×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Purdue - AAE 286 - Study Guide - Final
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Purdue - AAE 286 - Study Guide - Final

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

PURDUE / Aeronautical Engineering / AAE 286 / Why are some population more vulnerable to genetic drift than others?

Why are some population more vulnerable to genetic drift than others?

Why are some population more vulnerable to genetic drift than others?

Description


b) In a large, serially­monogamous population, how would Ne (effective population size) compare with Nc (census population size)?




a) What is phenotypic plasticity?




What is genetic drift and why are some populations more vulnerable to it than others?



BIO 286 FINAL REVIEW EXAM 1 REVIEW SHORT ANSWER 1. Snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) have seasonal coat color changes, from brown to white  and back to brown. a) Provide a proximate explanation for this phenomenoDon't forget about the age old question of money and banking final exam
We also discuss several other topics like ut ch 301
We also discuss several other topics like -what are the tradeoffs?
Don't forget about the age old question of How do you compute sales tax from total receipts?
We also discuss several other topics like acct 2101 final exam study guide
Don't forget about the age old question of the story of the sacred marriage of gaia and uranus comes from which classical work
n. Proximate causes are the mechanistic explanations for a phenomenon, such as  temperature dependent or photoperiod dependent gene expression or hormonal  expressions. So for the fur color example, the pigment producing brown fur is  only expressed at higher temperatures; otherwise no pigment is produced and the  fur is white. b)  Provide an ultimate explanation for this phenomenon. The ultimate explanations are the ‘big picture’ reasons why a trait is expressed,  such as fitness or evolutionarily related causes. An explanation might be that  hares whose fur matches their environmental background better, white on snow,  brown in growing vegetation, have higher survivorship. 2. What is genetic drift and why are some populations more vulnerable to it than others? Genetic drift is evolution due to random fluctuations in allele frequencies that DO NOT  necessarily result in a more adapted population. Some populations are more vulnerable  due to size. In smaller populations the random loss of a few individuals from a population may make that allele totally absent in the population. The remaining allele(s) may not  confer higher fitness. 3. a) What is phenotypic plasticity? It is the ability of a single genotype to express a different phenotype under different  environmental conditions.     b) (3 pts) On the following graph represent data that would demonstrate phenotypic plasticity   and data that demonstrate no phenotypic plasticity. Be sure to indicate each clearly and  appropriately label the graph axes. Genotype 2 is not phenotypically plastic.4. a) Contrast serial monogamy with a polyandrous mating system. In serial monogamy the parents are faithful to their mate through a breeding season or  breeding bout as they both work to nurture and protect their mutually produced offspring. Each parent may then go on to mate with other individuals in subsequent breeding  episodes. In a polyandrous mating system, a female mates with multiple males, and it is  the males that are providing the majority of parental care.  b) In a large, serially­monogamous population, how would Ne (effective population size)   compare with Nc (census population size)? For a polyandrous mating system, how they would Ne compare with Nc? Please explain. The census population is the number of individuals in the population. In a large serially  monogamous population, you would predict that the majority of the census population is  mating. Assuming random mating and that the population is not highly inbred, Nc should  approximate Ne. (Ne can never be larger than the censused population size). In the polyandrous mating system, mating is less likely to be random. There may be  many fewer females that are actually contributing genes to the next generation, but on  average a higher proportion of the males in the censused population would be mating.  Therefore the effective population in the polyandrous population relative to the censused  population would be much smaller compared with the effective population size of the  serially monogamous population compared to its NC.5. The above figure represents a fitness, or adaptive landscape. Explain how a population would  move from point Y to point X. The population at point X has a lower fitness than the population at point Y. Therefore  selection should NOT work to decrease the fitness of the Y population. If the population  is going to move down the fitness landscape, it can do so by drift (or having immigration  or emigration significantly change the allele frequencies in the population). Once the  population is at the base of the point X fitness peak, selection can once again direct the  population UP the peak. 6. a) What is the coefficient of relatedness? r is the proportion of genes individuals share that are identical by descent (inherited from  common relatives).      b) If mating is random and the population is large, what is the average relatedness of i. Parent to child? = 0.5 ii. Aunt or uncle to niece/nephew? = 0.25 c) Using a quantitative example, explain how cooperative breeding may evolve. Using the equation rB – C > 0 can explain why cooperation may evolve. If an individual  can assist arelative raise MORE offspring than could be done without the helper, and the  sum of the relatedness is greater than the direct fitness benefit of raising offspring  directly, then cooperation can evolve. So helping to raise 8 offspring that your brother  would not be able to raise on his own (r = 0.25), at the expense of not raising two of your  own offspring (r = 0.5), would be favored by selection. 0.25(8) – 0.5 (2) = 1.0 > 0Or you may help your parents raise three additional siblings that they would not be able  to raise on their own, at the expense of not having a child of your own: 0.5(3) – 0.5 (1) =  1.0 >0 7. What is sexual dimorphism and how have sexual selection and natural selection acted to  produce it? Sexual selection is a form of natural selection that could favor and increase sexual  dimorphism. If one sex (usually females) favor dimorphic traits (among males), then only opposite sex individuals exhibiting the sexually selected traits will gain mating success,  and over time more extremes may be favored. However as these sexually selected traits  incur higher survivorship costs, natural selection can stabilize them. 8. What is polyploidy and how can it contribute to speciation? What organismal group is thought to have diversified the most due to polyploidy? Polyploidy is a duplication in chromosome number in gametes and cells of a given  organism. Derived from diploid (2x) ancestors that produce haploid (1x) gametes,  polyploids may be tetraploid (4x) with diploid (2x) gametes, triploid, hexaploid, etc.  Once the polyploids are formed, they are no longer capable of reproducing with their  ancestral species, so they become reproductively isolated, even if they are sympatric with their ancestors.  A large proportion of the angiosperms (flowering plants) and hypothesized to have  evolved by polyploidy. We talked about Coffea species. 9. We discussed microevolution and used the evolution of antibiotic resistance as an example.  Please define microevolution and explain how each prerequisite of natural selection is met in the  evolution of antibiotic resistance in a population of bacteria. Use a specific example in your  explanation. Feel free to include a figure if it helps. Microevolution is the change in allele frequencies within a population that can be used to  document evolutionary change. The occurrence of antibiotic resistant bacteria is an  example of microevolutionary change that can happen on a very short time scale. If  antibiotic resistance among bacteria is able to evolve by natural selection, it means that  all the requirements for selection have been met (phenotypic variation, the trait is  heritable, all organisms in the population cannot survive, and the individuals with the  resistance trait have higher fitness ­ are better at surviving and reproducing). Antibiotic resistance means that the way that the drug normally kills bacteria is no longer  effective. Commonly antibiotics may kill bacteria by blocking their ability to synthesize: proteins,  ribosomes, lipids, membranes, etc.•  The ability to resist an antibiotic’s toxic effects first arises through mutation or  horizontal gene transfer, which generate phenotypic variation. Now the population will  consist of resistant and non­resistant individuals. •  Because the trait has a genetic basis that is passes from parent to offspring cells, the  trait is heritable. •  Those individuals with the new phenotype do not die from exposure to antibiotics in the environment so they can still synthesize whatever component was targeted by the drug.  They will divide to produce more cells that have the resistance trait. The presence of  antibiotics in the environment acts as a selective force. If the environment was different  and antibiotics were not present, the mutants may not be at an advantage. •  All cells produced do not survive, and those with the resistance trait will have the  highest probability of survival. •  The cells will resistance genes will increase in frequency in the population, because  cells that do not have the resistance genes are dying. 10. What is the Modern Synthesis and what is its contribution to our understanding of Darwinian evolution? The “Modern Synthesis” was a new branch of biology (during the 1930’s and ­40’s) that  integrated genetics and evolutionary biology. The primary contribution was to quantify  and model how evolutionary forces (selection, drift, could operate on Mendelian  variation in a population to produce rates of evolutionary change that explain historical  patterns of evolution. MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. A scientific theory A. is broad in scope. B. is supported by a wide body of scientific evidence. C. is a synonym for a scientific hypothesis. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and B are correct.  2. Which of the following would NOT be a factor that influences how rapidly organisms  may evolve? A. The size of the population. B. The number of haplotypes within the population. C. The rates of environmental change organisms experience.D. The generation time of the population. E. The amount of genetic variation within the species. 3. Evolution occurs at the level of the A. gene B. biomolecule C. community D. population E. individual 4. Horizontal gene transfer A. may allow organisms to rapidly acquire new traits. B. is most common among bacteria. C. may occur between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and B are correct. 5. In a population of Darwin’s finches on the island of Daphne Major, the average beak depth  was 9.96 mm prior to a year of abundant rainfall and 9.51 mm in the year following the rainfall. This is an example of A. directional selection favoring large beak size. B. directional selection favoring small beak size. C. disruptive selection. D. stabilizing selection. E. artificial selection. 6. Which of the following is NOT an assumption of the Hardy­Weinberg Theorem? A. large population B. genetic drift C. no immigration D. random matingE. no natural selection (For questions 7 and 8) The mean number of bristles on the abdomens of a population of  Drosophila pseudoobscura was 30. The mean number of bristles of D. pseudoobscura who  survived to breed was 33. (Recall that R = h2 S; S = µs ­ µ). 7. What is the strength of selection on bristle number? A. 33 bristles B. 30 bristles C. 3 bristles D. 2 bristles E. 63 bristles 8. If the heritability of bristle number is 0.2, what is the average bristle number you expect to  find in the next generation of flies? A. 30.60 B. 30.20 C. 30.04 D. 33.60 E. 33.20 9. In cats, the B allele is dominant and codes for black fur color. The recessive b allele codes for  the absence of pigment, and thus codes for white fur. In a population of cats at Hardy­Weinberg  equilibrium, the frequency of homozygous dominant cats is 0.36. What is the expected frequency of white cats in this population? (Some math that may save you some time: 0.36 x 0.36 = 0.1296; 0.36x 0.64 = 0.2304; 0.6 x 0.6 = 0.36; 0.4 x 0.6 = 0.24; 0.4 x 0.4 = 0.16; 0.64 x 0.64 = 0.4096). A. 0.13 B. 0.16 C. 0.24 D. 0.48 E. 0.64 10. Compared to animals that spend their time within a home range, territorial species A. must be able to defend the space they use. B. may use the quality of the territory to attract mates.C. must have the benefits of having a territory outweigh the cost of having a territory. D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and C are correct.  11. Which of the following phenomena can increase genetic drift? A. bottleneck effect B. small population size C. mutation D. inbreeding E. more than one of the above (For questions 12 – 14) The peppered moth, Biston betularia, experienced a dominant mutation  in the cortex gene, located on chromosome 17, about 1819 in England. This mutation is  responsible for the melanism mutation that causes dark coloration. The mutation is due to an  insertion of a large, tandemly repeated, transposable element into the gene’s first intron. The  ‘normal’ (non­mutant) coloration pattern is peppered light grey. 12. Melanism is a Mendelian trait. Refer to the alleles as M and m. The allele frequencies in a  population at Hardy­Weinberg equilibrium are M=0.4, m=0.6. Assuming that there is no  immediate selection on this trait, what is the expected frequency of melanistic moths in a  population of 100 individuals? A. 0.48 B. 0.36 C. 0.24 D. 0.64 E. 0.16 13. After a coal power plant in the habitat was shut down, the number of individuals of each  genotype that survived is given below. Which of the following represents how you would  calculate absolute fitness of the Mm genotype? A. 4/16B. 4/35 C. 4/60 D. 4/24 E. 4/48 14. Which genotype will have the smallest selection coefficient? A. MM B. Mm C. mm D. MM and mm will have equal selection coefficients. 