×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UA - HY 104 - Study Guide - Final
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UA - HY 104 - Study Guide - Final

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UA / History / HY 104 / What happened to public confidence in the federal government and milit

What happened to public confidence in the federal government and milit

What happened to public confidence in the federal government and milit

Description

School: University of Alabama - Tuscaloosa
Department: History
Course: American Civilization Since 1865
Professor: David beito
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: history
Cost: 50
Name: HY 104 Final Exam Study Guide
Description: Contains information about what the test covers, potential picture IDs along with their notes, class lecture notes, and a timeline of events. Everything you need to know for the exam will be in this study guide.
Uploaded: 04/26/2017
68 Pages 7 Views 13 Unlocks
Reviews


HY 104 Final Study Guide


What happened to public confidence in the federal government and military between 1945 and 1990?



 There will be one essay worth 100 points on the test

 There will also be 3 picture IDs worth 30 points (10 each)

 If a word or phrase is underlined, it is an important term

 Page 2: Potential Essay Topics

 Page 3: Potential Picture IDs

 Page 4­6: Picture ID Notes from Class

 Pages 7­30: Class Notes

o Pages 7­8: The Cold War and McCarthyism (03/20/17)

o Pages 9­10: Brown v. Board and Civil Rights in the 1950s (03/22/17) o Pages 11­12: Society and Culture in the 1950s ­ 1960s (03/27/17) o Pages 13­14: Integrationism and Black Power (03/29/17)

o Pages 15­16: Kennedy, the Cold War, and Vietnam (04/03/17) o Pages 17­18: The Vietnam War under Johnson and Nixon (04/05/17 o Pages 19­20: The Great Society, Dissent, and the 1968 Election (04/10/17) o Pages 21­22: Counterculture and Legacies of the 1960s (04/12/17) o Pages 23­24: Nixon, Watergate, and American Cynicism (04/17/17) o Pages 25­26: Malaise in the 1970s (04/19/17)


How did America’s former ally the Soviets become its greatest enemy?



o Pages 27­28: The Reagan Era and World Affairs (04/24/17)

o Pages 29­30: Society and Culture in the 1980s (04/26/17)

 Pages 31­32: Timeline of Events

Potential Essay Topics

(From professor’s study guide)

∙ What happened to public confidence in the federal government and military between 1945 and 1990? Was it consistently high? Low? 

1

Did it oscillate between the two? Make an argument one way or the other, making sure to support your narrative with specific events, wars, and historical figures that inspired  either cynicism or confidence regarding the institutions of authority in the United States  in this period. Use assigned books, films, and lectures to support your argument.  Don't forget about the age old question of What kinds of biological anthropologists are there?

∙ “The lives of African American people, North and South, have improved dramatically  since 1945.” Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Select a  few specific areas—economic achievement, political rights, geographic movement, etc.— and make an argument either for progress or stagnation in the position of blacks between  1945 and the 1990s. Use specific evidence from assigned books, films, and lectures for  support.


How did the Cold War climate help lead the U.S. into Vietnam?



Potential Picture IDs (#1­#14)

(From professor’s study guide)

2

Picture ID Notes from Class Don't forget about the age old question of How do you quantify a statement?

3

1. Sputnik (03/20/17) 

a. October of 1957 

b. Satellite sent into space by Soviet Union during cold war

c. Nikita Khrushchev was the leader of the Soviet Union

d. Set off panic in the United States

2. George McLaurin (03/22/17)

a. University of Oklahoma

b. School of Education, 1948

c. Shows black man sitting alone in classroom full of white people d. Shows need for civil rights movements in the 1940s ­ 1950s 

3. The Domestic Ideal (03/27/17)

a. 1950’s 

b. Shows a housewife very content and happy to be in the kitchen c. This was a main spot for women, where they could cook, clean, and do  laundry

d. Shows an average household kitchen, everything matches and appliances  are new and shiny

e. Does not show the husband/father for he is at work

f. The domestic reality is more of a women trying to cook and take care of  her children­­stressful 

4. Foster Auditorium ­ University of Alabama (03/29/17)

a. June 11, 1963

b. This was a huge day for segregation in the United States

c. Auditorium was a place where people registered for classes, shows George Wallace standing in front of the door to not allow blacks in

d. Paved the way for civil rights legislation 

e. Later that night, John Kennedy spoke up against this stand We also discuss several other topics like What is the Simple Linear Regression Model?

5. CIA Map of Missile Range (04/03/17)

a. Cuban Missile Crisis (Cold War) was confrontation of U.S. and Soviet  Union over missiles in Cuba in 1962

b. President Kennedy had the navy surround the island with missiles and air  support

c. They spend several days sending messages to the Russians

d. Castro and Khrushchev agreed to remove the missiles

e. Appeared as though Kennedy had won unlike in Bay of Pigs

6. Kent State Protest Killings (04/05/17)

a. May 1970

b. Anti war movement protest on campus in Ohio

c. National guardsmen panicked and shot at crowd, killing four Americans d. Shows American distraught with Nixon’s decision to attack communist  forces in Cambodia

7. Moderates (04/10/17)

a. 1960s

b. Moderate Crowd with sign “Vietnam Moratorium

4

c. Anti­war movement, were not radical, wanted peace 

d. They love the country, that’s why they were so angry about what they  chose to do about the war

e. They believed in their country’s system, just that they made a wrong turn  at war

8. Elvis Presley meeting President Nixon (04/12/17)

a. There were many riots in the 1970s for antiwar actions and most rock n’  roll artists supported those riots Don't forget about the age old question of What is the study of change and continuity in behavior and mental states during lifespan?

b. Elvis Presley sent a note to Richard Nixon in 1970 suggestion he could  make a change for the country considering he was not considered an  enemy in the counter culture

c. Nixon hated the counter culture and invited Presley to the White House to  meet him and make plans

9. Nixon’s Resignation (04/17/17)

a. August 1974

b. Watergate ­ 5 men linked to Nixon broke into DNC headquarters in 1972  to help reelect him, later Pentagon papers were leaked to the press so  Nixon hired “The Plumbers” to investigate, those 5 men were apart of  “The Plumbers”, and the people found out he was hiding things

c. Congress proposed to impeach him, so he decided to resign

d. He never would admit he was guilty and had no shame, says he did what  he did for the country’s safety 

10. Gas Shortages (04/19/17)

a. Houston in 1979

b. Shows a man filling up his gas tank

c. For a while there had been many different energy shortages

d. When Carter took office in 1977, there was a gas shortage that he tried to  tackle but was unsuccessful

e. This shows our dependence upon foreign affairs for foreign oil f. This is why politicians suggest green energy not only for the planet but for government and dependency 

11. New Empire of Faith (04/24/17)

a. December 1977 Don't forget about the age old question of What is the mid-ocean ridge?

b. Time Magazine ­ Evangelicals

c. Turning away from sin, supported family values

d. Capitalizes on culture wars

e. Voters wanted evangelicals

12. Fall of the Berlin Wall (04/24/17)

a. November 1989

b. Separates East and West Berlin

c. Reagan and Gorbachev responsible 

13. Homeless Veteran (04/26/17)

a. 1980s

b. Homelessness was spreading in D.C.

5

c. They rioted in front of the White House with signs that said “Welcome to  Reaganville” 

14. Sex and the City (04/26/17)

a. Liberalization of Culture in the 1990s

b. Violence, profanity, and sexual content (nudity) was spreading through the media Don't forget about the age old question of What is the thorndike’s two laws?

c. Since 1960s, shows slowly became more and more vulgar: showed nudity, talked about sex, had gay characters emerge, etc. 

d. The new culture was “killing America’s soul”

6

The Cold War and McCarthyism

(03/20/17)

How did America’s former ally the Soviets become its greatest enemy? How did that  rivalry affect life in the U.S.?

I. Origins of the Cold War

a. The End of World War II

b. Soviet Actions

  i.    Joseph Stalin 

    ii.    The Iron Curtain 

iii. Soviet Expansion 1939­1949 (Cold War I)

    iv.    Soviet Union (USSR) 

v. Marshall Plan aid recipients in 1948 

c. American Actions

i. Harry Truman ­ President from 1945­1953

1. “I believe that it must be the policy of the US to support 

free peoples who are resisting subjugation by armed 

minorities or by outside pressures.” (March 12, 1947)

    2.    Truman Doctrine 

    ii.    Containment ­ trying to contain communism like a disease 

    d.    North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) ­ France, Turkey, Italy, etc.     e.    Warsaw Pact (1955) ­ Soviet Union, Hungary, Poland, etc.

II. Cold War Flashpoints

a. Atomic Weapons

i. The atomic age begins, Nagasaki, Japan in August 1945

ii. Continues in 1954 when hydrogen bombs are created

b. Korean War

i. 1950­1953 

ii. Costly war to U.S.

c. Sputnik

i. Picture ID ­ Sputnik 

1. October ’57 

2. Satellite in space

3. Later put another one in space with a dog

4. Nikita Khrushchev 

5. Set off panic in the United States

ii. Vanguard ­ December 1957

7

iii. Space Race in June 1960

III. Cold War Homefront

    a.    McCarthyism 

i.   Senator Joe McCarthy and Roy Cohn

b. Legacies of McCarthyism

Other Terms:

∙ National Security Council ­ committee in executive branch that advises president  on matters relating to domestic, military, and foreign security

∙ Central Intelligence Agency ­ civilian foreign intelligence to gather, process, and  analyze national security info from around the world

∙ NSC­68 ­ a 58 page top secret policy paper presented to Truman on April 14,  1950

∙ Dwight Eisenhower ­ president from 1953 to 1961

∙ NASA ­ started in 1958, in charge of science in technology for airplanes and  space

∙ National Defense Education Act ­ 1958, providing funding to US education  institutions 

∙ Richard Nixon ­ president from 1969 ­ 1974

∙ Alger Hiss ­ American government official accused of being Soviet spy in 1948 ∙ House un­American Activities Committee ­ 1938 ­ 1975, created to investigate  disloyalty 

∙ Smith Act ­ (1940) made it an offense to advocate violent overthrow of  government

∙ Communist Control Act ­ (1954) communist part of U.S. is conspiracy to  overthrow government

∙ Mickey Spillane ­ American crime novelist 

8

Brown v. Board and Civil Rights in the 1950s

(03/22/17)

Why/how did civil rights come onto the national agenda in the 1950s?

I. Litigation and Backlash

a. Civil Rights in the 1940s

i. Civil rights expansion in 1950s:

1. Cold War publicity

2. Racial relocation to North

3. WWII discredits racism

4. Grass­roots / NAACP activism 

5. Postwar prosperity

6. Supreme Court committed to social justice

ii. Harry Truman ­ president from 1945­1953

1. Brought blacks into democratic party

2. Not key factor in black civil rights

iii. Strom Thurmond, SC

1. States’ Rights Democrat that ran in 1948 

2. Won LA, MISS, ALA, and SC

    iv.    Thurgood Marshall 

1. Young lawyer

2. First black supreme court justice

v. PID 

1. George McLaurin, U. of Oklahoma

2. School of Education, 1948

3. Black man sitting alone in classroom apart from whites

b. Brown v. Board of Education 

i. Educational segregation in US before trial

ii. Required in south, forbidden in north, no legislation in west

    iii.    Chief Justice Earl Warren  

iv. “In the field of public education, the doctrine of ‘separate but 

equal’ has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently 

unequal.” Brown I, 1954

9

v. “Segregated school systems must make a “prompt and reasonable  start toward full compliance” and do so with “all deliberate speed.”

