Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

GSU - PSY 1101 - Chapter Two Study Guide - Study Guide

Created by: Harley Williams Elite Notetaker

> > > > GSU - PSY 1101 - Chapter Two Study Guide - Study Guide

GSU - PSY 1101 - Chapter Two Study Guide - Study Guide

School: Georgia Southern University
Department: Psychology
Course: Intro to Psychology
Professor: Steirn
Term: Fall 2014
Tags: Intro to Psychology and Psychology
Name: Chapter Two Study Guide
Description: Study Guide, review, and learning objectives for chapter 2.
Uploaded: 04/01/2017
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 7 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image CHAPTER 2-The Biological Perspective 
YOU KNOW YOU ARE READY FOR THE TEST IF YOU ARE ABLE TO 
-Explain what neurons are and how they work to transfer and process information. 
-Introduce the peripheral nervous system and describe its role in the body.  
-Discuss the role of the endocrine system.  
-Describe the methods used to observe the structure and activity of the brain. 
-Identify the basic structures of the brain and explain their functions.  
 
RAPID REVIEW  
-The  nervous system is made up of a complex network of cells throughout your  body ​. Because psychology is the study of behavior and mental processes,  understanding how the nervous system works provides fundamental information about 
what is going on inside your body when you engage in a specific behavior, feel a 
particular emotion, or have an abstract thought.  
-The field of study that deals with these types of questions is called 
biological  psychology or behavioral neuroscience.  
-
The role of the nervous system is to carry information​. Without your nervous  system, you would not be able to think, feel, or act.  
-The cells in the nervous system that carry information are called 
neurons​. Information  enters a neuron at the dendrites, flows through the cell body (or soma) and down the 
axon in order to pass the information on to the next cell.  
-Although, neurons are the cells that carry the information, most of the nervous system 
(about 90%) consists of 
glial cells​. Glial cells provide food, support, and insulation to the  neuron cells. The insulation around the neuron is called myelin and works in a way very 
similar to the plastic coating of an electrical wire. Bundles of myelin-coated axons are 
wrapped together in cable like structures called nerves.  
-
Neurons use an electrical signal to send information​ from one end of its cell to the  other.  
-
At rest, a neuron has a negative charge inside and a positive charge outside​. This  is due to both electrostatic pressure and diffusion, the process of molecules moving from 
areas of high concentration to areas of low concentration. When a signal arrives, gates 
in the cell wall next to the signal open and the positive charge moves inside. The positive 
charge inside the cell causes the next set of gates to open and those positive charges 
move inside. In this way, the electrical signal makes its way down the length of the cell. 
The 
movement of the electrical signal is called an action potential.   -After the action potential is over, the positive charges get pumped back out of the cell 
and the neuron returns to its negatively charged state. This condition is called the 
resting potential
​. A ​neuron acts in an all-or-none manner.​ This means the neuron  either has an action potential or it does not. The neuron indicates the strength of the 
signal by how many action potentials are produced or “fired” within a certain amount of 
time.  
 