15. Harris ground squirrels and white­tailed ground squirrels speciated on either side of the  Grand Canyon. This is an example of A. allopatric speciation. B. sympatric speciation. C. hybridization. D. Both A and C. E. Both B and C. 16. Which of the following is/are a primary literature? A. Ecology, evolution, application, integration by David T. Krohne B. Current Biology C. Facebook D. All of the above. E. Both A and B only. 17. If you wanted to establish a newly discovered plant and a newly discovered beetle as new  species, which of the following would you need to do? A. Submit them to different international code of nomenclature governing bodies B. Submit them to the International Code of Nomenclature. C. Publish their descriptions in internationally accessible journals and archive them  multiple locations. D. Both A and C would need to be done.E. Both B and C would need to be done. 18. Among Belding’s ground squirrels, males leave the area where they were born when they  reach a threshold body mass. The behavior of these male ground squirrels is an example of A. philopatry B. saturation dispersal C. pre­saturation dispersal D. Both A and B. E. Both A and C. 19. For a plant that is capable of dispersing long distances to exploit newly created habitat, you  would predict that plant to reproduce by A. autogamy B. outcrossing C. apomixis 20. The number of known animal species on the planet exceeds one million. If you were to  sample one species randomly from all these animals, you would have the highest probability of  selecting a A. butterfly B. mammal C. spider D. beetle E. fly  21. In their analyses, Fennessy et al. used microsatellite data. Microsatellites are A. Tandemly repeated DNA segments usually <10 bp B. Usually composed of the bases G and C C. Are present in eukaryotes but not in prokaryotes. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and C are correct. 22. In their analyses, Fennessy et al. used haplotype data. Haplotypes A. are usually single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP’s).B. are areas of a chromosome that are more prone to recombination than would be  expected by chance. C. may be used to generate a gene tree. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and C are correct. 23. Male spring peeper frogs call for mates earlier in the spring season than do American toads.  Because of this, the two species do not mate. This is an example of A. hybridization B. a post­zygotic reproductive isolating mechanism C. a pre­reproductive isolating mechanism 24. The phylogenetic tree below represents the hypothesized evolutionary relationships among Darwin’s finches. Based on the tree, which of these birds evolved most recently? A. Warbler finch B. Cocos finch C. Small ground finch D. Vegetarian finch E. Large cactus finch25. Based on the evolutionary tree above, do squirrels, guinea pigs, tree shrews and colugos  comprise a clade? A. Yes B. No EXAM 2 REVIEW SHORT ANSWER 1. Globally, at what latitude are deserts most likely to be found? Please explain why. Hadley cells rise at the equator carrying warm moist air and circulate toward each of the  poles. As the air in the cells cool, they deposit precipitation near the equator. When the  air cells descend toward earth at 300 north and south latitudes, they bring dry air. This is  why the majority of the earth’s deserts can be found at about 300 latitudes. 2. In general, scientists favor the evolutionary hypothesis for senescence over the rate of living  hypothesis. The Jones et al. paper (Diversity of ageing across the tree of life) provides a new set  of data that allows us to further examine the merits (i.e., strengths) and deficiencies (i.e.,  weaknesses) of each hypothesis. Make a case for OR against the rate of living hypothesis using two examples from the paper.  Explain how each supports or fails to support the rate of living hypothesis. You will be graded on the strength of your case and the evidence you provide.•  The paper basically says we have to look at the ecological situation of each species to  understand how its senescence/life history pattern fits into any hypothesis for  aging/senescence. •  The rate of living hypothesis says that aging/senescence is the result of accumulated  metabolic damage. o Pro: Many species don’t fit the pattern of the evolutionary hypothesis (which states that reproductive fitness peaks and then mortality increases). Many plant species actually  become more fertile with age, with mortality sometimes decreasing, & some animal  species don’t fit the evolutionary hypothesis pattern. For example, the great tit’s fertility  increases with age as mortality decreases; the crocodile’s fertility levels off while its  mortality increases slowly; the desert tortoise’s fertility increases with age and morality  decreases.   o Con: Some species do not show any detrimental effects of metabolic processes. For  example, the hydra shows no increase in mortality or fertility, even after centuries, even  when it is clearly undergoing metabolic processes that are inherently detrimental. 3. a) On the following graph draw a curve for a population growing logistically and appropriately label the graph axes.      b) What formula would be used to generate the above graph from population data? Why does  this formula generate the curve you drew above? dN/dt = rN ((K­N)/K) Population recruitment decreases (at N = ½ K) as the population nears the carrying  capacity. At the carrying capacity the recruitment decreases to zero. The term (K­N)/K is  what decreases the recruitment relative to exponential growth.  4. a) On the following graph draw a type III functional response curve and appropriately label  the graph axes.     b) Explain why this curve has the shape it does. At low prey densities predators have a difficult time locating, pursuing, or capturing prey. Their abilities increase at intermediate prey densities. At a threshold prey density  predators reach satiation or reach a level at which they cannot consume prey at a higher  rate due to handling time constraints, motivation, etc. 4. The figure below represents the competitive outcomes between two species of oats, Avena  fatua and A. barbata. Based on this data, explain:      a) whether A. fatua is more susceptible to intra­ or interspecific competition. In both figures the dashed line indicates the null hypothesis of no competition between  the two species. And in both experiments density is held constant but the make­up of the  plants varies from monocultures of each species (both ends of the density axes), with  increasing densities of one species (towards 100%). A. fatua does better against all  densities of A. barbata, and decresases its seed spike production when it is only growing  with itself, so it is more susceptible to intraspecific competition over interspecific  competition.     b) whether A. barbata is more susceptible to intra­ or interspecific competition. Conversely, A. barbata does much worse growing with A. fatua completely or at  intermediate densities, (solid line below dashed line) but improves as it grows with  almost all of its own species. Therefore it is more susceptible to interspecific competition. 5. On the following graph draw data that demonstrate negative frequency dependence in a host  parasite relationship. Be sure to provide a legend and appropriately label the graph axes. For host­parasite disease dynamics, what is typically plotted are the allele frequencies of  host resistance and parasite infectivity. This would be an appropriate plot for the  bacteriophage/bacterial system. This assumes a single locus for each gene. 6. a) Distinguish between Batesian and Mullerian mimicry. In Batesian mimicry, non­harmful species have evolved coloration that looks similar to  actually harmful species. The mimics benefit when toxic species are at high enough  proportions that predators have learned to avoid the toxic species, thus benefitting the  Batesian mimics as well. And the mimics do not have to invest the energy to produce  harmfulIn Mullerian mimicry, groups of species that have similar coloration and are all  poisonous or harmful (i.e. bees, wasps) have converged in their phenotypes so that they  collectively benefit from predators avoiding the entire group. b) Which type of mimicry confers a higher fitness advantage to the mimic through a form of  frequency dependent selection? Explain. Batesian mimic fitness increases through positive frequency dependent selection. When  model species are at high frequency, the mimics benefit more. When the models are at  low frequency, the mimics do not have the benefit of lots of predators learning about the  toxic models, so they have a lower fitness because they are more likely to be preyed  upon. 7. a) What are Introduced species and why might they pose an ecological threat to native  populations? Introduced species are those that are not native or not endemic to a particular area but are  brought into an area on purpose (e.g. biological control agent) or accidentally. They can  pose a threat because they can suppress, displace or drive to extinction the  native/endemic species. b) The harlequin ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis, is considered to be one of the world’s  most invasive insects. Provide two reasons why it has been so successful. •  The beetle is able to survive harsh winter conditions because it can find indoor housing  and go into dormancy. •  It is resistant to a parasite (microsporidian) that can negatively affect other beetle  species. •  It has good a good predator avoidance adaptation. It produces unpleasant odor and  secretes fluids to deter predators. •  It can outcompete native species for food. 8. What are bacteriophages and why are they part of a good model system for studying  coevolutionary relationships? What type of coevolution can be studied with this model system? Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria because they can exploit specific  membrane receptors. They form a good model system with bacteria for studying host parasite coevolutionary relationships because of the specificity between host and parasite. The phage/bacterial system is useful for studying reciprocal (as opposed to diffuse)  coevolutionary relatonships. This is because samples of relevant genetic markers can be taken generation by generation in each species to look for reciprocal changes relative to  controls cultured along, and time shift experiments can also be conducted easily. 9. We discussed life history traits along an r to K continuum. Explain what the characteristics of organisms that lie at each end of the continuum are, and how  these life history traits influence demographic patterns.  Include at least four life history traits in your answer. Then describe, for an organism of your choice, a) its survivorship pattern, and b) explain where  its life history characteristics fit along the r to K continuum. r­selected life history traits are those which allow organisms to maximize r – their  intrinsic rate of increase. K­selected species are those which allow organisms to be  successful in environments where they face competition, so the life history traits are  adapted to density –dependent growth. r­selected life history traits include early sexual maturation, high fecundity, short  generation time, (though low juvenile survivorship, characteristic of type III  survivorship), semelparity or low parity, low parental care and parental investment in  offspring . These characteristics allow the populations to potential grow exponentially. K­selected life history traits include delayed sexual maturation, lower fecundity (fewer  offspring per reproductive bout), longer generation time, iteroparity and longer intervals  between reproductive bouts. Parental care/investment per offspring is greater.  Survivorship is likely to be Type I or Type II. 10.What is a ‘super bloom’ and why are they being observed in California?  Super blooms are synchronized growth and flowering of plants due to extensive rainfall.  The plants had had their seeds dormant in the seed bank, perhaps for a decade, and when  favorable conditions for germination suddenly arise, all the plants respond by breaking  dormancy. MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. Which of the following could function as an abiotic filter? A. The intensity of sunlight per unit area. B. The density of parasites per unit area. C. An avalanche. D. All of the above may serve as abiotic filters. E. Both A and C only are abiotic filters.2. In January the average high temperature in West Lafayette was 330 F. In January 2015 the  average high temperature was 39.80 F. This difference represents A. Random fluctuations in weather. B. Climate change. C. Ecological filtering. D. Both A and C are correct. E. Both B and C are correct. 3. Coniferous trees are the dominant vegetation type in which biome? A. temperate deciduous forest B. prairie C. taiga D. shrubland E. tropical savanna 4. Increases in atmospheric CO2 are leading to ocean acidification. How does this happen and  how does it negatively affect organisms with calcareous shells? A. CO2 combines with water to produce calcium carbonate and hydrogen ions.  Bicarbonate precipitates from the water, making it unavailable to organisms. B. CO2 combines with water to produce carbonic acid and hydrogen ions. Calcium  carbonate precipitates from the water, making it unavailable to organisms. C. CO2 combines with water to produce calcium carbonic acid which cannot be used as a calcium source by marine organisms. D. CO2 combines with water to produce carbonic acid, which then dissociates to  bicarbonate and hydrogen ions. Calcium precipitates from the water, making it  unavailable to organisms. E. CO2 combines with water to produce calcium bicarbonate and carbonic acid. The  calcium bicarbonate cannot be used as a calcium source by marine organisms. 