×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to GSU - BIOLO 4451 - Study Guide - Final
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to GSU - BIOLO 4451 - Study Guide - Final

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

GSU / OTHER / Biology 4451 / What is Thermal Pollution?

What is Thermal Pollution?

What is Thermal Pollution?

Description

FINAL REVIEW STUDY GUIDE


What is Thermal Pollution?



Total use associated with these three categories in the U.S

­ 70% for herbicides (top of the list)

­ 20% for insecticides (greatest use) 

­ 10% for fungicides

Pesticide Properties Affecting Movement: Mobility

• KD ratio for a pesticide is not constant from one soil to another • Variance in KD is associated with many soil properties:

o Soil pH

o Particle size distribution of the soil

o How much clay is present because it has the tendency to grab hold of these things due to its charge

o Soil organic matter content is critical

***Of these perimeters of the soil organic matter content, it will probably be  the most affordable***

Pesticide Properties Affecting Movement: Persistence

• Different processes are responsible for the dissipation of pesticides in  soil

­ Volatilization

­ Photolysis


What is Water with a neutral or basic pH?



Don't forget about the age old question of ingranation

­ Hydrolysis

­ Biological degradation

­ Oxidation

∙ Each Process is affected by soil properties and environmental factors ­ pH

­ Temperature

­ Moisture

­ Soil variability

Pesticide Properties Affecting Movement

• Pesticide Persistence in Soil

­ Persistence has been described simply by “half­life” of the compound­­­­ misleading concept

∙ Pesticides do not exhibit true exponential decay

Pesticides: Chemical Classification

• Chlorinated organics

­ Ex: DDT and its metabolites DDD and DDE

o Dichloro­diphenyl­trichloroethane

­ Persistent

­ Resistant to biodegradation

­ Long “half­life”

­ Bioaccumulate; since they seem to bioaccumulate, they tend to  biomagnified

­ Not toxic to humans

­ Caused cancer in laboratory animals

• Organophosphates


What is Water with an acidic pH?



­ Ex: Parathion and related compounds are highly and acutely toxic to humans than organics chlorinated

 Responsible for the majority of pesticide poisonings throughout the world  Biodegradable and non­persistent

 Preferred for shorter “half­life”

 Do not bioaccumulate; don’t biomagnified

• Carbamates

o Similar mode of action as organophosphates

o Biodegradable and non­persistent

o Do not bioaccumulate

o They tend not to be as toxic as the organophosphates

• Pyrethroids Don't forget about the age old question of meat softener cadmium

o Synthetic derivative of the natural pyrethrin esters obtained from  Chrysanthemum flowers

o Safe to use around households

o Highly toxic to fish

Pesticides: Malaria Control

• DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)

o We no longer used DDT in the United States

­ Chlorinated organic

• Malathion

­ Organic phosphate

• Issue with Pesticide resistance

­ Sri Lanka

Pesticides: Mode of Action

• Organophosphates and carbamates

­ Inhibit cholinesterase

• Pyrethroids

­ Sodium channel primary target site

• Chlorinated organics

­ Nervous system primary target site

Acceleration of metabolic reactions

∙ Q10  Law

∙ With every 10 degree, centigrade rises in temperature, there is a  doubling of metabolic or respiration rate till organisms were dead.  ∙ Heat has a direct and indirect effects on biological populations but it  also has an impact on abiotic (non­living)

­ Disrupts and changes the chemistry of the abiotic (non­living) environment.

Thermal Pollution

• Major ways heat can affect aquatic ecosystems:

o Gases dissolve more readily in cold water than in warm water; as the temperature  increase in the water, that means the amount of dissolve oxygen that is in that water is  going to decrease. 

o Higher temperatures accelerate metabolism and decomposition; depletion in dissolved  oxygen because it takes oxygen to carry out the decomposition

o Stratification can occur when hot water is discharged into a cooler body of water; if you  have a system that is mixed top to bottom as far as temperature and relatively cold, you  dump hot water on top of it cause stratification on the system. Hot water is less dense  than cold water so as results the hot water will sit on the top. Now you have created an  artificial stratification which is also going to affect the way mixing occurs Don't forget about the age old question of ucr uv

**** BE FAMILIAR WITH THESE THREE POINTS*** • Other Direct Effects:

­ Heat may interfere with normal fish migration and spawning

o Temperature is a major key to spawning and reproduction for many species

Principal ways in which metals are introduced to aquatic systems:

 Weathering of soils and rocks; natural leaching that occurs with rainfall  Volcanic eruptions

 Human activities; involves strip mining; industrial processes particularly heavy  industries.

