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UA - HDFS 382 - HD 382 Exam 2 Study Guide - Study Guide

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Schools > University of Alabama - Tuscaloosa > Human Development > HDFS 382 > UA - HDFS 382 - HD 382 Exam 2 Study Guide - Study Guide

UA - HDFS 382 - HD 382 Exam 2 Study Guide - Study Guide

School: University of Alabama - Tuscaloosa
Department: Human Development
Course: Parent and Family Devt
Professor: Mary Curtner-Smith
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: HD 382 Exam 2 Study Guide
Description: Exam 2 study guide Modules 4-6
Uploaded: 04/01/2017
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background image Study Guide Exam 2 Module 4: •  Corporal punishment: o  What parents believe about it §   Parents believe it is how you get a child’s attention, how you get a child to listen, it is effective in obtaining child compliance, nothing else works in getting a child to obey, it is sometimes necessary to give a child a good hard spanking, it teaches children right from wrong/respect for authority, children should fear their parents, children who are not spanked are unruly and spoiled, parents who do not spank their children are too permissive, biblical scripture instructs parents to use corporal punishment as a child training technique, it is impossible to reason with a very young child, and they were spanked and turned out okay so they can spank their child. o  Who uses §   Younger parents, parents with younger children, protestant parents, parents under marital strain or other stress, parents who reside in the south, parents who hold inappropriate expectations for children’s behavior, parents who were spanked more frequently when they were children, parents who believe it is the only thing that works, and parents of boys spank more often than parents of girls. o  Findings from the study: eavesdropping on the family §   Study found that in 15 of the 33 families there were 41 incidents of
corporal punishment. During these incidents mothers were often angry
and impulsive, spanked for minor annoyances, were quick to spank, and spanked much more frequently than self-report data from other studies suggest. During the 6 consecutive evenings, some children were spanked as many as 5 to 10 times. Three children were hit by both mother and father. In 90% of the incidents, parents spanked because their child was noncompliant. In 73% of the incidents, children were repeating the misbehavior within 10 minutes of having received the corporal punishment. o  Findings from studies conducted by the UA parent education and research laboratory §   73% could recall having been hit with an object such as belt, flyswatter, switch, extension cord, and hairbrush. 55% said mother used corporal punishment only in extreme situations. 19% said mother was moderately quick to use corporal punishment. 22% said mother was fairly quick to use corporal punishment. 22% felt slightly angry feelings after punishment. 35.8% felt moderately angry and 26% felt very angry. 45% said they learned not to commit the misbehavior again or to respect parents as authority. 30% learned nothing and 13.43% said they learned something other than what the parents probably intended.
background image •  Parental anger o  Why are some parents angry? §   All parents get angry on occasions. Pressures of life such as busy schedules, being late to a meeting, or forgetting something that is needed for work can make anyone have a short fuse. Adults who are often angry were raised by parents who were often angry. Angry adults often think the only way to get a child to listen is to convey anger. o  The effect of parental anger on children §   Children, especially young children, become very frightened by parental anger. Children depend on parents for love, security, food, safety, shelter and anger threatens a child’s sense of security. It can raise children’s cortisol, which can alter children’s brain development so that they become hyper reactive to stress. Some children are so overwhelmed by parental anger that they withdraw. It may appear that the child is unaffected but the withdrawal is simply the child’s way of coping with the stress of an angry parent. Verbal abuse may damage the child’s sense of self-worth. Anger conveys the message to a child that they are unworthy. o  What can parents do to control their anger §   They can commit to no screaming, no hitting, no swearing, no calling their child names, and no dolling out punishment when angry. They can stop making hostile attributions about children. They can set limits before getting angry. Make a list of acceptable ways to handle anger. Never act when angry. Try to use positive discipline techniques and praise children when they behave appropriately. •  Discipline versus punishment o  Definition of each §   Discipline encourages children to internalize standards for behavior and teaches children why the misbehavior is wrong and what they could do differently the next time. It is positive guidance. §   Punishment focuses on stopping misbehavior but fails to teach positive behavior. It induces anxiety or arousal in child which may interfere with child’s ability to learn from the punishment. o  Reciprocal discipline §   Discipline that relates to the misbehavior. It “fits the crime”. Involves
making restitution for the misbehavior, making the situation right.
o  Expiatory punishment §   Punishment that is unrelated to the misbehavior. •  Alternatives to corporal punishment o  4 pluses and a wish §   A strategy for motivating children’s compliance. Plus 1: Smile, the parent approaches the child with a smiling face. Plus 2: relaxed body language and friendly voice; parents should be certain that their voice tone, facial expression, and body language convey friendliness toward the child. Plus 3: say the child’s name; for the child, hearing the parent say his or her
background image name in a friendly voice is affirming. Plus 4: pay a compliment ot the child; perhaps comment on what the child is doing. The wish: only after providing four pluses for the child, does the parent make the request (The Wish). o  4 goals of misbehavior §   Attention- if the parent’s typical response to a child’s misbehavior is to provide attention, then attention is probably the underlying goal. §   Power- if the parent usually becomes angry and loses control, then the underlying goal of the child is most likely to engage the parent in a power struggle to gain or regain power. §   Revenge- if a parent feels hurt by a child’s words or actions, the parent’s reaction reflects an attempt by the child to seek revenge §   A display of inadequacy- when a parent sees the child as generally unmotivated, the child is probably expressing a belief that efforts will not be noticed, appreciated, or rewarded. o  Effective parent-child communication (problem ownership, active listening, I- messages, conflict negotiation) §   Problem ownership: to establish who owns the problem, one needs to determine who si distressed by the situation. If the child is troubled by events that have occurred or are occurring in a relationship, the child owns the problem. When the child has the problem, it is appropriate for the parent to use active listening to respond to the child’s feelings. When the behaviors of the child are bothersome to the parent, then the parent owns the problem. In that situation, the most effective technique to use for communicating the parent’s feelings to the child is a 3 part I-message. Active listening: the parent listens to and reflects the feelings of the child and the content of the child’s message. I-messages: when the parent owns the problem, an I-message is used to express the parent’s feelings regarding the child’s behavior. I-messages are not blamefule. They have three parts: the feelings of the sender, the unacceptable behavior of the recipient, and the tangible effect of the recipient’s behavior on the sender. Conflict negotiation: parents need effective negotiation skills to manage conflict in such a way as to maintain an appropriate level of parental authority and support children’s individual needs. •  Watch the video, ABC 20/20 John Stossel’s Report: “A Lesson They Will Never Forget.”
•  Watch the video, Super Nanny Confronts Angry Parents
•  Watch the video, “Positive Discipline of Young Children”
  Module 5: •  Optimizing the chances of having a healthy baby o  Avoid teratogens during pregnancy. Teratogens are factors that can cause prenatal harm such as viruses, drugs, chemicals, stressors, environmental hazards, and much more. Nicotine is the most common teratogen exposure. •  Nutrition and prenatal care

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School: University of Alabama - Tuscaloosa
Department: Human Development
Course: Parent and Family Devt
Professor: Mary Curtner-Smith
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: HD 382 Exam 2 Study Guide
Description: Exam 2 study guide Modules 4-6
Uploaded: 04/01/2017
8 Pages 162 Views 129 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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