5. Which of the following is true about data in a cohort life table? A. Survivorship may decline over time. B. Age­specific life expectancy may increase over time. C. Age­specific fecundity may increase over time.D. All of the above are true. E. Only A and C are true. 6. Consider the three dispersion patterns shown at right (A, B and C, top to bottom, respectively). Which pattern would you expect to find among organisms that defend a resource? A. A B. B Doubly keyed because resource not C. C specified 7. If organisms have a type III survivorship curve, you know that A. they have low early age class mortality. B. they have high early age class mortality. C. they probably have high fecundity per reproductive bout. D. Both A and C are correct. E. Both B and C are correct. 8. Organisms with complex life cycles A. may exploit different ecological niches during different stages of their development. B. may have increased competition between adult and juvenile forms. C. may specialize on different functions during different life stages.D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and C are correct. 9. The rate of living hypothesis gives rise to the testable prediction(s) that A. Extent of cell and tissue damage are caused by metabolism. B. An organism with a faster metabolic rate ages faster. C. Artificial selection cannot extend longevity. D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and B are correct. 10. The evolutionary hypothesis for aging gives rise to the testable prediction(s) that A. Natural selection leads to lifespans of increasing duration. B. Natural selection will weed out mutations/alleles that shorten lifespan. C. Natural selection is too weak to weed out mutations/alleles that shorten lifespan. D. Natural selection favors mutations/alleles that endow early fitness benefits only when  these mutations/alleles provide no late in life costs. E. None of the above 11. Which of the following patterns of fecundity were NOT observed in data presented by Jones  et al.? A. Bell­shaped and spread throughout life. B. Increasing with age. C. Decrease with age and then increase at older age classes. D. Constant with age. E. Plateau with age. 12. Which of the following is true for a population growing exponentially? A. R0 is greater than 1 B. r = 0 C. There is no competition for resources. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and C are correct.13. Among tundra plants, nitrogen is a limiting resource. You expect A. Those reliant upon more similar forms of nitrogen to have more intense competition. B. Those reliant upon more similar forms of nitrogen to have higher niche overlap. C. Tundra plants are regulated by bottom up factors. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and B only are correct. 14. Which of the following should MINIMIZE competition among organisms? A. High rates of disturbance in the habitat. B. Low population density. C. Resource abundance. D. All of the above should minimize competition. E. Both B and C only. 15. Which of the following is an example of mutualism? A. A cactus has spines which harm herbivores. B. The yucca moth is the only pollinator of the yucca plant, and the yucca plant is the  only suitable habitat for the yucca moth to lay its eggs. C. Sometimes, birds eat rotten food from the garbage. D. Cattle egrets wait for cows to displace insects so the birds can eat the insects. E. Staphylococcus aureus in cows developed resistance to antibiotics and then spread this methicillin resistance (MRSA) to humans. 16. What is the difference between a definitive host and an intermediate host? A. Intermediate host are bigger than definitive hosts. B. Adult parasites mate with definitive hosts to produce hybrid offspring who are  resistant to the intermediate hosts. C. Parasites may not infect definitive hosts, but must infect intermediate hosts in order to  reproduce. D. Definitive hosts are required for the parasite to reproduce, while intermediate hosts  serve as nurseries for other life stages of life in the parasite. E. Intermediate host are smaller than definitive hosts.17. Which of the following represents a numerical response? A. Cows eat more grass per unit time in the spring when new grass emerges. B. Cows increase reproduction when they are introduced into a new pasture of ungrazed  grasses. C. Lynx kill more hares per day when hare densities increase. D. The proportion of ants in a colony consumed by ant eaters decreases as ant densities  increase. 18. Which of the following represents an ecotone? A. The transition from a river to a river bank. B. A large distance between habitat patches. C. Differences in dorsal fins between resident and transient pods of orcas. D. Sun versus shade leaves. 19. The Chinese Wattle­necked softshell turtle A. Is on the IUCN red list of endangered species. B. Is threatened in its native habitat. C. Is an invasive species in Hawaii. D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and B are correct. 20. Which of the following is NOT a prerequisite to demonstrate adaptive radiation? A. Demonstrated adaptive value of trait in different environments. B. Demonstrated common ancestry. C. Heritability of traits. D. Phenotype­environment correlation that links divergent phenotypes of descendant  species and their differing environments E. Rapid speciation. 21. The Red Queen Hypothesis A. Is a model used to describe coeolutionary arms races. B. posits that rapid evolutionary change may be necessary to maintain evolutionary stasis. C. Allows for the extinction of a species.D. All of the above are correct. Double keyed because ‘population’ instead of ‘species’  should E. Only A and B are correct. Have been used in ‘C’. 22. When the frequency of scale eating fish (Perissodus microlepis) mouths twisted to the right  in Lake Tanganyika is high, you would predict that A. Most fish that are parasitized by the scale­eaters would look more frequently over  their left shoulders. B. Scale­eating fish with left twisted mouths would be at a fitness advantage. C. Scale­eating fish with right twisted mouths would be at a fitness advantage. D. Both A and B are expected. E. Both A and C are expected.  23. In southern Indiana, e.g. at the Falls of the Ohio, you can find fossils of marine organisms  that lived during the Devonian period (about 400 mya). Why is this the case? A. The land there was part of Pangea and was located closer to the equator. B. The land there was part of Laurasia and was located closer to the equator. C. That portion of the land mass was submerged in shallow tropical waters. D. Both A and C are correct. E. Both B and C are correct. 24. What evidence suggests that plants and insect pollinators have a long­term coevolutionary  relationship? A. Darwin’s orchid is pollinated by a sphinx moth that has a proboscis sized to retrieve  nectar from the flower spur. B. Plants and insects are involved in a mutualism. C. Eighty­six percent of 29 extant ancestral angiosperm families have species that are  insect pollinated. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both B and C are correct. 25. Communities reflect assemblages or organisms within an environment. According to the null  model of community composition, A. Current species reflect the outcomes of past competitive interactions.B. Interactions such as competition have influenced species that coexist. C. Species may have randomly dispersed into the community and established. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and B are correct. 26.What is Charles Darwin’s birthdate? A. February 21, 1839 B. February 14, 1859 C. February 14, 1799 D. February 12, 1859 E. February 12, 1809 27.Which of the following have commercial phage preparation products targeted against them? A. Influenza B. Listeria C. Salmonella D. All of the above do. E. Only B and C do. REVIEW QUESTIONS 1.Fish such as the Peruvian anchovetta were able to recover from overfishing, and the population sizes after this recovery have been similar to some of those prior to the population depletion.   Does this suggest that the anchovetta populations are no longer at ecological or evolutionary  risk?  Explain.   There is no guarantee that the population will remain viable. Can lead to “tragedy of the  commons” where there is little incentive for keeping the commons in good shape if you  can make short­term gain from exploitation. There are other problems where it is hard to  get good estimates of stock and of recruitment curves for some populations, and years  can vary: El Nino made the effect of over­fishing worse. 2.Among both birds and mammals, what it the overall pattern of population persistence? The overall pattern of population persistence is that both birds and mammals range from  10­20 years before extinction. The larger the population, the longer until extinction  occurs.3.What is a fixed harvest effort strategy for hunting or fishing?  Considering small population  sizes, how does it differ from a fixed quota strategy?   A fixed harvest effort strategy is the regulation of the harvesting effort. It results in a  harvest of a certain percent of prey populations and can cause harvest rates to go down  with lower prey densities. Differs from a fixed quota because is a percentage of the  population, not a specific number. 4.Be able to graphically represent a fixed harvest effort, including appropriately labeled axes.   What do harvest lines with different slopes mean biologically? Slope of the harvest line is an index of harvest effort: low slope=low effort. The system is stable where the harvest rate=recruitment rate. Intermediate effort will generate the  highest yield. 5.What is the ‘Tragedy of the Commons’ and how can it apply to commercial fishing? Tragedy of the commons is when there is little incentive for keeping commons in good  shape if you can make short­term gain from exploitation. 6.How do fishing practices for orange roughy demonstrate the importance of life history  information when establishing harvesting practices?BIO 286 FINAL REVIEW EXAM 1 REVIEW SHORT ANSWER 1. Snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) have seasonal coat color changes, from brown to white  and back to brown. a) Provide a proximate explanation for this phenomenon. Proximate causes are the mechanistic explanations for a phenomenon, such as  temperature dependent or photoperiod dependent gene expression or hormonal  expressions. So for the fur color example, the pigment producing brown fur is  only expressed at higher temperatures; otherwise no pigment is produced and the  fur is white. b)  Provide an ultimate explanation for this phenomenon. The ultimate explanations are the ‘big picture’ reasons why a trait is expressed,  such as fitness or evolutionarily related causes. An explanation might be that  hares whose fur matches their environmental background better, white on snow,  brown in growing vegetation, have higher survivorship. 2. What is genetic drift and why are some populations more vulnerable to it than others? Genetic drift is evolution due to random fluctuations in allele frequencies that DO NOT  necessarily result in a more adapted population. Some populations are more vulnerable  due to size. In smaller populations the random loss of a few individuals from a population may make that allele totally absent in the population. The remaining allele(s) may not  confer higher fitness. 3. a) What is phenotypic plasticity? It is the ability of a single genotype to express a different phenotype under different  environmental conditions.     b) (3 pts) On the following graph represent data that would demonstrate phenotypic plasticity   and data that demonstrate no phenotypic plasticity. Be sure to indicate each clearly and  appropriately label the graph axes. Genotype 2 is not phenotypically plastic.4. a) Contrast serial monogamy with a polyandrous mating system. In serial monogamy the parents are faithful to their mate through a breeding season or  breeding bout as they both work to nurture and protect their mutually produced offspring. Each parent may then go on to mate with other individuals in subsequent breeding  episodes. In a polyandrous mating system, a female mates with multiple males, and it is  the males that are providing the majority of parental care.  b) In a large, serially­monogamous population, how would Ne (effective population size)   compare with Nc (census population size)? For a polyandrous mating system, how they would Ne compare with Nc? Please explain. The census population is the number of individuals in the population. In a large serially  monogamous population, you would predict that the majority of the census population is  mating. Assuming random mating and that the population is not highly inbred, Nc should  approximate Ne. (Ne can never be larger than the censused population size). In the polyandrous mating system, mating is less likely to be random. There may be  many fewer females that are actually contributing genes to the next generation, but on  average a higher proportion of the males in the censused population would be mating.  Therefore the effective population in the polyandrous population relative to the censused  population would be much smaller compared with the effective population size of the  serially monogamous population compared to its NC.5. The above figure represents a fitness, or adaptive landscape. Explain how a population would  move from point Y to point X. The population at point X has a lower fitness than the population at point Y. Therefore  selection should NOT work to decrease the fitness of the Y population. If the population  is going to move down the fitness landscape, it can do so by drift (or having immigration  or emigration significantly change the allele frequencies in the population). Once the  population is at the base of the point X fitness peak, selection can once again direct the  population UP the peak. 6. a) What is the coefficient of relatedness? r is the proportion of genes individuals share that are identical by descent (inherited from  common relatives).      