×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Tulane - CELL 01 - Study Guide - Final
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Tulane - CELL 01 - Study Guide - Final

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

TULANE / Biology / CELL 01 / What are the importance of biology?

What are the importance of biology?

What are the importance of biology?

Description

School: Tulane University
Department: Biology
Course: Intro to Cell & Molec Biology
Professor: Meenakshi vijayaraghavan
Term: Spring 2017
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: CELL 1010 - Final Study Guide
Description: Compiled study guide of chapters 1-10!
Uploaded: 05/01/2017
76 Pages 12 Views 12 Unlocks
Reviews


CELL 1010 ­ Final Exam Study Guide


What are the importance of biology?



CHAPTER 1 ­ AN INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY

Biology = study of life

Importance of Biology

● Discovery of Nebraska shark

○ First case of sharks exhibiting parthenogenesis ­ ability of female to fertilize her own egg ○ Egg undergoes mitosis without cytokines

● Transgenic Rice (golden rice)

○ Took genes from beans, fungus, wild rice, and daffodil to create a rice with a lot of Vitamin A 

(beta­carotene)

● Viruses ­ living or nonliving?

● Started as non living outside of host

○ Were thought to be non living because they just USE living cells to function, now discovered the We also discuss several other topics like what is The Social Exchange Approach?

STEAL parts of living cells Don't forget about the age old question of what are the difference between astrology and astronomy?

● Underwent reductive evolution

● Can’t be classified as non living 

Seven Characteristics of Life

1. Cells and organization

2. Energy use and metabolism

a. Energy: ability to do work/capacity to cause change


What is mitosis?



i. Autotrophs → producers

1. Phototrophs (energy from sunlight)

2. Chemotrophs (make energy from other compounds)

ii. Heterotrophs → consumers

1. Get energy from carbs, lipids, proteins from producers, through cellular respiration b. Metabolism:  breakdown (catabolism) and synthesis (anabolism) of molecules 3. Response to environmental changes

a. Aka response to stimuli. Very important for adaptation. 

4. Regulation and homeostasis

5. Growth and development

a. Mitosis: example of growth 

i. More or larger cells

b. Voice change: example of development 

i. Changes in properties of cells/genes If you want to learn more check out Cognitive Theory

6. Reproduction

a. DNA has capacity to store information, replicate, reproduce

i. Ability to mutate (allows evolution)

7. Biological evolution

Properties of Life: 

A. UNITY ­ evolutionary conservation ­ common set of characteristics among all organisms B. DIVERSITY ­ many different environments with diverse organisms ­ speciation


What is the biological evolution?



Levels of Organization

1.) Atoms 2.) Molecules/macromolecules 3.) Cells 4.) Tissues 5.) Organs 6.) Organism 7.) 

Population 8.) Community 9.) Ecosystem 10.) Biosphere

● Population: group of the same species 

■ Species: organisms with similar genetic makeup with capability to mate

● Community: Interaction between different species 

● Ecosystem: Interaction btwn biotic and abiotic systems (land, air, water) If you want to learn more check out what are the difference between atoms and molecules?

● Biosphere: everywhere on earth where living organisms exist

**if asked for cellular level of organization: atoms→ molecule→ macromolecule→  organelles→cell

**if asked for level of organization of organism: cell→ tissue→ organs→ organ  system→ organism

**if asked for level of organization of biosphere: organism→ population→ community→ ecosystem→ biosphere

Evolution

● Accumulation of favorable changes and adaptations in a population over time ○ Ex: Glyptodont was really slow →became armadillo (can roll up and hide from

predators)

● Homologous structures: look different, different functions, connected evolutionarily ○ Ex: our forelimbs (grasp) vs. cat's forelimbs (walk) vs. porpoises forelimbs (swim) vs. bats wing 

(fly)

● Analogous Structures: look similar, same function, NOT connected evolutionarily. ○ Ex: butterfly's wing and eagle’s wing

● Two methods of evolutionary change

○ Vertical descent with modification

■ Relates to one species, changes in a lineage (down generations), accumulation of mutations, 

natural selection, etc.

○ Horizontal gene transfer

■ Between different species, no generational gap, rare in eukaryotes, common in  prokaryotic cells, mostly in bacteria (called conjunction) → creates a big web  of genes. Genetic recombination is primary force. 

Classification

● Taxonomy is the grouping of species based on common ancestry

● 3 domains: Bacteria, Archae, Eukarya If you want to learn more check out Which courts have original jurisdiction?

○ Bacteria and Archae are unicellular prokaryotes. (Used to be one domain called Prokarya.  Split into two domains because Archae were found to have introns and a complex plasma membrane like eukarya. Archae are also older and can live in hazardous/extreme  Don't forget about the age old question of What is Experimenter bias?

environments.)

○ Eukarya are unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes. 

■ Includes 4 kingdoms: Protista (single cell), Fungi (cell wall, chitin), Plantae (cellulose, 

photosynthesis), Animalia (no cell wall, cellular respiration).

■ Ex:

Taxonomy

Clown Fish

Jaguar

Man

Domain

Eukarya

Eukarya

Eukarya

Kingdom

Animalia

Animalia

Animalia

Phylum

Chordata

Chordata

Chordata

Sub­phylum

Class

Order

Vertebrata

Actinopterygi

Perciformes

Vertebrata

Mammalia

Carnivora

Vertebrata

Mammalia

Primates

Family

Pothacentridone 

(marine)

Felidae (catlike)

Homonidae

Genus

Amphiprion

Pantera

Homo

Species

Ocellaris (indian and  pacific ocean waters)

Onca

Sapiens

Important points: 

● Clown Fish: Amphiprion ocellaris

● Jaguar: Pantera onca

● Man: Homo sapien

● All three are the same classification up to sub­phylum

○ Clown Fish separate at Class (actinopterygi vs. Mammalia)

○ Jaguar separates at order (Carnivora vs. primates)

**Possible test question: what are the classification levels we share with jaguar and clownfish?  Answer: domain­subphylum. 

Genomes and Proteomes

● Genome: the complete genetic makeup of an organism

○ Genomics: techniques used to analyze DNA sequences in genomes

■ Ex: PCR or Polymerase Chain Reaction

● Proteomes: the complete complement of proteins that a cell or organism can make from the 

information in the genome.

○ Proteomics: techniques used to analyze the proteome of a single species and the comparison of 

proteomes of different species.

■ Example of direct relations between genome and proteome: GFP gene in  Jellyfish → exhibits bright green fluorescence

Science as a discipline

● Science: the observation, identification, experimental investigation, and theoretical explanation 

of natural phenomena.

● Scientific method used to test theories

○ 1) Observations made regarding natural phenomena

○ 2) Hypothesis (must be validated by prediction) made to try and explain phenomena ■ A useful hypothesis must make predictions or expected outcomes that can be correct or 

incorrect (must be testable and falsifiable)

○ 3) Experimentation to show if predictions correct/incorrect

■ Make sure to always reduce the variable to ONE tested variable (the rest should be constant.) ■ Use control to make sure the results are only from the one changed variable ○ 4) Data analyzed

○ 5) Either accepted (consistent with data) or rejected (but can never really prove it) ● Hypothesis vs. theory: hypothesis is a proposed explanation and regards “small 

steps”/phenomena that lead to a larger theory. Theories are broad explanations of nature 

substantiated by large body of evidence.. 

● Discovery­based science may lead to new hypothesis

○ Cystic Fibrosis example of discovery­based science and hypothesis testing (how they are used  together)

■ Used discovery­based science to identify the faulty CFTR gene (didn’t require any preconceived 

hypothesis re: function of the gene)

■ Once CFTR gene was identified, scientists were able to hypothesize the function of the normal 

CFTR gene (to encode a transport protein). 

● Scientists use reasoning

○ Deductive first, then inductive. Deductive = applying general principles to predict specific results (ex: I hypothesize that Perry is a duck­billed platypus, based on his characteristics, and now I 

will test it). 

○ Inductive = using specific observations to construct general scientific principles (ex: perry laid  an egg, therefore all duck­billed platypus’s lay eggs) ­­ inductive reasoning can easily be false.  Cystic Fibrosis

● Affects 1/35,000 Americans

● Symptoms: thick and sticky mucus that obstructs lungs and pancreas, average lifespan late 30’s ● 1945, Dorothy Anderson discovered CF was genetic disorder 

● Used discovery­based sciences to find CFTR gene

● Used hypothesis­testing to determine function of normal CFTR gene

○ Encodes a protein that functions in the transport of chloride ions (Cl­) across their plasma 

membranes. 

■ Because CF patients have abnormal regulation of salt balance across plasma membranes ● CF is one of the few pleiotropic disorders (caused by only CFTR ­ Cystic Fibrosis 

Transmembrane Regulator)

○ Pleiotropy: when ONE gene causes MANY phenotypic effects. 

● CF is a recessive disorder

○ Need two copies of expressive gene (found this using pedigrees)

Miscellaneous

● pH of blood in humans: ~7.4

● pH of stomach in humans: ~2

● Humans maintain constant body temp of 98.6

● Bacteria structure: flagella (lateral movement), pili (attachment)

○ Vibrio cholerae, one type of bacteria. Only becomes dangerous when virus CTX enters bacteria ● Sequential hermaphroditism:

○ Protandry: born as male and turn to female

■ Ex: clownfish born as males, then environment induces it to develop into female or stay male. 

Presence of a lot of one gender would induce it to become the other.

○ Protogyny: born as female and become male

● Central dogma: method in which information in genes flows into proteins. DNA →  (transcription) → mRNA → (translation) → proteins

CHAPTER 2 ­ THE CHEMICAL BASIS OF LIFE I: ATOMS, MOLECULES, AND  WATER

Atoms 

● All life made of matter ­ anything that has mass and takes up space

● Smallest functional units of matter that maintains feature of original element ● Composed of nucleus of protons and neutrons (contribute to mass) and  

electrons (contributes to volume → rutherfords gold foil experiment  

determined this struture)

● HAS NO NET ELECTRIC CHARGE. 

● Electrons found in orbitals. Each orbital holds a MAXIMUM of 2 electrons ○ Orbits vs. Orbitals

■ Orbits = shells. Energy levels pathway. “Pockets” of energy

■ Orbitals = liklihood/probability of finding an electron in a given region

○ s (spin), p (principal), d(diffused), f(fundamental)

Shell

Orbitals

# of electrons

Total #

K

1s

s:2

2

L

2s, 2px, 2py, 2pz

S:2   p:6

8

M

3s, 3p, 3d

S:2   p:6   d:10

18

N

6s, 6p, 6d, 6f

s:2  p:6  d:10 f:14

32

The more electrons, the farther the shell gets from the nucleus

● Organized by atomic number in Periodic Table

○ Rows → indicated # of electron shells/orbits

○ Columns → indicate # of valence electrons. Share similar properties ● Octet rule: atoms are stable when 8 electrons fill outer shell (except H and He) ● Atomic mass measured in Daltons. 1 (d) = 1/12 the mass of carbon atom ○ Weight of proton: 1.009 daltons

○ Weight of a neutron: 1.007 daltons

○ Weight of an electron: 1/1840 daltons → almost negligible. ● Isotopes: different number of neutrons, same chemical properties.

○ Most naturally occurring elements occur in form of an isotope

○ Radioisotopes: are unstable and break up into elements with lower atomic #’s while emitting 

energy during decay

■ Rate of decay measured in half­lives. 

● Hydrogen, Oxygen, Carbon, Nitrogen make up 95% of the atoms in living organisms ○ H and O in water → 60% of animals 95% of plants

○ C is building block of living matter

○ N important in proteins

○ Mineral elements (Ca, Cl, Mg, P, K, Na, S) → 1%

○ Trace elements (Fl, I, B, Si, Cu, etc.) → 0.01%

Chemical Bonds and Molecules

● Molecules: 2 or more atoms bonded together

● Compounds: Molecules composed of 2 or more different elements. 

○ Can call compounds molecules (water molecule), but cannot call molecules compounds (can’t 

say oxygen compound). 

● Covalent Bonds ­ sharing electrons

○ Strongest chemical bond → takes a lot of energy to break

○ Covalent bonds are flexible and can have bond rotation 

○ Can be polar or nonpolar based on electronegativities of atoms.

○ Electronegativity: an atom’s ability to attract an electron

○ Water: classic example of polar covalent bonds (very polar bc hydrogen  electronegativity is so small compared to oxygen) → creates strong hydrogen

bonds

● Hydrogen bonds ­ one molecule loosely associates with another

○ Weak relative to covalent

○ Holds DNA strands together

○ Enzymes bind to proteins (substrate) via hydrogen bonds

○ FON (fluorine, oxygen, nitrogen often form hydrogen bonds)

● Van der wall forces

○ Temporary attractive forces

● Ionic

○ Cation (positive) and anion (negative)

● Free radicals: O2, OH, NO

○ Molecules containing an atom with a single unpaired electron in outer shell. ○ Fight off bacteria

○ Can eat antioxidants (in fruits and veggies) to compensate for missing electron. ● Chemical reactions

○ Form new substances, new bonds between molecules

○ Often require catalyst (enzymes)

■ Enzymes lower energy threshold

○ Tend to proceed in a particular direction but will eventually reach equilibrium ■ Cells rarely actually reach equilibrium...we’d die..

Properties of Water

● Polar covalent ­ has dipole

○ Ions and molecules that contain polar covalent bonds easily dissolve in water ● Amphipathic molecules form micelles in water

○ Amphipathic: hydrophilic and hydrophobic

○ Micelles: clusters or bubbles with hydrophilic regions oriented towards surface and hydrophobic 

regions oriented toward center

● Colligative properties ­ depend on concentration/# of dissolved solute

○ Solutes raise/lower boiling/freezing point

○ Allows animals to live in extreme conditions

● Participate in chemical reactions

○ Dehydration and hydrolysis

● Cohesion (water­water) and Adhesion (water­surface)

● Surface tension

Acids and Bases

● Buffers help maintain homeostasis (maintain constant pH)

○ Too acidic: will start to form carbonic acid

○ Too basic: will start to form bicarbonate

CHAPTER 3 ­ THE CHEMICAL BASIS OF LIFE II: ORGANIC MOLECULES

Carbon Atom and Organic Molecules

● Organic Chemistry = study of carbon­containing molecules

● Macromolecules: large, complex organic molecules

● Carbon has 4 valence electron and can form 4 bonds. (highly reactive)

○ can form nonpolar and polar bonds

○ Short bond length allows life to be sustained in extreme conditions because the bonds are stable  

within a large range of temperatures 

● Functional groups ­ groups of atoms with characteristic chemical features and properties **Question: What makes something a functional group, not just a compound? Answer: share  properties, don’t fulfill the octet rule (want to bond)

○ Amino group NH2: acts like a base (because it takes a H+ and makes NH3+); forms part of 

peptide bonds; found in amino acids

○ Carboxyl group COOH: acts like an acid (gives up H+); forms part of peptide bonds; found in 

amino acids and fatty acids

○ Hydroxyl group OH: polar; forms hydrogen bonds with water; found in steroids, alcohol, 

carbohydrates, some amino acids.

○ Phosphate PO4 2­ : polar; weakly acidic; negatively charged; found in nucleic acids, ATP, 

phospholipids.