Brown II, 1955

    vi.    Emmett Till  

1. 1955 ­ wanted to see relatives in Mississippi

2. Mom couldn’t sleep till heard he was safe off the train

3. He spoke to woman in store and husband murdered him 

c. Massive Resistance

i. Dwight “Ike” Eisenhower ­ president from 1953 ­ 1961

d. Little Rock

i. Arkansas, 1957

II. Grass Roots Activism

a. Montgomery Bus Boycott

  i.    Rosa Parks 

    b.    Martin Luther King 

i.   Montgomery, Alabama

ii.   Dec. 21, 1956

III.      Race Relations in the North in the 1950s

a.   The Second Great Migration

b.   Northern Segregation 

i.   Different neighborhoods, etc.

ii.   Chicago one of the most segregated

Other Terms:

∙ Fred Vinson ­ American politician and 13th chief justice of supreme court ∙ Southern Manifesto ­ 1956, opposed racial integration of public places ∙ White Citizens’ Councils ­ network of white supremacist organization in south ∙ Autherine Lucy ­ first black student to attend University of Alabama ∙ Gov. Orval Faubus (Arkansas) ­ American democrat who stood against  desegregation 

10

Society and Culture in the 1950s ­ ‘60s

(03/27/17)

Was life in the 1950s really a “golden age”?

IV. The Middle­Class Nation

a. The Baby Boom and “Whiteness”

i. (See picture at bottom of page) ­ Baby Boom and its decline (1940­ 1970)

ii. Median Age at First Marriage (1947­1981)

1. Males were 23 or 25 in 1947, were 22 or 23 in 1961, and 

back up to 24 in 1981

2. Females were 20 in 1947 and 22 in 1981 

Males were usually older than females (key concept)

iii. Whiteness ­ set of privileges set out to certain groups, is not 

referring to color of skin (for example: Irish were not white)

iv. Ethnicity in American in 1950

1. Mostly Euro­Americans  (7/8th) 

2. 1/8th African American

3. Very slim population of Hispanic 

b. Growth of Suburbia and the Sunbelt

i. Levittown, USA

1. William Levitt came up with building houses like building 

cars

2. Shipped out parts, practically built the same but people 

made their own changes to them (customizable) 

3. Still around in 2007, most commonly called exurbs now

11

4. For new homeowners with wife and children, retreats for 

workers and workplaces for their wives

ii. Interstate Highway System (Highway Act ­1956) 

1. Under Eisenhower they were created

2. Made much easier to build settlements if highway was near 

connected to a big city 

3. Cold War measure  place to land our planes (especially in 

west interstates that are very straight) and movement of the 

army because they could shut down interstate and use it 

themselves

iii. 1950 ­ 1960: 18 million Americans move to the suburbs from farm  and city

c. Gender Roles in Families of the 1950s

i. Dr. Benjamin Spock ­ Baby and Child Care

1. Created a less stern approach to child caring

2. Millions of people bought this book instead of giving child 

to grandma

ii. PID ­ The Domestic Ideal (1950’s) 

1. Housewife very content and happy to be in the kitchen

2. Washer/dryer also in kitchen (main spot for women)

3. Average household kitchen ­ everything matches, shiny

4. Husband not there  at work

iii. Domestic reality? ­ Picture of woman trying to cook and take care  of three children (seems stressed)

V. 1950s Culture

a. Television

i. Most all middle class had a TV 

ii. Family sitcoms

1. Mostly showed white middle­class families where dad went

off with briefcase to work and mom in the kitchen

2. Kids were smoking weed and being delinquents but these 

things were never shown 

3. Mostly had very minor problems and gender roles 

standardized

b. Youth Culture

i. 1952 ­ Mr. Potato Head (had to provide actual potato) 

ii. 1947 ­ Slinky

iii. Cool and the Crazy and Rebel Without a Cause ­ movies of the  time for teens 

1. James Dean ­ American actor in Rebel Without a Cause

iv. Elvis Presley ­ parents concerned for effect on young girls minds v. “Beat’ coffeehouse, San Francisco 

vi.   “What held him back all day was the feeling that somewhere there  was something better for him than listening to babies cry and 

12

cheating people in used­car lots and it’s this feeling he tries to 

kill…” ­     John Updike,     Rabbit Run, 1960 

VI. Limits of Middle­Class America

a. Critics of Conformity

b. Racism and Poverty

Other Terms:

∙ Federal Housing Administration (FHA) ­ sets standards for construction, loans,  etc.

∙ The Sunbelt ­ the southern United States from California to Florida ∙ Jack Kerouac ­ American novelist and poet

∙ Richard Yates ­ American fiction writer 

∙ Revolutionary Road (1961) ­ written by Richard Yates

∙ Michael Harrington ­ American democratic socialist and writer  ∙ The Other America (1962) ­ written by Michael Harrington

Integrationism and Black Power

(03/29/17)

What were the victories of the civil rights movement in the 1960s­­and what impact did  they have?

I. Direct Action and Civil Disobedience

a. SCLC, SNCC (“Snick”) and CORE

  i.    Southern Christian Leadership Conference  

    1.    Martin Luther King 

    ii.    Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee 

1. Ella Baker

2. John Lewis

    iii.    Congress of Racial Equality  

1. James Farmer

b. The Sit­Ins of 1960­1961

i. Greensboro, NC in Feb. 1960 ­ African Americans sat at diner 

even though it was not allowed

ii. Sit­in Backlash was where whites would harass them while sitting  but they are trained to ignore it

II. Confrontation Activism

a. Freedom Rides

13

i. Supreme Court decision in 1940s where you couldn’t segregate  interstate travel 

ii. Riding Greyhound buses from Washington, D.C. to New Orleans  iii. Wanted to draw attention and get backlash

iv. Anniston, Alabama in 1961 ­ one bus stopped and beat both white  and black activists up and then burned the bus

b. Voter­Registration, 1962­1964

  i.    Voter Education Project  

1. Happened across 1962­1964

2. Went door to door to register voters

3. Promised money and protection if encountered violence to 

workers

4. Many were harassed and run off the roads

ii. Murder of Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, and Michael  

Schwerner in Mississippi in June of 1964 

c. Birmingham

i. Strictest segregation laws in the country = “bombingham” 

ii. Police Chief Eugene “Bull” Connor 

1. In process of being voted out of his position 

2. Bragged about keeping blacks in their place

iii. May 1963 ­ activists sit in on Birmingham 

iv. PID ­ June 11, 1963

1. Foster Auditorium ­ where people registered for classes

2. George Wallace ­ stands in front of door to block students 

3. Represents showdown of federal government v. state 

government

4. Paved way for civil rights legislation 

5. John Kennedy gives speech against UA’s stand

v. Medgar Evers ­ was shot the night of John Kennedy’s speech and  gave energy towards movement 

vi. De facto v. de jure segregation ­ being segregated in fact (de facto)  but not by law (de jure)

III. The Civil Rights Milestones of 1964­1965

    a.    The Civil Rights Act (1964) 

i. Banned segregation in public accommodations

ii. Banned racial and gender discrimination by employers and unions iii. Promised federal aid to communities with desegregation as a 

condition for receiving the money

    b.    The Voting Rights Act (1965) 

i. Banned the tricks that prevented African Americans from voting ii. Authorized federal oversight of suspicious voting districts

c. Black Voters in the South

i. 1964 ­ 1 million

ii. 1968 ­ 3.1 million

14

d. Legacies of the Acts

e. Limitations of the Acts

IV. Race Riots and Black Power

a. Long Hot Summers in Urban Ghettos

b. Black Power

  i.    Stokely Carmichael  

    ii.    Huey Newton and Bobby Seale ­ Black Panther Party

JFK, the Cold War, and Vietnam

(04/03/17)

How did the Cold War climate help lead the U.S. into Vietnam?

I. The 1960 Presidential Election

a. The Candidates: Kennedy and Nixon

  i.    John Fitzgerald Kennedy  

1. President from 1961 ­ 1963

2. Democrat

3. Catholic

    ii.    Richard M. Nixon 

1. Republican 

b. The “Missile Gap”

i. Kennedy spoke of missile gap as if we were falling behind, so he  came into election looking like the better alternative 

ii. Nixon was in the administration and already knew we were ahead,  but could not speak of it

15

c. JFK’s Narrow Victory

i. TV Debates and Stormy K “How much influence on the election?” II. Kennedy’s Approach to the Cold War

a. JFK’s Inaugural Speech

i. January of 1961

ii. “Ask not what your country can do for you­­ask what you can do  for your country.”

iii. “Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we  shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support 

any friend, oppose any foe, to assure the survival and success of 

liberty.” ­John Kennedy, January 1961

b. The “Can­do” Spirit and Robert McNamara

i. Robert McNamara 

1. Secretary of defense

2. Position at Ford Motor Company

3. Covered in Time Magazine

III. Cold War Flashpoints under Kennedy

a. The Bay of Pigs

  i.    Cuba ­ place to vacation for Americans, lots of ties to America

ii.   Prisoner at Bay of Pigs in April 1961 picture

    iii.    Fidel Castro was at Bay of Pigs

b. Cuban Missile Crisis

i. Nikita Khrushchev ­ leader of Soviet Union during Cold War

ii. PID ­ CIA map of missile range

    1.    Central Intelligence Agency 

2. Kennedy has navy surround island with missiles, air 

support, several days of messages to Russians

3. Castro and Khrushchev agreed to remove missiles

4. Looked as though Kennedy had won unlike in Bay of Pigs

IV. Vietnam

a. The French in Indochina

i. Ho Chi Minh (1890 ­ 1969) ­ living in exile, wanted Vietnam run  by Vietnamese

ii. French want colony back, but Ho Chi Minh launches guerilla war  and French lose after eight years (Vietminh) 

iii. 1954 partition ­ Geneva Conference to restore peace in Indochina  b. American Support for South Vietnam

c. Kennedy and Vietnam

i. Sends advisors to Vietnam to meet with Ngo Dinh Diem (U.S. 

supported leader of South Vietnam in 1950s ­ early 1960s)

ii. Come back saying we are winning the war (Vietcong) 

16

The War under Johnson and Nixon

(04/05/17)

What was the American experience fighting in Vietnam?