Behavior of Metals in Water

• Water with a neutral or basic pH

­ If metals contamination occurs in surface water then the metals will adsorb rapidly  to particulate matter or assimilated (taken up) by living organisms

­ Lakes or water where we do not have the buffer capacity or maybe subject to acid  rain, where the pH of the water is lower than normal

• Water with an acidic pH

­ Metals dissolve in the water

­ Do not readily adsorb Don't forget about the age old question of biol 339 textbook notes

­ Where the problem lies is when you are doing metal analysis of water which involves  sediments and utilizing fish tissues; it gives some indication of metals in the water ­ If the water is acidic then we can get a missing leading concentration, because if the  metals remain dissolve primarily in the water not in the fish tissue because it not taken up by the particles, it’s not precipitated out in the sediments so the greater concentrations  will be in the water which is often not analyze for metals because it takes so much of it to able to get to that concentration that is detected Don't forget about the age old question of fuzzy monkey technologies, inc., purchased as a long-term investment $80 million of 8% bonds, dated january 1, on january 1, 2018. management has the positive intent and ability to hold the bonds until maturity. for bonds of similar risk and maturity the
If you want to learn more check out bios 1107

­ The pH of the water can affect the behavior of the metals

Mercury is associated with the consumption of tuna

Calcium and Magnesium are the cations responsible for water  hardness 

Fluoride

Important Issues:

∙ The addition of fluoride in our drinking water is to prevent dental carries among  children

∙ Add the fluoride and have it during the tooth or teeth­forming year; less than 8 years old

∙ Health issues

∙ You have those that are anti­fluoride and those that are pro­fluoride and both are  in the Dental Association

∙ If you’re dealing with concentration of .7 to 1.2 milligrams per liter, that  concentration is beneficial

∙ Anti­cariogenic (prevention of tooth decay amongst children)

∙ Above this range >1.2mg/L, you have issue such as mottled (brown­spot on teeth) from individuals who lives in areas where fluoride concentration is high,  preferably groundwater. At higher level, there’s a chance of skeletal fluorosis,  which is high level of fluoride thus resulting individuals to have this disease  where you have bones that are poison by these high concentrations of fluoride.

Toxicology of Mercury

Depends on the chemical form of Hg

Inorganic form

­ Including metallic mercury such as Hg used in thermometers and various salts of mercury Note: At room temperature, metallic Hg may occur either as a gas (vapor) or as a liquid Organic form

• Example: Methyl Hg

o Most common and most dangerous

o Major effect is CNS

o Minamata Bay Japan

Toxicology of Cadmium

• Of major concern with Cd poisoning is the fact that ingested Cd has a “half­life” of  about 16­33 years in human body. Compared to mercury which is about 70 days for a half life. 

There was plastic factory that was releasing both inorganic and organic forms of  mercury into the water. This was in a creek or stream that led to Minamata Bay. When the 

mercury in the discharge came out as mercury, got into the sediments and then under  anaerobic conditions, it transformed the metallic mercury to metal mercury which was  then taken up to the food chain by the algae or phytoplankton which was then taken up by  small fish and then consumed by the bigger fish. It got into the food chain and as a result,  there was a contaminated bay with mercury. The first incident occurred with the cats that  lived along the shoreline would eat the fish, after a while the cats would start to do 

summersault and jump into the water. As a result, death and mental retardation occurs for individuals who consumed these fish. 

The other issue which was in the inorganic forms was back in 1700s in France, where they  used these forms of Mercury to make hats. Consumed through the breathing and intake  through the skin which then resulted in Mad Hatter Syndrome.

Water Hardness

­ When water shorten the life of appliances that must have water in them like a coffee pot;  shorten the life of a hot water tank because you have the formation of scale. When these  scales fill up hot water tanks, its referred to as lime­scales.

­ Problem where you may have water hardness is areas that have a lot of limestone

Composition of oil

• Crude oil­ major hydrocarbons; alkanes play a key role of the crude oil (straight chain);  cycloalkanes, very like the alkanes except we have a chain joined into rings; aromatics:  compounds that contain one or more benzene rings. 

• Refined Oil; contains something that the crude doesn’t. It contains olefins found in  refined oil, NOT FOUND IN CRUDE, example is ethynylene, cyclohexenes. API(American  Petrolueum Institute) has its own finger prints for all the crude oil so whenever there is an oil  spill, they know where the oil originated from; Track its components.

Major spill from a tanker: We have formation of this surface slick; it would float in the water  (immiscible), once it enters the water depends on the properties of that particular oil  (environmental factors, temperature, wind, wave action and currents that are present); Depending upon the temperature and so forth, this slick is going to move and typically it will move at a rate  of 2 to 4% of the wind’s speed.

Key Factor: When the oil is on the water, the weathering process beings, most important  weathering process is evaporation. Evaporation is the most important modified factor in the  weathering process. A lot of the volatile go into the atmosphere, as the oil beings to evaporate  what happens to the density? The density increases thus the oil begins to sink. The location of the oil spill is critical to what the impact is going to be. Once the oil begins to sink, it’s going to mix  with sediments and form what is called a chocolate mousse. Oil and water in sediments in  motion. The mousse is form from solutions. The chocolate mousse is the precursor to that tar bar. An incident that occurred (major oil production: ixtoc) and compares itself with buzzer bay (the  environment devastation was much greater here because there wasn’t enough opportunity for the  oil to be weathered 

Cleanup

o Offloading: pumping of oil from another vessel

o Burning

o Chemical Dispersal; oil is broken up into droplets or be disperse

o Mechanical containment and Cleanup; collection boobs

o Sinking (is not recommended by the EPA)

o Bioremediation

Alpha particles

 Positive charged particle emitted during decay of certain radioactive elements  Least penetrating of the three common forms of ionizing radiation (alpha, beta,  gamma)