○ Methyl CH3

○ Sulfate SO4­ 

● Isomers ­ two structures with an identical molecular formula but different structures and 

characteristics

○ Structural isomers ­ contain the same atoms but in     different     bonding relationships ■ Example: glucose and fructose

○ Stereoisomers ­ identical bonding relationships, but     different     spatial positioning ■ Geometric or cis­trans isomers: positioning around double bond

Cis: atoms are next to each other → polar

Trans: Atoms are across from each other → nonpolar

○ Trans isomers are more stable

Example: alpha (hydroxyl group below ring) vs. beta glucose (hydroxyl 

group above ring)

■ Enantiomers ­ mirror images

Example: D vs. L glucose.

Formation of Organic Molecules and Macromolecules

● Macromolecules depend on structure of monomers, number of monomers, 3­d way in which 

monomers are linked

● Condensation Reaction: 2 or more molecules combine into a larger one, with the loss of a small

molecule

○ Dehydration synthesis is a condensation reaction in which water molecule is removed (OH and 

H removed)

● Hydrolysis breaks a covalent bond by adding OH and H ­ hydrolytic cleavage Carbohydrates

● Structure: Composed of C,H,O in 1:2:1 ration; most carbons linked to hydrogen and hydroxyl 

group (some linked to amino or carboxyl groups)

● Store energy in C­H bonds. Lots of bonds = lots of potential energy

● Sugars: one of the most important energy storage molecules

○ Monosaccharides ­ simplest sugars (usually 5 or 6 carbons)

■ 6­carbon sugars: glucose, fructose, galactose

● Glucose is the transport sugar in animals

○ Very water­soluble and thus circulates in blood or fluids of animals, where it can be transported 

across cell me

■ 5­carbon sugars: ribose, deoxyribose

■ Ring or linear shape

○ Disaccharides ­ 2 monosaccharides

■ Formed by glycosidic bond between monosaccharides

■ Sucrose: fructose and glucose (transport sugar in plants)

■ Maltose: 2 alpha glucose

■ Lactose: beta glucose and beta galactose

○ Polysaccharides

■ Starch (energy storage in plant cells). 

● Alpha glucose; Moderately branched.

● Amylose: long chain. Ex: rice

● Amylopectin: branched. Ex: potatoes

○ Potatoes boil faster than rice because more crevices for water to get in, more branches with 

hydroxyl groups, more places for hydrogen bonding to occur.

■ Glycogen (energy storage in animal cells). 

● Alpha glucose; Highly branched.

■ Cellulose (structure in plants)

● Beta glucose; Unbranched

○ Plants and animals don’t have an enzyme to break down cellulose; bacteria do. ○ Enzymes that break the bonds btwn starch don’t recognize the shape between beta glucose 

monomers in cellulose. Can break down starch without breaking down cellulose. Why cellulose 

is a good rigid cell wall.

■ Glycosaminoglycans (structure in animals)

■ Chitin (structure in insects and crustaceans)

Lipids

● Composed predominantly  of hydrogen and carbon atoms; nonpolar and highly insoluble in 

water

○ Hydrophobic Exclusion: Water pushes nonpolar/hydrophobic parts away from it. ■ ex: when you spray oil droplets in water, forms micelles. 

● Fats made of triglycerides ­ one glycerol bonded to three fatty acids via dehydration (­3H20). 

Bond is called an ester bond.

○ Glycerol structure: 3­carbon molecule with 1 OH group bonded to each carbon ○ Fatty acid structure: carbohydrate chain with COOH group on one end

○ Each OH bonds to each COOH via dehydration (hence ­3H20)

● Fatty acids:

○ Saturated fatty acids: all carbons are linked by single covalent bonds, tend to be solid at room 

temp

■ Ex: palm and coconut

○ Unsaturated fatty acids: contain one (monounsaturated) or more (polyunsaturated) double 

bonds

■ Cis unsaturated

● Ex: vegetable oil

■ Trans unsaturated: unnaturally formed. Gives fatty a compound structure like  

saturated. Very high boiling points → very bad for you. Sticks to arteries ● Ex: baking goods

○ Measuring HDL (high density lipoprotein, good for you) and LDL (low density lipoprotein, bad  for you) cholesterols: 

Trans unsaturated Saturated

HDL decreases (bad) HDL increases (good)

LDL increases (bad) LDL increases (bad)

○ Essential fatty acids: cell membrane; cushioning of vital organs; insulation; mobility between 

joints

○ OMEGA 3 fatty acid: first double bond in 3rd carbon → names of lipids comes  

from where carbon bonds.

● Phospholipids

○ (Usually a nitrogen containing molecule attached to) phosphate group, attached to glycerol 

backbone, attached to fatty acids

■ Same as triglyceride, except phosphate group is attached to the third hydroxyl group instead of a 

fatty acid (and addition of nitrogen group)

○ Amphipathic!

■ Fatty acid tails are nonpolar, glycerol, phosphate, nitrogen heads are polar ○ Create our semi­permeable cell membranes. 

● Steroids

○ Carbon rings with a few hydroxyl groups

○ Main steroid: cholesterol. Cholesterol helps with membrane fluidity and protein synthesis.  ■ Estrogen and Testosterone derived from cholesterol

■ Estrogen differs from testosterone by having one less methyl group, a hydroxyl group instead 

of a ketone group (double bond to oxygen), and additional double bonds in one ring.  ● Waxes

○ Made of one or more hydrocarbons and long structures that resemble fatty acids attached by its 

carboxyl group to another long hydrocarbon chain

○ Very nonpolar → exclude water

■ Barrier to water loss in plants (leaves) and insects (cuticles)

○ Also form structural elements → honeycomb

○ Sperm whale

■ Spermaceti wax (looked like sperm)

■ Made lipstick

● Prostaglandins ­ important kind of lipid that helps with injuries (i.e. blood clotting of scabs) ● Terpenes

○ Long chain lipids

○ Components of biologically important pigments

■ Makes erasers

Proteins

● Transport; storage; immune; energy; movement; enzymes → act as catalyst ● Made of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and small amounts of other elements (sulfur)

● Amino Acids are the monomers, linked together by peptide bonds:

○ Amino group: positively charged → N terminus

○ Carboxyl group: negatively charged → C terminus

○ R/side chain: determines structure and function 

○ Carbon: alpha carbon

○ 4 types of Amino Acids

■ Nonpolar ­ R groups CH2 or CH3

■ Polar uncharged ­ R groups O2 or H

■ Charged ­ R groups acids or bases

■ Aromatic ­ R groups aromatic carbon ring with single or double bonds ■ Special function ­ particular position and function

○ 3 important amino acids (there are 20 total)

■ Methionine (AUG): needed to begin translation

■ Proline: associated with breaking down long chain of amino acids

■ Cystine: associated with linking long chains of amino acids

○ Isomers of amino acids form from flip between functional (R) group and hydrogen ■ Glycine doesn’t exhibit isomerism 

● Has hydrogen instead of R group

○ Essential Amino acids (8/20): necessary for growth

○ Non­essential amino acids (12/20): made from essential amino acids

● Primary structure of proteins

○ Sequence of amino acids determined by genes

○ Dictates the structure and function of proteins

○ Proteins will never be found in its primary structure → not functional ■ Prions: unfolded proteins that unfold neighboring proteins. INFECTIOUS AGENTS ● Secondary structure of proteins

○ Chemical and physical interactions cause folding

■ Type of folding is key determinant of proteins characteristics, and the strength of the protein ○ Only HYDROGEN BONDS are relevant

○ Alpha helix: hydrogen bonds btwn distant adjacent amino acids within same chain  ○ Beta pleated sheet: hydrogen bonds between adjacent, parallel regions on, different chains.  ○ Super­secondary structures:

■ Motif (not alpha or beta) aka “randomly coiled structures” or “supercoiled structures” ■ Shape is specific and important to its function (each is different)

● Tertiary structure

○ Folding gives complex 3­D shape

○ First functional form of protein because of the 3­D structure. Must be 3d to be functional. ○ 5 factors promoting protein folding:

■ Hydrogen bonds: bonds form between atoms in polypeptide backbone and between atoms in a 

different side chain

■ Ionic bonds: bonds form between oppositely charged side chains

■ Hydrophobic effects: nonpolar amino acids in the center of the protein to avoid contact with 

water

■ Van der Waals forces: attractive forces occur between atoms that are optimal distances apart ■ Disulfide bridges: a covalent bond forms between 2 cysteine side chains. Only work in amino 

acids with sulfur. Only covalent bonds you’ll find in tertiary structure.

● Quaternary Structure

○ Made of 2 or more polypeptides (each polypeptide called protein subunit) ○ AKA multimeric proteins (multiple parts)

Denaturation Dissociation

● Unfolding occurs because of breaking of bonds 

● Can occur in tertiary and quaternary structures

● Individual “protein subunits” or polypeptides separate and move away ● Can only occur in quaternary structures

● Can use heat or chemicals (stress

causes denaturation)

● Proteins lose their 3D structure and

therefore their ability to function

● Can lead to disease

● Ex: sunny side up egg →

breaking of bonds (in protein

albamin) with intense heat

● Christian Anfinsen

● NOT HARMFUL to organism because function was already performed

● Ex: hemoglobin ­ alpha and beta globin dissociate after function

(transport oxygen) performed

○ Showed the primary structure of ribonuclease determines its 3­D structure, NOT the organelles ○ Even in the complete absence of any cellular factors or organelles, an unfolded protein can 

refold into its functional structure.

○ Denatured ribonuclease using urea and beta mercaptoethanol (ME)

■ Ribonuclease changed to its primary structure

○ Using size­exclusion column chromatography, were able to filter solution and watch the protein 

renature. 

○ Chaperone proteins: identify de­natured protein, bind to it, produce environment that helps it 

re­nature. 

● Proteins contain functional domains

○ Domain: part of a protein that has its own shape and own set of amino acids, (have the same 

function even on different proteins).

■ Ex: different enzymes can have identical domains (binding sites)

● Sickle Cell Anemia: surface area of red blood cell decreases, gets less oxygen, becomes sticky, 

blood clots. Alpha 141 beta 146.

○ Point mutation (in which one nucleotide is substituted) occurs in one beta globin of hemoglobin ○ GAG (glutamic acid) becomes GTG (valine)

○ Hemoglobin function: transport oxygen. People with sickle cell anemia can’t get as much oxygen

transferred at once.

○ Can result in resistant to malaria!

Nucleic Acids

● Responsible for storage, expression, and transmission of genetic info

● Monomer: nucleotides. Connected by phosphodiester bonds.

● DNA → stores genetic information coded in the sequence of nucleotides ○ Deoxyribose

○ Double helix with strands that run antiparallel (5’ → 3’ and 3’ → 5’) ○ A,T,G,C

○ A ­­­double bond­­­T; C­­­triple bond­­­G

○ A,G → purines (angels and gods are pure); (T,C → pyrimidines) ● RNA → involved in decoding this information into instructions for linking  

together a specific sequence of amino acids and forming polypeptides. GENE 

EXPRESSION.

○ Ribose

○ Single stranded: linear (mRNA), globular (rRNA), clover shaped (tRNA) ○ A,U,G,C

○ Uracil and Thymine differ by a methyl group CH3

● Structure

○ Pentose sugar

■ Carbon 1: nitrogenous base attaches

■ Carbon 2: either OH (ribose) or H (deoxyribose) attaches

■ Carbon 3: links to the phosphate of the next nucleotide by phosphodiester bond ■ Carbon 4: carbon 5 branches off

■ Carbon 5: connects to phosphate group by 1st ester bond.

○ Sugar + Nitrogenous Base = nucleoside (no phosphate)

● Ribozyme → nucleic acid that can act as an enzyme

● Threose Nucleic Acid

○ First nucleic acid to arise

○ Made RNA, which made DNA

Calories

1. Carbohydrates ­ 4.3 cal/gram

2. Proteins ­ 4.3 cal/gram

3. Lipids ­ 9.3 cal/gram

CHAPTER 4 ­ GENERAL FEATURES OF CELLS

Cell theory: 1) All living things are composed of one more more cells 2) Cells are the smallest  units of living organisms 3) New cells come from old ones

Microscopy

● Microscopes: instruments that magnify 

● Magnification: ratio between the size of the image produced and actual size ● Resolution: Relates to the clarity of a microscope. Ability to observe 2 adjacent objects as 

distinct. 

○ Ex: Microscope allows us to identify two adjacent chromosomes as distinct objects (rather than 

one blob)

● Contrast: Relates to the ability to visualize structures, and how different structures look from 

one another. 

○ Ex: Microscopes allowed us to visualize the difference between the golgi apparatus and the ER,  and that they have different densities.

Types of Microscopes:

Light Microscopes Electron Microscopes

● Uses light for illumination ● Magnification: 0.2 um ● Light reflects off of 1 point ● Confocal Fluorescence  Microscope

○ Best type of light microscope ○ Uses light amplification by 

● Uses a beam of electrons for illumination

○ Shorter wavelength than visible light = between resolution ● Magnification: 2 nm

● Each reflection reflects off of 2 points in your eye. Can  determine distance between things. 

● Can distinguish outer vs. inner membrane of a cell ● Transmission electron microscopy (TEM): 

stimulated electron radiation  (laser)

Different Cell Structures

○ Best resolution among all microscopes

○ Provides a cross­sectional view of a cell and organelles ○ Biological sample stained with heavy metals ○ Electron beam hits heavy metal → some  

electrons are scattered while others pass through to  form an image

● Scanning electron microscopy (SEM):

○ Sample coated with heavy metal 

○ Beam scans surface and creates a 3D image of the surface  of the sample

○ Electrons scattered

○ Shadows

Prokaryotic Cells Both Eukaryotic Cells

● Simple structure

● Plasma membrane

● Compartmentalized

● Nucleoid → general region in  ● Cytoplasm

● Nucleus → membrane  

which DNA exists. NOT  membrane bound

● Either Bacteria or Archaea

● DNA

bound specific region of  DNA

● Membrane­bound organelles

○ Bacteria abundant throughout world ○ Archaea in extreme environments.  Has introns

● No membrane bound organelles

○ Subcellular structure with unique  function

● Different cell types within same  organism

*Cell structure is determined by matter, energy, organization, and information Bacteria

● Type of Prokaryotic cell

● Plasma membrane → barrier

○ **Bacteria that perform special functions such as photosynthesis have invaginated membranes to compensate for not having membrane bound structures like chloroplasts. Extra surface area 

needed for mo

● Nucleoid → region that contains DNA

● Ribosomes → involved in protein synthesis

● Cytoplasm → area inside cell membrane

● Cell wall → support and protection

○ Cell wall of bacteria is porous and allows in nutrients

○ Made of meshwork of carbohydrates including peptidoglycan

○ Gram staining: technique used to identify type of bacteria based on cell wall composition. One 

of the first tests performed on an unknown bacterium.

■ Gram (+) → stain appears purple/violet

● Cell wall consists of a thick layer of peptidoglycan

● Indicates non virulent bacteria

■ Gram (-) → stain appears pink

● Cell wall consists of thin layer of peptidoglycan and a thick layer of lipopolysaccharides ● Indicates virulent bacteria

■ Exception to gram staining: anthrax. Stains purple but is VIRULENT

● Glycocalyx

○ Viscous (sticky flowy) outer layer outside of cell wall. Attaches to things. Traps water to prevent

cell dehydration. 