I. Lyndon Johnson’s War

a. Contrast/Continuities with JFK Approach

i. Lyndon Johnson takes oath of office on Air Force One in 

November of 1963 after Kennedy’s assassination 

ii. Lyndon Johnson followed in the shadow of Kennedy

iii. Johnson was a complex and extraordinary man

iv. Both believed they needed to contain communism to win in 

Vietnam

b. The Tonkin Gulf Incident and Resolution

17

i. August 2nd in 1964

ii. North Vietnamese motor torpedo boat attacked the U.S.S. Maddox iii. U.S.S. C. Turner Joy - destroyed named for Vice  

Admiral Charles Turner Joy  

iv. Johnson asked Congress to be able to take any necessary attack  and Congress approved

v. War escalates in next year against Vietcong 

vi. Set up airbases in South Vietnam and sent troops to Danang, South Vietnam 

vii. Vietcong tunnels in war, so small, needed “tunnel rats” or smaller  American men 

c. Americanization and Stalemate: 1965­1967

d. The Tet Offensive, 1968

i. January through February 1968

ii. Massive military victory for American side

iii. Major public relations defeat 

iv. My Lai Massacre ­ mass killing of helpless people in South 

Vietnam in 1968 by U.S. 

II. The Draft

a. Demographics of the Soldiers in Vietnam

i. 1964 ­ 1973:

1. 27 million men come of age

2. 3 million go to Vietnam

a. 1/3 drafted

b. 1/3 professionals

c. 1/3 draft­motivated

b. Working­Class Bias

i. Class Composition of 3 million U.S. Soldiers in Vietnam

1. 55% ­ Working class

2. 25% ­ Poor

3. 20% ­ Middle Class

III. Richard Nixon’s War

a. Nixon takes Office

i. January of 1969 

ii. Hated anti­war movement, but wanted to scale the war down 

b. De­Escalation: Vietnamization 

c. Escalation: Cambodia 

i. The communist forces set up sanctuaries in neutral Cambodia even though they were not allowed to

ii. U.S. attacks and kills several Cambodian people 

iii. Nixon announces Cambodia invasion in April 1970

iv. Soldiers looked for “base” while American people were very angry v. PID

18

    1.    Kent State  

2.   May 1970 

3.   Anti war movement protest on campus in Ohio

4.   National guardsmen got panicked and shot at crowd, killed 

four Americans 

5.   Shows American distraught at Nixon’s actions 

d. The End of the War

i. Hanoi 

1. Capital of North Vietnam

2. Where American soldiers were held

ii. April 1975 ­ unified country under communism so war was 

ultimately lost 

e. North Vietnam

i. North Vietnamese Army (NVA), and Vietcong (southern 

insurgents; political leadership was the National Liberation Front, 

or NLF)

f. South Vietnam

i. The Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN), and the United  States

The Great Society, Dissent, and the 1968 Election

(04/10/17)

Why are the 1960s known as the “turbulent” decade?

I. The Great Society

a. Johnson’s Liberalism

i. He wanted to move the country upward to the Great Society

ii. Believed nation should put an end to poverty and racial injustice 19

b. The War on Poverty

i. The Other America ­ book about poverty in the U.S.

ii. Programs (1964­1966) federal spending on:

1. Educational programs (Head Start, Upward Bound) 

2. Inner city improvements in education, housing, 

employment (Model Cities) 

3. Scholarships for poor college students

4. Aid to Families with Dependent Children (welfare)

5. Job training

6. Food Stamps

7. Federal Medical Care Programs (1965)

a. Medicare ­ for the elderly

b. Medicaid ­ for the poor

c. Impact

II. 1960s Dissent and Activism

    a.    The New Left 

  i.    Tom Hayden ­ founded it

    ii.    Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) ­ 100,000

iii.   Saw war in Vietnam as imperialism

iv.   Bernadine Dohrn (1968) ­ high in SDS

b. Moderates

i. Moderate protesters

1. Were not radical

2. Believed in system of country but took wrong turn at war

3. Wanted peace

ii. PID 

1. Crowd with sign “Vietnam Moratorium” 

2. Anti war movement

3. They love the country, that’s why they were so angry about

what they chose to do about the war 

c. Conservatives

i. Young Americans for Freedom (YAF) 1967

1. A million members

2. “If you can’t be with them, be for them! Support our boys 

in Vietnam!”

ii. Barry Goldwater ­ “My aim is not to pass laws but to repeal them.” 1. Ran as Republican in 1964 Election and lost terribly, 

Johnson won

III. 1968 Election

a. The Democratic Nomination Process

  i.    Eugene McCarthy 

    ii.    Hubert Humphrey 

    iii.    Robert F. Kennedy 

20

iv.   Chicago 1968 ­ Outside the Democratic National Convention there was chaos 

b. Republican: Richard Nixon 

c. Independent: George Wallace 

Counterculture and Legacies of the 1960s

(04/12/17)

Why are the 1960s known as the “turbulent” decade? (Part II)

21

I. The Counterculture

i. Bob Dylan ­ The Time They Are A­Changin’ 

1. Come you masters of war, You that build all the guns, You 

that build the death planes, You that build the big bombs, 

You that hide behind walls, You that hide behind desks, I 

just want you to know, I can see through your masks         

 ­“Masters of War,” Bob Dylan, 1963

ii. Joan Baez ­ American folk singer and activist 

iii. Hippie Culture 

1. In Time Magazine

2. Merry Pranksters ­ huge group of hippies that rode around 

on a bus blasting music and smoking marijuana 

3. Statistically made up tiny portion of the country 

b. Sex

i. Challenges to sex before marriage

ii. Time Magazine in July 1969

1. “The Sex Explosion”

2. Pre­marital sex was become more widespread

iii. Birth Control pill in 1960

iv. Pregnancies and STDs became more common and known

c. Drugs

i. Marijuana much more prevalent during these times but was present before 

ii. Timothy Leary ­ psychology professor at Harvard who pushed the  use of acid and LSD / “Turn on, Tune In, Drop Out”

d. And Rock ‘n’ Roll

i. The Byrds ­ Eight Miles High 

ii. The Beatles  

iii. Both huge figures in drug culture

II. The Intersection of Culture and Politics

i. Varieties of antiwar protest 

    b.    John Lennon  

i.   Summer 1971, Beatles broken up

ii.   Big political figure in the culture

iii.   Meeting with people to plan antiwar tour when Nixon was running  for reelection 

iv.   Storm Thurmond suggested deporting John Lennon to White 

House and said it would be a “strategy counter­measure”

v.   They took counterculture to government very seriously 

    c.    Elvis Presley 

i.   Sent a note to President Richard Nixon in 1970 to try and help 

country out because he was not considered an enemy in hippie 

culture

ii. PID ­ Elvis meeting Nixon and shaking hands

22

1. Nixon hated counter culture

III. Legacies of the 1960s

    a.    Ronald Reagan  

b.   Liberals became a dirty word ­ called themselves progressives

Nixon, Watergate, and American Cynicism

(04/17/17)

23

How should we assess the Nixon presidency?

I. The Nixon Presidency

a. Foreign Policy and Détente

i. Richard Nixon was more concerned with foreign policy than 

domestic policy

    ii.    Henry Kissinger 

1. National security advisor

2. Took on a moderate view on war with Nixon

iii. Other parts of the world other than U.S. and Russia were gaining  more power

1. Middle East gained power from U.S. oil needs

2. Japan and China

3. Nixon and Kissinger had to be careful with foreign affairs

iv. Nixon Doctrine

1. Response to U.S. shrinkage of power in the world

2. Decided to aid countries as long as they do the dirty work

v. Détente ­ using diplomacy to keep communism at a halt without  war

1. Mao Zedong ­ Chinese communist leader

2. “We are using the Chinese thaw to get the Russians shook”

3. Nixon met with Zedong in Feb. of 1972 and Soviet Union

vi. Terrorists

1. Munich Olympics, 1972 

2. Terrorist capture Israeli athletes and hold them hostage then

murder them

vii. Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) ­ 

petroleum prices raised to show disapproval of Israeli support 

b. Domestic Policy ­ Liberal or Conservative?

i. Nixon represented old centrist republic party (more moderate)

ii. Supported affirmative action

iii. Nixon required businesses to lessen amount of minority’s jobs and  women’s jobs

iv. Arts and education programs budget doubled

v. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ­ proposed a guaranteed  minimum income for all Americans but didn’t happen

vi. Nixon hated anti­war movements and did lots to disrupt the 

movement 

II. Watergate and American Cynicism

a. Dirty Tricks and the Pentagon Papers

  i.    CREEP (Committee to Re­elect the President) 

ii. The Watergate ­ 5 men arrested for breaking into DNC 

headquarters in June of 1972

24

iii. Nixon won in landslide victory (reelected)

iv. 5 men broke in to help reelect president

v. Daniel Ellsberg ­ leaks Pentagon Papers to the press

1. Shows truth about Vietnam

2. Shows Johnson’s lies

3. Nixon created “The Plumbers” to investigate

b. The Cover­Up

i. Nixon’s mistake was covering up the break­ins

1. 5 guys who broke in were apart of “the plumbers”

2. Address book connected them to Nixon

ii. Nixon issued “hush money”

c. The Investigation

i. Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward were reporters who found the  links between the men

ii. Police forced Nixon to release the tapes

iii. 18 minute gap of erased evidence

iv. Revealed that Nixon told CIA to stop FBI investigation d. Nixon’s Resignation

i. Congress proposes impeachment

ii. PID

1. Nixon’s Resignation

a. August 1974

b. Nixon never admitted he was guilty or had shame

c. “I’m not a crook”

d. Says what he did was for the country’s safety

e. Legacies 

i. Time Magazine ­ “Can trust be restored” 

ii. Americans distrusted the government

iii. 1971 ­ thieves break into FBI and release info that government had been spying on citizens for decades

iv. Theory that government killed JFK, MLK, and others 

25

Malaise in the 1970s

(04/19/17)

What happened to social movements in the 1970s? And why is that decade known for its  “malaise”?

I. Activism and Backlash in the 1970s

    a.    Cultural Nationalism 

i. Rally for black studies program at University of Wisconsin in Feb.  of 1969

ii. Kwanzaa ­ festival observed by blacks from Dec 26 ­ Jan 1 as 

cultural celebration 

iii. Mexican­American Activism at University of New Mexico 

(Chicano Pride) 

iv. Cesar Chavez ­ American civil rights activist who co­founded 

National Farm Workers Association in 1962

v. Red Power ­ Native Americans fought to get back land

vi. Occupation of Alcatraz Island, California from 1969 ­ 1971

b. Second­Wave Feminism

i. Betty Friedan, 1963 

1. Wrote The Feminine Mystique 

2. Feminist and wife and mother

    ii.    National Organization for Women (NOW) 

1. Pushed for equal pay

c. Achievements of the Women’s Movement

i. 1976 ­ Time Magazine published magazine with “Women of the  Year”

ii. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) ­ says that  women cannot be discriminated against in the workforce

iii. Congress passed Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) that says quality of rights under law shouldn’t be changed by gender

iv. Title IX of the Higher Education Act (1972) ­ couldn’t 

discriminate genders in universities 

d. Anti­Feminist Backlash

i. Saw this as an attack on their values since being a housewife was  fulfilling to them

ii. Phyllis Schlafly and “Stop Era” 

1. Believed men and women are not the same and should not 

be treated the same

2. Believed women deserved more rights with their children

3. Believed would lead to children being drafted into the war

26

4. Believed would lead to unisex bathrooms

iii. Roe v. Wade (1973) ­ court case on abortion

1. Decided women’s decision to have an abortion

2. Right must be balanced against state’s interests in 

regulation

e. Gerald Ford ­ President from 1974 ­ 1977

II. The Carter Years

a. Jimmy Carter, the “Anti­Nixon”

i. President from 1977­1981 

ii. “We have learned that more is not necessarily better, that even our  great Nation has its recognized limits, and that we can neither 

answer all problems nor solve all problems. We can not afford to 

do everything....We must simply do our best.” ­ Jimmy Carter, Jan  1977

iii. Wanted to restore trust, said he would never lie to American 

people

b. Energy and Economy

i. PID

1. Gas Shortage in Houston

2. 1979

3. Man filling up his car

4. Summer of 1976 ­ embargo is lifted briefly 

5. Jan. of 1977 ­ gas shortage when Carter takes office and 

wants to tackle energy shortages but wasn’t successful

6. Shows dependence on foreign affairs for foreign oil

7. Why politicians force green energy not only for the planet 

but for government and dependency

III. The Great Inflation and American Malaise

a. Inflation’s Impact

i. Cost of goods goes up

ii. Stagflation is when inflation and unemployment rate goes up

iii. Stagflation ­ economy slows in growth 

iv. “Misery Index” ­ Goes up when inflation and employment rates go up 

v. Great Depression: encourages savings (1930s)

vi. Inflation: encourages investment and credit (1970s) 

b. Money Revolution: From Savings to Investments and Credit

c. The Malaise Speech (“Crisis of Confidence”)

27

The Reagan Era and World Affairs

(04/24/17)

How did conservatism come to dominate American politics? How did the Cold War come to an end?