 Greatest threat to health when particles such as plutonium, radium or radon are  inhaled, ingested with food or water

 Can cause intense damage within a localized area

 Positively charged particles

Beta particles 

o A negatively charged particle

o Easily stopped by a thin sheet of metal or a piece of wood

o Exposure to high levels of beta radiation can cause skin burns

o Several beta­emitters (strontium­ 90, iodine­131) are chemically like naturally  occurring bodily constituents 

o Internal emitters, they emit radiation once inside the body; both can cause those  damages

***Beta particles is most harmful if it’s internal***

Radiation and Nuclear Power Generation (Nuclear Fuel Cycle)

∙ Mining: There was an increase in cancer incident among uranium workers that  smoke and work in the uranium mining versus those that didn’t smoke.

∙ Milling: Produce in the beginning of the milling process; With the process of  mining and milling, there is greater exposure to ionized radiation due to waste  piles; can be air­borne and contaminate 

∙ Enrichment: We want U­235, most of the uranium that comes from the ground is 238. U­fluoride, that will allow the 235 to pass through and the U­238 is held  back. Buildup of 235. When take out of the ground, we are looking at .7% U­235;  bulk of it is U­238. We must get it to about 2­4%, purpose of the gas going  through the ceramic filter (standard for commercial usage); For military 

production, the percentage of U­235 would have to be greater than 90%. U­235 is  what maintains the chain reaction in the nuclear reactor; heat the rods and heat the water and create the steam

∙ Fuel Fabrication: Once we have remove the U­235 from the U­238, we now  have depleted uranium (DU); doesn’t have the radioactivity but very dense; used  for shielding and armor piercing projectile. One of the issue was the depleted  uranium and issue of adverse health effects. Uranium dioxide UO2, loaded into  the fuel rod and go to the nuclear power plant. Lower into the reactor core  surrounded by water. Main concern: is a major nuclear accident and if it occurs,  the core meltdown occurs if the coolant which is the water leaks out, then rods  over heats and you have a meltdown of the reactor. Loss of coolant accident.  ∙ Power Production: 

∙ Reprocessing: spent fuel rods, you now have buildup in the fuel rods, waste  products, buildup of plutonium, greater than 92 atomic number, rods get remove  from the reactor. Store in swimming pools that are adjacent to the plant. Heat that  is being produced is cesium 137 and strontium 90. Has taken place in France and  the UK

∙ Waste Disposal: high and low level waste. 1982 nuclear waste policy;  department of energy, maintains or regulate the waste; responsible for locating a  site for disposal, and operating the site once it was built. First place was 

somewhere in Nevada; commercial waste. This was the place to be stored; a lot of opposition by the people of Nevada.

Trans­uranic elements are the chemical elements with atomic numbers  greater than 92%; no commercial waste. They are unstable and decay  radioactively into other elements

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) (military); located near Carl Bath, New  Mexico. A lot of the waste is transuranic wastes (greater than 92). No  commercial waste.

Acid Rain 

∙ Refers to the precipitation of acidic compounds formed when  components of air pollution (e.g., SO2 and NOx) interact with other  components in the air such as water, oxygen, and oxidants

∙ Emissions of SO2 and NOx are produced by installations such as  electric utility plants

∙ Sulfuric (SO3)

∙ SO2 is omitted during combustion; when its release in the atmosphere, it reacts photochemically with ozone to produce sulfur tri. SO3 then  reacts in water into water droplets thus producing 

∙ Sulfuric is produced not omitted. Nitrous oxide reacts with the ozone,  after it reacts, we have formation of NO2, NO2 dissolve with water to  produce nitric acid.

∙ Factors that impact: amount of acid concentration within a given areas that fall; given waster shed, path of material take; is it runoff or flows  through the soil and how it can be buffer; characteristics of the soil,  buffering capacity; rate in which buffer is release to the soil. Areas of  the US that is susceptible

Eastern U.S not in the western; typically, soil is impacted because the soil is shallow and not enough buffering capacity. 

Acid Mine Drainage

∙ Coal waste piles or refuse banks

­ Water, air, and iron pyrite come together 

∙ Chemical and biological process

∙ Additional reactions add to problem

∙ Regional problem: Areas where the most devastations has occurred is  Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and neighboring coast states. These particular  states in the past has been impacted the most until they implemented  regulations.

Ferrous sulfide dissolves in water  oxygen in water begins to oxidize both sulfide and ferrous  ions  conversion of sulfide ion to sulfate ion  conversion of ferrous ion to ferric ion.  Biological process is called thiobacillus trioxidanes (bacteria), it’s a chemosynthetic that  accelerate the process. Oxygen is depleted rapidly; Normal aquatic life is threatened and stress.

The next step in all of this is…. The ferric ion that has been form, combines with the hydroxyl  ions in the water thus a formation of yellow­brown precipitate which is (ferric hydroxide) and  sometimes referred to as (yellow­boy). This precipitate down to the bottom, whatever organisms 

that were at the bottom have now been disrupted. The next step is the precipitation of the ferric  hydroxide (yellow­boy) which leaves excess hydrogen ions in the water because of the  combinations of hydroxyl ions. We have an excess of hydrogen and excess of sulfate. This is  equivalent to adding H2SO4 to the water.