○ Capsule: gelatinous, thicker glycocalyx. More carbohydrates/higher complexity. Present in 

bacteria that invade animal’s bodies. Resist anti­biotics!

● Pili → appendage

○ Conjunction tube → drills holes through plasma membrane and transmits  

plasmid

○ Fertility factor → transmission of plasmid between two different types of  

bacteria.

■ Allows for genetic recombination

■ F+ bacteria (with plasmid) transfers plasmid to F­ bacteria (without plasmid). F­ bacteria 

becomes F+

● Flagella → appendage

○ Made of flagellin

○ Allows bacteria to move → motility/locomotion

○ To move: flagella winds up like a corkscrew creating a lot of tension/pressure/potential energy.  Releases corkscrew to propel bacteria forward

Specialized Cells

**the proteome determines the characteristics (structures and function) of the cell ● Every cell in one organism has identical genes. How does an organism produce different types of

cells? (e.g. white blood cells, red blood cells, neurons, etc.)

○ Answer: cells have identical genomes but different proteomes!

○ The proteome is the complete protein composition of a cell or organism. ○ The proteome of the cell determines the cell's structure and function

● 4 ways proteomes can be altered:

1. Differential gene regulation

■ Certain proteins are produced in some cells and not others

■ Genes are never completely “switched on” or “switched off” in any cell

■ BUT, some genes are upregulated (more expressed) and downregulated (less expressed) in 

specified cells

● Results in different kinds of cells!

2. Concentration and stability (lifespan) of a protein

■ Some cells may have different amounts/concentrations of a protein

● Can be do to the rate at which a protein is synthesized or degraded

■ Ex: you have more muscle in your limbs and abdomen than in your face because of greater  concentration of acetylgalactosamine in those places.

3. Small changes in amino acid structure

■ Each protein has a mother gene that can create multiple proteins by a process called alternative 

splicing

● After transcription, the pre­mRNA is produced, including both introns (noncoding regions) and 

exons (coding regions).

● Before continuing to translation, the pre­MRNA strand must be spliced into mRNA, a process 

which isolates the specific region to be coded, and removes any other gene sequences. ● Slightly different splicing techniques (alternative splicing) can result in small changes in amino 

acid structure.

■ Ex: Globin mother gene produces myoglobin, alpha globin, and beta globin 4. Two cell types can alter their proteins in different ways

■ After the protein is made, the structure of it can change depending on the covalent attachment of  molecules, and the cleavage of a protein to a smaller size. 

Cytosol

● Part of the cytoplasm that includes the region outside of organelles but inside the plasma 

membrane. (Cytoplasm includes everything inside the cell membrane)

● Central coordinating region for metabolic processes

Cytoskeleton

● Found in cytosol and along inner nuclear membrane

● Network of 3 proteins: microtubules, intermediate filaments, and actin filaments ● Cytoskeletal proteins are present in cell throughout life

Microtubules Intermediate Actin

● 25mm 

● Long, hollow, cylindrical ● Also known as “cellular tracts”

● 10nm 

● Twisted and rope­like ○ Made of strong fibers

● 7nm 

● Long, thin fibers

● Originate from below the  

● Originate from centrosome with  

● Very different from 

plasma membrane 

centrioles 

actin and MT

● Main function: helps the cell 

● Main function: transport of  cargo within the cell. Motor  proteins move.

● NO polarity; NO motor  proteins

○ No dynamic instability

move. Helps with mobility of  cell. Helps it change shape to  pass through capillaries. 

● Exhibit dynamic instability 

● Exhibit dynamic instability 

● Laminins → type of  

○ Can polymerize (grow) and  depolymerize (shrink/break  down)

○ Are polar

intermediate  

filament

● Main function: give  stability, shape, and 

○ Can polymerize (grow) and  depolymerize (shrink/break  down)

● Motor proteins will also move, 

○ **the polarity dictates where the  proteins are going

● Negative end forms towards nucleus, positive end builds  away from nucleus

● Two motor proteins associated  with microtubules:

○ Dyein:towards nucleus

○ kinesin: away from nucleus What are motor proteins?

structure to the cell

but differently than MT

● Myosin is the only motor  protein that works in actin

● Exhibits polarity

● Negative end orients away from  nucleus, and toward the plasma  membrane

● Can polymerize and 

depolymerize

○ Can polymerize away or  towards the nucleus

● Proteins that require energy (ATP) and promote movement of cargo within the cell ● Consists of a head, hinge, and tail

○ Head: walks along cytoskeletal filament; site of ATP binding and hydrolysis which promotes 

movement

○ Hinge: region that attaches the tail and head, and bends (like a joint)

○ Tail: binds to other components (cargo) 

● Dr. V’s analogy: our legs = head; our hip = hinge; our torso = cargo

● 3 kinds of movements

**FIRST STEP IS ALWAYS ATP HYDROLYSIS

1. Walking movement

a. Motor protein has liberty to move about.

b. Moves cargo from one location to another

c. Gets energy from ATP

d. ATP binds to head, hydrolyzes to ADP and a phosphate

i. Causes a bend in the hinge and promotes movement

e. Associated with microtubules (kinesin)

2. Motor protein is fixed in place, but cytoskeleton/filament moves left to right a. Associated with actin (myosin)

b. Occurs during muscle contraction

3. Bending movement

a. Motor protein and cytoskeleton are both fixed in place (due to presence of linking proteins) b. Exert a force that causes filament (microtubules) to bend

c. Associated with microtubules (dynein)

d. Flagella and cilia cause movement by a bending motion

i. Involves propagation of a bend,which begins at the base of the structure and proceeds towards tip (whiplike)

Cell Appendages

● Flagella

○ Usually longer than cilia and present singly or in pairs

○ Movement occurs in whiplike motion

○ Ex: sperm

● Cilia

○ Often shorter than flagella and tend to cover all or part of the surface of cell ● Flagella and cilia share the same internal structure called axoneme which contains: ○ Microtubules

○ motor protein dynein

○ linking proteins

Endomembrane System

● Network of membranes that pass nutrients via connected membranes or vesicles ● Very slight differences between the Endomembrane System and Secretory Pathway

Endomembrane System Secretory Pathway

● Includes:

○ Nuclear membrane (aka nuclear envelope) ○ ER

○ Golgi complex

○ Vacuoles (Plant cells)

○ Lysosomes (animal cells)

○ Peroxisomes 

○ Plasma membrane

Nuclear Envelope

● Includes:

○ Nuclear membrane ○ ER

○ Golgi complex

○ Vacuoles (Plant cells) ○ Lysosomes (Animal cells) ○ Plasma membrane

● Double­membrane structure enclosing nucleus

● Have nuclear pores ­ cavities where outer membrane meets inner membrane; provides 

passageways

○ Has gatekeeper proteins that allows some things in (ie. proteins) and keeps some things out (ie. 

RNA)

● Encloses the components of the nucleus

○ Nuclear matrix (ensures that chromosomes never overlap)

○ Chromosomes (composed of chromatin ­ DNA and proteins)

○ DNA

○ Nucleolus

■ Where rRNA is made

■ Proteins enter through nuclear pore and are assembled at nucleolus 

■ Ribosomes are made of rRNA and proteins (bulk and structure given by rRNA) ○ Nuclear lamina → type of intermediate filament that provides support to  

nuclear envelope

Endoplasmic Reticulum

● Network of membranes that are folded several times and form flattened, fluid filled cavities 

called cisternae

● ER membrane encloses a single compartment called the ER lumen (internal space) ● Rough ER ­ ribosomes present

Functions of RER include:

○ Protein synthesis

○ Protein sorting (and distributing)

○ Protein insertion (into membrane of ER)

○ Glycosylation

■ Carbohydrates added to the protein, like the tags put on suitcases at an airport ■ How you know where the proteins are headed!

■ Glycosylation is initiated in the RER but continued in the golgi

● Smooth ER ­ no ribosomes

Functions of SER include:

○ Detoxification

■ Alcohol insults the SER!

■ Alcohol tolerance happens because the surface are of the SER expands when it’s “insulted” ■ Alcohol is turned into hydrophilic metabolites (why drinking water is good, helps flush out 

alcohol)

○ Carbohydrate metabolism

■ Glucose­6­phosphatase removes phosphate from glucose molecule, and glucose is released into 

the bloodstream

○ Calcium reserve

■ Calcium pumps transport Calcium ions into ER

■ Disparity of Ca ions results in an influx of Ca into the cytosol

■ Involved in muscle contraction

○ Synthesis and modification of lipids

■ INCLUDING PHOSPHOLIPID SYNTHESIS

Golgi Apparatus

● Stacks of flattened, fluid filled, membrane­bound compartments, which are not continuous with 

the ER

● Stacks: cis golgi (near ER), medial golgi (middle), trans golgi (near plasma membrane) ● Packaging and transport center of the cell

○ Cargo CANNOT pass through membranes of the stacks 

○ Moves by secretion via vesicles

● 3 overlapping functions:

○ Processing: modifying certain proteins and lipids

■ After initiated in the ER, glycosylation continues in the golgi (mostly in the medial golgi). Adds 

proteins or lipids onto carbs

■ Proteolysis: enzymes called proteases make cuts in polypeptides to make smaller, functional 

proteins

○ Protein sorting

○ Secretion

■ The golgi packages some materials from ER into secretory vesicles that transport material to 

plasma membrane and fuse with plasma membrane to release contents outside the cell ● Process called secretory pathway

○ The golgi also produces vesicles that travel to other parts of the cell, such as lysosomes Lysosomes

● Small membrane bound organelle; Only present in animal cells

● Function: break down macromolecules

● Contains acid hydrolase ­ enzyme that enables breakdown of complex materials ○ Function best at an acidic pH. (pH of lysosome = 4.8; pH of cytosol = 7.2) ○ pH of free lysosome (primary) a little higher than 4.8 until it comes into contact  

with big cargo and takes up protons → pH drops to 4.8

■ This lysosome with increased proton concentration = secondary lysosome ● Perform autophagy: process by which lysosomes break down worn­out organelles and 

macromolecules by endocytosis and recycle them

● Autophagocytosis (cell eats its own organelles) is NOT the same as apoptosis (cell suicide) ○ Autophagosome engulfs weak organelle (i.e. mitochondria) and becomes a double layered 

organelle. Fuse with lysosome, which releases degrading enzymes.

● Tay­sachs disease: lysosomal storage disease

Vacuoles

● Used to think they were just big areas of empty space

● Really are membrane­bound organelles that contain a lot of water, amino acids, waste, and 

nutrients

● Most prominent in plant cells, fungal cells, and certain protists

● Tonoplast ­ vacuolar membrane. Exhibits elasticity

● Different functions depending on cell type and environment

○ Vacuoles in animal cells: vacuoles are smaller; used to store materials or transport materials ○ Central vacuoles: Found in mature plant cells.

■ Store water, enzymes, and inorganic ions

■  Take up space and exhibit turgor pressure ­  helps maintain structure of plant; drives expansion 

of cell wall.

○ Contractile vacuoles: Necessary to remove excess water that continually enters the cell by 

diffusion

■ Innate capacity of water to get into the cell (hypertonic)

■ Vacuoles expand as water enters, and contract once they reach their limit, squeezing water out of

cell

■ Present in certain protists

○ Phagocytic vacuoles: function in degradation

■ Present in some protists and white blood cells

■ Engulf a substance (like food or bacteria) and then break it down with digestive enzymes Peroxisomes

● Small organelles found in eukaryotic cells

● NOT included in secretory membrane system, only endomembrane system (don’t take in things 

through secretory vesicles)

○ Derived from endomembrane system → vesicle buds from ER ● Fuse together to form multi peroxisomes (like binary fission)

● Function #1: catalyze chemical reactions that break down molecules detoxify the cell ○ Exist where toxic molecules are (liver)

○ Hydrogen peroxide is a common byproduct of the breakdown of toxins

■ Peroxisomes use catalase to break down H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) into oxygen and water ● Function #2: involved in metabolism (breakdown) of fats and amino acids

○ Glyoxysomes: the microbody in plant cells (particularly seeds) that break down fats to 

carbohydrates (sugars). 

■ Similar to peroxisomes in animals

Plasma membrane

● Boundary between cell and extracellular environment

● Functions:

1.) Semi­permeable (made of phospholipids)

2.) Transport proteins (selectively permeable)

a.) Certain substances allowed through certain cell/tissue types

3.) Have receptors

a.) Help with cell signaling and communication with outside environment

4.) Adhesive properties

a.) Holds multiple cells together

Semiautonomous organelles

● Can grow and divide to reproduce themselves, but depend on other parts of cell for their internal 

components

● Contain their own DNA

○ Resemble smaller versions of bacterial chromosomes

Mitochondria 

● Supplies cell with most of its ATP

● Structure:

○ Has an outer membrane and inner membrane, with intermembrane space between ■ Intermembrane space has a high concentration of protons that helps in the production of ATP ○ Inner membrane is highly invaginated, and has small projections called cristae ■ Increases surface area to accommodate proteins like electron transport chain ○ Mitochondrial matrix: semi­fluid compartment within inner membrane. Where ATP is 

synthesized by ATP synthase

● Function #1: Converts chemical energy stored in covalent bonds of organic molecules into a 

usable form (ATP)

○ Using electron transport chain and ATP synthase (found in mitochondrial matrix) ● Function #2: involved in synthesis, modification, and breakdown of some cellular molecules like

certain hormones

● Function #3: generate heat in brown fat cells

○ Brown fat adipose cells → specialized mitochondria produce heat instead of  

ATP

○ Help revive hibernating animals and protect young animals

■ Babies have more brown fat cells than adults

■ If you exercise and eat well, you can transfer some of your white fat to brown fat ● Have their own mitochondrial genome

○ Divide by binary fission

Chloroplasts 

● Capture the light energy needed for photosynthesis → using light energy to synthesize  

glucose

● Found in plants and algae

● Structure:

○ Outer and inner membrane

○ Membrane bound thylakoids → many flattened, fluid-filled tubules that enclose  

thylakoid lumen (contains oxygen)

○ Chlorophyll pigments found on membrane of thylakoids

○ Grana: stacks of thylakoids

○ Stacks of thylakoid sacs connected by stroma lamellae

○ Stroma: compartment of chloroplast outside thylakoid membrane

■ Synthesis of starch

■ Contains ATP (energy currency) and NADH (energy intermediate)

● Types of plastids 

○ Chloroplast: green pigment, absorb sunlight, transfer to chemical energy ○ Chromoplast: red, yellow, orange pigment, attract pollinators and seed dispersers ○ Leucoplasts: no pigment, store energy (potatoes)

●  Have their own chloroplast genome

○ Divides by binary fission

Blood types

● Carbohydrates attach to immunoglobulin by covalent bonds to the surface of the blood cell.  ● 4 different blood types caused by the different carbohydrates attached.

○ A → N acetyl-galactosamine

○ B → galactose

○ AB → both N acetyl-galactosamine and galactose (universal recipient) ○ O → no carbohydrate (universal donor.)