b) If mating is random and the population is large, what is the average relatedness of i. Parent to child? = 0.5 ii. Aunt or uncle to niece/nephew? = 0.25 c) Using a quantitative example, explain how cooperative breeding may evolve. Using the equation rB – C > 0 can explain why cooperation may evolve. If an individual  can assist arelative raise MORE offspring than could be done without the helper, and the  sum of the relatedness is greater than the direct fitness benefit of raising offspring  directly, then cooperation can evolve. So helping to raise 8 offspring that your brother  would not be able to raise on his own (r = 0.25), at the expense of not raising two of your  own offspring (r = 0.5), would be favored by selection. 0.25(8) – 0.5 (2) = 1.0 > 0Or you may help your parents raise three additional siblings that they would not be able  to raise on their own, at the expense of not having a child of your own: 0.5(3) – 0.5 (1) =  1.0 >0 7. What is sexual dimorphism and how have sexual selection and natural selection acted to  produce it? Sexual selection is a form of natural selection that could favor and increase sexual  dimorphism. If one sex (usually females) favor dimorphic traits (among males), then only opposite sex individuals exhibiting the sexually selected traits will gain mating success,  and over time more extremes may be favored. However as these sexually selected traits  incur higher survivorship costs, natural selection can stabilize them. 8. What is polyploidy and how can it contribute to speciation? What organismal group is thought to have diversified the most due to polyploidy? Polyploidy is a duplication in chromosome number in gametes and cells of a given  organism. Derived from diploid (2x) ancestors that produce haploid (1x) gametes,  polyploids may be tetraploid (4x) with diploid (2x) gametes, triploid, hexaploid, etc.  Once the polyploids are formed, they are no longer capable of reproducing with their  ancestral species, so they become reproductively isolated, even if they are sympatric with their ancestors.  A large proportion of the angiosperms (flowering plants) and hypothesized to have  evolved by polyploidy. We talked about Coffea species. 9. We discussed microevolution and used the evolution of antibiotic resistance as an example.  Please define microevolution and explain how each prerequisite of natural selection is met in the  evolution of antibiotic resistance in a population of bacteria. Use a specific example in your  explanation. Feel free to include a figure if it helps. Microevolution is the change in allele frequencies within a population that can be used to  document evolutionary change. The occurrence of antibiotic resistant bacteria is an  example of microevolutionary change that can happen on a very short time scale. If  antibiotic resistance among bacteria is able to evolve by natural selection, it means that  all the requirements for selection have been met (phenotypic variation, the trait is  heritable, all organisms in the population cannot survive, and the individuals with the  resistance trait have higher fitness ­ are better at surviving and reproducing). Antibiotic resistance means that the way that the drug normally kills bacteria is no longer  effective. Commonly antibiotics may kill bacteria by blocking their ability to synthesize: proteins,  ribosomes, lipids, membranes, etc.•  The ability to resist an antibiotic’s toxic effects first arises through mutation or  horizontal gene transfer, which generate phenotypic variation. Now the population will  consist of resistant and non­resistant individuals. •  Because the trait has a genetic basis that is passes from parent to offspring cells, the  trait is heritable. •  Those individuals with the new phenotype do not die from exposure to antibiotics in the environment so they can still synthesize whatever component was targeted by the drug.  They will divide to produce more cells that have the resistance trait. The presence of  antibiotics in the environment acts as a selective force. If the environment was different  and antibiotics were not present, the mutants may not be at an advantage. •  All cells produced do not survive, and those with the resistance trait will have the  highest probability of survival. •  The cells will resistance genes will increase in frequency in the population, because  cells that do not have the resistance genes are dying. 10. What is the Modern Synthesis and what is its contribution to our understanding of Darwinian evolution? The “Modern Synthesis” was a new branch of biology (during the 1930’s and ­40’s) that  integrated genetics and evolutionary biology. The primary contribution was to quantify  and model how evolutionary forces (selection, drift, could operate on Mendelian  variation in a population to produce rates of evolutionary change that explain historical  patterns of evolution. MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. A scientific theory A. is broad in scope. B. is supported by a wide body of scientific evidence. C. is a synonym for a scientific hypothesis. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and B are correct.  2. Which of the following would NOT be a factor that influences how rapidly organisms  may evolve? A. The size of the population. B. The number of haplotypes within the population. C. The rates of environmental change organisms experience.D. The generation time of the population. E. The amount of genetic variation within the species. 3. Evolution occurs at the level of the A. gene B. biomolecule C. community D. population E. individual 4. Horizontal gene transfer A. may allow organisms to rapidly acquire new traits. B. is most common among bacteria. C. may occur between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and B are correct. 5. In a population of Darwin’s finches on the island of Daphne Major, the average beak depth  was 9.96 mm prior to a year of abundant rainfall and 9.51 mm in the year following the rainfall. This is an example of A. directional selection favoring large beak size. B. directional selection favoring small beak size. C. disruptive selection. D. stabilizing selection. E. artificial selection. 6. Which of the following is NOT an assumption of the Hardy­Weinberg Theorem? A. large population B. genetic drift C. no immigration D. random matingE. no natural selection (For questions 7 and 8) The mean number of bristles on the abdomens of a population of  Drosophila pseudoobscura was 30. The mean number of bristles of D. pseudoobscura who  survived to breed was 33. (Recall that R = h2 S; S = µs ­ µ). 7. What is the strength of selection on bristle number? A. 33 bristles B. 30 bristles C. 3 bristles D. 2 bristles E. 63 bristles 8. If the heritability of bristle number is 0.2, what is the average bristle number you expect to  find in the next generation of flies? A. 30.60 B. 30.20 C. 30.04 D. 33.60 E. 33.20 9. In cats, the B allele is dominant and codes for black fur color. The recessive b allele codes for  the absence of pigment, and thus codes for white fur. In a population of cats at Hardy­Weinberg  equilibrium, the frequency of homozygous dominant cats is 0.36. What is the expected frequency of white cats in this population? (Some math that may save you some time: 0.36 x 0.36 = 0.1296; 0.36x 0.64 = 0.2304; 0.6 x 0.6 = 0.36; 0.4 x 0.6 = 0.24; 0.4 x 0.4 = 0.16; 0.64 x 0.64 = 0.4096). A. 0.13 B. 0.16 C. 0.24 D. 0.48 E. 0.64 10. Compared to animals that spend their time within a home range, territorial species A. must be able to defend the space they use. B. may use the quality of the territory to attract mates.C. must have the benefits of having a territory outweigh the cost of having a territory. D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and C are correct.  11. Which of the following phenomena can increase genetic drift? A. bottleneck effect B. small population size C. mutation D. inbreeding E. more than one of the above (For questions 12 – 14) The peppered moth, Biston betularia, experienced a dominant mutation  in the cortex gene, located on chromosome 17, about 1819 in England. This mutation is  responsible for the melanism mutation that causes dark coloration. The mutation is due to an  insertion of a large, tandemly repeated, transposable element into the gene’s first intron. The  ‘normal’ (non­mutant) coloration pattern is peppered light grey. 12. Melanism is a Mendelian trait. Refer to the alleles as M and m. The allele frequencies in a  population at Hardy­Weinberg equilibrium are M=0.4, m=0.6. Assuming that there is no  immediate selection on this trait, what is the expected frequency of melanistic moths in a  population of 100 individuals? A. 0.48 B. 0.36 C. 0.24 D. 0.64 E. 0.16 13. After a coal power plant in the habitat was shut down, the number of individuals of each  genotype that survived is given below. Which of the following represents how you would  calculate absolute fitness of the Mm genotype? A. 4/16B. 4/35 C. 4/60 D. 4/24 E. 4/48 14. Which genotype will have the smallest selection coefficient? A. MM B. Mm C. mm D. MM and mm will have equal selection coefficients. 15. Harris ground squirrels and white­tailed ground squirrels speciated on either side of the  Grand Canyon. This is an example of A. allopatric speciation. B. sympatric speciation. C. hybridization. D. Both A and C. E. Both B and C. 16. Which of the following is/are a primary literature? A. Ecology, evolution, application, integration by David T. Krohne B. Current Biology C. Facebook D. All of the above. E. Both A and B only. 17. If you wanted to establish a newly discovered plant and a newly discovered beetle as new  species, which of the following would you need to do? A. Submit them to different international code of nomenclature governing bodies B. Submit them to the International Code of Nomenclature. C. Publish their descriptions in internationally accessible journals and archive them  multiple locations. D. Both A and C would need to be done.E. Both B and C would need to be done. 18. Among Belding’s ground squirrels, males leave the area where they were born when they  reach a threshold body mass. The behavior of these male ground squirrels is an example of A. philopatry B. saturation dispersal C. pre­saturation dispersal D. Both A and B. E. Both A and C. 19. For a plant that is capable of dispersing long distances to exploit newly created habitat, you  would predict that plant to reproduce by A. autogamy B. outcrossing C. apomixis 20. The number of known animal species on the planet exceeds one million. If you were to  sample one species randomly from all these animals, you would have the highest probability of  selecting a A. butterfly B. mammal C. spider D. beetle E. fly  21. In their analyses, Fennessy et al. used microsatellite data. Microsatellites are A. Tandemly repeated DNA segments usually <10 bp B. Usually composed of the bases G and C C. Are present in eukaryotes but not in prokaryotes. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and C are correct. 22. In their analyses, Fennessy et al. used haplotype data. Haplotypes A. are usually single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP’s).B. are areas of a chromosome that are more prone to recombination than would be  expected by chance. C. may be used to generate a gene tree. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and C are correct. 23. Male spring peeper frogs call for mates earlier in the spring season than do American toads.  Because of this, the two species do not mate. This is an example of A. hybridization B. a post­zygotic reproductive isolating mechanism C. a pre­reproductive isolating mechanism 24. The phylogenetic tree below represents the hypothesized evolutionary relationships among Darwin’s finches. Based on the tree, which of these birds evolved most recently? A. Warbler finch B. Cocos finch C. Small ground finch D. Vegetarian finch E. Large cactus finch25. Based on the evolutionary tree above, do squirrels, guinea pigs, tree shrews and colugos  comprise a clade? A. Yes B. No EXAM 2 REVIEW SHORT ANSWER 1. Globally, at what latitude are deserts most likely to be found? Please explain why. Hadley cells rise at the equator carrying warm moist air and circulate toward each of the  poles. As the air in the cells cool, they deposit precipitation near the equator. When the  air cells descend toward earth at 300 north and south latitudes, they bring dry air. This is  why the majority of the earth’s deserts can be found at about 300 latitudes. 2. In general, scientists favor the evolutionary hypothesis for senescence over the rate of living  hypothesis. The Jones et al. paper (Diversity of ageing across the tree of life) provides a new set  of data that allows us to further examine the merits (i.e., strengths) and deficiencies (i.e.,  weaknesses) of each hypothesis. Make a case for OR against the rate of living hypothesis using two examples from the paper.  Explain how each supports or fails to support the rate of living hypothesis. You will be graded on the strength of your case and the evidence you provide.•  The paper basically says we have to look at the ecological situation of each species to  understand how its senescence/life history pattern fits into any hypothesis for  aging/senescence. •  The rate of living hypothesis says that aging/senescence is the result of accumulated  metabolic damage. o Pro: Many species don’t fit the pattern of the evolutionary hypothesis (which states that reproductive fitness peaks and then mortality increases). Many plant species actually  become more fertile with age, with mortality sometimes decreasing, & some animal  species don’t fit the evolutionary hypothesis pattern. For example, the great tit’s fertility  increases with age as mortality decreases; the crocodile’s fertility levels off while its  mortality increases slowly; the desert tortoise’s fertility increases with age and morality  decreases.   