Effects on Aquatic Ecosystems/ Watershed

∙ Normal rain is slightly acidic; below 7, carbon dioxide mix with the water ∙ Be mindful that sulfuric acid

∙ Factors that impact susceptibility

∙ Areas of U.S most susceptible; areas that are impacted by acid rain, aluminum is  tied up in the soil and you have a lot of acid rain falling, eventually it will be  release and can kill off due to aluminum poisoning. When there’s a decrease in  surface water, because the pH dropping, indirect effect on reproduction. Typically kills the eggs thus reproduction is halted. Below 6 or 6.2, that is typically when  we will see the release of aluminum ions.

The vadose zone also known as the unsaturated zone, the area between the surface and the  aquifers; region above the groundwater. The phreatic zone, or zone of saturation is the area in  an aquifer, below the water table, in which relatively all pores and fractures are saturated with  water. The phreatic zone defines the lower edge of the vadose zone.

Cone of depression occurs in an aquifer when groundwater is pumped from a well. In an  unconfined aquifer (water table), this is an actual depression of the water levels. Unconfined  aquifers (artesian), the cone of depression is a reduction in the pressure head surrounding the  pumped well. As the rate of withdrawal increases, the cone of depression increases.

Overdrafting is the process of extracting groundwater beyond the safe yield or equilibrium yield of the aquifer. 

Vadose zone; underground environment; one or more aquifers. All three have different  characteristics; areas between the surface and the aquifers; normally its unsaturated. It can  contain saturated or near saturated portions; after rainfall or irrigation is one area. Perched zone;  we have a bed of clays that holds pockets of. Region above groundwater and the groundwater  starts as a water table. Chemicals that are used or stop near the surface; acts as a filter; stop  chemicals from passing through the vadose; also stop microbes, chemicals and serve as an area  for recharge. Those are confined aquifers.  Look at the water table as a moving table; comes up  and down. Having a free surface. The unconfined aquifer allows it the water table to flow. Semi confined aquifer is sandwich. Impermeable layers. Aquitard allow some flow to occur back and  forth. Known the difference between an aquifer… confined layer and essential impermeable  layers. Aquitard is permeable to let water transmitted water

Neither has a free lowering water table. They are typically recharge in outcrop. Piezometric surface basically character a pressure some in the confined aquifer

Outcrop could be miles but are in the areas where water was travel downward to perculate the  aquifer

The lowering of the water table is known as drawdown and may amount to many tens of  feet. Looking at the base of cone of depression versus the top. It’s affected by rate of  withdrawal.

Drawdown: The drawdown in a well is the difference between the pumping water level and the  static (non­pumping) water level. Drawdown begins when the pump is turned on and increases  until the well reaches "steady state" sometime later. Therefore, drawdown measurements are 

usually reported along with the amount of time that has elapsed since pumping began. For  example, "The drawdown was 10 feet, 1 hour after pumping began."

Drawdown cone: The depression in the water table near the well that is caused by pumping is  called the "drawdown cone" or sometimes the "cone of depression". When the well is  pumping, water levels are drawn down most near the well and the amount of drawdown  decreases as the distance from the well increases. At some distance from the well at any given  time there is a point at which the pumping does not change the water table and the drawdown is  zero.

Theory: Wastes are carefully contained to prevent cross­mixing of reactive substances. Fill in  capped with impervious clay to prevent infiltration and percolation of water through the fill. Fill  bottom is lined and provided with a drainage system to contain and remove any leakage or  leachate that occurs. Monitoring nearby wells provide a final check.

Practice

∙ Burrowing animals make holes in clay cap

∙ Freezing temperatures shrink and tear liner

∙ Error in storage allows reactive chemicals to mix, triggering an explosion ∙ Chemicals corrode collection pipes, preventing effective withdrawal. ∙ Plume of leaking wastes bypasses monitoring well

Different sources of groundwater contamination

1. Sources designed to discharge substances

2. Sources designed to store, treat, and/or dispose of substances 3. Sources designed to retain substances during transport

4. Sources discharging substances as a consequence of other planned activities 5. Sources providing a conduit for contaminated water to enter aquifers 6. Naturally occurring sources whose discharge is created and/ or exacerbated  by human activity

Leachate is water that has percolated through a solid and leached out some of the  constituents.

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act enacted in 1976; became effective in 1980

∙ Defines which wastes are hazardous

∙ Tracks movement of waste through manifest system

∙ Sets performance standards for owners and operators of hazardous waste  facilities

∙ Issues permits only after technical standards met

∙ Help states develop their own programs that cannot be less stringent than  federal programs

∙ Assures that wastes get to suitable disposal facilities

∙ “cradle­to­grave”. This includes the generation, transportation, treatment,  storage, and disposal of hazardous waste.