Endosymbiosis theory

● Mitochondria and chloroplast exhibit similar characteristics to certain bacterial species (genetic 

material and replication)

● Endosymbiosis theory proposed: mitochondria and chloroplast originated from bacteria that took

up residence within a primordial eukaryotic cell

○ Endosymbiosis: a symbiotic relationship in which a smaller species lives inside the larger species

○ Primordial cell engulfs symbiont; symbiont sheds membrane and takes on membrane of host cell ○ Benefits both host and symbiont

Protein Sorting

● Each protein made in the cell needs to reach its proper destination either within the cell our out 

of the cell

● Most proteins have sorting/traffic signals: short stretches of amino acid sequences that directs 

protein to its correct location

● Protein synthesis always begins in the cytosol on a free­floating ribosome

○ free amino acids in cytosol —> translation begins

○ Depending on the destination of the protein, translation will either be completed in the cytosol or in the ER

Protein sorting

Cytosolic 

Co­translational

Post­translational

cytosolic proteins don’t 

require signal sequence protein synthesized in  ●

cytosol, gets 3D structure  in cytosol, functions in  cytosol

protein synthesis initiated in cytosol; 

translation halted; synthesis completed on  RER

includes proteins destined for ER, golgi, 

lysosomes, vacuoles, or secretory vesicles  (plasma membrane)

● 

these proteins have an     ER signal sequence (6­12 hydrophobic amino acids) usually  located on N terminus

Part 1: 

signal recognition particle (SRP) (made of  RNA and protein) recognizes ER signal  sequence, binds to it, and halts translation SRP binds to a receptor in ER membrane,  carrying the ribosome with the half

developed protein with it

SRP detaches, translation continues in a  channel going through ER membrane

ER signal sequence is cut off by peptidase Polypeptide is fully synthesized and 

protein synthesized in cytosol  (translation completed); uptake  by respective organelle

includes proteins destined for  nucleus, mitochondria, 

chloroplasts, and peroxisomes these proteins already have  appropriate sorting signals as a  part of their amino acid sequence called target sequences

3D function NOT obtained yet in cytosol (chaperone proteins help keep it unfolded)

Process 

targeting sequence binds to  receptor protein on target 

membrane

chaperone proteins released unfolded protein is able to go  through channel through target 

released into ER lumen 

Part 2: 

If destined for ER → retention signal  sequence keeps it in the ER 

if destined for golgi, lysosome, vacuoles,  ●

plasma membrane or secretory vesicles,  protein is transported from ER to correct  ●

location via vesicles (usually go to golgi  after ER, then elsewhere) 

cargo/proteins bind to receptors on ER  membrane 

membrane buds off with help of coat  proteins, forming vesicle 

Coat­proteins are shed 

V­snares in vesicle find the appropriate T snares on target membrane —> bind Vesicle fuses with target membrane,  releasing proteins 

membrane

chaperone proteins inside the  organelle help keep protein  unfolded from the inside as it  comes through channel

targeting sequence cut off by an  enzyme

once all the way entered, 

chaperone proteins release from  protein and it folds into it’s  functional 3D form

CHAPTER 5 ­ MEMBRANE STRUCTURE, SYNTHESIS, AND TRANSPORT

Membrane Structure

● Phospholipid bilayer: framework of every biological membrane. Two layers of phospholipids. ○ Phospholipids are amphipathic molecules (both hydrophobic and hydrophilic) ■ Hydrophobic, nonpolar, fatty acid tails face in

■ Hydrophilic, polar, head face out

● Leaflet: term for half of a phospholipid bilayer

○ Extracellular and intracellular leaflets

○ Usually highly symmetrical

○ Presence of glycolipids (lipids with carbohydrate attached) makes leaflets  

asymmetrical → usually on extracellular leaflet

● Fluid­mosaic model

○ Membrane is a mosaic of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate molecules

○ Resemble properties of a fluid: lipids and proteins can move within the membrane ● Membrane proteins

○ Possible functions of membrane proteins: transportation, act as catalysts, ATP synthesis,  photosynthesis, cell signalling, cell to cell adhesion

Intrinsic proteins (integral) Extrinsic proteins (peripheral)

● Cannot be isolated from membrane (to analyze) unless the membrane is broken down (e.g. dissolved with organic  solvent or detergent.)

● Transmembrane proteins

○ Traverses entire membrane

○ Physically inserted in hydrophobic interior of membrane  (stretches of nonpolar amino acids in these regions) ○ The main force holding transmembrane proteins in place  is hydrophobic exclusion 

● Lipid­anchored proteins

○ Covalent attachment of a lipid to an amino acid side chain of a protein

○ Lipid inserted in hydrophobic region of membrane,  protein on outside

Appx 25% of all genes encode membrane proteins Fluidity of Membranes

Peripheral membrane proteins To isolate, just need to pour  solution of opposite charge over  membrane

Noncovalently bound to polar  heads of phospholipids, or to polar regions of integral membrane  proteins

● Membranes are semifluid → move bilaterally within membrane in a 2D motion.  

(“fluid” motion = 3D movement)

○ Rotational and lateral movements → keep fatty acid tails in hydrophobic  

interior → energy efficient

■ Occurs spontaneously (w/out energy)

○ “Flip-flop” movement → phospholipid leaflets do a “cartwheel” and switch to  opposite side, with the help of the enzyme flipase → energy inefficient process 

(requires ATP).

■ Does NOT occur spontaneously

■ Needed for: 1) injury, to repair cells. 2) Carthenogenisist, uncontrolled cell division. 3) ?? ● Length of fatty acid tail affects fluidity of the membrane

○ Optimum length: 14­24 carbon atoms

○ Shorter acyl tails = more fluid membrane (less likely to interact with each other) ● Saturation factor affects fluidity of the membrane

○ Presence of double bonds in acyl tails

■ Double bonds = unsaturated = kinks = more fluid 

● Presence of cholesterol affects fluidity of the membrane

○ In animal cells, cholesterol helps maintain fluidity, or stabilize membranes (plant cells don’t 

have cholesterol)

■ Attaches to fatty acid tails

■ Prevents phospholipids from too much movement in warm weather

■ Acts a cushion, allowing movement of phospholipids in cold weather

○ **since plant cells don’t have cholesterol, they will just adjust length and saturation of 

phospholipid to maintain fluidity in extreme weather

■ In cold weather: decrease length of hydrocarbon, make unsaturated (allows more movement) ■ In hot weather: increase length of hydrocarbon tail, and induce saturation (less movement)

Movement of transmembrane (integral) proteins

● Mouse experiment

○ Verified the lateral movement of transmembrane proteins

● In contrast to the experiment, not ALL transmembrane proteins can move! ○ 10%­70% of membrane proteins may be restricted in their movement

○ TM proteins may be bound to cytoskeleton or molecules outside of the membrane that restrict 

movement

● Transmembrane proteins can move laterally and rotate, but they can’t flip­flop like lipids do!  ○ Move much slower than lipids because of their size

Synthesis of membrane components

      Phospholipid synthesis 

● Lipid synthesis occurs at the cytosolic leaflet of the smooth ER 

● Phospholipids consist of: 2 fatty acids each with an acyl tail, 1 glycerol molecule, 1 phosphate, 1 

polar head group (sometimes choline)

○ All components made via enzymes in the cytosol or are from food

● Process:

1. Fatty acids synthesized in smooth ER

2. Fatty acids are activated by attachment of organic coenzyme A (CoA)

a. Replaces the OH from carboxylic acid end of fatty acid

b. Makes molecule unstable

3. 2 activated fatty acids bond to a glycerol­phosphate molecule

4. Molecule is inserted from cytosol into the cytosolic leaflet of the SER membrane by enzyme 

acyl transferase

5. Phosphate is removed from glycerol by phosphatase enzyme (to make it polar) 6. Polar phosphorylated molecule (choline P) is attached to glycerol to form polar head a. Attached by enzyme choline phosphotransferase

7. Flipases transfer some of the phospholipids from the cytosolic leaflet to the other leaflet of the 

ER membrane that faces the ER lumen

● After synthesis, phospholipid must be transferred to other membranes

○ Diffuses laterally to nuclear envelope 

○ Transported by vesicles to golgi, lysosomes, vacuoles, plasma membrane ○ Lipid exchange proteins can transfer lipid between any two membranes ■ Extracts lipid from one mem, diffuses through cell, inserts into other mem.

      Transmembrane protein synthesis 

● Most transmembrane proteins are first inserted into the ER membrane before going to destined 

organelle (except proteins destined for semiautonomous organelles)

○ Contain ER signal sequence that directs them to ER

● TM protein begins polypeptide synthesis into ER (through channel protein), ER signal sequence 

is cleaved by signal peptidase

● Each time a stretch of 20 hydrophobic amino acids that form an alpha helix is reached, a  transmembrane segment is made as the polypeptide is being threaded through the channel 

(could be more than 1)

● When polypeptide synthesis is completed:

○ If destined for ER: transmembrane segment remains in the ER membrane ○ If destined for golgi, vacuoles, plasma membrane, etc.: TM proteins transferred via vesicles

  Glycosylation 

● Glycosylation of proteins occurs in the ER and Golgi Apparatus

● Glycosylation: process of covalently attaching a carb to a lipid (glycolipid) or protein 

(glycoprotein)

● Glycolipids/proteins play a role in cell surface recognition

○ lipid/protein is inserted in membrane, carb is on extracellular portion (makes 2 layers of 

membrane asymmetrical)

○ The proper migration of cells and cell layers during development relies on recognitions of cell 

types

○ Carbs tell the cell how to position itself

○ Glycolipids involved in tissue specific recognition within an individual

● Glycolipids/proteins also serve a protective role

○ Carb­rich zones on outer surface of cell form viscous glycocalyx, protection from mechanical 

and physical stress

○ Also, the carb attached to a membrane protein protects the protein from degradation from harsh 

extracellular environment

● 2 forms of protein glycosylation in eukaryotes

N­linked : RER O­linked: Golgi complex

● Attachment of a carb to the amino acid asparagine in a 

● Addition of oligosaccharide to the O

polypeptide chain

● Carb attaches to Nitrogen atom in amino acid side chain

of either serine or threonine side  chains.

(hence: N­linked)

○ AA sequence: asparagine­X­threonine or serine (X  cannot be proline)

● important for production of  proteoglycans: glycosylated 

● Prior to glycosylation, carb tree (14 sugars) is built off  of dolichol lipid in ER membrane

proteins to organize extracellular  matrix

● Component of mucus

● Oligosaccharide transferase transfers carbon tree from

dolichol to asparagine in the polypeptide being 

synthesized, and catalyzes the covalent bond formed 

between them

● Commonly occurs on membrane of proteins that move 

on cell surface/plasma membrane

● Also occurs in archaea

Analyzing membranes with electron microscopy

● Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) uses a thin biological sample stained with heavy­metal ○ Binds to polar heads of membrane, but not well to the nonpolar interior

● Freeze fracture electron microscopy (FFEM): special form of TEM that helps analyze interior of 

phospholipid bilayer

○ Sample frozen in liquid nitrogen and fractured with knife

○ The two leaflets split into P (protoplasmic) face and E (extracellular) face ■ Asymmetrical

Membrane Transport

● Membrane transport: the movement of ions and molecules across biological membranes ● Phospholipid membrane: semi­permeable (only some things can physically pass through) ○ Because of hydrophobic interiors, phospholipid bilayers act as a barrier to ions and hydrophilic 

molecules

○ Nonpolar items and most gases have high permeability (pass through easily) ■ O2, N2, CO2

■ Ethane (nonpolar) more permeable than ethanol (polar)

■ Diethylurea (mostly nonpolar; urea with 2 ethyl groups aka added hydrocarbons) more 

permeable than urea (polar)

■ ATP WILL NEVER PASS THROUGH MEMBRANE

○ Rate of diffusion across membrane depends on the chemistry (size, polarity) and concentration of the solute

High permeability →  

Moderate permeability ­ ­ ­ >

Gases (CO2, N2, O2), very small uncharged molecules (ethanol) Water, Urea (H2NCONH2)

Low permeability Polar organic molecules (sugars)

Very low permeability Ions, charged polar molecules and macromolecules (ATP, amino 

acids, proteins, polysaccharides, Nucleic acids (DNA and RNA)

● Presence of proteins in membrane makes plasma membrane selectively permeable (chooses 

what it allows through)

○ Maintains favorable internal environment by ensuring:

■ Essential molecules enter

■ Metabolic intermediates remain

■ Waste products exit

Passive transport Active transport

Diffusion

● Substance moves from area of high to low concentration  of that substance 

● Requires NO energy → energy efficient ● Breaks gradient

Facilitated Diffusion

● A specific type of diffusion

○ Cargo is specific to protein

● Requires proteins (NOT energy)

○ Channel and transporter (carrier)

Cells Maintain Gradients

● Moves substance from low  concentration to high 

concentration

● Requires energy (ATP) →  energy inefficient 

● Makes gradient

● important for homeostasis 

● We are alive bc cells are able to maintain different internal environments than external ● There are 2 gradients in our body: ion­electron chemical gradient and transmembrane gradient ● Transmembrane gradient: concentration of solute is higher on one side of a membrane than the

other

● Ion electrochemical gradient: gradients involving ions; both an electrical and chemical gradient ○ Electrical gradient: due to net charge differences of ions across membrane ○ Chemical gradient: due to concentration differences of ions across membrane

Osmosis

***on a test, if it says “movement of a liquid across a membrane,” assume liquid is water unless  otherwise specified

● Isotonic: equal water and solute concentration on either side of the membrane ○ Animal cells are isotonic; maintain balance btwn intracellular and extracellular ○ Albumen → maintains isoosmotic conditions for blood cells to survive ● Hypertonic: solute concentration is higher (and water concentration lower) on one side of 

membrane

○ If medium has higher solute concentration than cell, medium is hypertonic to cell ○ If medium has lower solute concen. than cell, cell is hypertonic to medium ● Hypotonic: solute concen. is lower (and water concen. higher) on one side of membrane ● Osmosis: diffusion of water across a membrane from lower to higher concentration of the solute. 