o Con: Some species do not show any detrimental effects of metabolic processes. For  example, the hydra shows no increase in mortality or fertility, even after centuries, even  when it is clearly undergoing metabolic processes that are inherently detrimental. 3. a) On the following graph draw a curve for a population growing logistically and appropriately label the graph axes.      b) What formula would be used to generate the above graph from population data? Why does  this formula generate the curve you drew above? dN/dt = rN ((K­N)/K) Population recruitment decreases (at N = ½ K) as the population nears the carrying  capacity. At the carrying capacity the recruitment decreases to zero. The term (K­N)/K is  what decreases the recruitment relative to exponential growth.  4. a) On the following graph draw a type III functional response curve and appropriately label  the graph axes.     b) Explain why this curve has the shape it does. At low prey densities predators have a difficult time locating, pursuing, or capturing prey. Their abilities increase at intermediate prey densities. At a threshold prey density  predators reach satiation or reach a level at which they cannot consume prey at a higher  rate due to handling time constraints, motivation, etc. 4. The figure below represents the competitive outcomes between two species of oats, Avena  fatua and A. barbata. Based on this data, explain:      a) whether A. fatua is more susceptible to intra­ or interspecific competition. In both figures the dashed line indicates the null hypothesis of no competition between  the two species. And in both experiments density is held constant but the make­up of the  plants varies from monocultures of each species (both ends of the density axes), with  increasing densities of one species (towards 100%). A. fatua does better against all  densities of A. barbata, and decresases its seed spike production when it is only growing  with itself, so it is more susceptible to intraspecific competition over interspecific  competition.     b) whether A. barbata is more susceptible to intra­ or interspecific competition. Conversely, A. barbata does much worse growing with A. fatua completely or at  intermediate densities, (solid line below dashed line) but improves as it grows with  almost all of its own species. Therefore it is more susceptible to interspecific competition. 5. On the following graph draw data that demonstrate negative frequency dependence in a host  parasite relationship. Be sure to provide a legend and appropriately label the graph axes. For host­parasite disease dynamics, what is typically plotted are the allele frequencies of  host resistance and parasite infectivity. This would be an appropriate plot for the  bacteriophage/bacterial system. This assumes a single locus for each gene. 6. a) Distinguish between Batesian and Mullerian mimicry. In Batesian mimicry, non­harmful species have evolved coloration that looks similar to  actually harmful species. The mimics benefit when toxic species are at high enough  proportions that predators have learned to avoid the toxic species, thus benefitting the  Batesian mimics as well. And the mimics do not have to invest the energy to produce  harmfulIn Mullerian mimicry, groups of species that have similar coloration and are all  poisonous or harmful (i.e. bees, wasps) have converged in their phenotypes so that they  collectively benefit from predators avoiding the entire group. b) Which type of mimicry confers a higher fitness advantage to the mimic through a form of  frequency dependent selection? Explain. Batesian mimic fitness increases through positive frequency dependent selection. When  model species are at high frequency, the mimics benefit more. When the models are at  low frequency, the mimics do not have the benefit of lots of predators learning about the  toxic models, so they have a lower fitness because they are more likely to be preyed  upon. 7. a) What are Introduced species and why might they pose an ecological threat to native  populations? Introduced species are those that are not native or not endemic to a particular area but are  brought into an area on purpose (e.g. biological control agent) or accidentally. They can  pose a threat because they can suppress, displace or drive to extinction the  native/endemic species. b) The harlequin ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis, is considered to be one of the world’s  most invasive insects. Provide two reasons why it has been so successful. •  The beetle is able to survive harsh winter conditions because it can find indoor housing  and go into dormancy. •  It is resistant to a parasite (microsporidian) that can negatively affect other beetle  species. •  It has good a good predator avoidance adaptation. It produces unpleasant odor and  secretes fluids to deter predators. •  It can outcompete native species for food. 8. What are bacteriophages and why are they part of a good model system for studying  coevolutionary relationships? What type of coevolution can be studied with this model system? Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria because they can exploit specific  membrane receptors. They form a good model system with bacteria for studying host parasite coevolutionary relationships because of the specificity between host and parasite. The phage/bacterial system is useful for studying reciprocal (as opposed to diffuse)  coevolutionary relatonships. This is because samples of relevant genetic markers can be taken generation by generation in each species to look for reciprocal changes relative to  controls cultured along, and time shift experiments can also be conducted easily. 9. We discussed life history traits along an r to K continuum. Explain what the characteristics of organisms that lie at each end of the continuum are, and how  these life history traits influence demographic patterns.  Include at least four life history traits in your answer. Then describe, for an organism of your choice, a) its survivorship pattern, and b) explain where  its life history characteristics fit along the r to K continuum. r­selected life history traits are those which allow organisms to maximize r – their  intrinsic rate of increase. K­selected species are those which allow organisms to be  successful in environments where they face competition, so the life history traits are  adapted to density –dependent growth. r­selected life history traits include early sexual maturation, high fecundity, short  generation time, (though low juvenile survivorship, characteristic of type III  survivorship), semelparity or low parity, low parental care and parental investment in  offspring . These characteristics allow the populations to potential grow exponentially. K­selected life history traits include delayed sexual maturation, lower fecundity (fewer  offspring per reproductive bout), longer generation time, iteroparity and longer intervals  between reproductive bouts. Parental care/investment per offspring is greater.  Survivorship is likely to be Type I or Type II. 10.What is a ‘super bloom’ and why are they being observed in California?  Super blooms are synchronized growth and flowering of plants due to extensive rainfall.  The plants had had their seeds dormant in the seed bank, perhaps for a decade, and when  favorable conditions for germination suddenly arise, all the plants respond by breaking  dormancy. MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. Which of the following could function as an abiotic filter? A. The intensity of sunlight per unit area. B. The density of parasites per unit area. C. An avalanche. D. All of the above may serve as abiotic filters. E. Both A and C only are abiotic filters.2. In January the average high temperature in West Lafayette was 330 F. In January 2015 the  average high temperature was 39.80 F. This difference represents A. Random fluctuations in weather. B. Climate change. C. Ecological filtering. D. Both A and C are correct. E. Both B and C are correct. 3. Coniferous trees are the dominant vegetation type in which biome? A. temperate deciduous forest B. prairie C. taiga D. shrubland E. tropical savanna 4. Increases in atmospheric CO2 are leading to ocean acidification. How does this happen and  how does it negatively affect organisms with calcareous shells? A. CO2 combines with water to produce calcium carbonate and hydrogen ions.  Bicarbonate precipitates from the water, making it unavailable to organisms. B. CO2 combines with water to produce carbonic acid and hydrogen ions. Calcium  carbonate precipitates from the water, making it unavailable to organisms. C. CO2 combines with water to produce calcium carbonic acid which cannot be used as a calcium source by marine organisms. D. CO2 combines with water to produce carbonic acid, which then dissociates to  bicarbonate and hydrogen ions. Calcium precipitates from the water, making it  unavailable to organisms. E. CO2 combines with water to produce calcium bicarbonate and carbonic acid. The  calcium bicarbonate cannot be used as a calcium source by marine organisms. 5. Which of the following is true about data in a cohort life table? A. Survivorship may decline over time. B. Age­specific life expectancy may increase over time. C. Age­specific fecundity may increase over time.D. All of the above are true. E. Only A and C are true. 6. Consider the three dispersion patterns shown at right (A, B and C, top to bottom, respectively). Which pattern would you expect to find among organisms that defend a resource? A. A B. B Doubly keyed because resource not C. C specified 7. If organisms have a type III survivorship curve, you know that A. they have low early age class mortality. B. they have high early age class mortality. C. they probably have high fecundity per reproductive bout. D. Both A and C are correct. E. Both B and C are correct. 8. Organisms with complex life cycles A. may exploit different ecological niches during different stages of their development. B. may have increased competition between adult and juvenile forms. C. may specialize on different functions during different life stages.D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and C are correct. 9. The rate of living hypothesis gives rise to the testable prediction(s) that A. Extent of cell and tissue damage are caused by metabolism. B. An organism with a faster metabolic rate ages faster. C. Artificial selection cannot extend longevity. D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and B are correct. 10. The evolutionary hypothesis for aging gives rise to the testable prediction(s) that A. Natural selection leads to lifespans of increasing duration. B. Natural selection will weed out mutations/alleles that shorten lifespan. C. Natural selection is too weak to weed out mutations/alleles that shorten lifespan. D. Natural selection favors mutations/alleles that endow early fitness benefits only when  these mutations/alleles provide no late in life costs. E. None of the above 11. Which of the following patterns of fecundity were NOT observed in data presented by Jones  et al.? A. Bell­shaped and spread throughout life. B. Increasing with age. C. Decrease with age and then increase at older age classes. D. Constant with age. E. Plateau with age. 12. Which of the following is true for a population growing exponentially? A. R0 is greater than 1 B. r = 0 C. There is no competition for resources. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and C are correct.13. Among tundra plants, nitrogen is a limiting resource. You expect A. Those reliant upon more similar forms of nitrogen to have more intense competition. B. Those reliant upon more similar forms of nitrogen to have higher niche overlap. C. Tundra plants are regulated by bottom up factors. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and B only are correct. 14. Which of the following should MINIMIZE competition among organisms? A. High rates of disturbance in the habitat. B. Low population density. C. Resource abundance. D. All of the above should minimize competition. E. Both B and C only. 15. Which of the following is an example of mutualism? A. A cactus has spines which harm herbivores. B. The yucca moth is the only pollinator of the yucca plant, and the yucca plant is the  only suitable habitat for the yucca moth to lay its eggs. C. Sometimes, birds eat rotten food from the garbage. D. Cattle egrets wait for cows to displace insects so the birds can eat the insects. E. Staphylococcus aureus in cows developed resistance to antibiotics and then spread this methicillin resistance (MRSA) to humans. 16. What is the difference between a definitive host and an intermediate host? A. Intermediate host are bigger than definitive hosts. B. Adult parasites mate with definitive hosts to produce hybrid offspring who are  resistant to the intermediate hosts. C. Parasites may not infect definitive hosts, but must infect intermediate hosts in order to  reproduce. D. Definitive hosts are required for the parasite to reproduce, while intermediate hosts  serve as nurseries for other life stages of life in the parasite. E. Intermediate host are smaller than definitive hosts.17. Which of the following represents a numerical response? A. Cows eat more grass per unit time in the spring when new grass emerges. B. Cows increase reproduction when they are introduced into a new pasture of ungrazed  grasses. C. Lynx kill more hares per day when hare densities increase. D. The proportion of ants in a colony consumed by ant eaters decreases as ant densities  increase. 18. Which of the following represents an ecotone? A. The transition from a river to a river bank. B. A large distance between habitat patches. C. Differences in dorsal fins between resident and transient pods of orcas. D. Sun versus shade leaves. 19. The Chinese Wattle­necked softshell turtle A. Is on the IUCN red list of endangered species. B. Is threatened in its native habitat. C. Is an invasive species in Hawaii. D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and B are correct. 