∙ Current disposal issues

LOVE CANAL

­ Niagara Falls, N.Y

­ Mid­1890s William T. Love

­ 3000 ft. excavation or ditch

­ Bankrupt

­ 30 years later (1920)—hooker/ electrochemical to disposes wastes from its  operations

­ 21,000 tons’ liquid and solid waste into the ditch­­­11 years ­ 1953 sold to Niagara Falls Board of Education­­ $1.00

­ Residential Development Elementary School

­ 1978> over 200 families were evacuated because the leachate from the ditch  was leaking into people homes and yards

­ 1000 families included in Federal Declaration of Health Emergency NIMBY (Not in My Back Yard)

FINAL REVIEW STUDY GUIDE

Total use associated with these three categories in the U.S

­ 70% for herbicides (top of the list)

­ 20% for insecticides (greatest use) 

­ 10% for fungicides

Pesticide Properties Affecting Movement: Mobility

• KD ratio for a pesticide is not constant from one soil to another • Variance in KD is associated with many soil properties:

o Soil pH

o Particle size distribution of the soil

o How much clay is present because it has the tendency to grab hold of these things due to its charge

o Soil organic matter content is critical

***Of these perimeters of the soil organic matter content, it will probably be  the most affordable***

Pesticide Properties Affecting Movement: Persistence

• Different processes are responsible for the dissipation of pesticides in  soil

­ Volatilization

­ Photolysis

­ Hydrolysis

­ Biological degradation

­ Oxidation

∙ Each Process is affected by soil properties and environmental factors ­ pH

­ Temperature

­ Moisture

­ Soil variability

Pesticide Properties Affecting Movement

• Pesticide Persistence in Soil

­ Persistence has been described simply by “half­life” of the compound­­­­ misleading concept

∙ Pesticides do not exhibit true exponential decay

Pesticides: Chemical Classification

• Chlorinated organics

­ Ex: DDT and its metabolites DDD and DDE

o Dichloro­diphenyl­trichloroethane

­ Persistent

­ Resistant to biodegradation

­ Long “half­life”

­ Bioaccumulate; since they seem to bioaccumulate, they tend to  biomagnified

­ Not toxic to humans

­ Caused cancer in laboratory animals

• Organophosphates

­ Ex: Parathion and related compounds are highly and acutely toxic to humans than organics chlorinated

 Responsible for the majority of pesticide poisonings throughout the world  Biodegradable and non­persistent

 Preferred for shorter “half­life”

 Do not bioaccumulate; don’t biomagnified

• Carbamates

o Similar mode of action as organophosphates

o Biodegradable and non­persistent

o Do not bioaccumulate

o They tend not to be as toxic as the organophosphates

• Pyrethroids

o Synthetic derivative of the natural pyrethrin esters obtained from  Chrysanthemum flowers

o Safe to use around households

o Highly toxic to fish

Pesticides: Malaria Control

• DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)

o We no longer used DDT in the United States

­ Chlorinated organic

• Malathion

­ Organic phosphate

• Issue with Pesticide resistance

­ Sri Lanka

Pesticides: Mode of Action

• Organophosphates and carbamates

­ Inhibit cholinesterase

• Pyrethroids

­ Sodium channel primary target site

• Chlorinated organics

­ Nervous system primary target site

Acceleration of metabolic reactions

∙ Q10  Law

∙ With every 10 degree, centigrade rises in temperature, there is a  doubling of metabolic or respiration rate till organisms were dead.  ∙ Heat has a direct and indirect effects on biological populations but it  also has an impact on abiotic (non­living)

­ Disrupts and changes the chemistry of the abiotic (non­living) environment.

Thermal Pollution

• Major ways heat can affect aquatic ecosystems:

o Gases dissolve more readily in cold water than in warm water; as the temperature  increase in the water, that means the amount of dissolve oxygen that is in that water is  going to decrease. 

o Higher temperatures accelerate metabolism and decomposition; depletion in dissolved  oxygen because it takes oxygen to carry out the decomposition

o Stratification can occur when hot water is discharged into a cooler body of water; if you  have a system that is mixed top to bottom as far as temperature and relatively cold, you  dump hot water on top of it cause stratification on the system. Hot water is less dense  than cold water so as results the hot water will sit on the top. Now you have created an  artificial stratification which is also going to affect the way mixing occurs

**** BE FAMILIAR WITH THESE THREE POINTS*** • Other Direct Effects:

­ Heat may interfere with normal fish migration and spawning

o Temperature is a major key to spawning and reproduction for many species

Principal ways in which metals are introduced to aquatic systems:

 Weathering of soils and rocks; natural leaching that occurs with rainfall  Volcanic eruptions

 Human activities; involves strip mining; industrial processes particularly heavy  industries.

