Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

FAU - SOC 1101 - Study Guide - Midterm

Created by: Victoria Martinez Elite Notetaker

> > > > FAU - SOC 1101 - Study Guide - Midterm

FAU - SOC 1101 - Study Guide - Midterm

School: Florida Atlantic University
Department: Sociology
Course: Sociological Perspectives
Professor: Gina Carreno-Lukasik
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: sociology
Name: Sociology Exam 2 Study Guide
Description: These notes go into detail about what you can study and the topics needed to prepare for the upcoming exam.
Uploaded: 04/01/2017
0 5 3 69 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 12 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Sociological Perspectives (SYG 1000) w/ Dr. Carreno­Lukasik Study Guide 2 Your second exam will consist of multiple choice questions that can address any of the 
concepts below:
chapter 7: Interaction, Groups, and Organizations definition and examples of social aggregate and social category – are these 
groups?
SOCIAL AGGREGATE: People who happen to be in the same place at the same time. 
Ex: : tri rail waiting in line. Everyone in that line would be a social 
aggregate.
Or the people waiting in line to buy a movie ticket.
SOCIAL CATEGORY: People who share a common characteristic WHAT IS A GROUP? A. DEFINITION GROUP:
A group of two people would be called a dyad. A group of three would
be Triad. Any more would just be referred to as a group. definitions and examples of in­groups and out­groups IN­GROUPS:  group towards which you feel loyalty and respect. ( Group that You are In) Mainly 
from your perspective and point of view.
OUT­GROUPS:  Group towards which you feel contempt or exclusion 
( Group you are outside of) 
ex: My big fat greek wedding if your greek you can marry my daughter you are in if not you are out definitions and examples of primary groups and secondary groups PRIMARY GROUPS: 
small, characterized by face to face interaction, intimacy, and a sense of 
commitment 
background image ex: Gina’s family powerpoint of her family group purpose: emotional connection  SECONDARY GROUPS:  larger, impersonal; involve very little emotional attachment
Purpose: There to achieve a goal
definition and examples of reference group REFERENCE GROUPS: 
a group that provides a standard for judging your own behavior.
 ­Anticipatory socialization: group that you will be a part of
 ­ group you want to be a part of, but you never will be 
what is conformity?   Going along with a group or you follow orders * Milgram’s obedience (not everyone conforms) video: Compliance  Weber’s characteristics of bureaucracy  Text:  1. Division of labor
2. A hierarchy of authority and accountability
3. Impersonality
4. Written rules and records
Ritzer’s McDonaldization of Society – know his main argument ( all aspects of  human life, not just fast­food restaurants, are becoming increasingly regulated /  rationalized / impersonal)  in text, not in lecture: o definition of Thomas Theorem:  When we consider both our spontaneous  interpretation of the circumstances at hand as well as what society has 
taught us about those circumstances. Our interpretation then infulences 
how we act. “
if men define situations as real, they are real in their  consequences.” o Helps understand how interpretations of a situation shape social  interaction on various levels. o Helps understand stereotypes o definition of stereotypes:  exaggerated, distorted, or untrue generalizations  about categories of people that do not acknowledge individual variation. o how do the Asch experiments demonstrate conformity?: The Asch experiments suggested that group pressure can generate 
conformit.
chapter 8: Deviance and Social Control
background image definition of deviance DEVIANCE:  Any behavior that goes against society’s norms what do we mean when we say that deviance is socially constructed?  know 
examples
SOCIALLY CONSTRUCTED: What is considered deviant varies across time and place definitions and examples of external versus internal social control SOCIAL CONTROL DEFINITION: Ways we promote conformity to norms EXTERNAL VS INTERNAL External: Norms are enforced through sanctions (Threat of punishment) Internal: Internalize norms - generalized other - conscience - feel guilty Example: Linda is taking Gina’s exam, she studied really hard 
but has test anxiety and blanks, she can see the scantron next 
to her and is tempted to cheat but doesn’t want Gina to see 
and give her a zero.
Answer: External (WHY?) She is tempted but she is worried about 
getting a zero. WORRIED ABOUT THE THREAT OF PUNISHMENT!!! 
be able to define and apply the sociological explanations of deviance (strain 
theory, control theory, differential association theory, and labeling theory)– for 
labeling theory, know primary deviation, secondary deviation, and self­fulfilling 
prophecy
EXPLANATIONS OF DEVIANCE A. BIOLOGICAL Biological predisposition to deviant behavior B. PSYCHOLOGICAL

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Florida Atlantic University who use StudySoup to get ahead
12 Pages 97 Views 77 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Florida Atlantic University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Florida Atlantic University
Department: Sociology
Course: Sociological Perspectives
Professor: Gina Carreno-Lukasik
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: sociology
Name: Sociology Exam 2 Study Guide
Description: These notes go into detail about what you can study and the topics needed to prepare for the upcoming exam.
Uploaded: 04/01/2017
12 Pages 97 Views 77 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to FAU - SOC 1101 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to FAU - SOC 1101 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here