×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to FIU - SOP 3004 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to FIU - SOP 3004 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

FIU / social psychology / SOP 3004 / What is an example of inoculation?

What is an example of inoculation?

What is an example of inoculation?

Description

School: Florida International University
Department: social psychology
Course: Introductory Social Psychology
Professor: David charman
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: Psychology, SocialPsychology, social, #socialPsychology, and stevecharman
Cost: 50
Name: SOP 3004- Exam 3 Studyguide
Description: This study guide will be covered in exam 3 in Professor Steve Charman's Social Psychology course.
Uploaded: 03/21/2017
2 Pages 38 Views 2 Unlocks
Reviews


Spring 2017


What is an example of inoculation?



SOP 3004

Social Psychology- Steve Charman

____________________________________________________________________________ Exam 3 Study Guide

- Persuasion ​- effort to change people’s attitudes

- Mindlessness​ - when decisions are made without careful thought, we can be persuaded by irrelevant variables

- Photocopier study

- ELM​ - Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion

- The nature of thinking determines the type of persuasion that is needed - Central Persuasion - analyze the content of the argument and whether it makes logical sense; humor doesn’t matter to the audience

- Peripheral Persuasion - fail to analyze the content of the argument and disregard whether it makes sense or not; rely on cues present in situations, usually irrelevant to the product itself


What is an example of social proof?



We also discuss several other topics like What are the stages of general adaptation syndrom (gas)?
Don't forget about the age old question of Why is self-defense justified?

- The Audience​ - involvement affects how we are persuaded

- Central route - higher audience involvement makes the information more relevant to the audience We also discuss several other topics like Who won the sino japanese war?

- Peripheral route - lower audience involvement makes the information less relevant to the audience

- Ex: argument quality study

- The Source​ - the speaker affects how we are persuaded

- Central route - “high involvement” individuals focus on the argument itself rather than the source

- Peripheral route - “low involvement” individuals rely on peripheral cues and their opinion on an argument depends on the source

- Credibility​ - affects how we are persuaded

- Expertise and trustworthiness determine credibility


What is reciprocity in a relationship?



- Ex: expertise study

- Attractiveness -​ affects how we are persuaded If you want to learn more check out Who is logan and molotch?

- Similarity and physical appeal determine attractiveness

- Ex: commercials have attractive actors

- The Message​ - how the message is presented affects how we are persuadedDon't forget about the age old question of What is unique about the nervous system?

Spring 2017

- Reason v. Emotion

- Peripheral route - positive emotion leads to a positive mindset

- Primacy v. recency - the timing in which a message is presented affects the audience’s receptiveness to it (ex: first vs. last)

- Attitude Inoculation​ - being exposed to a weaker version of an argument makes one more resistant to that argument in the future, even if it is stronger in the future - Psychological Reactance​ - if one is told not to do something, they are more inclined to do it

________________________________________________________ - Compliance​ - when a direct request is being made

- Reciprocity​ - “treat others as they treat you”

- Ex: christmas card study

- Door-in-the-face technique: make a large request that is likely to get turned down and then make a smaller request that is more reasonable

- Commitment and consistency​ - once we commit, we’re motivated to behave consistently

- Ex: beach towel study

- Foot-in-the-door technique: get someone to comply with a small request and then increase the request

- Only works if the requests are related in subject Don't forget about the age old question of What do you call the study of forces and their effects on living systems?

- Low-balling: get someone to agree with a request and reveal the hidden costs after

- Social Proof​ - if we see others performing a behavior, we view that behavior as correct in a situation

- Works more in times of uncertainty and when people are similar to us - Authority​ - we tend to comply with authority figures

- Ex: security guard studies

________________________________________________________ - Obedience​ - Milgram Studies

- Tests how far subjects would go in the name of authority

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here