Behavior of Metals in Water

• Water with a neutral or basic pH

­ If metals contamination occurs in surface water then the metals will adsorb rapidly  to particulate matter or assimilated (taken up) by living organisms

­ Lakes or water where we do not have the buffer capacity or maybe subject to acid  rain, where the pH of the water is lower than normal

• Water with an acidic pH

­ Metals dissolve in the water

­ Do not readily adsorb

­ Where the problem lies is when you are doing metal analysis of water which involves  sediments and utilizing fish tissues; it gives some indication of metals in the water ­ If the water is acidic then we can get a missing leading concentration, because if the  metals remain dissolve primarily in the water not in the fish tissue because it not taken up by the particles, it’s not precipitated out in the sediments so the greater concentrations  will be in the water which is often not analyze for metals because it takes so much of it to able to get to that concentration that is detected

­ The pH of the water can affect the behavior of the metals

Mercury is associated with the consumption of tuna

Calcium and Magnesium are the cations responsible for water  hardness 

Fluoride

Important Issues:

∙ The addition of fluoride in our drinking water is to prevent dental carries among  children

∙ Add the fluoride and have it during the tooth or teeth­forming year; less than 8 years old

∙ Health issues

∙ You have those that are anti­fluoride and those that are pro­fluoride and both are  in the Dental Association

∙ If you’re dealing with concentration of .7 to 1.2 milligrams per liter, that  concentration is beneficial

∙ Anti­cariogenic (prevention of tooth decay amongst children)

∙ Above this range >1.2mg/L, you have issue such as mottled (brown­spot on teeth) from individuals who lives in areas where fluoride concentration is high,  preferably groundwater. At higher level, there’s a chance of skeletal fluorosis,  which is high level of fluoride thus resulting individuals to have this disease  where you have bones that are poison by these high concentrations of fluoride.

Toxicology of Mercury

Depends on the chemical form of Hg

Inorganic form

­ Including metallic mercury such as Hg used in thermometers and various salts of mercury Note: At room temperature, metallic Hg may occur either as a gas (vapor) or as a liquid Organic form

• Example: Methyl Hg

o Most common and most dangerous

o Major effect is CNS

o Minamata Bay Japan

Toxicology of Cadmium

• Of major concern with Cd poisoning is the fact that ingested Cd has a “half­life” of  about 16­33 years in human body. Compared to mercury which is about 70 days for a half life. 

There was plastic factory that was releasing both inorganic and organic forms of  mercury into the water. This was in a creek or stream that led to Minamata Bay. When the 

mercury in the discharge came out as mercury, got into the sediments and then under  anaerobic conditions, it transformed the metallic mercury to metal mercury which was  then taken up to the food chain by the algae or phytoplankton which was then taken up by  small fish and then consumed by the bigger fish. It got into the food chain and as a result,  there was a contaminated bay with mercury. The first incident occurred with the cats that  lived along the shoreline would eat the fish, after a while the cats would start to do 

summersault and jump into the water. As a result, death and mental retardation occurs for individuals who consumed these fish. 

The other issue which was in the inorganic forms was back in 1700s in France, where they  used these forms of Mercury to make hats. Consumed through the breathing and intake  through the skin which then resulted in Mad Hatter Syndrome.

Water Hardness

­ When water shorten the life of appliances that must have water in them like a coffee pot;  shorten the life of a hot water tank because you have the formation of scale. When these  scales fill up hot water tanks, its referred to as lime­scales.

­ Problem where you may have water hardness is areas that have a lot of limestone

Composition of oil

• Crude oil­ major hydrocarbons; alkanes play a key role of the crude oil (straight chain);  cycloalkanes, very like the alkanes except we have a chain joined into rings; aromatics:  compounds that contain one or more benzene rings. 

• Refined Oil; contains something that the crude doesn’t. It contains olefins found in  refined oil, NOT FOUND IN CRUDE, example is ethynylene, cyclohexenes. API(American  Petrolueum Institute) has its own finger prints for all the crude oil so whenever there is an oil  spill, they know where the oil originated from; Track its components.

Major spill from a tanker: We have formation of this surface slick; it would float in the water  (immiscible), once it enters the water depends on the properties of that particular oil  (environmental factors, temperature, wind, wave action and currents that are present); Depending upon the temperature and so forth, this slick is going to move and typically it will move at a rate  of 2 to 4% of the wind’s speed.

Key Factor: When the oil is on the water, the weathering process beings, most important  weathering process is evaporation. Evaporation is the most important modified factor in the  weathering process. A lot of the volatile go into the atmosphere, as the oil beings to evaporate  what happens to the density? The density increases thus the oil begins to sink. The location of the oil spill is critical to what the impact is going to be. Once the oil begins to sink, it’s going to mix  with sediments and form what is called a chocolate mousse. Oil and water in sediments in  motion. The mousse is form from solutions. The chocolate mousse is the precursor to that tar bar. An incident that occurred (major oil production: ixtoc) and compares itself with buzzer bay (the  environment devastation was much greater here because there wasn’t enough opportunity for the  oil to be weathered 

Cleanup

o Offloading: pumping of oil from another vessel

o Burning

o Chemical Dispersal; oil is broken up into droplets or be disperse

o Mechanical containment and Cleanup; collection boobs

o Sinking (is not recommended by the EPA)

o Bioremediation

Alpha particles

 Positive charged particle emitted during decay of certain radioactive elements  Least penetrating of the three common forms of ionizing radiation (alpha, beta,  gamma)

 Greatest threat to health when particles such as plutonium, radium or radon are  inhaled, ingested with food or water

 Can cause intense damage within a localized area

 Positively charged particles

Beta particles 

o A negatively charged particle

o Easily stopped by a thin sheet of metal or a piece of wood

o Exposure to high levels of beta radiation can cause skin burns

o Several beta­emitters (strontium­ 90, iodine­131) are chemically like naturally  occurring bodily constituents 

o Internal emitters, they emit radiation once inside the body; both can cause those  damages

***Beta particles is most harmful if it’s internal***

Radiation and Nuclear Power Generation (Nuclear Fuel Cycle)

∙ Mining: There was an increase in cancer incident among uranium workers that  smoke and work in the uranium mining versus those that didn’t smoke.