I. The New Right

a. Twentieth­Century American Conservatism

i. Republican Party troubles in 1976

ii. Battle between Reagan and Ford

iii. Barry Goldwater ­ Republican who ran for president in 1964 but  lost, started conservative movement that ran Republicans 

b. The New Right Agenda

i. Family values ­ moral decline

1. PID

a. New Empire of Faith

b. Time Magazine ­ December 1977

c. The Evangelicals (turning away from sin)

d. Capitalizes on culture wars

e. Voters wanted evangelicals 

ii. Strong defense 

iii. Small government (anti­new deal)

iv. Anti­elitism ­ when the rich wouldn’t pay taxes

c. Softening the Message: Neoconservatives

i. Neoconservatives are “liberals who’ve been mugged by reality.” ­  Irving Kristol 

d. The Tax Revolt

i. People didn’t want to pay for politician’s food when they cannot  even afford their own, refused to pay taxes

II. The Reagan Ascendancy

a. The 1980 Election

i. The 1980 Reagan Coalition:

1. Diehard conservatives 

a. Strong national defense

b. Anti­big government

28

2. Religious Right 

a. Social conservatives

b. Evangelicals 

3. “Reagan Democrats” 

a. Former Democrats 

i. Urban, ethnic, and working­class people

ii. Tired of taxation for welfare

    ii.    Ronald Reagan  

1. President from 1981­1989

2. Actor ­ where he got the idea that taxes ruined work 

3. Huge victory (especially in electoral vote)

b. Reagan’s Domestic Policies

i. Known to be a good communicator

c. Reaganomics

i. Supply­side Economics ­ investing in capital and reducing barriers  on producing goods and services creates more economic growth

III. Reagan and the Cold War

a. Early Tensions and Military Buildup

i. Strategic Defense Initiative (Star Wars) ­ March 23, 1983  

1. To prevent missile attacks by creating anti­ballistic missile 

system

2. Shoot down soviet missiles

3. Created spur of movies of arms race / nuclear attack

b. The Reagan Doctrine

i. Somewhat like Truman Doctrine

ii. Pursue troops, send troops to Afghanistan, etc. 

1. Mujahedeen ­ guerrilla fighters

2. Nicaragua ­ revolution to get rid of dictatorship in 1978­

1979

3. El Salvador ­ civil war in 1980 when they would not 

improve living standards

a. Contras ­ U.S. backed and funded militant groups 

(right­wing)

b. Sandinistas ­ socialist government (left­wing)

c. Reagan, Gorbachev, and the End of the Cold War

i. Mikhail Gorbachev ­ leader of Soviet Union 

1. Perestroika ­ practice of reforming economy and politics 

(1979) 

2. Glasnost ­ practice of a more open government (1985)

ii. Reagan and Gorbachev sign treaties together 

iii. PID

1. Fall of Berlin Wall (separates east and west Berlin)

2. November 1989

3. Both men responsible

29

Society and Culture in the 1980s

(04/26/17)

How would America emerge from the malaise of the 1970s?

I. The New Immigrants

a. 1965 Reforms

b. Latinos and Asians

i. Post­1965 immigration:

1. Latin American ­ 46% of new immigration

2. Asian ­ 26% of new immigration 

c. Resistance to Immigration

i. Towns full of immigrants

1. San Francisco 

2. New York, 1983 (China Town)

ii. Illegal immigrants arrested near San Diego

iii. 1950  2002 ­ Asian Americans become apart of immigration chart iv. 1993 ­ Time Magazine embracing different faces of America

v. 1992 ­ started to worry about amount of illegal aliens coming in  vi. Immigration and Nationality Act (1965) ­ 

vii. Immigration Reform and Control Act (1986) ­ 

II. Two Americans in the 1980s

a. Urban Crises

i. PID

1. 1980s

2. Veteran in front of White House

3. Homeless in D.C.

4. “Welcome to Reaganville” 

ii. Drug abuse and homelessness 

b. The AIDS Epidemic

30

i. 1985 ­ The AIDS quilt, Time Magazine “The Growing Threat” 

    ii.    Autoimmune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) ­ disease with serious  loss of immunity, caused by HIV

    iii.    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) ­ damages immune system c. Abundance and Ostentation

i. “Greed is good.” Wall Street (1987)

ii. Celebration of wealth

iii. Bill Gates and Donald Trump ­ known for wealth 

iv. Yuppies (young urban professionals) ­ gentrified neighborhoods,  hated figures 

III. Culture Wars in the 1980s ad 1990s

a. The Religious Right

i. Ralph Reed ­ apart of Christian Coalition to take over U.S. politics  (Republican) 

ii. Concerned Women for America ­ go into school libraries and take  out certain books with damaging messages (Wizard of Oz) 

founded by Beverly LaHayes 

iii. Others protested TV

iv. Moral Majority ­ American political organization associated with  Christianity and Republicans (1979) founded by Jerry Falwell 

b. Liberalization of Culture

i. 1990 ­ Time “Dirty Words” America’s Foul­Mouthed Pop Culture ii. Increase in violence 

1. Slasher films in 1970s and 1980s (Friday the 13th, 

Chainsaw Massacre, etc.) 

2. Music talked more about violence (Parental Advisory 

Explicit Content Only) 

3. Rodney King beaten by L.A. police on March 3, 1991

iii. Sexual content and nudity on TV

1. 1960s ­ Beverly Hillbillies

2. 1970s ­ MASH

3. 1980s ­ Threes Company (Graphic language, man 

pretended he was gay) 

4. PID

a. Sex and the City 

b. 1990s

c. “Sex” in the title

d. Openly gay characters in shows now

iv. 1995 ­ Time “Are Music and Movies Killing America’s Soul?” 31

Timeline of Events from Ch. 27 ­ Ch. 32

1945 ­ Yalta and Potsdam Conferences, United Nations founded

1946 ­ Atomic Energy Commission established

1947 ­ Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan proposed, National Security Act, Taft­Hartley  Act, Levittown construction begins

1948 ­ Berlin blockade, Truman elected president, Hiss case begins

1949 ­ NATO established, Soviet Union explodes A­bomb, Mao victorious in China 1950 ­ NSC­68, Korean War begins, McCarthy’s anticommunism campaign begins 1951 ­ Truman fires MacArthur

1952 ­ American occupation of Japan ends, Eisenhower elected president 1953 ­ Korean War ends

1954 ­ Brown v. Board of Education, Army­McCarthy hearings

1955 ­ Montgomery bus boycott

1956 ­ Federal Highway Act, Eisenhower reelected, Suez crisis

1957 ­ Sputnik launched, Kerouac’s On the Road, Little Rock desegregation crisis 1959 ­ Castro seizes power in Cuba

1960 ­ U­2 incident, Eisenhower’s farewell address, Kennedy elected president 1961 ­ First American in space, U.S. serves diplomatic relations with Cuba, Freedom  rides, Bay of Pigs, Berlin Wall erected

1962 ­ Cuban missile crisis

1963 ­ March on Washington, Kennedy assassinated and Johnson becomes president,  Civil rights demonstrations in Birmingham, Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique 1964 ­ Johnson launches war on poverty, Civil Rights Act, Gulf of Tonkin Resolution,  Johnson elected president, Free Speech Movement begins

1965 ­ Malcolm X assassinated, Voting Rights Act, U.S. troops in Vietnam, Racial  violence in Watts

1966 ­ National Organization for Women founded

32

1967 ­ Antiwar movement grows, Racial violence in Detroit

1968 ­ Tet offensive, Martin Luther King Jr. assassinated, Robert Kennedy assassinated,  Nixon elected president, Turmoil in universities 

1969 ­ Americans land on moon, Rock concert in Woodstock, NY

1970 ­ Cambodian incursion, Kent State and Jackson State shootings 1971 ­ Pentagon Papers published, Nixon imposes wage­price controls 1972 ­ Nixon visits China, SALT I, “Christmas bombing” of North Vietnam, Watergate  burglary, Nixon reelected 

1973 ­ U.S. withdraws from Vietnam, Arab oil embargo, Agnew resigns, Supreme Court  decided Roe v. Wade

1974 ­ Nixon resigns and Ford becomes president, “Stagflation”, Ford pardons Nixon 1975 ­ South Vietnam falls

1976 ­ Carter elected president

1977 ­ Panama Canal treaties signed, Apple introduces first personal computer 1978­1979 ­ Camp David accords, American hostages in Iran, Soviet Union invades  Afghanistan, U.S. and China restore relations, Three Mile Island nuclear accident 1980 ­ U.S. boycotts Moscow Olympics, Reagan elected president 

1981 ­ American hostages in Iran released, Reagan wins tax and budget cuts, AIDS first  reported in U.S.