(Aka hypotonic → hypertonic)

○ Occurs if solutes cannot readily move across membrane, so water moves to balance solute 

concentrations

● Animal cells have transport proteins to allow solute movement across the membrane and prevent 

osmosis

○ Don’t want to change shape

● However, if placed in hypotonic/hypertonic medium, water will diffuse in and out of membrane 

to equalize solute concentrations

○ Hypertonic medium: water diffuses out of cell and shrinks (crenation)

○ Hypotonic medium: water diffuses into cell and grows

■ May rupture if too big (osmotic lysis)

● Red blood cells, kidney cells, and uterine cells have higher movement of water compared to  

other cells, much faster that passive diffusion across PM usually allows

○ Peter Agre discovered CHIP28 or aquaporins on these cells, transport proteins for water! ■ 28,000 daltons

■ Injected CHIP 28 gene into frog oocyte and placed in hypotonic solution to  

test if it really wold uptake water → it did

● **In cells with cell walls:

○ Hypertonic medium: water exits cell and plasma membrane pulls away from cell wall 

(plasmolysis)

■ Ex: plants wilt

○ Hypotonic medium: cell wall prevents osmotic lysis ­ only lets cell take up small amount of 

water

■ Turgor pressure: pushes plasma membrane against cell wall → maintains  

shape and size (keeps plants upright)

■ Most “lower eukaryotes” (like plants, bacteria, fungi, etc.) are hypertonic to environment (aka 

medium is hypotonic)

■ PLANTS ARE ALWAYS HYPERTONIC TO ENVIRONMENT → water goes in. ■ Contractile vacuoles in freshwater organisms (amoebae and paramecia) can also prevent osmotic 

lysis

Transport Proteins

● Transport proteins enable biological membranes to be selectively permeable ● 2 classes: channels and transporters (carrier proteins)

○ Channel proteins → faster rate

■ Open passageway for direct diffusion

■ Cargo passes straight through, doesn’t bind to the cargo passing through (may bind to signal  protein)

■ Rate depends on concentration of solute 

○ Carrier proteins → slower rate

■ Conformational change transports solute

■ Cargo needs to physically bind to protein

■ Principal pathway for uptake of organic molecules, such as sugars, amino acids, nucleotides  (when gradient moving high to low)

■ Play a key role in export 

■ Rate depends on release of solute (NOT on concentration of solute)

■ Imagine a golf cart carrying 4 people at a time; rate doesn’t go faster if more people are waiting  in line

     Types of channels 

1. Ligand/gated channels

a. Most channels are gated

b. Gated channels controlled by the noncovalent binding of small molecules ­ called ligands ­ such 

as neurotransmitters and hormones. 

i. Often important in transmission of signals btwn neurons and muscle cells c. Ligands are signal molecules, very specific 

d. Allows movement of solutes into or out of cell

2. Intracellular regulatory proteins

a. Transports inside cell

b. Noncovalently binds to channel causing channel to open

3. Phosphorylation

a. Phosphate attaches to channel

b. Covalently bonding

4. Voltage gated

a. Nothing binded to channel

b. Difference in charges on different sides of channels causes to open

5. Mechanosensitive

a. Change in membrane tension

b. Ex: frequency of sound

c. Small changes in pressure/frequency

     Types of transporters (carriers) 

1. Uniporter → single molecule or ion

2. Symporter → 2 or more ions or molecules transported in same direction 3. Antiporter → 2 or more ions or molecules transported in opposite direction 

Active transport

● Pumps: can be uniporters, symporters, or antiporters

● Primary active transport → involves functioning of a pump to directly use energy

to transport solute against gradient

○ ATP hydrolysis

■ Ex: Ca2+ ATPase pump

● Secondary active transport → involves the use of a pre­existing gradient (usually 

established by pumps) as source of energy to drive the active transport of another solute ○ Symporters enable cells to actively import nutrients against a gradient

○ Common: using H+/sucrose symporter Na+/solute symporters to power uphill movement of 

organic solutes such as sugars, amino acids, and other needed molecules.

○ Secondary always with goes cotransport 

○ Na/Ca → antiporter

○ Na/solute → symporter

Ion Electrochemical Gradients

● ATP­driven ion pumps generate ion electrochemical gradients

● Main example: Na+/K+ ­ ATPase pump.

○ More Na out of cell; more K inside cell. 

○ Is an active antiporter: pumps 3 Na+ out of cell and 2 K+ into cytosol (against gradient) using 

energy from ATP hydrolysis

■ Electrogenic pump: because it generates an electrical gradient (net export of one positive  charge)

Process 

1. E1 conformation: 3 Na+ bind to cytosolic side of pump

2. ATP hydrolysis occurs → ADP is released

3. P covalently binds to pump, changing conformation to E2

a. **binding of phosphate causes the change to E2 formation, NOT binding of Na+ 4. E2 formation has no affinity to bind to Na+, therefore the 3 Na+ are released outside of cell 5. 2 binding sites open up to bond with 2K+ on the extracellular side of pump 6. P is released → pump switches back to E1 formation

7. 2K+ is released into cell

***note: 

­ One ATP is hydrolyzed in this whole process

­ Example of co­transport

­ Example of primary active transport 

­ Example of antiporter 

Endocytosis/Exocytosis

● Small cargo → passes through phospholipid membrane or through transport  

proteins

● Big cargo → requires exo/endocytosis

● Exocytosis: material inside cell is packaged into vesicles and excreted into extracellular 

environment

○ Occurs often in golgi

1. Based on cargo, we have transport proteins in membrane called V­snares 2. Coat proteins help in budding of vesicle → break down when vesicle detaches 3. Vesicle exits from trans golgi and moves toward plasma membrane via microtubules 4. T­snares (target) allow vesicle to dock on to plasma membrane with carvo ● Endocytosis: plasma membrane invaginates to form a vesicle that brings substances  

into the cell → usually brings to lysosomes to break down new cargo ○ Receptor­mediated endocytosis: very specific

■ Process by which cholesterol enters the plasma membrane!!

1. Pitted and protein (clathrin) coated plasma membrane

2. Embedded receptors (LDL receptors)

3. When all receptors are filled (with LDL), clathrin is signaled to close and form vesicle 4. Clathrin invaginates membrane and helps with budding (clathrin is analogous to coat proteins in 

exocytosis)

5. When vesicle buds off, clathrin is recycles 

6. We now need to recycle the receptors!

a. Vesicle forms into two cesicles, one filled with recepotrs and one filled with cargo (cholesterol 

and LDL)

7. Endosome divides

○ Pinocytosis: cell drinking

■ Found often in lining of intestines and in steroli cells 

○ Phagocytosis: cell eating

CHAPTER 6 ­ AN INTRODUCTION TO ENERGY, ENZYMES, AND METABOLISM Overview

Enzymes: proteins that are critical catalysts to speed up thousands of reactions in cells ● Ex: cyclooxygenase is an enzyme that speeds up synthesis of prostaglandins (molecule that gives

you fever, pain, inflammation.)

○ Ibuprofen and aspirin work by inhibiting cyclooxygenase

● Enzymes increase rate of reaction inside the body, but HEAT increases rate of reaction outside the body (in a test tube)

Metabolism: the sum total of all chemical reactions that occur within an organism (usually re:  breakdown or synthesis of organic molecules)

● Anabolic reactions: synthesis of molecules. Use energy (endothermic). 

● Catabolic reactions: break down of molecules. Release energy (exothermic).  ● Fate of chemical reaction     determined by     direction   andrate 

Energy: ability to promote change. 

● Many different forms of energy (mechanical, kinetic, potential, chemical, aerodynamic, light, 

etc.) 

○ But all have in common: can be transformed into heat and can release heat ● Thermodynamics: changes in heat

○ Heat: measure of random movement

○ Temp: measure of heat

○ Unit: calorie ­ heat required to raise temp of one gram of water 1 degree celsius ■ kilocalorie 100s calories 

■ joule .239 calories 

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ 2 Laws of Thermodynamics 

1. First law: law of conservation of energy → energy cannot be created or  

destroyed  

a. But CAN be transformed from one type to another (ex: heat)

2. Second law: transfer or transformation of energy from one form to another increases entropy or 

degree of disorder of a system  

a. Entropy: measure of randomness of molecules in a system.

i. Unusable → cannot be harnessed to do work

Change in free energy determines direction 

● Unusable vs. usable energy in a system

○ Total energy = usable energy + unusable energy

○ H=G+TS → G = H - TS

○ H= enthalpy or total energy 

○ G=free energy or amount of energy for work 

○ S= entropy or unusable energy 

○ T= absolute temp in kelvin(K)

● Spontaneous reactions 

○ Occur w/o input of additional energy 

○ Not necessarily fast (like sugar breakdown to water and CO2 in a bowl)

● To determine if a chemical reaction is spontaneous or not: key factor is the free energy change  ● ^G = ^H ­ T^S  

● Exergonic: ^G< 0 or negative free energy change

○ spontaneous 

○ Exothermic

○ catabolic

○ Favors formation of products (forward direction)*

○ Reactants have more energy than products

● Endergonic: ^G> or positive free energy change: requires addition of free energy  ○ Not spontaneous 

○ **bc it requires the addition of free energy

○ Endothermic

○ anabolic

○ Favors formation of reactants (backward direction)*

○ Products have more energy than reactants

*because of this, we can use experimentally determined free­energy changes to predict direction of  reaction

● ATP : Adenosine triphosphate 

○ Energy stored in electrostatic repulsion between the phosphate groups 

○ For hydrolysis of ATP → ^G = -7.3 kcal/mole

■ Spontaneous, forward reaction

○ Energy liberated can drive a variety of cellular processes 

● Cells use ATP hydrolysis: 

○ An endergonic reaction can be coupled with an exergonic reaction 

○ Endergonic reaction will be spontaneous if net free energy change for both processes is negative  

(exergonic)  

● A cell uses ATP to drive endergonic reactions 

○ convert an endergonic reaction to net exergonic one (seen above)

Enzymes and Ribozymes 

● A spontaneous reaction is not necessarily fast → for most reactions our cells  

need catalysts to occur at a rapid pace

● Catalyst: agent that speeds up rate rxn without being consumed or changed during the rxn ● Enzyme: most common catalysts in living cells (protein)

○ In living cells, rates of enzyme­catalyzed reactions typically occur millions of times faster than  the corresponding uncatalyzed reactions

○ Ex: catalase ­ found in peroxisomes. Responsible for breakdown of toxic molecules like 

hydrogen peroxide.

● Ribozymes: another type of biological catalysts (RNA molecules)

● Activation energy: initial input of energy to start reaction

○ Needed to overcome repulsion of electron clouds of 2 reactants

■ Allows molecules to get close enough to cause bond rearrangement

○ Needed to increase probability of colliding in correct orientation

■ puts them in position optimal to react and stretches bond 

○ With input of activation energy, glucose and ATP can now achieve a transition state in which  

the original bonds have stretched to their limit → reaction will proceed ● 2 ways to overcome activation energy 

1. Large amounts of heat

2. Using enzymes to lower activation energy

a. small amount of heat can now push reactants to transition state 

i. Enzyme strains bonds in reactants to make it easier to achieve the transition state ii. Enzyme provides a site in which reactants are positioned very close and in an optimal orientation

to facilitate bonding

iii. Enzyme can change the local environment of the reactants → direct  

participation through temporary bonding

1. Like ATP hydrolyzation → bonding phosphate to charged amino acid Enzyme­Substrate binding

● Active site: location where rxn takes place 

● Substrate: reactants that bind to active site 

● Enzyme­substrate complex: formed when enzyme and substrate bind 

● Enzymes have a high affinity or high degree of specificity for a substrate 

○ Affinity: degree of attraction between enzyme and substrate

○ Lock and key model: specificity in which a substrate binds to enzyme 

● Induced fit: conformational changes of enzyme that bond it more tightly with substrate ○ when a substrate binds to the enzyme it does not initially fit compactly the compound aligns the 

bonds and then the active sites precisely fit

○ Required for catalysis to occur

Factors that Influence Enzyme Function

● Enzyme function is influenced by substrate concentration and by inhibitors ○ Reversible inhibitors (temporary)

■ Competitive ­ compete for access to active site

■ Noncompetitive ­ bind outside of the active site (called an allosteric site)

● Allosteric site: binding causes conformational change in enzyme active site inhibiting enzyme 

function

○ Irreversible inhibitors (permanent)

■ Associated with dementia and schizophrenia

● Presence of prosthetic groups: small non­protein molecules permanently attached to the enzyme

that aid in enzyme function

● Presence of cofactor: usually inorganic (e.x. ions) that temporarily binds to enzyme and 

promotes chemical reaction

○ Zinc and iron

● Presence of coenzyme: organic molecule that temporarily binds to enzyme and participates in 

reaction but is left unchanged afterward 

○ non proteinaceous 

○ e.x. vitamins (some synthesized by cell but mostly consumed)

● Enzymes are affected by environment

○ most enzymes function maximally in a narrow range of temperature and pH (­log of Hydrogen) ■ Range different depending on enzyme

● pepsin in stomach → optimal pH = 2.0

● Cytosolic enzymes → optimal pH = 7.2

○ Outside of the range, enzyme function decreases 

■ pH greatly affects charged amino acids in particular

■ High temp/extreme pH may denature/unfold a protein → loses function Using Chemical Energy to Drive Metabolism 

● Autotrophs: harvest sunlight and convert radiant energy into chemical energy (photoautotrophs) ● Heterotrophs live off energy produced by autotrophs 

○ Foods: carbs, proteins, fats 

● Extraction of energy takes place in stages 

1. digestion: larger to smaller 

2. catabolism: smaller fragments dismantled a little at a time to harvest energy a. Highly controlled process

b. Fragments (covalent bonds) break down one at a time 

c. Highly regulated by enzymes 

i. Timely enzyme action → only when energy is required

Metabolic Pathways

● Chemical reaction: A+B → C+D

● Chemical pathway: A+B → C+D → E+F → G+H → ATP

○ Biochemical pathway is a series of steps where initial products become reactants of next step 

until final product is achieved

○ Require a multi­enzyme complex: different enzymes used for each step of series (enzymes bind 

in noncovalent manner)

■ Energy efficient

■ Avoids unwanted attractions from taking place

■ Time­efficient

■ Allows the entire pathway to occur in one big unit (not split up)

● Catabolic pathways: result in breakdown and are exergonic 

● Anabolic pathways: promote synthesis and are endergonic 

○ **must be coupled to exergonic reaction

Catabolic Pathways

● Used for recycling 

○ Ex: proteases break down unneeded proteins into amino acids

● Obtain energy for endergonic reactions by storing energy in energy intermediates (ATP and 

NADH) 

○ → see energy intermediates under “Redox Reactions”

● 2 ways to synthesize ATP:

Direct Indirect

Substrate -level phosphorylation →  enzyme directly transfers a  

phosphate from an organic molecule  

Chemi-osmotic → Energy stored in  an ion electrochemical gradient is  used to make ATP from ADP and P

(high energy) to ADP, thereby  making ATP

● Ex: glycolysis provides maximum ATP  directly

● In mitochondria

● H+ protons go down gradient through ATP  synthase enzyme from intermembrane to  mitochondrial matrix

○ catabolic reaction that provides ATP for future

endergonic processes in cell resp.

Redox Reactions

● Oxidation → removal (loss) of electrons

○ Term derived from oxygen’s capacity to attract e­

● Reduction → addition (gain) of electrons

● Redox → electron removed from one molecule and added to another ○ Substance reduced has more energy than substance oxidized

● Organisms save energy by reducing potential 

○ Oxidizing, reducing, oxidize, reduce → saves energy

● Energy intermediates (energy currency)

○ ATP (bills)

○ NADH, NADPH, FADH2 (checks) → have to go through electron transport chain  

(bank)

○ Energy intermediates are created when electrons are removed by oxidation

■ In this process, organic molecule has been oxidized and NAD+ has been reduced (gains 

electrons) to form NADH

○ NAD+ (electron acceptor)

■ Is the oxidized version of NADH

■ acts as coenzyme bc recipient of electrons of substrate

● Always recipient of two electrons → substrate becomes positive ■ Nicotinamide Adenine(core molecule) Dinucleotide

■ **anywhere there is NAD+ make sure to balance equation

■ NAD+ + 2e­ + 2H+ → NADH + H+ 

○ NADH (electron carrier)

■ Oxidized (loses electrons) to make ATP (exergonic reaction)

■ Can donate electrons during synthesis reactions and energize them

● Often needed in reactions that involve synthesis (anabolic)

Anabolic Pathways

● Also called biosynthetic reactions → necessary to make larger molecules and  

macromolecules or smaller molecules not available from food ● **must be coupled to exergonic reaction

● Catabolic pathways lead to (and provide energy for) anabolic pathways ● CATABOLIC PATHWAY ALWAYS FIRST

● Example: synthesis of glutamate and glutamine amino acids

○ Gets energy from preceding catabolic cycle

○ Glutamate is made by covalent linkage between between a­ketoglutarate and ammonium ○ Glutamate and ammonium form glutamine

○ a-ketoglutarate + NH4 + NADH → Glutamate ; Glutamate+ATP+NH4 →  glutamine

Regulation of metabolic pathways

● Important for energy efficiency

***Do you want glycolysis to take place when you’re hungry? Yes, gives you ATP

● 3 ways to regulate metabolism:

1. Gene regulation: turning genes on/off (upregulation/downregulation)

a. Genes produce enzymes, so if an enzyme is unneeded → turn gene off b. Whole body moving.