∙ Milling: Produce in the beginning of the milling process; With the process of  mining and milling, there is greater exposure to ionized radiation due to waste  piles; can be air­borne and contaminate 

∙ Enrichment: We want U­235, most of the uranium that comes from the ground is 238. U­fluoride, that will allow the 235 to pass through and the U­238 is held  back. Buildup of 235. When take out of the ground, we are looking at .7% U­235;  bulk of it is U­238. We must get it to about 2­4%, purpose of the gas going  through the ceramic filter (standard for commercial usage); For military 

production, the percentage of U­235 would have to be greater than 90%. U­235 is  what maintains the chain reaction in the nuclear reactor; heat the rods and heat the water and create the steam

∙ Fuel Fabrication: Once we have remove the U­235 from the U­238, we now  have depleted uranium (DU); doesn’t have the radioactivity but very dense; used  for shielding and armor piercing projectile. One of the issue was the depleted  uranium and issue of adverse health effects. Uranium dioxide UO2, loaded into  the fuel rod and go to the nuclear power plant. Lower into the reactor core  surrounded by water. Main concern: is a major nuclear accident and if it occurs,  the core meltdown occurs if the coolant which is the water leaks out, then rods  over heats and you have a meltdown of the reactor. Loss of coolant accident.  ∙ Power Production: 

∙ Reprocessing: spent fuel rods, you now have buildup in the fuel rods, waste  products, buildup of plutonium, greater than 92 atomic number, rods get remove  from the reactor. Store in swimming pools that are adjacent to the plant. Heat that  is being produced is cesium 137 and strontium 90. Has taken place in France and  the UK

∙ Waste Disposal: high and low level waste. 1982 nuclear waste policy;  department of energy, maintains or regulate the waste; responsible for locating a  site for disposal, and operating the site once it was built. First place was 

somewhere in Nevada; commercial waste. This was the place to be stored; a lot of opposition by the people of Nevada.

Trans­uranic elements are the chemical elements with atomic numbers  greater than 92%; no commercial waste. They are unstable and decay  radioactively into other elements

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) (military); located near Carl Bath, New  Mexico. A lot of the waste is transuranic wastes (greater than 92). No  commercial waste.

Acid Rain 

∙ Refers to the precipitation of acidic compounds formed when  components of air pollution (e.g., SO2 and NOx) interact with other  components in the air such as water, oxygen, and oxidants

∙ Emissions of SO2 and NOx are produced by installations such as  electric utility plants

∙ Sulfuric (SO3)

∙ SO2 is omitted during combustion; when its release in the atmosphere, it reacts photochemically with ozone to produce sulfur tri. SO3 then  reacts in water into water droplets thus producing 

∙ Sulfuric is produced not omitted. Nitrous oxide reacts with the ozone,  after it reacts, we have formation of NO2, NO2 dissolve with water to  produce nitric acid.

∙ Factors that impact: amount of acid concentration within a given areas that fall; given waster shed, path of material take; is it runoff or flows  through the soil and how it can be buffer; characteristics of the soil,  buffering capacity; rate in which buffer is release to the soil. Areas of  the US that is susceptible

Eastern U.S not in the western; typically, soil is impacted because the soil is shallow and not enough buffering capacity. 

Acid Mine Drainage

∙ Coal waste piles or refuse banks

­ Water, air, and iron pyrite come together 

∙ Chemical and biological process

∙ Additional reactions add to problem

∙ Regional problem: Areas where the most devastations has occurred is  Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and neighboring coast states. These particular  states in the past has been impacted the most until they implemented  regulations.

Ferrous sulfide dissolves in water  oxygen in water begins to oxidize both sulfide and ferrous  ions  conversion of sulfide ion to sulfate ion  conversion of ferrous ion to ferric ion.  Biological process is called thiobacillus trioxidanes (bacteria), it’s a chemosynthetic that  accelerate the process. Oxygen is depleted rapidly; Normal aquatic life is threatened and stress.

The next step in all of this is…. The ferric ion that has been form, combines with the hydroxyl  ions in the water thus a formation of yellow­brown precipitate which is (ferric hydroxide) and  sometimes referred to as (yellow­boy). This precipitate down to the bottom, whatever organisms 

that were at the bottom have now been disrupted. The next step is the precipitation of the ferric  hydroxide (yellow­boy) which leaves excess hydrogen ions in the water because of the  combinations of hydroxyl ions. We have an excess of hydrogen and excess of sulfate. This is  equivalent to adding H2SO4 to the water.