1982 ­ Severe recession

1983 ­ U.S. invades Grenada

1984 ­ Reagan reelected

1985 ­ Reagan and Gorbachev meet 

1986 ­ Intra­contra scandal revealed

1988 ­ George H. W. Bush elected president

1989 ­ Berlin Wall dismantled, Communist regimes collapse, U.S. troops in Panama 1990 ­ Iraq invades Kuwait

1991 ­ Collapse of Soviet regime, Persian Gulf War

1992 ­ Los Angeles race riots, Bill Clinton elected president

1993 ­ NAFTA ratified

1995 ­ Government shutdown

1996 ­ Welfare reform passed, Defense of Marriage Act, Clinton reelected 1997 ­ Balanced budget agreement

1998 ­ Lewinsky scandal breaks, Clinton impeached by House

1999 ­ Clinton acquitted by Senate

2000 ­ George W. Bush wins contested election

2001 ­ 9/11 attacks, U.S. defeats Taliban regime in Afghanistan

2003 ­ U.S. invades Iraq

2004 ­ Abu Ghraib scandal, Bush reelected

2005 ­ Hurricane Katrina

2007 ­ “Tea Party” fields candidates, Troop “surge” in Iraq, Mortgage crisis 2008 ­ The Great Recession, Obama elected nation’s first African American president 2010 ­ Affordable Care Act signed, Deepwater Horizon (BP) oil spill 2011 ­ Osama bin Laden killed by U.S. Special Forces, Occupy Wall Street

33

2012 ­ Obama reelected, Sandy Hook school shooting

2013 ­ Border bill passes Senate but fails in the House

2015 ­ Obergefell v. Hodges 

34

HY 104 Final Study Guide

 There will be one essay worth 100 points on the test

 There will also be 3 picture IDs worth 30 points (10 each)

 If a word or phrase is underlined, it is an important term

 Page 2: Potential Essay Topics

 Page 3: Potential Picture IDs

 Page 4­6: Picture ID Notes from Class

 Pages 7­30: Class Notes

o Pages 7­8: The Cold War and McCarthyism (03/20/17)

o Pages 9­10: Brown v. Board and Civil Rights in the 1950s (03/22/17) o Pages 11­12: Society and Culture in the 1950s ­ 1960s (03/27/17) o Pages 13­14: Integrationism and Black Power (03/29/17)

o Pages 15­16: Kennedy, the Cold War, and Vietnam (04/03/17) o Pages 17­18: The Vietnam War under Johnson and Nixon (04/05/17 o Pages 19­20: The Great Society, Dissent, and the 1968 Election (04/10/17) o Pages 21­22: Counterculture and Legacies of the 1960s (04/12/17) o Pages 23­24: Nixon, Watergate, and American Cynicism (04/17/17) o Pages 25­26: Malaise in the 1970s (04/19/17)

o Pages 27­28: The Reagan Era and World Affairs (04/24/17)

o Pages 29­30: Society and Culture in the 1980s (04/26/17)

 Pages 31­32: Timeline of Events

Potential Essay Topics

(From professor’s study guide)

∙ What happened to public confidence in the federal government and military between 1945 and 1990? Was it consistently high? Low? 

1

Did it oscillate between the two? Make an argument one way or the other, making sure to support your narrative with specific events, wars, and historical figures that inspired  either cynicism or confidence regarding the institutions of authority in the United States  in this period. Use assigned books, films, and lectures to support your argument. 

∙ “The lives of African American people, North and South, have improved dramatically  since 1945.” Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Select a  few specific areas—economic achievement, political rights, geographic movement, etc.— and make an argument either for progress or stagnation in the position of blacks between  1945 and the 1990s. Use specific evidence from assigned books, films, and lectures for  support.

Potential Picture IDs (#1­#14)

(From professor’s study guide)

2

Picture ID Notes from Class

3

1. Sputnik (03/20/17) 

a. October of 1957 

b. Satellite sent into space by Soviet Union during cold war

c. Nikita Khrushchev was the leader of the Soviet Union

d. Set off panic in the United States

2. George McLaurin (03/22/17)

a. University of Oklahoma

b. School of Education, 1948

c. Shows black man sitting alone in classroom full of white people d. Shows need for civil rights movements in the 1940s ­ 1950s 

3. The Domestic Ideal (03/27/17)

a. 1950’s 

b. Shows a housewife very content and happy to be in the kitchen c. This was a main spot for women, where they could cook, clean, and do  laundry

d. Shows an average household kitchen, everything matches and appliances  are new and shiny

e. Does not show the husband/father for he is at work

f. The domestic reality is more of a women trying to cook and take care of  her children­­stressful 

4. Foster Auditorium ­ University of Alabama (03/29/17)

a. June 11, 1963

b. This was a huge day for segregation in the United States

c. Auditorium was a place where people registered for classes, shows George Wallace standing in front of the door to not allow blacks in

d. Paved the way for civil rights legislation 

e. Later that night, John Kennedy spoke up against this stand

5. CIA Map of Missile Range (04/03/17)

a. Cuban Missile Crisis (Cold War) was confrontation of U.S. and Soviet  Union over missiles in Cuba in 1962

b. President Kennedy had the navy surround the island with missiles and air  support

c. They spend several days sending messages to the Russians

d. Castro and Khrushchev agreed to remove the missiles

e. Appeared as though Kennedy had won unlike in Bay of Pigs

6. Kent State Protest Killings (04/05/17)

a. May 1970

b. Anti war movement protest on campus in Ohio

c. National guardsmen panicked and shot at crowd, killing four Americans d. Shows American distraught with Nixon’s decision to attack communist  forces in Cambodia

7. Moderates (04/10/17)

a. 1960s

b. Moderate Crowd with sign “Vietnam Moratorium

4

c. Anti­war movement, were not radical, wanted peace 

d. They love the country, that’s why they were so angry about what they  chose to do about the war

e. They believed in their country’s system, just that they made a wrong turn  at war

8. Elvis Presley meeting President Nixon (04/12/17)

a. There were many riots in the 1970s for antiwar actions and most rock n’  roll artists supported those riots

b. Elvis Presley sent a note to Richard Nixon in 1970 suggestion he could  make a change for the country considering he was not considered an  enemy in the counter culture

c. Nixon hated the counter culture and invited Presley to the White House to  meet him and make plans

9. Nixon’s Resignation (04/17/17)

a. August 1974

b. Watergate ­ 5 men linked to Nixon broke into DNC headquarters in 1972  to help reelect him, later Pentagon papers were leaked to the press so  Nixon hired “The Plumbers” to investigate, those 5 men were apart of  “The Plumbers”, and the people found out he was hiding things

c. Congress proposed to impeach him, so he decided to resign

d. He never would admit he was guilty and had no shame, says he did what  he did for the country’s safety 

10. Gas Shortages (04/19/17)

a. Houston in 1979

b. Shows a man filling up his gas tank

c. For a while there had been many different energy shortages

d. When Carter took office in 1977, there was a gas shortage that he tried to  tackle but was unsuccessful

e. This shows our dependence upon foreign affairs for foreign oil f. This is why politicians suggest green energy not only for the planet but for government and dependency 

11. New Empire of Faith (04/24/17)

a. December 1977

b. Time Magazine ­ Evangelicals

c. Turning away from sin, supported family values

d. Capitalizes on culture wars

e. Voters wanted evangelicals

12. Fall of the Berlin Wall (04/24/17)

a. November 1989

b. Separates East and West Berlin

c. Reagan and Gorbachev responsible 

13. Homeless Veteran (04/26/17)

a. 1980s

b. Homelessness was spreading in D.C.

5

c. They rioted in front of the White House with signs that said “Welcome to  Reaganville” 

14. Sex and the City (04/26/17)

a. Liberalization of Culture in the 1990s

b. Violence, profanity, and sexual content (nudity) was spreading through the media

c. Since 1960s, shows slowly became more and more vulgar: showed nudity, talked about sex, had gay characters emerge, etc. 

d. The new culture was “killing America’s soul”

6

The Cold War and McCarthyism

(03/20/17)

How did America’s former ally the Soviets become its greatest enemy? How did that  rivalry affect life in the U.S.?

I. Origins of the Cold War

a. The End of World War II

b. Soviet Actions

  i.    Joseph Stalin 

    ii.    The Iron Curtain 

iii. Soviet Expansion 1939­1949 (Cold War I)

    iv.    Soviet Union (USSR) 

v. Marshall Plan aid recipients in 1948 

c. American Actions

i. Harry Truman ­ President from 1945­1953

1. “I believe that it must be the policy of the US to support 

free peoples who are resisting subjugation by armed 

minorities or by outside pressures.” (March 12, 1947)

    2.    Truman Doctrine 

    ii.    Containment ­ trying to contain communism like a disease 

    d.    North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) ­ France, Turkey, Italy, etc.     e.    Warsaw Pact (1955) ­ Soviet Union, Hungary, Poland, etc.

II. Cold War Flashpoints

a. Atomic Weapons

i. The atomic age begins, Nagasaki, Japan in August 1945

ii. Continues in 1954 when hydrogen bombs are created

b. Korean War

i. 1950­1953 

ii. Costly war to U.S.

c. Sputnik

i. Picture ID ­ Sputnik 

1. October ’57 

2. Satellite in space

3. Later put another one in space with a dog

4. Nikita Khrushchev 

5. Set off panic in the United States

ii. Vanguard ­ December 1957

7

iii. Space Race in June 1960

III. Cold War Homefront

    a.    McCarthyism 

i.   Senator Joe McCarthy and Roy Cohn

b. Legacies of McCarthyism

Other Terms:

∙ National Security Council ­ committee in executive branch that advises president  on matters relating to domestic, military, and foreign security

∙ Central Intelligence Agency ­ civilian foreign intelligence to gather, process, and  analyze national security info from around the world

∙ NSC­68 ­ a 58 page top secret policy paper presented to Truman on April 14,  1950

∙ Dwight Eisenhower ­ president from 1953 to 1961

∙ NASA ­ started in 1958, in charge of science in technology for airplanes and  space

∙ National Defense Education Act ­ 1958, providing funding to US education  institutions 

∙ Richard Nixon ­ president from 1969 ­ 1974

∙ Alger Hiss ­ American government official accused of being Soviet spy in 1948 ∙ House un­American Activities Committee ­ 1938 ­ 1975, created to investigate  disloyalty 

∙ Smith Act ­ (1940) made it an offense to advocate violent overthrow of  government

∙ Communist Control Act ­ (1954) communist part of U.S. is conspiracy to  overthrow government

∙ Mickey Spillane ­ American crime novelist 

8

Brown v. Board and Civil Rights in the 1950s

(03/22/17)

Why/how did civil rights come onto the national agenda in the 1950s?

I. Litigation and Backlash

a. Civil Rights in the 1940s

i. Civil rights expansion in 1950s:

1. Cold War publicity

2. Racial relocation to North

3. WWII discredits racism

4. Grass­roots / NAACP activism 

5. Postwar prosperity

6. Supreme Court committed to social justice

ii. Harry Truman ­ president from 1945­1953

1. Brought blacks into democratic party

2. Not key factor in black civil rights

iii. Strom Thurmond, SC

1. States’ Rights Democrat that ran in 1948 

2. Won LA, MISS, ALA, and SC

    iv.    Thurgood Marshall 

1. Young lawyer

2. First black supreme court justice

v. PID 

1. George McLaurin, U. of Oklahoma

2. School of Education, 1948

3. Black man sitting alone in classroom apart from whites

b. Brown v. Board of Education 

i. Educational segregation in US before trial

ii. Required in south, forbidden in north, no legislation in west

    iii.    Chief Justice Earl Warren  

iv. “In the field of public education, the doctrine of ‘separate but 

equal’ has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently 

unequal.” Brown I, 1954

9

v. “Segregated school systems must make a “prompt and reasonable  start toward full compliance” and do so with “all deliberate speed.”