2. Cellular regulation: cells integrate signals from their environment and adjust their reactions to 

adapt (signals often recognized from endo/exocytosis)

a. Often lead to the activation of kinases: enzymes that attach a phosphate to a target protein b. Ex: Dr. V throws chalk at someone → enzymes needed to dodge it are  

signaled by hormones

i. Fight or flight mode activated (adrenaline produced)

ii. Digestive system turns off

iii. Glycolysis (energy) is activated

c. Compartmentalization 

3. Biochemical regulation: noncovalent bonding of a molecule to an enzyme directly regulates its 

function (competitive and noncompetitive inhibitors)

a. Feedback inhibition: type of noncompetitive inhibition (allosteric site) in which the product of a metabolic pathway inhibits an enzyme that acts early in the pathway­­preventing 

overaccumulation of the product 

● For metabolic pathways composed of several enzymes biochemical and cellular regulation are  often directed at the enzyme that catalyzes the rate­limiting step (slowest step in a chemical  pathway)

Recycling

● As mentioned above, recycling organic molecules is an important feature of metabolism 

(catabolism)

● Besides DNA, most large molecules (RNA, proteins, lipids, polysaccharides) exist for a short 

period of time

● Recycling them rather than starting from scratch each time they are used up is energy efficient ● Half life: the time it takes for 50% of the molecules to be broken down and recycled ● Importance: energy conservation

● Importance of mRNA degradation:

1. conserve energy by degrading mRNAs for proteins no longer needed (already completed 

function)

2. removal of faulty mRNA copies

● mRNA has cap and tail 

○ Cap at 5’ end ; Poly­A tail (consists of many adenine bases) at 3’ end

○ Stabilizing → make sure mRNA will not be digested when entering cytosol ○ Once cap and tail are removed, mRNA susceptible to breakdown

mRNA is recycled in 2 ways 

1.) 1st step for both: removal of nucleotides in the poly A tail at 3’ end

Exonuclease (enzyme)

Exosome (multiprotein complex)

Removes 5’ cap

Digestion proceeds from 3’ ­­­> 5’

Digestion proceeds from from 5’ ­­­­> 3’

**direction is important

Proteasome

● Protein complex that is the primary pathway for protein degradation in archaea and eukaryotic 

cells

● Proteases: enzymes that cleave the bonds between adjacent amino acids ○ Recognizes proteins to be degraded

Structure 

● Core: 4 stacked rings of proteins, each composed of 7 subunits

● Caps at each end (in eukaryotic cells)

○ Control the entry of proteins into the proteasome

○ Have binding sites for ubiquitin ­ a string of proteins (76 a.a) covalently attached to unwanted 

protein (tagged) that directs the protein to cap

■ Glycine at the C terminal of ubiquitin protein forms a covalent bond with lysine of target protein ■ Warrants rapid breakdown of particular proteins after certain cellular processes ○ Has enzymes that unfold the protein 

Process 

1. String of ubiquitins are attached to target protein

2. protein/ubiquitin is directed into proteasome

3. Protein is unfolded by proteins in the cap (ubiquitin is released back into cytosol) 4. Protein is degraded to small peptides and amino acids via proteases 

5. Small peptides and amino acids are recycled back into cytosol 

Autophagy

● Autophagy ­ recycling of worn out organelles

● Lysosomes contain hydrolases to break down macromolecules

○ Digest extracellular substances taken up by endocytosis

○ Digest intracellular materials (like worn out organelles) taken up by autophagosome Process 

1. Membrane tubule encloses and organelle

2. Double membrane autophagosome encloses organelle

3. Autophagosome fuses with lysosome, contents are degraded and recycled back to the cytosol  CHAPTER 7 ­ CELLULAR RESPIRATION AND FERMENTATION

Overview

● Cellular respiration: the metabolic processes that living cells use to obtain energy from organic 

molecules and release waste products

○ Very controlled process

○ Aim: produce ATP and NADH

○ General equation: Organic molecules + O2 → CO2 + H2O + Energy

○ Organic molecule can be carbs, protein, and fats… but usually glucose

Presence of O2

Absence of O2

Aerobic respiration

Anaerobic respiration

Fermentation

O2 is consumed, CO2 is 

produced

O2 receives de­energized  election

Inorganic compounds receive 

the de­energized electron ○

Organic compounds receive  the electron

(pyruvate or acetaldehyde)

4 steps of aerobic respiration involving glucose 

1.) Glycolysis

2.) Breakdown of pyruvate

3.) Citric acid cycle

4.) Oxidative phosphorylation

Glycolysis

● Occurs in the cytosol 

● Glucose (6 carbons) is broken down (lysis) to two pyruvate (3 carbons), producing net energy 

yield of: two ATP molecules and two NADH molecules

● Can occur in the presence OR absence of oxygen.

○ Even though it is a very energy inefficient process, our body has maintained it because of this ● 3 phases: Energy investment (priming) phase (1­3), Cleavage phase (4­5), Energy liberation 

phase (6­10)

● Key: Enzyme, substances released or consumed, final product. 

      Process 

1. Glucose (6C) is broken down by hexokinase. ATP is hydrolyzed into ADP and P →  

phosphate attaches to glucose. Glucose­6­phosphate is the result (6C). 2. Glucose­6­phosphate (6C) transforms into its structural isomer Fructose­6­phosphate (6C) with 

the help of phosphoglucoisomerase. 

3. ATP is hydrolyzed into ADP and P, and with the help of phosphofructokinase, phosphate  attaches and fructose 1,6 phosphate 

*At the end of energy investment phase we are left with one molecule of fructose 1,6 phosphate (6C).

*2 ATP are used in this phase, in the 1st step and 3rd step (might be on test)

*the energy investment phase is endergonic, raising the free energy of glucose so later reactions  can be exergonic 

4. Next, aldolase breaks down fructose 1,6 phosphate into two molecules: one glyceraldehyde­3­ 

phosphate (3C) and one dihydroxyacetone (3C) 

5. Then, trinase phosphate isomerase helps transform the dihydroxyacetone (3C) into  glyceraldehyde­3­phosphate as well. No energy is required in this step

*at the end of the cleavage phase we are left with two molecules of glyceraldehyde­3­phosphate (3C each)

6. 2 inorganic, free phosphates from the cytosol bind to each glyceraldehyde­3­phosphate, 

converting each into to 1,3 bisphosphoglycerate. Each reaction releases 1 NADH and 1 H+. 7. The phosphate molecule on the the 1st carbon of each 1,3 bisphosphoglycerate molecule is 

released and binds to ADP, releasing ATP, (2 ATP molecules are released total), and forming 2 

molecules of 3 phosphoglycerate. This process is catalyzed by phosphoglycerokinase 8. Phosphoglyceromutase moves the phosphate on each 3 phosphoglycerate from the 3rd to second

carbon, forming two molecules of 2 phosphoglycerate. This step requires no energy. 9. Enolase breaks down each 2 phosphoglycerate molecule into phosphoenolpyruvate, releasing a 

molecule of H2O in the process (2 H2O molecules released total). The absence of the H2O 

makes phosphoenolpyruvate very unstable.

10. Phosphate leaves each molecule of phosphoenolpyruvate, binding to ADP, releasing 2 molecules of ATP. Two pyruvate molecules are formed with the help of pyruvate kinase.       Overall result: 

● 2 pyruvate

● 2 ATP (4­2)

● 2 NADH

● 2 H+ protons

● 2 H2O

Breakdown of Pyruvate

● Occurs in the mitochondrial matrix

● Pyruvate molecules are broken down (oxidized) by pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex. ● Two phases: transport of pyruvate to mitochondrial matrix, and oxidation of pyruvate

      Process

1. Pyruvate travels from cytosol to mitochondria, and passes through the outer mitochondrial 

membrane into the intermembrane space through a pyruvate channel. 

a. Concentration of pyruvate is lower in the intermembrane space than the cytosol, so  

this is an act of passive diffusion → facilitated diffusion (b/c of channel) 2. Pyruvate travels from intermembrane space through the inner mitochondrial membrane to the 

mitochondrial matrix by an H+/pyruvate symporter pump. 

a. Concentration of pyruvate is higher in the mitochondrial matrix than in the  intermembrane space, so this is an act of active transport → secondary active 

transport (because of help of H+ proton gradient)

3. Pyruvate dehydrogenase: removes CO2 from each pyruvate, resulting in 2 acetyl groups 4. Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase: attaches coenzyme A (CoA, CoASH), onto acetyl groups, forming 

two molecules of acetyl CoA. 

5. Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase: releases NADH (NAD+ + 2e- + 2H+ → NADH + H+) *note: the first pathway in cellular respiration where we lose a carbon is during the oxidation of pyruvate (possibl

      Overall result 

● 2 NADH

● 2H+

● 2 CO2

● 2 acetyl CoA

Citric Acid Cycle

● Citric acid is the first product produced

● Also known as “Krebs Cycle,” or Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA) cycle

● The process is a metabolic cycle → organic molecules are regenerated with each  

turn of the cycle

○ Particular molecules enter the cycle while others leave

● Involves the breakdown of carbohydrates to CO2

● Complete oxidation of carbons takes place here

● There are 2 rounds of the Kreb cycle per 1 glucose molecule 

○ 4 carbons from 1 glucose molecule enter Krebs (2 per molecule of Acetyl CoA from breakdown 

of pyruvate)

● 3 phases: Priming phase → preparing for breakdown (1-2), Oxidation phase (3­4), 

Regeneration phase (5­8)

● Key: Enzyme, substances released or consumed, final product. 

      Process of ONE cycle:

● **Oxaloacetate (4C) is the starting and ending compound of the Kreb cycle 1. Acetyl CoA (2C) from the breakdown of pyruvate enters the Krebs Cycle. The acetyl group 

(CH3CO) attaches to oxaloacetate (4C) with the help of citrate synthetase, forming citrate aka 

citric acid (6C). CoA­SH is released from the Acetyl CoA molecule.

a. Highly exergonic reaction

2. Aconitase rearranges citrate into an isomer called Isocitrate (6C), in a two step process that 

involves:

a. Releasing one molecule of H2O

b. Consuming one molecule of H2O

3. Isocitrate dehydrogenase oxidizes isocitrate (6C) into ?­ketoglutarate (5C), releasing one CO2 

and forming one NADH molecule (NAD+ + 2e- + 2H+ → NADH + H+) a. Highly exergonic 

b. **first energy compound (NADH) in Kreb cycle is produced here!

c. When CO2 is released, a hydronium ion is also released, forming NADH 4. ?­ketoglutarate dehydrogenase oxidizes ­ketoglutarate (5C) and attaches it to  CoA­SH, forming 

succinyl CoA (4C), releasing one CO2 and forming one NADH molecule

a. Highly exergonic reaction

b. Attaching the CoA­SH compound helps stabilize the molecule

5. Succinyl CoA synthetase breaks down succinyl CoA into succinate (4C), releasing the CoA­SH 

attachment. 

a. This exergonic reaction drives formation of GTP from GDP and Pi, which then gives a 

phosphate to ADP forming ATP

i. ***this step (formation of succinate from succinyl CoA) is the only step in the Krebs cycle 

where ATP is produced

6. Succinate dehydrogenase oxidizes succinate (4C) into fumarate (4C), producing FADH2 7. Fumarase helps fumarate(4C) to combine with water, forming malate (4C). a. **only step where net one water molecule comes in

8. Malate dehydrogenase oxidizes malate into oxaloacetate (4C) → the starting compound of the krebs cycle, forming one NADH. The cycle begins again and repeats itself! (2 cycles per  glucose molecule)   

      Final product (per 1 cycle) 

1. 2 CO2

2. 1 ATP

3. 1 FADH

4. 3 NADH

Per glucose:

Pathway/cycle

CO2

ATP

NADH

FADH2

Glycolysis

­­­­­­­

2

2

­­­­­­

Breakdown of  Pyruvate

2

______

2

______

Kreb Cycle

4

2

6

2

Oxidative Phosphorylation

● Process by which high­energy electrons are removed from NADH and FADH2 to produce more 

ATP

● Typically requires oxygen (last electron acceptor in ETC)

○ “Oxidative” → high energy electrons from NADH and FADH2 are removed via 

oxidation in electron transport chain 

○ “Phosphorylation” → ATP is created by the phosphorylation of ADP via ATP synthase Electron transport chain (ETC) → first step of oxidative  

phosphorylation.  

● ETC: group of protein complexes and small organic molecules 

○ In humans: embedded in inner mitochondrial membrane 

■ H+ is pumped into intermembrane space

○ In bacteria: embedded in plasma membrane 

■ H+ is pumped into space between plasma membrane and cell wall

Structure 

● Protein complexes involved in ETC:

I. NADH dehydrogenase → proton pump 

II. Succinate reductase 

III. Cytochrome b­c­1 → proton pump 

IV. Cytochrome oxidase → proton pump 

● Mobile electron carriers involved in ETC:

Q. Ubiquinone (coenzyme Q) 

○ Organic molecule

CyC. Cytochrome c 

○ Protein

Process

● Electrons passed from NADH and FADH2 → ETC → oxygen ○ e­ are passed linearly from one component to the next in a series of redox reactions

 1a) NADH is oxidized to NAD+ → releasing 2e-

◆ One electron at a time, e­ are transferred to I. 

◆ I. uses part of electron’s energy to pump H+ from mitochondrial matrix (low concentration) to 

intermembrane space (high concentration), establishing proton gradient

◆ e­ are then transferred to Q 

      1b) FADH2 is oxidized to FAD

◆ e­ are transferred to II. 

● Because FADH is found in inner mitochondrial membrane right next to II. ◆ e­ are then transferred to Q 

2. Q accepts the partly de­energized electrons from complex I. and electrons from complex II. and 

delivers them to complex III. 