Effects on Aquatic Ecosystems/ Watershed

∙ Normal rain is slightly acidic; below 7, carbon dioxide mix with the water ∙ Be mindful that sulfuric acid

∙ Factors that impact susceptibility

∙ Areas of U.S most susceptible; areas that are impacted by acid rain, aluminum is  tied up in the soil and you have a lot of acid rain falling, eventually it will be  release and can kill off due to aluminum poisoning. When there’s a decrease in  surface water, because the pH dropping, indirect effect on reproduction. Typically kills the eggs thus reproduction is halted. Below 6 or 6.2, that is typically when  we will see the release of aluminum ions.

The vadose zone also known as the unsaturated zone, the area between the surface and the  aquifers; region above the groundwater. The phreatic zone, or zone of saturation is the area in  an aquifer, below the water table, in which relatively all pores and fractures are saturated with  water. The phreatic zone defines the lower edge of the vadose zone.

Cone of depression occurs in an aquifer when groundwater is pumped from a well. In an  unconfined aquifer (water table), this is an actual depression of the water levels. Unconfined  aquifers (artesian), the cone of depression is a reduction in the pressure head surrounding the  pumped well. As the rate of withdrawal increases, the cone of depression increases.

Overdrafting is the process of extracting groundwater beyond the safe yield or equilibrium yield of the aquifer. 

Vadose zone; underground environment; one or more aquifers. All three have different  characteristics; areas between the surface and the aquifers; normally its unsaturated. It can  contain saturated or near saturated portions; after rainfall or irrigation is one area. Perched zone;  we have a bed of clays that holds pockets of. Region above groundwater and the groundwater  starts as a water table. Chemicals that are used or stop near the surface; acts as a filter; stop  chemicals from passing through the vadose; also stop microbes, chemicals and serve as an area  for recharge. Those are confined aquifers.  Look at the water table as a moving table; comes up  and down. Having a free surface. The unconfined aquifer allows it the water table to flow. Semi confined aquifer is sandwich. Impermeable layers. Aquitard allow some flow to occur back and  forth. Known the difference between an aquifer… confined layer and essential impermeable  layers. Aquitard is permeable to let water transmitted water

Neither has a free lowering water table. They are typically recharge in outcrop. Piezometric surface basically character a pressure some in the confined aquifer

Outcrop could be miles but are in the areas where water was travel downward to perculate the  aquifer

The lowering of the water table is known as drawdown and may amount to many tens of  feet. Looking at the base of cone of depression versus the top. It’s affected by rate of  withdrawal.

Drawdown: The drawdown in a well is the difference between the pumping water level and the  static (non­pumping) water level. Drawdown begins when the pump is turned on and increases  until the well reaches "steady state" sometime later. Therefore, drawdown measurements are 

usually reported along with the amount of time that has elapsed since pumping began. For  example, "The drawdown was 10 feet, 1 hour after pumping began."

Drawdown cone: The depression in the water table near the well that is caused by pumping is  called the "drawdown cone" or sometimes the "cone of depression". When the well is  pumping, water levels are drawn down most near the well and the amount of drawdown  decreases as the distance from the well increases. At some distance from the well at any given  time there is a point at which the pumping does not change the water table and the drawdown is  zero.

Theory: Wastes are carefully contained to prevent cross­mixing of reactive substances. Fill in  capped with impervious clay to prevent infiltration and percolation of water through the fill. Fill  bottom is lined and provided with a drainage system to contain and remove any leakage or  leachate that occurs. Monitoring nearby wells provide a final check.

Practice

∙ Burrowing animals make holes in clay cap

∙ Freezing temperatures shrink and tear liner

∙ Error in storage allows reactive chemicals to mix, triggering an explosion ∙ Chemicals corrode collection pipes, preventing effective withdrawal. ∙ Plume of leaking wastes bypasses monitoring well

Different sources of groundwater contamination

1. Sources designed to discharge substances

2. Sources designed to store, treat, and/or dispose of substances 3. Sources designed to retain substances during transport

4. Sources discharging substances as a consequence of other planned activities 5. Sources providing a conduit for contaminated water to enter aquifers 6. Naturally occurring sources whose discharge is created and/ or exacerbated  by human activity

Leachate is water that has percolated through a solid and leached out some of the  constituents.

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act enacted in 1976; became effective in 1980

∙ Defines which wastes are hazardous

∙ Tracks movement of waste through manifest system

∙ Sets performance standards for owners and operators of hazardous waste  facilities

∙ Issues permits only after technical standards met

∙ Help states develop their own programs that cannot be less stringent than  federal programs

∙ Assures that wastes get to suitable disposal facilities

∙ “cradle­to­grave”. This includes the generation, transportation, treatment,  storage, and disposal of hazardous waste.

∙ Current disposal issues

LOVE CANAL

­ Niagara Falls, N.Y

­ Mid­1890s William T. Love

­ 3000 ft. excavation or ditch

­ Bankrupt

­ 30 years later (1920)—hooker/ electrochemical to disposes wastes from its  operations

­ 21,000 tons’ liquid and solid waste into the ditch­­­11 years ­ 1953 sold to Niagara Falls Board of Education­­ $1.00

­ Residential Development Elementary School

­ 1978> over 200 families were evacuated because the leachate from the ditch  was leaking into people homes and yards

­ 1000 families included in Federal Declaration of Health Emergency NIMBY (Not in My Back Yard)

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here