Brown II, 1955

    vi.    Emmett Till  

1. 1955 ­ wanted to see relatives in Mississippi

2. Mom couldn’t sleep till heard he was safe off the train

3. He spoke to woman in store and husband murdered him 

c. Massive Resistance

i. Dwight “Ike” Eisenhower ­ president from 1953 ­ 1961

d. Little Rock

i. Arkansas, 1957

II. Grass Roots Activism

a. Montgomery Bus Boycott

  i.    Rosa Parks 

    b.    Martin Luther King 

i.   Montgomery, Alabama

ii.   Dec. 21, 1956

III.      Race Relations in the North in the 1950s

a.   The Second Great Migration

b.   Northern Segregation 

i.   Different neighborhoods, etc.

ii.   Chicago one of the most segregated

Other Terms:

∙ Fred Vinson ­ American politician and 13th chief justice of supreme court ∙ Southern Manifesto ­ 1956, opposed racial integration of public places ∙ White Citizens’ Councils ­ network of white supremacist organization in south ∙ Autherine Lucy ­ first black student to attend University of Alabama ∙ Gov. Orval Faubus (Arkansas) ­ American democrat who stood against  desegregation 

10

Society and Culture in the 1950s ­ ‘60s

(03/27/17)

Was life in the 1950s really a “golden age”?

IV. The Middle­Class Nation

a. The Baby Boom and “Whiteness”

i. (See picture at bottom of page) ­ Baby Boom and its decline (1940­ 1970)

ii. Median Age at First Marriage (1947­1981)

1. Males were 23 or 25 in 1947, were 22 or 23 in 1961, and 

back up to 24 in 1981

2. Females were 20 in 1947 and 22 in 1981 

Males were usually older than females (key concept)

iii. Whiteness ­ set of privileges set out to certain groups, is not 

referring to color of skin (for example: Irish were not white)

iv. Ethnicity in American in 1950

1. Mostly Euro­Americans  (7/8th) 

2. 1/8th African American

3. Very slim population of Hispanic 

b. Growth of Suburbia and the Sunbelt

i. Levittown, USA

1. William Levitt came up with building houses like building 

cars

2. Shipped out parts, practically built the same but people 

made their own changes to them (customizable) 

3. Still around in 2007, most commonly called exurbs now

11

4. For new homeowners with wife and children, retreats for 

workers and workplaces for their wives

ii. Interstate Highway System (Highway Act ­1956) 

1. Under Eisenhower they were created

2. Made much easier to build settlements if highway was near 

connected to a big city 

3. Cold War measure  place to land our planes (especially in 

west interstates that are very straight) and movement of the 

army because they could shut down interstate and use it 

themselves

iii. 1950 ­ 1960: 18 million Americans move to the suburbs from farm  and city

c. Gender Roles in Families of the 1950s

i. Dr. Benjamin Spock ­ Baby and Child Care

1. Created a less stern approach to child caring

2. Millions of people bought this book instead of giving child 

to grandma

ii. PID ­ The Domestic Ideal (1950’s) 

1. Housewife very content and happy to be in the kitchen

2. Washer/dryer also in kitchen (main spot for women)

3. Average household kitchen ­ everything matches, shiny

4. Husband not there  at work

iii. Domestic reality? ­ Picture of woman trying to cook and take care  of three children (seems stressed)

V. 1950s Culture

a. Television

i. Most all middle class had a TV 

ii. Family sitcoms

1. Mostly showed white middle­class families where dad went

off with briefcase to work and mom in the kitchen

2. Kids were smoking weed and being delinquents but these 

things were never shown 

3. Mostly had very minor problems and gender roles 

standardized

b. Youth Culture

i. 1952 ­ Mr. Potato Head (had to provide actual potato) 

ii. 1947 ­ Slinky

iii. Cool and the Crazy and Rebel Without a Cause ­ movies of the  time for teens 

1. James Dean ­ American actor in Rebel Without a Cause

iv. Elvis Presley ­ parents concerned for effect on young girls minds v. “Beat’ coffeehouse, San Francisco 

vi.   “What held him back all day was the feeling that somewhere there  was something better for him than listening to babies cry and 

12

cheating people in used­car lots and it’s this feeling he tries to 

kill…” ­     John Updike,     Rabbit Run, 1960 

VI. Limits of Middle­Class America

a. Critics of Conformity

b. Racism and Poverty

Other Terms:

∙ Federal Housing Administration (FHA) ­ sets standards for construction, loans,  etc.

∙ The Sunbelt ­ the southern United States from California to Florida ∙ Jack Kerouac ­ American novelist and poet

∙ Richard Yates ­ American fiction writer 

∙ Revolutionary Road (1961) ­ written by Richard Yates

∙ Michael Harrington ­ American democratic socialist and writer  ∙ The Other America (1962) ­ written by Michael Harrington

Integrationism and Black Power

(03/29/17)

What were the victories of the civil rights movement in the 1960s­­and what impact did  they have?

I. Direct Action and Civil Disobedience

a. SCLC, SNCC (“Snick”) and CORE

  i.    Southern Christian Leadership Conference  

    1.    Martin Luther King 

    ii.    Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee 

1. Ella Baker

2. John Lewis

    iii.    Congress of Racial Equality  

1. James Farmer

b. The Sit­Ins of 1960­1961

i. Greensboro, NC in Feb. 1960 ­ African Americans sat at diner 

even though it was not allowed

ii. Sit­in Backlash was where whites would harass them while sitting  but they are trained to ignore it

II. Confrontation Activism

a. Freedom Rides

13

i. Supreme Court decision in 1940s where you couldn’t segregate  interstate travel 

ii. Riding Greyhound buses from Washington, D.C. to New Orleans  iii. Wanted to draw attention and get backlash

iv. Anniston, Alabama in 1961 ­ one bus stopped and beat both white  and black activists up and then burned the bus

b. Voter­Registration, 1962­1964

  i.    Voter Education Project  

1. Happened across 1962­1964

2. Went door to door to register voters

3. Promised money and protection if encountered violence to 

workers

4. Many were harassed and run off the roads

ii. Murder of Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, and Michael  

Schwerner in Mississippi in June of 1964 

c. Birmingham

i. Strictest segregation laws in the country = “bombingham” 

ii. Police Chief Eugene “Bull” Connor 

1. In process of being voted out of his position 

2. Bragged about keeping blacks in their place

iii. May 1963 ­ activists sit in on Birmingham 

iv. PID ­ June 11, 1963

1. Foster Auditorium ­ where people registered for classes

2. George Wallace ­ stands in front of door to block students 

3. Represents showdown of federal government v. state 

government

4. Paved way for civil rights legislation 

5. John Kennedy gives speech against UA’s stand

v. Medgar Evers ­ was shot the night of John Kennedy’s speech and  gave energy towards movement 

vi. De facto v. de jure segregation ­ being segregated in fact (de facto)  but not by law (de jure)

III. The Civil Rights Milestones of 1964­1965

    a.    The Civil Rights Act (1964) 

i. Banned segregation in public accommodations

ii. Banned racial and gender discrimination by employers and unions iii. Promised federal aid to communities with desegregation as a 

condition for receiving the money

    b.    The Voting Rights Act (1965) 

i. Banned the tricks that prevented African Americans from voting ii. Authorized federal oversight of suspicious voting districts

c. Black Voters in the South

i. 1964 ­ 1 million

ii. 1968 ­ 3.1 million

14

d. Legacies of the Acts

e. Limitations of the Acts

IV. Race Riots and Black Power

a. Long Hot Summers in Urban Ghettos

b. Black Power

  i.    Stokely Carmichael  

    ii.    Huey Newton and Bobby Seale ­ Black Panther Party

JFK, the Cold War, and Vietnam

(04/03/17)

How did the Cold War climate help lead the U.S. into Vietnam?

I. The 1960 Presidential Election

a. The Candidates: Kennedy and Nixon

  i.    John Fitzgerald Kennedy  

1. President from 1961 ­ 1963

2. Democrat

3. Catholic

    ii.    Richard M. Nixon 

1. Republican 

b. The “Missile Gap”

i. Kennedy spoke of missile gap as if we were falling behind, so he  came into election looking like the better alternative 

ii. Nixon was in the administration and already knew we were ahead,  but could not speak of it

15

c. JFK’s Narrow Victory

i. TV Debates and Stormy K “How much influence on the election?” II. Kennedy’s Approach to the Cold War

a. JFK’s Inaugural Speech

i. January of 1961

ii. “Ask not what your country can do for you­­ask what you can do  for your country.”

iii. “Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we  shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support 

any friend, oppose any foe, to assure the survival and success of 

liberty.” ­John Kennedy, January 1961

b. The “Can­do” Spirit and Robert McNamara

i. Robert McNamara 

1. Secretary of defense

2. Position at Ford Motor Company

3. Covered in Time Magazine

III. Cold War Flashpoints under Kennedy

a. The Bay of Pigs

  i.    Cuba ­ place to vacation for Americans, lots of ties to America

ii.   Prisoner at Bay of Pigs in April 1961 picture

    iii.    Fidel Castro was at Bay of Pigs

b. Cuban Missile Crisis

i. Nikita Khrushchev ­ leader of Soviet Union during Cold War

ii. PID ­ CIA map of missile range

    1.    Central Intelligence Agency 

2. Kennedy has navy surround island with missiles, air 

support, several days of messages to Russians

3. Castro and Khrushchev agreed to remove missiles

4. Looked as though Kennedy had won unlike in Bay of Pigs

IV. Vietnam

a. The French in Indochina

i. Ho Chi Minh (1890 ­ 1969) ­ living in exile, wanted Vietnam run  by Vietnamese

ii. French want colony back, but Ho Chi Minh launches guerilla war  and French lose after eight years (Vietminh) 

iii. 1954 partition ­ Geneva Conference to restore peace in Indochina  b. American Support for South Vietnam

c. Kennedy and Vietnam

i. Sends advisors to Vietnam to meet with Ngo Dinh Diem (U.S. 

supported leader of South Vietnam in 1950s ­ early 1960s)

ii. Come back saying we are winning the war (Vietcong) 

16

The War under Johnson and Nixon

(04/05/17)

What was the American experience fighting in Vietnam?

I. Lyndon Johnson’s War

a. Contrast/Continuities with JFK Approach

i. Lyndon Johnson takes oath of office on Air Force One in 

November of 1963 after Kennedy’s assassination 

ii. Lyndon Johnson followed in the shadow of Kennedy

iii. Johnson was a complex and extraordinary man

iv. Both believed they needed to contain communism to win in 

Vietnam

b. The Tonkin Gulf Incident and Resolution

17

i. August 2nd in 1964

ii. North Vietnamese motor torpedo boat attacked the U.S.S. Maddox iii. U.S.S. C. Turner Joy - destroyed named for Vice  

Admiral Charles Turner Joy  

iv. Johnson asked Congress to be able to take any necessary attack  and Congress approved

v. War escalates in next year against Vietcong 

vi. Set up airbases in South Vietnam and sent troops to Danang, South Vietnam 

vii. Vietcong tunnels in war, so small, needed “tunnel rats” or smaller  American men 

c. Americanization and Stalemate: 1965­1967

d. The Tet Offensive, 1968

i. January through February 1968

ii. Massive military victory for American side

iii. Major public relations defeat 

iv. My Lai Massacre ­ mass killing of helpless people in South 

Vietnam in 1968 by U.S. 