◆ III. uses part of electron’s energy to pump H+ from mitochondrial matrix (low concentration) to 

intermembrane space (high concentration), establishing proton gradient

◆ e­ are then transferred to CyC 

3. CyC carries e­ from III to IV 

◆ IV. uses part of electron’s energy to pump H+ from mitochondrial matrix (low concentration) to 

intermembrane space (high concentration), establishing proton gradient

◆ e- are then transferred to O2 (oxygen is reduced) → water is produced Function 

● Movement of electrons across ETC is an exergonic process (negative free energy) ○ Some free energy is harnessed to pump H+ ions into intermembrane space, ultimately generating

an H+ electrochemical (proton) gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane ● Gradient is source of potential energy that helps drive ATP synthesis later

******possible test questions******

● Q: how many proton pumps are involved in electron transfer from NADH? ○ A: 3 pumps (NADH dehydrogenase, Cytochrome b­c­1, Cytochrome oxidase) ● Q: how many proton pumps are involved in electron transfer from FADH2? ○ A: 2 pumps (Cytochrome b­c­1, Cytochrome oxidase)

● Q: similarities and differences between Ubiquinone (coenzyme Q) and Cytochrome c? ○ A: both are mobile electron carriers. Ubiquinone is an organic molecule, while  Cytochrome c is 

a protein. Ubiquinone carries electrons from I. and II. to III., while Cytochrome c carries 

electrons from  III to IV.

● Q: what is the role of succinate reductase (II) in the ETF, if it is not a proton pump?

○ A: II. is simply located near FADH2 in the intermembrane space, so it is convenient for FADH2  electrons to be transferred to Q from II 

Racker and Stoeckenius Experiment

● Artificial vesicle made in lab

● Insert bacteriorhodopsin into vesicle membrane

○ light­driven H+ pump —> pumps protons from outside of vesicle to inside vesicle in the 

presence of light

● Insert ATP synthase into vesicle membrane

○ helps protons move from inside of vesicle to outside of vesicle, down the concentration gradient ● ADP and Pi added on the outside of vesicle

○ One sample in light (H+ pump activated): showed ATP was made

○ One sample in dark (H+ pump not activated): showed no ATP was made ● Result/conclusion: ATP synthase directly requires an H+ proton electrochemical gradient to 

synthesize ATP

ATP Synthesis → second step of oxidative phosphorylation ● ATP synthase: enzyme embedded in inner membrane of mitochondria that synthesizes ATP. Process 

● ETC creates H+ electrochemical gradient across inner mitochondrial membrane ○ High concentration of H+ in intermembrane space

○ Low concentration of H+ in mitochondrial matrix

● Passive movement of H+ down gradient is an exergonic process

○ ATP synthase allows H+ to pass through lipid bilayer (usually impermeable to ions) ○ ATP synthase harnesses energy released as ions flow through membrane

Function 

● Free energy is used to synthesize ATP from ADP and iP

○ Energy conversion: energy from H+ gradient converted to chemical bond energy in ATP ○ Chemiosmosis: the movement or “push” of H+ ions down their gradient, resulting in ATP 

synthesis

Structure 

○ ATP synthase is a rotary machine

○ ATP synthase is made of a membrane ( F0) and matrix embedded (

F1) unit 

■ Membrane embedded unit:

● c subunits (9-12) → create proton  

channel ring

● a subunit (1) → connects c units to  

b units

● b subunits (2) → connect  

membrane embedded units to matrix embedded units

■ Matrix embedded unit:

● ε subunit (1) → binds to c subunits

● Ɣ subunit (1) → long central stalk.  

Connected to c subunits, and α/β ring. Rotates clockwise  

(when viewed from the inter membrane space) in 3 sets of  

120 degrees to synthesize ATP. Causes β subunits to  

change conformation

● β subunits (3) → forms ring with 3 α

subunits. Each contains catalytic site where ATP is made.  

Changes conformation each time Ɣ subunit rotates 120  

degrees. No to Beta ever in the same conformation

1. Conformation 1 →  

(accept) ADP and Pi bind with good affinity

2. Conformation 2 →  

(squish) Squishes to bind ADP and Pi tightly enough  

to make ATP

3. Conformation 3 →  

(release) ATP binds weakly, ATP is released

● α subunits (3) → forms ring with 3 β

subunits

● ẟ subunit (1) → connects α/β ring to

two b subunits

Yoshida and Kinosita Experiment

● Examined the  ­ 3­ 3 protein complex of ATP synthase on a glass slide so the   subunit was  Ɣ α β Ɣ

pointing upward

● Attached large, fluorescent actin filament to   subunit so it could be seen with fluorescent mic Ɣ ● Added ATP to glass slide

○ (ATP synthase can work backwards to hydrolyze ATP)

○ Observed that   subunit was rotating counterclockwise Ɣ

● Result/conclusion:   subunit of ATP synthase rotates clockwise when synthesizing ATP Ɣ

Regulating Aerobic Respiration

● It is important for our bodies to regulate aerobic respiration, so we don’t waste energy creating 

unneeded amounts of ATP.

● Rate of aerobic respiration is largely regulated by the availability of substrates and feedback  

inhibition 

○ Glycolysis: regulated by rate limiting enzyme phosphofructokinase 

■ Involved in the third step of glycolysis → the rate-limiting step ■ Levels of ATP, AMP, and citrate regulate activation/inhibition of phosphofructokinase ○ Pyruvate oxidation: regulated by rate limiting enzyme pyruvate decarboxylase.  ■ Levels of NADH and ATP regulate activation/inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylase ■ Pyruvate dehydrogenase is also activated by its substrate, pyruvate, and inhibited by its product,  

acetyl CoA. 

○ Krebs Cycle: regulated by rate limiting enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase. ■ Levels of ATP and NADH regulate activation/inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase ○ Oxidative phosphorylation: regulated by availability of ETC substrates and rate limiting 

enzyme cytochrome oxidase (complex IV) 

■ Levels of NADH and O2 regulate rate of ETC

■ ATP/ADP ratio regulate activation/inhibition of cytochrome oxidase

● High levels of ATP → ATP binds to IV and inhibits it, inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation ● High levels of ADP → stimulates IV, and provides more substrate to produce ATP, 

stimulating oxidative phosphorylation

Cancer Cells Favor Glycolysis

● Warburg effect in cancer cells: cancer cells tend to increase glycolysis and decrease oxidative 

phosphorylation

○ Increased glycolysis rates can be detected in PET scans → can be used to  

diagnose cancers

● Why is there an increased rate of glycolysis in cancer cells?

1. Environmental factor: lack of oxygen (hypoxia)

● Such rapid cell division of cancer cells requires a lot of oxygen

2. Genetic factor: VHL gene mutation

● VHL gene regulates all 10 enzymes of glycolysis

● Mutation of VHL gene causes over expression of enzymes → faster glycolysis ● The enzymes actually used to detect high rate of glycolysis are 3 enzymes in the energy 

liberation phase of glycolysis:

○ 1. glyceraldehyde­3­phosphate dehydrogenase

○ 2. enolase

○ 3. pyruvate kinase

Protein, Fat, and Other Carb Metabolism

● Sucrose is not the only thing that can be metabolized to get energy!

● Recap: 

○ Metabolism of proteins and carbs → 4.3 calories/gram

○ Metabolism of lipids → 9.3 calories/gram

● Different organic molecules can be broken down into molecules that enter glycolysis or the  Krebs cycle at different times

Proteins

● Broken down by enzymes into individual amino acids

● Amino acids undergo deamination → lose their amino group (NH2) ● When different amino acids (there are 20) undergo deamination, they become a carbohydrate and

can then enter anywhere in the catabolic cycle

○ Breakdown products of amino acids can enter later steps of glycolysis

■ Ex: Alanine → releases NH2 (deamination) → becomes pyruvate → enters  

pyruvate oxidation

○ Acetyl group from amino acids can be removed, attach to Acetyl CoA, and then enter Krebs 

cycle

○ Modified amino acids can directly enter Krebs cycle

■ Ex: glutamic acid → releases NH2 (deamination) → becomes α-ketoglutarate  

→ enters Krebs cycle

■ Ex: aspartic acid → releases NH2 (deamination) → becomes oxaloacetate →  enters Krebs cycle

Lipids

● Broken down into glycerol or fatty acid

○ Glycerol → modified to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and enters glycolysis ○ Fatty acid → 6 carbon fatty acid modified to Acetyl CoA and enters Kreb Cycle ■ Fatty acid undergoes 2 rounds of betaoxidation (process by which fat is converted to a 

carbohydrate) forming 3 molecules of Acetyl CoA (2C)

● Occurs in the peroxisomes

■ During the 2 rounds of betaoxidation, 2 ATP are used, 2 NADH are released, and 2 FADH are 

released 

● (2 NADH x 2.5) + (2 FADH2 x 1.5) – (2 ATP) = 6 ATP

■ Each of the 3 Acetyl CoA molecules enter the Krebs Cycle (3 cycles), yielding 30 ATP ■ One 6­carbon fat produces 36 ATP (30+6)

Carbs

● Sugars → glycolysis → pyruvate oxidation → Krebs cycle → oxidative  

phosphorylation

● One 6­carbon sugar produces 30 ATP

Anaerobic Metabolism

● Occurs when a cell needs to metabolize organic molecules in an environment that lacks oxygen ○ Ex: bacteria living deep in soil

○ Ex: human cells during exercise

● 2 strategies of anaerobic metabolism: anaerobic respiration and fermentation Anaerobic Respiration 

● More common in prokaryotes

● Organism uses another substance other than O2 as the final electron acceptor in the ETC. 

(Glycolysis, pyruvate oxidation, and Krebs cycle can all already occur in the absence of O2)  ○ Ex: E. coli uses NO3­ (nitrate) as the final electron acceptor in ETC. 

● An enzyme other than Cytochrome oxidase is needed to recognize the new organic molecule ○ In aerobic conditions, Cytochrome oxidase is the last proton pump in ETC that recognizes O2, 

and catalyzes its reduction to H2O. 

○ Ex: E. coli uses nitrate reductase to recognize NO3­ (nitrate), and catalyze its conversion to  

NO2­ (nitrite)

● ETC in bacteria has two pumps that create H+ gradient: NADH dehydrogenase and ubiquinone ● The reduction of nitrate to nitrate consumes H+ in the cytoplasm, and also indirectly contributes 

to the H+ gradient

**possible test questions**

● Q: What is the second proton pump in bacteria?

○ A: ubiquinone

● Q: What is the difference between the ETC in humans and bacteria?

○ A: ETC in bacteria has two pumps (NADH dehydrogenase and ubiquinone) whereas ETC in  humans has three pumps (NADH dehydrogenase, cytochrome B, cytochrome oxidase)

Fermentation 

● More common in eukaryotes

○ Organisms like animals and yeast can’t substitute another molecule for O2 in the ETC like many 

prokaryotes can

● Glycolysis is the only method in which ATP can be produced

○ (glycolysis can occur in the presence or absence of oxygen)

○ Glycolysis only yields 2 ATP per 6­carbon glucose

○ ATP is made via substrate­level phosphorylation without any net oxidation of organic molecules ● Glycolysis requires NAD+ and generates NADH

● Unlike in aerobic conditions, in anaerobic conditions NADH is not converted back into NAD+ in

the ETC

○ Problem: Buildup of NADH, lack of NAD+

■ NAD+ is required to drive glycolysis

■ Excess NADH can promote the formation of free radicals and damage the cell ● Fermentation occurs to cope with the buildup of NADH and decrease in NAD+ ○ Fermentation: breakdown of organic molecules to harness energy without any net oxidation (no 

net removal of electrons)

○ Recycles NAD+ to reuse in glycolysis 

○ Occurs in cytosol

Fermentation

Muscle cells

Yeast cells

Glucose is broken down into pyruvate in 

glycolysis

Pyruvate uses electrons from NADH to create 

lactate or lactic acid

Pyruvate is reduced lactate

NADH is oxidized to NAD+ 

Lactate is later recycled once aerobic 

conditions return

○ 

Glucose is broken down into pyruvate in  glycolysis

Pyruvate breaks down into CO2 and  acetaldehyde (2C)

Acetaldehyde uses electrons from NADH to  create ethanol 

Acetaldehyde is reduced to ethanol

NADH is oxidized to NAD+

○ 

Secondary metabolism

● Secondary metabolism: synthesis of secondary metabolites that are not necessary for cell 

structure and growth

○ Enhances life, but not essential for survival like primary metabolism ○ Often plays a role in defense, competition, attraction, and protection ● Secondary metabolites:

○ Phenolics ­ flavonoids (expensive wine vs. inexpensive wine), tannins, and lignins ■ Antioxidants with intense flavors and smells

○ Alkaloids ­ caffeine, nicotine, atropine

■ Bitter­tasting molecules for defense

○ Terpenoids ­ cinnamon, fennel, cloves, erasers, 5C isoprene (attracts or repels) ■ Intense smells and colors

○ Polyketides ­ antibiotics

■ derivatives of acetyl and propionyl group

■ Chemical weapons, cancer cure

■ Produced by microorganisms that compete for food and space

CHAPTER 8 ­ PHOTOSYNTHESIS

Overview

● Photosynthesis: the process by which an organism uses sunlight to synthesize carbohydrates 

from carbon dioxide and water, thereby converting light energy into chemical energy ○ 6CO2 + 12H20 + light energy → C6H12O6 +6O2 + 6H20 ○ Endergonic reaction driven by light

■ Not energetically favorable

■ ΔG = +685 kcal

○ CO2 is reduced, H2O is oxidized

○ 18 ATP and 12 NADPH required to make 6­carbon sugar

■ Note: NADPH → extra phosphate → extra electron acceptor ● Photoautotrophs perform photosynthesis

○ Organisms that use light as a source of energy to make organic molecules ○ Green plants, algae, cyanobacteria

● Photosynthesis primarily occurs in the leaves of plants

○ Mesophyll: tissue in the internal part of the leaf that contains chloroplasts ○ Stomata: pores in the leaves of plants where CO2 enters and O2 exits

● Photosynthesis powers the biosphere!