 
background image - Neurons pass information onto target cells using a chemical signal​. When the  electrical signal travels down the axon and reaches the other end of the neuron called 
the axon terminal, it enters the very tip of the terminal called the synaptic knob and 
causes the neurotransmitters in the synaptic vesicles to be released into the fluid-filled 
space between the two cells. This fluid-filled space is called the synapse or the synaptic 
gap. -
The neurotransmitters are the chemical signals the neuron uses​ to  communicate with its target cell. The neurotransmitters fit into the receptor sites of the 
target cell and create a new electrical signal that then can be transmitted down the 
length of the target cell. Neurotransmitters can have two different effects on the target 
cell. If the neurotransmitter increases the likelihood of an action potential in the target 
cell, the connection is called an excitatory synapse. If the neurotransmitter decreases the 
likelihood of an action potential, the connection is called an inhibitory synapse. Agonists 
and antagonists are chemicals that are not naturally found in our body but that can fit 
into the receptor sites of target cells when they get into our nervous system. Agonists 
lead to a similar response in the target cell as the neurotransmitter itself, while 
antagonists block or reduce the action of the neurotransmitter on the target cell.  
-
There are at least 50–100 different types of neurotransmitters in the human body​.  Acetylcholine ​ was the first to be discovered; it is an excitatory neurotransmitter that  causes your muscles to contract and has a role in cognition, particularly memory. 
Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA)
​ is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that decreases  the activity level of neurons in your brain.  Serotonin​ is both an excitatory and inhibitory  neurotransmitter and has been linked with sleep, mood, and appetite. Low levels of the 
neurotransmitter 
dopamine​ have been found to cause Parkinson’s disease and  increased levels of dopamine have been linked to the psychological disorder known as 
schizophrenia.  
-
Endorphin is a special neurotransmitter called a neural regulator that controls the  release of other neurotransmitters. ​ When endorphin is released in the body, they  neurons transmitting information about pain are not able to fire action potentials. All the 
different types of neurotransmitters are cleared out of the synaptic gap through the 
process of reuptake, diffusion, or enzymatic degradation.  
-
The central nervous system (CNS) is made up of the brain and the spinal cord.  The  spinal cord​ is a long bundle of neurons that transmits messages between the brain  and the body. The cell bodies or somas of the neurons are located along the inside of 
the spinal cord and the cell axons run along the outside of the spinal cord. 
Afferent  (sensory) neurons ​ send information from our senses to the spinal cord. For example,  sensory neurons would relay information about a sharp pain in your finger.  Efferent  (motor) neurons  ​send commands from the spinal cord to our muscles, such as a  command to pull your finger back.  Interneurons​ connect sensory and motor neurons  and help to coordinate the signals. All three of these neurons act together in the spinal 
cord to form a reflex arc. The ability of the brain and spinal cord to change both in 
structure and function is referred to as 
neuroplasticity​. Stem cells are one type of cell  that facilitates these changes.  
background image - The peripheral nervous system (PNS) is made up of all the nerves and neurons  that are NOT in the brain or spinal cord ​. This includes all the nerves that connect to  your eyes, ears, skin, mouth, and muscles. The PNS is  divided into two parts, the  somatic nervous system and the autonomic nervous system (ANS).  
The somatic nervous system
​ consists of all the nerves coming from our sensory  systems, called the sensory pathway, and all the nerves going to the skeletal muscles 
that control our voluntary movements, called the motor pathway. 
The autonomic  nervous system ​ is made up of the nerves going to and from our organs, glands, and  involuntary muscles and is  divided into two parts: the sympathetic division and the  parasympathetic division.  ​The ​sympathetic division​ turns on the body’s fight-or-flight  reactions, which include responses such as increased heart rate, increased breathing, 
and dilation of your pupils. The 
parasympathetic division​ controls your body when you  are in a state of rest to keep the heart beating regularly, to control normal breathing, and 
to coordinate digestion. The parasympathetic division is active most of the time. The 
endocrine glands represent a second communication system in the body.  
-The
 endocrine glands​ lack ducts and secrete chemicals called hormones directly into  the bloodstream. Compared to neuronal communication, the hormonal system generally 
results in slower, more widespread effects on the body and/or behavior. 
- The
 pituitary gland​ is located in the brain and secretes the hormones that control milk  production, salt levels, and the activity of other glands.  
-The 
pineal gland​ is also located in the brain and secretes ​melatonin​. This hormone  helps to track day length and contributes to the regulation of the sleep cycle in humans. 
-The 
thyroid gland​ is located in the neck and releases a hormone that regulates  metabolism.  
-The 
pancreas ​controls the level of blood sugar in the body, while the gonad sex glands  — called the ovaries in females and the testes in males — regulate sexual behavior and 
reproduction.  
-The 
adrenal glands​ play a critical role in regulating the body’s response to stress.  -Researchers have used animal models to learn a great deal about the human brain. 
Two of the most common techniques used in animals involve either destroying a specific 
area of the brain
 (deep lesioning) ​or stimulating a specific brain area ​(electrical  stimulation of the brain or ESB) ​ to see the effect.   -In work with humans, researchers have developed several methods to observe the 
structure and activity of a living brain. If a researcher wants a picture of the structure of 
the brain, she might choose a CT scan or an MRI. 
Computed tomography (CT)​ scans  use x-rays to create images of the structures within the brain.  Magnetic resonance  images (MRIs)  ​use a magnetic field to “take a picture” of the brain. MRIs provide much  greater detail than CT scans.  
 
 
 
 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Georgia Southern University who use StudySoup to get ahead
7 Pages 19 Views 15 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Georgia Southern University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Georgia Southern University
Department: Psychology
Course: Intro to Psychology
Professor: Steirn
Term: Fall 2014
Tags: Intro to Psychology and Psychology
Name: Chapter Two Study Guide
Description: Study Guide, review, and learning objectives for chapter 2.
Uploaded: 04/01/2017
7 Pages 19 Views 15 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to GSU - PSY 1101 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to GSU - PSY 1101 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here