II. The Draft

a. Demographics of the Soldiers in Vietnam

i. 1964 ­ 1973:

1. 27 million men come of age

2. 3 million go to Vietnam

a. 1/3 drafted

b. 1/3 professionals

c. 1/3 draft­motivated

b. Working­Class Bias

i. Class Composition of 3 million U.S. Soldiers in Vietnam

1. 55% ­ Working class

2. 25% ­ Poor

3. 20% ­ Middle Class

III. Richard Nixon’s War

a. Nixon takes Office

i. January of 1969 

ii. Hated anti­war movement, but wanted to scale the war down 

b. De­Escalation: Vietnamization 

c. Escalation: Cambodia 

i. The communist forces set up sanctuaries in neutral Cambodia even though they were not allowed to

ii. U.S. attacks and kills several Cambodian people 

iii. Nixon announces Cambodia invasion in April 1970

iv. Soldiers looked for “base” while American people were very angry v. PID

18

    1.    Kent State  

2.   May 1970 

3.   Anti war movement protest on campus in Ohio

4.   National guardsmen got panicked and shot at crowd, killed 

four Americans 

5.   Shows American distraught at Nixon’s actions 

d. The End of the War

i. Hanoi 

1. Capital of North Vietnam

2. Where American soldiers were held

ii. April 1975 ­ unified country under communism so war was 

ultimately lost 

e. North Vietnam

i. North Vietnamese Army (NVA), and Vietcong (southern 

insurgents; political leadership was the National Liberation Front, 

or NLF)

f. South Vietnam

i. The Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN), and the United  States

The Great Society, Dissent, and the 1968 Election

(04/10/17)

Why are the 1960s known as the “turbulent” decade?

I. The Great Society

a. Johnson’s Liberalism

i. He wanted to move the country upward to the Great Society

ii. Believed nation should put an end to poverty and racial injustice 19

b. The War on Poverty

i. The Other America ­ book about poverty in the U.S.

ii. Programs (1964­1966) federal spending on:

1. Educational programs (Head Start, Upward Bound) 

2. Inner city improvements in education, housing, 

employment (Model Cities) 

3. Scholarships for poor college students

4. Aid to Families with Dependent Children (welfare)

5. Job training

6. Food Stamps

7. Federal Medical Care Programs (1965)

a. Medicare ­ for the elderly

b. Medicaid ­ for the poor

c. Impact

II. 1960s Dissent and Activism

    a.    The New Left 

  i.    Tom Hayden ­ founded it

    ii.    Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) ­ 100,000

iii.   Saw war in Vietnam as imperialism

iv.   Bernadine Dohrn (1968) ­ high in SDS

b. Moderates

i. Moderate protesters

1. Were not radical

2. Believed in system of country but took wrong turn at war

3. Wanted peace

ii. PID 

1. Crowd with sign “Vietnam Moratorium” 

2. Anti war movement

3. They love the country, that’s why they were so angry about

what they chose to do about the war 

c. Conservatives

i. Young Americans for Freedom (YAF) 1967

1. A million members

2. “If you can’t be with them, be for them! Support our boys 

in Vietnam!”

ii. Barry Goldwater ­ “My aim is not to pass laws but to repeal them.” 1. Ran as Republican in 1964 Election and lost terribly, 

Johnson won

III. 1968 Election

a. The Democratic Nomination Process

  i.    Eugene McCarthy 

    ii.    Hubert Humphrey 

    iii.    Robert F. Kennedy 

20

iv.   Chicago 1968 ­ Outside the Democratic National Convention there was chaos 

b. Republican: Richard Nixon 

c. Independent: George Wallace 

Counterculture and Legacies of the 1960s

(04/12/17)

Why are the 1960s known as the “turbulent” decade? (Part II)

21

I. The Counterculture

i. Bob Dylan ­ The Time They Are A­Changin’ 

1. Come you masters of war, You that build all the guns, You 

that build the death planes, You that build the big bombs, 

You that hide behind walls, You that hide behind desks, I 

just want you to know, I can see through your masks         

 ­“Masters of War,” Bob Dylan, 1963

ii. Joan Baez ­ American folk singer and activist 

iii. Hippie Culture 

1. In Time Magazine

2. Merry Pranksters ­ huge group of hippies that rode around 

on a bus blasting music and smoking marijuana 

3. Statistically made up tiny portion of the country 

b. Sex

i. Challenges to sex before marriage

ii. Time Magazine in July 1969

1. “The Sex Explosion”

2. Pre­marital sex was become more widespread

iii. Birth Control pill in 1960

iv. Pregnancies and STDs became more common and known

c. Drugs

i. Marijuana much more prevalent during these times but was present before 

ii. Timothy Leary ­ psychology professor at Harvard who pushed the  use of acid and LSD / “Turn on, Tune In, Drop Out”

d. And Rock ‘n’ Roll

i. The Byrds ­ Eight Miles High 

ii. The Beatles  

iii. Both huge figures in drug culture

II. The Intersection of Culture and Politics

i. Varieties of antiwar protest 

    b.    John Lennon  

i.   Summer 1971, Beatles broken up

ii.   Big political figure in the culture

iii.   Meeting with people to plan antiwar tour when Nixon was running  for reelection 

iv.   Storm Thurmond suggested deporting John Lennon to White 

House and said it would be a “strategy counter­measure”

v.   They took counterculture to government very seriously 

    c.    Elvis Presley 

i.   Sent a note to President Richard Nixon in 1970 to try and help 

country out because he was not considered an enemy in hippie 

culture

ii. PID ­ Elvis meeting Nixon and shaking hands

22

1. Nixon hated counter culture

III. Legacies of the 1960s

    a.    Ronald Reagan  

b.   Liberals became a dirty word ­ called themselves progressives

Nixon, Watergate, and American Cynicism

(04/17/17)

23

How should we assess the Nixon presidency?

I. The Nixon Presidency

a. Foreign Policy and Détente

i. Richard Nixon was more concerned with foreign policy than 

domestic policy

    ii.    Henry Kissinger 

1. National security advisor

2. Took on a moderate view on war with Nixon

iii. Other parts of the world other than U.S. and Russia were gaining  more power

1. Middle East gained power from U.S. oil needs

2. Japan and China

3. Nixon and Kissinger had to be careful with foreign affairs

iv. Nixon Doctrine

1. Response to U.S. shrinkage of power in the world

2. Decided to aid countries as long as they do the dirty work

v. Détente ­ using diplomacy to keep communism at a halt without  war

1. Mao Zedong ­ Chinese communist leader

2. “We are using the Chinese thaw to get the Russians shook”

3. Nixon met with Zedong in Feb. of 1972 and Soviet Union

vi. Terrorists

1. Munich Olympics, 1972 

2. Terrorist capture Israeli athletes and hold them hostage then

murder them

vii. Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) ­ 

petroleum prices raised to show disapproval of Israeli support 

b. Domestic Policy ­ Liberal or Conservative?

i. Nixon represented old centrist republic party (more moderate)

ii. Supported affirmative action

iii. Nixon required businesses to lessen amount of minority’s jobs and  women’s jobs

iv. Arts and education programs budget doubled

v. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ­ proposed a guaranteed  minimum income for all Americans but didn’t happen

vi. Nixon hated anti­war movements and did lots to disrupt the 

movement 

II. Watergate and American Cynicism

a. Dirty Tricks and the Pentagon Papers

  i.    CREEP (Committee to Re­elect the President) 

ii. The Watergate ­ 5 men arrested for breaking into DNC 

headquarters in June of 1972

24

iii. Nixon won in landslide victory (reelected)

iv. 5 men broke in to help reelect president

v. Daniel Ellsberg ­ leaks Pentagon Papers to the press

1. Shows truth about Vietnam

2. Shows Johnson’s lies

3. Nixon created “The Plumbers” to investigate

b. The Cover­Up

i. Nixon’s mistake was covering up the break­ins

1. 5 guys who broke in were apart of “the plumbers”

2. Address book connected them to Nixon

ii. Nixon issued “hush money”

c. The Investigation

i. Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward were reporters who found the  links between the men

ii. Police forced Nixon to release the tapes

iii. 18 minute gap of erased evidence

iv. Revealed that Nixon told CIA to stop FBI investigation d. Nixon’s Resignation

i. Congress proposes impeachment

ii. PID

1. Nixon’s Resignation

a. August 1974

b. Nixon never admitted he was guilty or had shame

c. “I’m not a crook”

d. Says what he did was for the country’s safety

e. Legacies 

i. Time Magazine ­ “Can trust be restored” 

ii. Americans distrusted the government

iii. 1971 ­ thieves break into FBI and release info that government had been spying on citizens for decades

iv. Theory that government killed JFK, MLK, and others 

25

Malaise in the 1970s

(04/19/17)

What happened to social movements in the 1970s? And why is that decade known for its  “malaise”?

I. Activism and Backlash in the 1970s

    a.    Cultural Nationalism 

i. Rally for black studies program at University of Wisconsin in Feb.  of 1969

ii. Kwanzaa ­ festival observed by blacks from Dec 26 ­ Jan 1 as 

cultural celebration 

iii. Mexican­American Activism at University of New Mexico 

(Chicano Pride) 

iv. Cesar Chavez ­ American civil rights activist who co­founded 

National Farm Workers Association in 1962

v. Red Power ­ Native Americans fought to get back land

vi. Occupation of Alcatraz Island, California from 1969 ­ 1971

b. Second­Wave Feminism

i. Betty Friedan, 1963 

1. Wrote The Feminine Mystique 

2. Feminist and wife and mother

    ii.    National Organization for Women (NOW) 

1. Pushed for equal pay

c. Achievements of the Women’s Movement

i. 1976 ­ Time Magazine published magazine with “Women of the  Year”

ii. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) ­ says that  women cannot be discriminated against in the workforce

iii. Congress passed Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) that says quality of rights under law shouldn’t be changed by gender

iv. Title IX of the Higher Education Act (1972) ­ couldn’t 

discriminate genders in universities 

d. Anti­Feminist Backlash

i. Saw this as an attack on their values since being a housewife was  fulfilling to them

ii. Phyllis Schlafly and “Stop Era” 

1. Believed men and women are not the same and should not 

be treated the same

2. Believed women deserved more rights with their children

3. Believed would lead to children being drafted into the war

26

4. Believed would lead to unisex bathrooms

iii. Roe v. Wade (1973) ­ court case on abortion

1. Decided women’s decision to have an abortion

2. Right must be balanced against state’s interests in 

regulation

e. Gerald Ford ­ President from 1974 ­ 1977

II. The Carter Years

a. Jimmy Carter, the “Anti­Nixon”

i. President from 1977­1981 

ii. “We have learned that more is not necessarily better, that even our  great Nation has its recognized limits, and that we can neither 

answer all problems nor solve all problems. We can not afford to 

do everything....We must simply do our best.” ­ Jimmy Carter, Jan  1977

iii. Wanted to restore trust, said he would never lie to American 

people

b. Energy and Economy

i. PID

1. Gas Shortage in Houston

2. 1979

3. Man filling up his car

4. Summer of 1976 ­ embargo is lifted briefly 

5. Jan. of 1977 ­ gas shortage when Carter takes office and 

wants to tackle energy shortages but wasn’t successful

6. Shows dependence on foreign affairs for foreign oil

7. Why politicians force green energy not only for the planet 

but for government and dependency

III. The Great Inflation and American Malaise

a. Inflation’s Impact

i. Cost of goods goes up

ii. Stagflation is when inflation and unemployment rate goes up

iii. Stagflation ­ economy slows in growth 

iv. “Misery Index” ­ Goes up when inflation and employment rates go up 

v. Great Depression: encourages savings (1930s)

vi. Inflation: encourages investment and credit (1970s) 

b. Money Revolution: From Savings to Investments and Credit

c. The Malaise Speech (“Crisis of Confidence”)

27

The Reagan Era and World Affairs

(04/24/17)

How did conservatism come to dominate American politics? How did the Cold War come to an end?

