:

∙ An awareness of the textures in nature offers a treasure of possibilities for a designer ∙ The original definition for the word “texture” related to textiles and the surface interest resulting from weaving in various fibers.

∙ Light is in an important factor in any use of tactile texture.

∙ Haut Relief­ carving that stands relatively high above its background ∙ The Batik (pg. 103) has a strong visual texture composed of varied elements: rhythmic lines, open spaces, and areas of pattern.

∙ When  motifs  are repeated at regular intervals to create an orderly overall  design, the design becomes a pattern.

∙ In drawing, painting, or printmaking, the structure of the ground is important because it influences the work upon it. 

∙ Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso experimented and they created collage (a new form of art).

∙ An area of texture carries emotional impact just as a spot of color does. ∙

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here