20. Which of the following is NOT a prerequisite to demonstrate adaptive radiation? A. Demonstrated adaptive value of trait in different environments. B. Demonstrated common ancestry. C. Heritability of traits. D. Phenotype­environment correlation that links divergent phenotypes of descendant  species and their differing environments E. Rapid speciation. 21. The Red Queen Hypothesis A. Is a model used to describe coeolutionary arms races. B. posits that rapid evolutionary change may be necessary to maintain evolutionary stasis. C. Allows for the extinction of a species.D. All of the above are correct. Double keyed because ‘population’ instead of ‘species’  should E. Only A and B are correct. Have been used in ‘C’. 22. When the frequency of scale eating fish (Perissodus microlepis) mouths twisted to the right  in Lake Tanganyika is high, you would predict that A. Most fish that are parasitized by the scale­eaters would look more frequently over  their left shoulders. B. Scale­eating fish with left twisted mouths would be at a fitness advantage. C. Scale­eating fish with right twisted mouths would be at a fitness advantage. D. Both A and B are expected. E. Both A and C are expected.  23. In southern Indiana, e.g. at the Falls of the Ohio, you can find fossils of marine organisms  that lived during the Devonian period (about 400 mya). Why is this the case? A. The land there was part of Pangea and was located closer to the equator. B. The land there was part of Laurasia and was located closer to the equator. C. That portion of the land mass was submerged in shallow tropical waters. D. Both A and C are correct. E. Both B and C are correct. 24. What evidence suggests that plants and insect pollinators have a long­term coevolutionary  relationship? A. Darwin’s orchid is pollinated by a sphinx moth that has a proboscis sized to retrieve  nectar from the flower spur. B. Plants and insects are involved in a mutualism. C. Eighty­six percent of 29 extant ancestral angiosperm families have species that are  insect pollinated. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both B and C are correct. 25. Communities reflect assemblages or organisms within an environment. According to the null  model of community composition, A. Current species reflect the outcomes of past competitive interactions.B. Interactions such as competition have influenced species that coexist. C. Species may have randomly dispersed into the community and established. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and B are correct. 26.What is Charles Darwin’s birthdate? A. February 21, 1839 B. February 14, 1859 C. February 14, 1799 D. February 12, 1859 E. February 12, 1809 27.Which of the following have commercial phage preparation products targeted against them? A. Influenza B. Listeria C. Salmonella D. All of the above do. E. Only B and C do. REVIEW QUESTIONS 1.Fish such as the Peruvian anchovetta were able to recover from overfishing, and the population sizes after this recovery have been similar to some of those prior to the population depletion.   Does this suggest that the anchovetta populations are no longer at ecological or evolutionary  risk?  Explain.   There is no guarantee that the population will remain viable. Can lead to “tragedy of the  commons” where there is little incentive for keeping the commons in good shape if you  can make short­term gain from exploitation. There are other problems where it is hard to  get good estimates of stock and of recruitment curves for some populations, and years  can vary: El Nino made the effect of over­fishing worse. 2.Among both birds and mammals, what it the overall pattern of population persistence? The overall pattern of population persistence is that both birds and mammals range from  10­20 years before extinction. The larger the population, the longer until extinction  occurs.3.What is a fixed harvest effort strategy for hunting or fishing?  Considering small population  sizes, how does it differ from a fixed quota strategy?   A fixed harvest effort strategy is the regulation of the harvesting effort. It results in a  harvest of a certain percent of prey populations and can cause harvest rates to go down  with lower prey densities. Differs from a fixed quota because is a percentage of the  population, not a specific number. 4.Be able to graphically represent a fixed harvest effort, including appropriately labeled axes.   What do harvest lines with different slopes mean biologically? Slope of the harvest line is an index of harvest effort: low slope=low effort. The system is stable where the harvest rate=recruitment rate. Intermediate effort will generate the  highest yield. 5.What is the ‘Tragedy of the Commons’ and how can it apply to commercial fishing? Tragedy of the commons is when there is little incentive for keeping commons in good  shape if you can make short­term gain from exploitation. 6.How do fishing practices for orange roughy demonstrate the importance of life history  information when establishing harvesting practices?BIO 286 FINAL REVIEW EXAM 1 REVIEW SHORT ANSWER 1. Snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) have seasonal coat color changes, from brown to white  and back to brown. a) Provide a proximate explanation for this phenomenon. Proximate causes are the mechanistic explanations for a phenomenon, such as  temperature dependent or photoperiod dependent gene expression or hormonal  expressions. So for the fur color example, the pigment producing brown fur is  only expressed at higher temperatures; otherwise no pigment is produced and the  fur is white. b)  Provide an ultimate explanation for this phenomenon. The ultimate explanations are the ‘big picture’ reasons why a trait is expressed,  such as fitness or evolutionarily related causes. An explanation might be that  hares whose fur matches their environmental background better, white on snow,  brown in growing vegetation, have higher survivorship. 2. What is genetic drift and why are some populations more vulnerable to it than others? Genetic drift is evolution due to random fluctuations in allele frequencies that DO NOT  necessarily result in a more adapted population. Some populations are more vulnerable  due to size. In smaller populations the random loss of a few individuals from a population may make that allele totally absent in the population. The remaining allele(s) may not  confer higher fitness. 3. a) What is phenotypic plasticity? It is the ability of a single genotype to express a different phenotype under different  environmental conditions.     b) (3 pts) On the following graph represent data that would demonstrate phenotypic plasticity   and data that demonstrate no phenotypic plasticity. Be sure to indicate each clearly and  appropriately label the graph axes. Genotype 2 is not phenotypically plastic.4. a) Contrast serial monogamy with a polyandrous mating system. In serial monogamy the parents are faithful to their mate through a breeding season or  breeding bout as they both work to nurture and protect their mutually produced offspring. Each parent may then go on to mate with other individuals in subsequent breeding  episodes. In a polyandrous mating system, a female mates with multiple males, and it is  the males that are providing the majority of parental care.  b) In a large, serially­monogamous population, how would Ne (effective population size)   compare with Nc (census population size)? For a polyandrous mating system, how they would Ne compare with Nc? Please explain. The census population is the number of individuals in the population. In a large serially  monogamous population, you would predict that the majority of the census population is  mating. Assuming random mating and that the population is not highly inbred, Nc should  approximate Ne. (Ne can never be larger than the censused population size). In the polyandrous mating system, mating is less likely to be random. There may be  many fewer females that are actually contributing genes to the next generation, but on  average a higher proportion of the males in the censused population would be mating.  Therefore the effective population in the polyandrous population relative to the censused  population would be much smaller compared with the effective population size of the  serially monogamous population compared to its NC.5. The above figure represents a fitness, or adaptive landscape. Explain how a population would  move from point Y to point X. The population at point X has a lower fitness than the population at point Y. Therefore  selection should NOT work to decrease the fitness of the Y population. If the population  is going to move down the fitness landscape, it can do so by drift (or having immigration  or emigration significantly change the allele frequencies in the population). Once the  population is at the base of the point X fitness peak, selection can once again direct the  population UP the peak. 6. a) What is the coefficient of relatedness? r is the proportion of genes individuals share that are identical by descent (inherited from  common relatives).      b) If mating is random and the population is large, what is the average relatedness of i. Parent to child? = 0.5 ii. Aunt or uncle to niece/nephew? = 0.25 c) Using a quantitative example, explain how cooperative breeding may evolve. Using the equation rB – C > 0 can explain why cooperation may evolve. If an individual  can assist arelative raise MORE offspring than could be done without the helper, and the  sum of the relatedness is greater than the direct fitness benefit of raising offspring  directly, then cooperation can evolve. So helping to raise 8 offspring that your brother  would not be able to raise on his own (r = 0.25), at the expense of not raising two of your  own offspring (r = 0.5), would be favored by selection. 0.25(8) – 0.5 (2) = 1.0 > 0Or you may help your parents raise three additional siblings that they would not be able  to raise on their own, at the expense of not having a child of your own: 0.5(3) – 0.5 (1) =  1.0 >0 7. What is sexual dimorphism and how have sexual selection and natural selection acted to  produce it? Sexual selection is a form of natural selection that could favor and increase sexual  dimorphism. If one sex (usually females) favor dimorphic traits (among males), then only opposite sex individuals exhibiting the sexually selected traits will gain mating success,  and over time more extremes may be favored. However as these sexually selected traits  incur higher survivorship costs, natural selection can stabilize them. 8. What is polyploidy and how can it contribute to speciation? What organismal group is thought to have diversified the most due to polyploidy? Polyploidy is a duplication in chromosome number in gametes and cells of a given  organism. Derived from diploid (2x) ancestors that produce haploid (1x) gametes,  polyploids may be tetraploid (4x) with diploid (2x) gametes, triploid, hexaploid, etc.  Once the polyploids are formed, they are no longer capable of reproducing with their  ancestral species, so they become reproductively isolated, even if they are sympatric with their ancestors.  A large proportion of the angiosperms (flowering plants) and hypothesized to have  evolved by polyploidy. We talked about Coffea species. 9. We discussed microevolution and used the evolution of antibiotic resistance as an example.  Please define microevolution and explain how each prerequisite of natural selection is met in the  evolution of antibiotic resistance in a population of bacteria. Use a specific example in your  explanation. Feel free to include a figure if it helps. Microevolution is the change in allele frequencies within a population that can be used to  document evolutionary change. The occurrence of antibiotic resistant bacteria is an  example of microevolutionary change that can happen on a very short time scale. If  antibiotic resistance among bacteria is able to evolve by natural selection, it means that  all the requirements for selection have been met (phenotypic variation, the trait is  heritable, all organisms in the population cannot survive, and the individuals with the  resistance trait have higher fitness ­ are better at surviving and reproducing). Antibiotic resistance means that the way that the drug normally kills bacteria is no longer  effective. Commonly antibiotics may kill bacteria by blocking their ability to synthesize: proteins,  ribosomes, lipids, membranes, etc.•  The ability to resist an antibiotic’s toxic effects first arises through mutation or  horizontal gene transfer, which generate phenotypic variation. Now the population will  consist of resistant and non­resistant individuals. •  Because the trait has a genetic basis that is passes from parent to offspring cells, the  trait is heritable. •  Those individuals with the new phenotype do not die from exposure to antibiotics in the environment so they can still synthesize whatever component was targeted by the drug.  They will divide to produce more cells that have the resistance trait. The presence of  antibiotics in the environment acts as a selective force. If the environment was different  and antibiotics were not present, the mutants may not be at an advantage. •  All cells produced do not survive, and those with the resistance trait will have the  highest probability of survival. •  The cells will resistance genes will increase in frequency in the population, because  cells that do not have the resistance genes are dying. 10. What is the Modern Synthesis and what is its contribution to our understanding of Darwinian evolution? The “Modern Synthesis” was a new branch of biology (during the 1930’s and ­40’s) that  integrated genetics and evolutionary biology. The primary contribution was to quantify  and model how evolutionary forces (selection, drift, could operate on Mendelian  variation in a population to produce rates of evolutionary change that explain historical  patterns of evolution. MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. A scientific theory A. is broad in scope. B. is supported by a wide body of scientific evidence. C. is a synonym for a scientific hypothesis. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and B are correct.  2. Which of the following would NOT be a factor that influences how rapidly organisms  may evolve? A. The size of the population. B. The number of haplotypes within the population. C. The rates of environmental change organisms experience.D. The generation time of the population. E. The amount of genetic variation within the species. 3. Evolution occurs at the level of the A. gene B. biomolecule C. community D. population E. individual 4. Horizontal gene transfer A. may allow organisms to rapidly acquire new traits. B. is most common among bacteria. C. may occur between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and B are correct. 5. In a population of Darwin’s finches on the island of Daphne Major, the average beak depth  was 9.96 mm prior to a year of abundant rainfall and 9.51 mm in the year following the rainfall. This is an example of A. directional selection favoring large beak size. B. directional selection favoring small beak size. C. disruptive selection. D. stabilizing selection. E. artificial selection. 6. Which of the following is NOT an assumption of the Hardy­Weinberg Theorem? A. large population B. genetic drift C. no immigration D. random matingE. no natural selection (For questions 7 and 8) The mean number of bristles on the abdomens of a population of  Drosophila pseudoobscura was 30. The mean number of bristles of D. pseudoobscura who  survived to breed was 33. (Recall that R = h2 S; S = µs ­ µ). 7. What is the strength of selection on bristle number? A. 33 bristles B. 30 bristles C. 3 bristles D. 2 bristles E. 63 bristles 8. If the heritability of bristle number is 0.2, what is the average bristle number you expect to  find in the next generation of flies? A. 30.60 B. 30.20 C. 30.04 D. 33.60 E. 33.20 9. In cats, the B allele is dominant and codes for black fur color. The recessive b allele codes for  the absence of pigment, and thus codes for white fur. In a population of cats at Hardy­Weinberg  equilibrium, the frequency of homozygous dominant cats is 0.36. What is the expected frequency of white cats in this population? (Some math that may save you some time: 0.36 x 0.36 = 0.1296; 0.36x 0.64 = 0.2304; 0.6 x 0.6 = 0.36; 0.4 x 0.6 = 0.24; 0.4 x 0.4 = 0.16; 0.64 x 0.64 = 0.4096). A. 0.13 B. 0.16 C. 0.24 D. 0.48 E. 0.64 10. Compared to animals that spend their time within a home range, territorial species A. must be able to defend the space they use. B. may use the quality of the territory to attract mates.C. must have the benefits of having a territory outweigh the cost of having a territory. D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and C are correct.  11. Which of the following phenomena can increase genetic drift? A. bottleneck effect B. small population size C. mutation D. inbreeding E. more than one of the above (For questions 12 – 14) The peppered moth, Biston betularia, experienced a dominant mutation  in the cortex gene, located on chromosome 17, about 1819 in England. This mutation is  responsible for the melanism mutation that causes dark coloration. The mutation is due to an  insertion of a large, tandemly repeated, transposable element into the gene’s first intron. The  ‘normal’ (non­mutant) coloration pattern is peppered light grey. 12. Melanism is a Mendelian trait. Refer to the alleles as M and m. The allele frequencies in a  population at Hardy­Weinberg equilibrium are M=0.4, m=0.6. Assuming that there is no  immediate selection on this trait, what is the expected frequency of melanistic moths in a  population of 100 individuals? A. 0.48 B. 0.36 C. 0.24 D. 0.64 E. 0.16 13. After a coal power plant in the habitat was shut down, the number of individuals of each  genotype that survived is given below. Which of the following represents how you would  calculate absolute fitness of the Mm genotype? A. 4/16B. 4/35 C. 4/60 D. 4/24 E. 4/48 14. Which genotype will have the smallest selection coefficient? A. MM B. Mm C. mm D. MM and mm will have equal selection coefficients. 15. Harris ground squirrels and white­tailed ground squirrels speciated on either side of the  Grand Canyon. This is an example of A. allopatric speciation. B. sympatric speciation. C. hybridization. D. Both A and C. E. Both B and C. 16. Which of the following is/are a primary literature? A. Ecology, evolution, application, integration by David T. Krohne B. Current Biology C. Facebook D. All of the above. E. Both A and B only. 17. If you wanted to establish a newly discovered plant and a newly discovered beetle as new  species, which of the following would you need to do? A. Submit them to different international code of nomenclature governing bodies B. Submit them to the International Code of Nomenclature. C. Publish their descriptions in internationally accessible journals and archive them  multiple locations. D. Both A and C would need to be done.E. Both B and C would need to be done. 18. Among Belding’s ground squirrels, males leave the area where they were born when they  reach a threshold body mass. The behavior of these male ground squirrels is an example of A. philopatry B. saturation dispersal C. pre­saturation dispersal D. Both A and B. E. Both A and C. 19. For a plant that is capable of dispersing long distances to exploit newly created habitat, you  would predict that plant to reproduce by A. autogamy B. outcrossing C. apomixis 20. The number of known animal species on the planet exceeds one million. If you were to  sample one species randomly from all these animals, you would have the highest probability of  selecting a A. butterfly B. mammal C. spider D. beetle E. fly  21. In their analyses, Fennessy et al. used microsatellite data. Microsatellites are A. Tandemly repeated DNA segments usually <10 bp B. Usually composed of the bases G and C C. Are present in eukaryotes but not in prokaryotes. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and C are correct. 22. In their analyses, Fennessy et al. used haplotype data. Haplotypes A. are usually single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP’s).B. are areas of a chromosome that are more prone to recombination than would be  expected by chance. C. may be used to generate a gene tree. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and C are correct. 23. Male spring peeper frogs call for mates earlier in the spring season than do American toads.  Because of this, the two species do not mate. This is an example of A. hybridization B. a post­zygotic reproductive isolating mechanism C. a pre­reproductive isolating mechanism 24. The phylogenetic tree below represents the hypothesized evolutionary relationships among Darwin’s finches. Based on the tree, which of these birds evolved most recently? A. Warbler finch B. Cocos finch C. Small ground finch D. Vegetarian finch E. Large cactus finch25. Based on the evolutionary tree above, do squirrels, guinea pigs, tree shrews and colugos  comprise a clade? A. Yes B. No EXAM 2 REVIEW SHORT ANSWER 1. Globally, at what latitude are deserts most likely to be found? Please explain why. Hadley cells rise at the equator carrying warm moist air and circulate toward each of the  poles. As the air in the cells cool, they deposit precipitation near the equator. When the  air cells descend toward earth at 300 north and south latitudes, they bring dry air. This is  why the majority of the earth’s deserts can be found at about 300 latitudes. 2. In general, scientists favor the evolutionary hypothesis for senescence over the rate of living  hypothesis. The Jones et al. paper (Diversity of ageing across the tree of life) provides a new set  of data that allows us to further examine the merits (i.e., strengths) and deficiencies (i.e.,  weaknesses) of each hypothesis. Make a case for OR against the rate of living hypothesis using two examples from the paper.  Explain how each supports or fails to support the rate of living hypothesis. You will be graded on the strength of your case and the evidence you provide.•  The paper basically says we have to look at the ecological situation of each species to  understand how its senescence/life history pattern fits into any hypothesis for  aging/senescence. •  The rate of living hypothesis says that aging/senescence is the result of accumulated  metabolic damage. o Pro: Many species don’t fit the pattern of the evolutionary hypothesis (which states that reproductive fitness peaks and then mortality increases). Many plant species actually  become more fertile with age, with mortality sometimes decreasing, & some animal  species don’t fit the evolutionary hypothesis pattern. For example, the great tit’s fertility  increases with age as mortality decreases; the crocodile’s fertility levels off while its  mortality increases slowly; the desert tortoise’s fertility increases with age and morality  decreases.   o Con: Some species do not show any detrimental effects of metabolic processes. For  example, the hydra shows no increase in mortality or fertility, even after centuries, even  when it is clearly undergoing metabolic processes that are inherently detrimental. 3. a) On the following graph draw a curve for a population growing logistically and appropriately label the graph axes.      b) What formula would be used to generate the above graph from population data? Why does  this formula generate the curve you drew above? dN/dt = rN ((K­N)/K) Population recruitment decreases (at N = ½ K) as the population nears the carrying  capacity. At the carrying capacity the recruitment decreases to zero. The term (K­N)/K is  what decreases the recruitment relative to exponential growth.  4. a) On the following graph draw a type III functional response curve and appropriately label  the graph axes.     b) Explain why this curve has the shape it does. At low prey densities predators have a difficult time locating, pursuing, or capturing prey. Their abilities increase at intermediate prey densities. At a threshold prey density  predators reach satiation or reach a level at which they cannot consume prey at a higher  rate due to handling time constraints, motivation, etc. 4. The figure below represents the competitive outcomes between two species of oats, Avena  fatua and A. barbata. Based on this data, explain:      a) whether A. fatua is more susceptible to intra­ or interspecific competition. In both figures the dashed line indicates the null hypothesis of no competition between  the two species. And in both experiments density is held constant but the make­up of the  plants varies from monocultures of each species (both ends of the density axes), with  increasing densities of one species (towards 100%). A. fatua does better against all  densities of A. barbata, and decresases its seed spike production when it is only growing  with itself, so it is more susceptible to intraspecific competition over interspecific  competition.     b) whether A. barbata is more susceptible to intra­ or interspecific competition. Conversely, A. barbata does much worse growing with A. fatua completely or at  intermediate densities, (solid line below dashed line) but improves as it grows with  almost all of its own species. Therefore it is more susceptible to interspecific competition. 5. On the following graph draw data that demonstrate negative frequency dependence in a host  parasite relationship. Be sure to provide a legend and appropriately label the graph axes. For host­parasite disease dynamics, what is typically plotted are the allele frequencies of  host resistance and parasite infectivity. This would be an appropriate plot for the  bacteriophage/bacterial system. This assumes a single locus for each gene. 6. a) Distinguish between Batesian and Mullerian mimicry. In Batesian mimicry, non­harmful species have evolved coloration that looks similar to  actually harmful species. The mimics benefit when toxic species are at high enough  proportions that predators have learned to avoid the toxic species, thus benefitting the  Batesian mimics as well. And the mimics do not have to invest the energy to produce  harmfulIn Mullerian mimicry, groups of species that have similar coloration and are all  poisonous or harmful (i.e. bees, wasps) have converged in their phenotypes so that they  collectively benefit from predators avoiding the entire group. b) Which type of mimicry confers a higher fitness advantage to the mimic through a form of  frequency dependent selection? Explain. Batesian mimic fitness increases through positive frequency dependent selection. When  model species are at high frequency, the mimics benefit more. When the models are at  low frequency, the mimics do not have the benefit of lots of predators learning about the  toxic models, so they have a lower fitness because they are more likely to be preyed  upon. 7. a) What are Introduced species and why might they pose an ecological threat to native  populations? Introduced species are those that are not native or not endemic to a particular area but are  brought into an area on purpose (e.g. biological control agent) or accidentally. They can  pose a threat because they can suppress, displace or drive to extinction the  native/endemic species. b) The harlequin ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis, is considered to be one of the world’s  most invasive insects. Provide two reasons why it has been so successful. •  The beetle is able to survive harsh winter conditions because it can find indoor housing  and go into dormancy. •  It is resistant to a parasite (microsporidian) that can negatively affect other beetle  species. •  It has good a good predator avoidance adaptation. It produces unpleasant odor and  secretes fluids to deter predators. •  It can outcompete native species for food. 8. What are bacteriophages and why are they part of a good model system for studying  coevolutionary relationships? What type of coevolution can be studied with this model system? Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria because they can exploit specific  membrane receptors. They form a good model system with bacteria for studying host parasite coevolutionary relationships because of the specificity between host and parasite. The phage/bacterial system is useful for studying reciprocal (as opposed to diffuse)  coevolutionary relatonships. This is because samples of relevant genetic markers can be taken generation by generation in each species to look for reciprocal changes relative to  controls cultured along, and time shift experiments can also be conducted easily. 9. We discussed life history traits along an r to K continuum. Explain what the characteristics of organisms that lie at each end of the continuum are, and how  these life history traits influence demographic patterns.  Include at least four life history traits in your answer. Then describe, for an organism of your choice, a) its survivorship pattern, and b) explain where  its life history characteristics fit along the r to K continuum. r­selected life history traits are those which allow organisms to maximize r – their  intrinsic rate of increase. K­selected species are those which allow organisms to be  successful in environments where they face competition, so the life history traits are  adapted to density –dependent growth. r­selected life history traits include early sexual maturation, high fecundity, short  generation time, (though low juvenile survivorship, characteristic of type III  survivorship), semelparity or low parity, low parental care and parental investment in  offspring . These characteristics allow the populations to potential grow exponentially. K­selected life history traits include delayed sexual maturation, lower fecundity (fewer  offspring per reproductive bout), longer generation time, iteroparity and longer intervals  between reproductive bouts. Parental care/investment per offspring is greater.  Survivorship is likely to be Type I or Type II. 10.What is a ‘super bloom’ and why are they being observed in California?  Super blooms are synchronized growth and flowering of plants due to extensive rainfall.  The plants had had their seeds dormant in the seed bank, perhaps for a decade, and when  favorable conditions for germination suddenly arise, all the plants respond by breaking  dormancy. MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. Which of the following could function as an abiotic filter? A. The intensity of sunlight per unit area. B. The density of parasites per unit area. C. An avalanche. D. All of the above may serve as abiotic filters. E. Both A and C only are abiotic filters.2. In January the average high temperature in West Lafayette was 330 F. In January 2015 the  average high temperature was 39.80 F. This difference represents A. Random fluctuations in weather. B. Climate change. C. Ecological filtering. D. Both A and C are correct. E. Both B and C are correct. 3. Coniferous trees are the dominant vegetation type in which biome? A. temperate deciduous forest B. prairie C. taiga D. shrubland E. tropical savanna 4. Increases in atmospheric CO2 are leading to ocean acidification. How does this happen and  how does it negatively affect organisms with calcareous shells? A. CO2 combines with water to produce calcium carbonate and hydrogen ions.  Bicarbonate precipitates from the water, making it unavailable to organisms. B. CO2 combines with water to produce carbonic acid and hydrogen ions. Calcium  carbonate precipitates from the water, making it unavailable to organisms. C. CO2 combines with water to produce calcium carbonic acid which cannot be used as a calcium source by marine organisms. D. CO2 combines with water to produce carbonic acid, which then dissociates to  bicarbonate and hydrogen ions. Calcium precipitates from the water, making it  unavailable to organisms. E. CO2 combines with water to produce calcium bicarbonate and carbonic acid. The  calcium bicarbonate cannot be used as a calcium source by marine organisms. 5. Which of the following is true about data in a cohort life table? A. Survivorship may decline over time. B. Age­specific life expectancy may increase over time. C. Age­specific fecundity may increase over time.D. All of the above are true. E. Only A and C are true. 6. Consider the three dispersion patterns shown at right (A, B and C, top to bottom, respectively). Which pattern would you expect to find among organisms that defend a resource? A. A B. B Doubly keyed because resource not C. C specified 7. If organisms have a type III survivorship curve, you know that A. they have low early age class mortality. B. they have high early age class mortality. C. they probably have high fecundity per reproductive bout. D. Both A and C are correct. E. Both B and C are correct. 8. Organisms with complex life cycles A. may exploit different ecological niches during different stages of their development. B. may have increased competition between adult and juvenile forms. C. may specialize on different functions during different life stages.D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and C are correct. 9. The rate of living hypothesis gives rise to the testable prediction(s) that A. Extent of cell and tissue damage are caused by metabolism. B. An organism with a faster metabolic rate ages faster. C. Artificial selection cannot extend longevity. D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and B are correct. 10. The evolutionary hypothesis for aging gives rise to the testable prediction(s) that A. Natural selection leads to lifespans of increasing duration. B. Natural selection will weed out mutations/alleles that shorten lifespan. C. Natural selection is too weak to weed out mutations/alleles that shorten lifespan. D. Natural selection favors mutations/alleles that endow early fitness benefits only when  these mutations/alleles provide no late in life costs. E. None of the above 11. Which of the following patterns of fecundity were NOT observed in data presented by Jones  et al.? A. Bell­shaped and spread throughout life. B. Increasing with age. C. Decrease with age and then increase at older age classes. D. Constant with age. E. Plateau with age. 12. Which of the following is true for a population growing exponentially? A. R0 is greater than 1 B. r = 0 C. There is no competition for resources. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and C are correct.13. Among tundra plants, nitrogen is a limiting resource. You expect A. Those reliant upon more similar forms of nitrogen to have more intense competition. B. Those reliant upon more similar forms of nitrogen to have higher niche overlap. C. Tundra plants are regulated by bottom up factors. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and B only are correct. 14. Which of the following should MINIMIZE competition among organisms? A. High rates of disturbance in the habitat. B. Low population density. C. Resource abundance. D. All of the above should minimize competition. E. Both B and C only. 15. Which of the following is an example of mutualism? A. A cactus has spines which harm herbivores. B. The yucca moth is the only pollinator of the yucca plant, and the yucca plant is the  only suitable habitat for the yucca moth to lay its eggs. C. Sometimes, birds eat rotten food from the garbage. D. Cattle egrets wait for cows to displace insects so the birds can eat the insects. E. Staphylococcus aureus in cows developed resistance to antibiotics and then spread this methicillin resistance (MRSA) to humans. 16. What is the difference between a definitive host and an intermediate host? A. Intermediate host are bigger than definitive hosts. B. Adult parasites mate with definitive hosts to produce hybrid offspring who are  resistant to the intermediate hosts. C. Parasites may not infect definitive hosts, but must infect intermediate hosts in order to  reproduce. D. Definitive hosts are required for the parasite to reproduce, while intermediate hosts  serve as nurseries for other life stages of life in the parasite. E. Intermediate host are smaller than definitive hosts.17. Which of the following represents a numerical response? A. Cows eat more grass per unit time in the spring when new grass emerges. B. Cows increase reproduction when they are introduced into a new pasture of ungrazed  grasses. C. Lynx kill more hares per day when hare densities increase. D. The proportion of ants in a colony consumed by ant eaters decreases as ant densities  increase. 18. Which of the following represents an ecotone? A. The transition from a river to a river bank. B. A large distance between habitat patches. C. Differences in dorsal fins between resident and transient pods of orcas. D. Sun versus shade leaves. 19. The Chinese Wattle­necked softshell turtle A. Is on the IUCN red list of endangered species. B. Is threatened in its native habitat. C. Is an invasive species in Hawaii. D. All of the above are correct. E. Only A and B are correct. 20. Which of the following is NOT a prerequisite to demonstrate adaptive radiation? A. Demonstrated adaptive value of trait in different environments. B. Demonstrated common ancestry. C. Heritability of traits. D. Phenotype­environment correlation that links divergent phenotypes of descendant  species and their differing environments E. Rapid speciation. 21. The Red Queen Hypothesis A. Is a model used to describe coeolutionary arms races. B. posits that rapid evolutionary change may be necessary to maintain evolutionary stasis. C. Allows for the extinction of a species.D. All of the above are correct. Double keyed because ‘population’ instead of ‘species’  should E. Only A and B are correct. Have been used in ‘C’. 22. When the frequency of scale eating fish (Perissodus microlepis) mouths twisted to the right  in Lake Tanganyika is high, you would predict that A. Most fish that are parasitized by the scale­eaters would look more frequently over  their left shoulders. B. Scale­eating fish with left twisted mouths would be at a fitness advantage. C. Scale­eating fish with right twisted mouths would be at a fitness advantage. D. Both A and B are expected. E. Both A and C are expected.  23. In southern Indiana, e.g. at the Falls of the Ohio, you can find fossils of marine organisms  that lived during the Devonian period (about 400 mya). Why is this the case? A. The land there was part of Pangea and was located closer to the equator. B. The land there was part of Laurasia and was located closer to the equator. C. That portion of the land mass was submerged in shallow tropical waters. D. Both A and C are correct. E. Both B and C are correct. 24. What evidence suggests that plants and insect pollinators have a long­term coevolutionary  relationship? A. Darwin’s orchid is pollinated by a sphinx moth that has a proboscis sized to retrieve  nectar from the flower spur. B. Plants and insects are involved in a mutualism. C. Eighty­six percent of 29 extant ancestral angiosperm families have species that are  insect pollinated. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both B and C are correct. 25. Communities reflect assemblages or organisms within an environment. According to the null  model of community composition, A. Current species reflect the outcomes of past competitive interactions.B. Interactions such as competition have influenced species that coexist. C. Species may have randomly dispersed into the community and established. D. All of the above are correct. E. Both A and B are correct. 26.What is Charles Darwin’s birthdate? A. February 21, 1839 B. February 14, 1859 C. February 14, 1799 D. February 12, 1859 E. February 12, 1809 27.Which of the following have commercial phage preparation products targeted against them? A. Influenza B. Listeria C. Salmonella D. All of the above do. E. Only B and C do. REVIEW QUESTIONS 1.Fish such as the Peruvian anchovetta were able to recover from overfishing, and the population sizes after this recovery have been similar to some of those prior to the population depletion.   Does this suggest that the anchovetta populations are no longer at ecological or evolutionary  risk?  Explain.   There is no guarantee that the population will remain viable. Can lead to “tragedy of the  commons” where there is little incentive for keeping the commons in good shape if you  can make short­term gain from exploitation. There are other problems where it is hard to  get good estimates of stock and of recruitment curves for some populations, and years  can vary: El Nino made the effect of over­fishing worse. 2.Among both birds and mammals, what it the overall pattern of population persistence? The overall pattern of population persistence is that both birds and mammals range from  10­20 years before extinction. The larger the population, the longer until extinction  occurs.3.What is a fixed harvest effort strategy for hunting or fishing?  Considering small population  sizes, how does it differ from a fixed quota strategy?   A fixed harvest effort strategy is the regulation of the harvesting effort. It results in a  harvest of a certain percent of prey populations and can cause harvest rates to go down  with lower prey densities. Differs from a fixed quota because is a percentage of the  population, not a specific number. 4.Be able to graphically represent a fixed harvest effort, including appropriately labeled axes.   What do harvest lines with different slopes mean biologically? Slope of the harvest line is an index of harvest effort: low slope=low effort. The system is stable where the harvest rate=recruitment rate. Intermediate effort will generate the  highest yield. 5.What is the ‘Tragedy of the Commons’ and how can it apply to commercial fishing? Tragedy of the commons is when there is little incentive for keeping commons in good  shape if you can make short­term gain from exploitation. 6.How do fishing practices for orange roughy demonstrate the importance of life history  information when establishing harvesting practices?

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here