I. The New Right

a. Twentieth­Century American Conservatism

i. Republican Party troubles in 1976

ii. Battle between Reagan and Ford

iii. Barry Goldwater ­ Republican who ran for president in 1964 but  lost, started conservative movement that ran Republicans 

b. The New Right Agenda

i. Family values ­ moral decline

1. PID

a. New Empire of Faith

b. Time Magazine ­ December 1977

c. The Evangelicals (turning away from sin)

d. Capitalizes on culture wars

e. Voters wanted evangelicals 

ii. Strong defense 

iii. Small government (anti­new deal)

iv. Anti­elitism ­ when the rich wouldn’t pay taxes

c. Softening the Message: Neoconservatives

i. Neoconservatives are “liberals who’ve been mugged by reality.” ­  Irving Kristol 

d. The Tax Revolt

i. People didn’t want to pay for politician’s food when they cannot  even afford their own, refused to pay taxes

II. The Reagan Ascendancy

a. The 1980 Election

i. The 1980 Reagan Coalition:

1. Diehard conservatives 

a. Strong national defense

b. Anti­big government

28

2. Religious Right 

a. Social conservatives

b. Evangelicals 

3. “Reagan Democrats” 

a. Former Democrats 

i. Urban, ethnic, and working­class people

ii. Tired of taxation for welfare

    ii.    Ronald Reagan  

1. President from 1981­1989

2. Actor ­ where he got the idea that taxes ruined work 

3. Huge victory (especially in electoral vote)

b. Reagan’s Domestic Policies

i. Known to be a good communicator

c. Reaganomics

i. Supply­side Economics ­ investing in capital and reducing barriers  on producing goods and services creates more economic growth

III. Reagan and the Cold War

a. Early Tensions and Military Buildup

i. Strategic Defense Initiative (Star Wars) ­ March 23, 1983  

1. To prevent missile attacks by creating anti­ballistic missile 

system

2. Shoot down soviet missiles

3. Created spur of movies of arms race / nuclear attack

b. The Reagan Doctrine

i. Somewhat like Truman Doctrine

ii. Pursue troops, send troops to Afghanistan, etc. 

1. Mujahedeen ­ guerrilla fighters

2. Nicaragua ­ revolution to get rid of dictatorship in 1978­

1979

3. El Salvador ­ civil war in 1980 when they would not 

improve living standards

a. Contras ­ U.S. backed and funded militant groups 

(right­wing)

b. Sandinistas ­ socialist government (left­wing)

c. Reagan, Gorbachev, and the End of the Cold War

i. Mikhail Gorbachev ­ leader of Soviet Union 

1. Perestroika ­ practice of reforming economy and politics 

(1979) 

2. Glasnost ­ practice of a more open government (1985)

ii. Reagan and Gorbachev sign treaties together 

iii. PID

1. Fall of Berlin Wall (separates east and west Berlin)

2. November 1989

3. Both men responsible

29

Society and Culture in the 1980s

(04/26/17)

How would America emerge from the malaise of the 1970s?

I. The New Immigrants

a. 1965 Reforms

b. Latinos and Asians

i. Post­1965 immigration:

1. Latin American ­ 46% of new immigration

2. Asian ­ 26% of new immigration 

c. Resistance to Immigration

i. Towns full of immigrants

1. San Francisco 

2. New York, 1983 (China Town)

ii. Illegal immigrants arrested near San Diego

iii. 1950  2002 ­ Asian Americans become apart of immigration chart iv. 1993 ­ Time Magazine embracing different faces of America

v. 1992 ­ started to worry about amount of illegal aliens coming in  vi. Immigration and Nationality Act (1965) ­ 

vii. Immigration Reform and Control Act (1986) ­ 

II. Two Americans in the 1980s

a. Urban Crises

i. PID

1. 1980s

2. Veteran in front of White House

3. Homeless in D.C.

4. “Welcome to Reaganville” 

ii. Drug abuse and homelessness 

b. The AIDS Epidemic

30

i. 1985 ­ The AIDS quilt, Time Magazine “The Growing Threat” 

    ii.    Autoimmune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) ­ disease with serious  loss of immunity, caused by HIV

    iii.    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) ­ damages immune system c. Abundance and Ostentation

i. “Greed is good.” Wall Street (1987)

ii. Celebration of wealth

iii. Bill Gates and Donald Trump ­ known for wealth 

iv. Yuppies (young urban professionals) ­ gentrified neighborhoods,  hated figures 

III. Culture Wars in the 1980s ad 1990s

a. The Religious Right

i. Ralph Reed ­ apart of Christian Coalition to take over U.S. politics  (Republican) 

ii. Concerned Women for America ­ go into school libraries and take  out certain books with damaging messages (Wizard of Oz) 

founded by Beverly LaHayes 

iii. Others protested TV

iv. Moral Majority ­ American political organization associated with  Christianity and Republicans (1979) founded by Jerry Falwell 

b. Liberalization of Culture

i. 1990 ­ Time “Dirty Words” America’s Foul­Mouthed Pop Culture ii. Increase in violence 

1. Slasher films in 1970s and 1980s (Friday the 13th, 

Chainsaw Massacre, etc.) 

2. Music talked more about violence (Parental Advisory 

Explicit Content Only) 

3. Rodney King beaten by L.A. police on March 3, 1991

iii. Sexual content and nudity on TV

1. 1960s ­ Beverly Hillbillies

2. 1970s ­ MASH

3. 1980s ­ Threes Company (Graphic language, man 

pretended he was gay) 

4. PID

a. Sex and the City 

b. 1990s

c. “Sex” in the title

d. Openly gay characters in shows now

iv. 1995 ­ Time “Are Music and Movies Killing America’s Soul?” 31

Timeline of Events from Ch. 27 ­ Ch. 32

1945 ­ Yalta and Potsdam Conferences, United Nations founded

1946 ­ Atomic Energy Commission established

1947 ­ Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan proposed, National Security Act, Taft­Hartley  Act, Levittown construction begins

1948 ­ Berlin blockade, Truman elected president, Hiss case begins

1949 ­ NATO established, Soviet Union explodes A­bomb, Mao victorious in China 1950 ­ NSC­68, Korean War begins, McCarthy’s anticommunism campaign begins 1951 ­ Truman fires MacArthur

1952 ­ American occupation of Japan ends, Eisenhower elected president 1953 ­ Korean War ends

1954 ­ Brown v. Board of Education, Army­McCarthy hearings

1955 ­ Montgomery bus boycott

1956 ­ Federal Highway Act, Eisenhower reelected, Suez crisis

1957 ­ Sputnik launched, Kerouac’s On the Road, Little Rock desegregation crisis 1959 ­ Castro seizes power in Cuba

1960 ­ U­2 incident, Eisenhower’s farewell address, Kennedy elected president 1961 ­ First American in space, U.S. serves diplomatic relations with Cuba, Freedom  rides, Bay of Pigs, Berlin Wall erected

1962 ­ Cuban missile crisis

1963 ­ March on Washington, Kennedy assassinated and Johnson becomes president,  Civil rights demonstrations in Birmingham, Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique 1964 ­ Johnson launches war on poverty, Civil Rights Act, Gulf of Tonkin Resolution,  Johnson elected president, Free Speech Movement begins

1965 ­ Malcolm X assassinated, Voting Rights Act, U.S. troops in Vietnam, Racial  violence in Watts

1966 ­ National Organization for Women founded

32

1967 ­ Antiwar movement grows, Racial violence in Detroit

1968 ­ Tet offensive, Martin Luther King Jr. assassinated, Robert Kennedy assassinated,  Nixon elected president, Turmoil in universities 

1969 ­ Americans land on moon, Rock concert in Woodstock, NY

1970 ­ Cambodian incursion, Kent State and Jackson State shootings 1971 ­ Pentagon Papers published, Nixon imposes wage­price controls 1972 ­ Nixon visits China, SALT I, “Christmas bombing” of North Vietnam, Watergate  burglary, Nixon reelected 

1973 ­ U.S. withdraws from Vietnam, Arab oil embargo, Agnew resigns, Supreme Court  decided Roe v. Wade

1974 ­ Nixon resigns and Ford becomes president, “Stagflation”, Ford pardons Nixon 1975 ­ South Vietnam falls

1976 ­ Carter elected president

1977 ­ Panama Canal treaties signed, Apple introduces first personal computer 1978­1979 ­ Camp David accords, American hostages in Iran, Soviet Union invades  Afghanistan, U.S. and China restore relations, Three Mile Island nuclear accident 1980 ­ U.S. boycotts Moscow Olympics, Reagan elected president 

1981 ­ American hostages in Iran released, Reagan wins tax and budget cuts, AIDS first  reported in U.S.

1982 ­ Severe recession

1983 ­ U.S. invades Grenada

1984 ­ Reagan reelected

1985 ­ Reagan and Gorbachev meet 

1986 ­ Intra­contra scandal revealed

1988 ­ George H. W. Bush elected president

1989 ­ Berlin Wall dismantled, Communist regimes collapse, U.S. troops in Panama 1990 ­ Iraq invades Kuwait

1991 ­ Collapse of Soviet regime, Persian Gulf War

1992 ­ Los Angeles race riots, Bill Clinton elected president

1993 ­ NAFTA ratified

1995 ­ Government shutdown

1996 ­ Welfare reform passed, Defense of Marriage Act, Clinton reelected 1997 ­ Balanced budget agreement

1998 ­ Lewinsky scandal breaks, Clinton impeached by House

1999 ­ Clinton acquitted by Senate

2000 ­ George W. Bush wins contested election

2001 ­ 9/11 attacks, U.S. defeats Taliban regime in Afghanistan

2003 ­ U.S. invades Iraq

2004 ­ Abu Ghraib scandal, Bush reelected

2005 ­ Hurricane Katrina

2007 ­ “Tea Party” fields candidates, Troop “surge” in Iraq, Mortgage crisis 2008 ­ The Great Recession, Obama elected nation’s first African American president 2010 ­ Affordable Care Act signed, Deepwater Horizon (BP) oil spill 2011 ­ Osama bin Laden killed by U.S. Special Forces, Occupy Wall Street

33

2012 ­ Obama reelected, Sandy Hook school shooting

2013 ­ Border bill passes Senate but fails in the House

2015 ­ Obergefell v. Hodges 

34

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here