○ Plants replenish the organic molecules that all cells need for energy

■ Photosynthesis creates organic molecules from CO2, drives cellular respiration, which releases 

CO2

■ Energy cycle between photosynthesis and cellular respiration

○ Plants produce O2

● Occurs in 2 steps: light reactions (light dependent) and the Calvin cycle (light independent) ● 4 key players in photosynthesis:

1. Chloroplasts

2. Light and the Electromagnetic spectrum

3. Pigments

4. NADP+

Chloroplast

● Chloroplasts are the organelles that carry out photosynthesis

● Chlorophyll: pigment that gives plants green color

      Structure

● Outer membrane, inner membrane, intermembrane space

● Grana: large stacks of thylakoids throughout chloroplast

○ Thylakoids: flattened, fluid­filled tubules

○ Thylakoid lumen: convoluted compartment enclosed by thylakoids

○ Thylakoid membrane: contains chlorophyll

● Stroma: fluid­filled region between the thylakoid membrane and the inner membrane Light and the Electromagnetic Spectrum

● Light is a type of electromagnetic radiation

○ Consists of energy in the form of electric and magnetic fields that travels in waves ● Wavelength: distance between the peaks in the wave pattern

● Photosynthetically active region on electromagnetic spectrum: 380mm­740mm ○ Visible light range

○ Light that can drive photosynthesis

● Photon: massless particles traveling in a wavelike pattern at the speed of light ○ Packages of energy

■ More energy = shorter wavelengths

Pigments

● Photons can: 1) pass through an object, 2) be reflected/scattered, or 3) be absorbed ● Pigments: Traps/absorbs the energy from light (photons) and convert it into chemical energy ○ Some light energy is reflected → the light we see is the light not absorbed! ● “Absorption” of light refers to the ability to excite an electron

○ When a pigment absorbs a photon, e­ of pigment is boosted to a higher orbital and becomes 

photoexcited 

■ Moves from ground state to excited state

■ When e­ goes back to ground state, it releases energy as heat or light 

○ The wavelength of light that a specific pigment can absorb depends on the amount of energy 

required to excite the electrons in that pigment

● Types of pigments:

○ Chlorophyll a and b→ found in green plants and green algae ■ Made of porphyrin ring head (polar) and phytol tail (hydrocarbon tail, nonpolar, embedded in 

thylakoid mem)

■ Magnesium ion bound to porphyrin ring (CH3 group in a; CHO group in b) ○ Carotenoid → found in yellow/orange/red plants (flowers and fruits) ● Absorption spectrum: plots a pigment’s light absorption as a function of wavelength ○ Measures range and efficacy (different plot for each pigment)

○ Chlorophyll a: max absorption → 430. Reflects light green (450­600) ○ Chlorophyll b: max absorption → 450. Reflects dark green (500­625) ○ Carotene B: max absorption → 450. Reflects light orange (525­700)

● Action spectrum: plots the rate of photosynthesis as a function of wavelength ○ Measures effectiveness to promote photosynthesis (one plot)

Light Reactions

● Aka light dependent reactions

● Occurs in thylakoid membrane

● Capture light energy and ultimately produce ATP, NADPH, and O2

○ ATP and NADPH continue to calvin cycle, while O2 is released

● Consist of 2 parts: photosystem II and photosystem I

     Structure of PSII 

● Composed of approximately 19 different subunits (don’t need to know all of them) ● Subunits CP43 and CP47 compose the light harvesting complex (aka antenna complex). Wrap 

around D1 and D2.

○ Contain all the pigments

○ Directly absorbs photons → primary photon event occurs here ● Subunits D1 and D2 contain the reaction center 

○ Unstable

○ D1 contains: reaction center pigment (P680), magnesium cluster, tyrosine ○ D2 contains: primary electron acceptor (pheophytin)

○ Carries out redox reactions

     Structure of PSI 

● Light harvesting complex

● Reaction center

○ Reaction center pigment: P700

○ Primary electron acceptor (name irrelevant)

     Process 

1. Oxidation of water occurs in the reaction center to give P680+ back a low­energy electron a. Very important process

b. Occurs in manganese clusters found on the lumen side of the D1 protein c. The manganese clusters break water to release electrons

i. H2O → 2H+ + ½ O2 + 2e

d. Electrons are given one at a time to tyrosine amino acid, and then back to P680+ to regenerate 

P680

e. 2H+ contributes to a proton gradient in thylakoid lumen needed for ATP synthase  f. Oxygen is released into environment

2. Primary photon event occurs → pigments in light harvesting complex of PSII  absorb photons

a. Electrons in all pigments get excited, but then release energy in the form of heat or light (wave 

example from class)

b. Energy is transferred among adjacent pigments by resonance energy transfer 3. Eventually, energy is transferred to reaction center pigment: P680

a. Once excited, it’s called P680*

b. What makes P680 special from other pigments?

i. Different position (in reaction center near primary electron acceptor)

ii. Didn’t start out with it’s own electron; got its electron from tyrosine which got it from water 4. Instead of releasing energy as heat/light under resonance energy transfer, P680* releases excited 

electron to reaction center and is immediately “grabbed” by primary electron acceptor: 

pheophytin

a. P680* → P680+ + e

b. In class example: Dr. V (pheophytin) grabs chalk (electron) from girl (P680*) c. Pheophytin differs from other chlorophyll pigments in that it lacks an Mg2+ atom 5. Pheophytin passes the electron to plastoquinone A (QA), which cannot move, so passes it to 

plastoquinone B (QB) which can move.

6. From QB, the electron goes to the cytochrome complex, or cytochrome B6F pump a. Only pump in photosynthesis

b. Harnesses some energy from e­ and uses it to pump H+ into lumen, creating gradient needed for  

ATP synthase 

7. The electron is passed from cytochrome B6F to a small protein called plastocyanin (Pc) 8. Pc carries the electron to photosystem I

9. Photosystem I is similarly activated when light strikes the light­harvesting complex 10.Energy is transferred to reaction center pigment: P700

a. Z­scheme

i. Represents the energy of the electron moving from photosystem I to photosystem II ii. Involves TWO photoactivation events (gets excited twice at each reaction center) iii. Electron loses some, but not all of it’s energy during photosystem I, so it gets bumped to an even

higher energy state at P700 than at it did at P680

11.Primary electron acceptor “grabs” excited electron from P700, and brings it to a protein called 

ferredoxin.

12.Ferredoxin transfers electron to enzyme NADP+ reductase

a. Catalyzes formation of NADPH in the stroma (because needed for Calvin Cycle) →  

first energy intermediate formed

b. NADP+ + 2H+ → NADPH + H+

c. ***NADP+ is the last receptor of the electron in the light reactions

13.ATP synthase pumps ATP into the stroma 

a. Driven by protein gradient from:

i. Oxidation of water

ii. Cytochrome b6F

b. Used in Calvin cycle

**possible questions: 

● Q: What is the primary agent that increases protons in the thylakoid lumen? ○ A: cytochrome pump

● Q: what are the products of photosystem II? 

○ A: ATP, O2

● Q: What are the products of photosystem I?

○ NADPH

● Q: In photosynthesis, where does ATP synthesis take place?

○ A: in the stroma

● Q: What is the only identical process in mitochondria and chloroplasts?

○ A: chemiosmosis (ATP synthase)

Cyclic vs. Noncyclic

● Photosynthesis is a linear process

○ Electrons flow in a non cyclic manner through photosystems II and I

● Cyclic electron flow occurs when there is a shortage of ATP compared to NADPH ○ In this case, in photosystem I, ferredoxin takes the electron back to Qb instead of to NADP+ 

reductase. 

○ Qb then brings the electron to the cytochrome pump → pumps more H+ →  more gradient → makes more ATP

Wavelength experiment

● Emerson observed action spectrum of algae

○ How wavelength of light affects rate of photosynthesis

1. Coated algae on a slide

2. Exposed algae to only 680 nm

a. Slow rate of photosynthesis

3. Exposed algae to only 700 nm

a. Slow rate of photosynthesis

4. Exposed algae to 680 nm and 700 nm simultaneously

a. Very fast rate of photosynthesis, more than double

● Conclusion: PSII and PSI are two separate processes/complexes of photosynthesis that work in a 

series, not parallel to each other. Electrons move from photosystem II to I. 

○ Have different reaction centers ­ P680 and P700 ­ that absorb different wavelengths of light Evolutionary History of Homologous Genes

● Mitochondria and chloroplast contain evolutionarily related proteins!

○ Share a common ancestor

● Similar proteins in electron transport chain of mitochondria and chloroplast

○ Ex: cytochrome pump

■ In mitochondria → ubiquinone carries electron to cytochrome bc1 pump ■ In chloroplast → plastoquinone carries electron to cytochrome b6f pump ■ Both have same function: receive electrons from “quinons”, harness energy from an electron, 

and use it to pump protons

Calvin cycle → light independent

● 2nd phase of photosynthesis: ATP and NADPH from light reactions are used to make 

carbohydrates 

○ 12 NADPH and 18 ATP required to make 6C­sugar

● Occurs in stroma

● Called a cycle because it regenerates what it starts with: RuBP

● 6 cycles required per 6­C sugar

○ ***note: in the outline below, each compound will be multiplied by the appropriate coefficient in 

bold after 6 cycles have occurred 

● Occurs in 3 phases

      Phase 1: Carbon Fixation 

1. 6 x CO2 (1C) enter the cycle from the environment and join with the final product of the cycle: 6 x RuBP (ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate) (5C). The enzyme Rubisco catalyzes this reaction and helps 

form a 6 x 6­carbon intermediate (unnamed)

a. Total of 36 carbons enter calvin cycle

b. Biphosphate → 2 phosphates (12 total)

c. Rubisco is the most abundant protein on earth

i. Ribulose biphosphate carboxylase oxygenase 

2. The 6 x 6­carbon intermediate is very unstable, and each immediately splits into two 3C 

molecules resulting in 12 x 3­phosphoglycerate.

a. Considered the first (stable) product of the Calvin cycle

b. Also called the C3 cycle

      Phase 2: Reduction Phase 

3. 12 ATP are used to convert 12 x 3­phosphoglycerate to  12 x 1,3 biphosphoglycerate  a. Just adding a phosphate to compound from ATP

4. 12 NADPH are used to convert 12 x 1,3 biphosphoglycerate to 12 x glyceraldehyde 3­phosphate a. Second phosphate released, another molecule added in its place

5. 2 of the 12 G3P (3C) molecules exit the cycle and undergo reverse glycolysis a. Total of 6C exits the cycles

b. Form glucose and other sugars

      Regeneration Phase 

6. 6 ATP are used to convert the other 10 x G3P(3C) molecules back to 6 x RuBP(5C) Photorespiration

● Regulation method in which stomata closes (to retain water)

○ CO2 can’t come in

○ Accumulation of oxygen

○ Process uses oxygen and releases CO2 (reverse photosynthesis)

○ Problematic because it is very energy inefficient

● Photorespiration rates are higher at hotter temps because stomata close to conserve water, 

consequently building up oxygen

● RuBisco causes photorespiration

○ CO2 binding site → when CO2 binds, RuBisco catalyzes carbon fixation ■ RuBisco acts as a carboxylase 

○ O2 is a competitive inhibitor of RuBisco → can also bind to CO2 binding site ■ When oxygen concentrations are high, O2 binds. 

■ Can’t have carbon fixation

■ RuBisco acts as an oxygenase 

○ O2 binds with RuBP (5C) and yields just 1 3PG molecule (5C) and one Phosphoglycolate (2C) ■ Phosphoglycolate → glycolate → → organic molecule + CO2 ● While photorespiration decreases agricultural yield (photosynthesis), it is an adaptation that 

consumes toxic oxygen and lessons buildup when stomata are closed

Variations in Photosynthesis

● Environments of different light intensity, temperatures, and water availability all affect 

photosynthesis

● Stomata close around 12pm to conserve water

○ Plants lose water b/c of transpiration

● 95­96% of plants are C3 plants

○ 3PG (3C) is first product of carbon fixation 

○ RuBisco catalyzes carbon fixation 

○ Can’t survive in hot climates → would begin photorespiration too early in day ● C4 plants have developed adaptations that helps them in their hot environment ○ Oxaloacetate (4C) is first product of carbon fixation 

■ Have a C4 cycle that occurs before C3 cycle (more energy efficient)

■ note: C3 cycle still exists in C4 plants

○ PEP carboxylase catalyzes carbon fixation 

■ Doesn’t recognize oxygen, so doesn’t undergo photorespiration 

○ Two types of C4 plants include: tropical/subtropical plants and desert plants 

Tropical/subtropical plants

Desert Plants (CAM)

Unique leaf anatomy that allows them to 

avoid photorespiration 

Two­cell organization composed of mesophyll

cells and bundle sheath cells

Impermeable membrane between the two cells Only malate can be passed down into C3  cycle

Pyruvate can pass back up 

C4 cycle occurs in mesophyll, C3 cycle  occurs in bundle­sheath

C3 plants: C3 cycle occurs in mesophyll

Unique day/night process that conserves water and avoids photorespiration 

C4 cycle occurs at night, C3 cycle occurs in  day

Stomata open once sun sets and  stays open all night → accumulates  CO2 and stores it it in malate in a  vacuole

C4 cycle 

1. Carbon dioxide enters mesophyll cell in through stomata

2. PEP carboxylase adds CO2 to PEP­phosphoenolpyruvate (3C) to produce oxaloacetate (4C) a. **PEP is the molecule made before pyruvate in glycolysis

3. Oxaloacetate uses 1 ATP → ADP + Pi to convert to malate (4C) a. C4 plants: malate passes through impermeable membrane to bundle sheath  b. CAM plants: malate accumulates in vacuole at night, leaves vacuole in day 4. Malate breaks down into pyruvate and CO2

a. C4 plants: pyruvate in bundle sheath passes through membrane back into mesophyll b. Pyruvate sticks around until night time

5. CO2 drives the calvin cycle

a. C4 plants: in bundle sheath

b. CAM plants: in mesophyll, during day 

6. Malate uses 1 ATP → AMP + PP (a lot of energy) to convert back to PEP ● *using 6 x 2 = 12 ATP total in C4 cycle per glucose and 18 ATP total in C3 cycle per glucose. 

12 + 18 = 30 ATP used

CHAPTER 9 ­ CELL COMMUNICATION

Overview

● Cell communication: process through which cells can detect and respond to signals in their 

extracellular environment

● Signals: agent that influences properties of cells

○ Include incoming and outgoing signals

● Receptors: cellular proteins that receive signals

○ Type of communication protein

○ Specific signals for specific receptors

Reasons for cell signaling

1. Need to respond/adapt to changes in environment (cellular response)

a. Example: Yeast

i. Glucose acts as the signal for yeast (specific)

ii. When glucose is present, glucose receptors detect the signal

iii. Transport channels are activated and enzymes are synthesized

1. Help yeast metabolize glucose

2. Cell­to­cell communication

a. Multicellular organisms need to respond to environment and other cells in system b. Example: phototropism (plants bend toward source of light → multi-step  

response)

i. Sunlight produces signal molecules called auxin

ii. Auxin diffuses and accumulates toward the dark side of the plant

iii. Cell response to accumulation of auxin: cells elongate 

iv. Plant bends

Types of Signals

● Determined by: 1) distance between signal and cells, and 2) nature of signals 1. Direct Intercellular Signaling

a. Signal molecules flow through communicating junctions (called gap junctions in animal cells) b. Occurs between cells 

c. Ex: viruses

2. Autocrine Signaling

a. Signal molecules produced by cell bind to receptors on the same cell or on another cell of the  

same cell type. 

b. Occurs outside of the cell

c. Ex: when cell is ready to divide

3. Paracrine Signaling

a. Signal molecules bind to receptors of different cell types in close proximity i. Signals have short half­life and can’t travel far. “Localized signals”

b. Occurs outside of cell

i. e.g: “Synaptic signaling”

c. Ex: neuro­muscle cell interaction

4. Endocrine Signaling

a. Signals bind to receptors of different cell types long distances apart 

i. Ex: hormones

5. Contact­Dependent Signaling

a. Signal molecule can’t move off of cell surface

b. Signal binding to receptor depends on direct contact between two cells

Stages of Cell Signaling

● Once signal binds to receptor, cell signaling occurs in 3 stages.

1. Receptor activation

a. Receptor undergoes conformational change

2. Signal Transduction

a. Signal transduction pathway: series of conformational changes in intracellular proteins 3. Cell Response

a. Making enzymes

b. Alter protein function

c. Change gene expression (transcription factor)

i. Includes permanent changes in properties of cell

ii. Ex: voice change

Extracellular Receptors

Enzyme­linked receptor

G­protein coupled receptor (GPCR)

Ligand­gated ion channels

Present in all living species

Has 2 domains: intracellular and 

extracellular domain

Extracellular: binds to signal

~conformational change~

Intracellular: catalytic function is 

activated

Most E­L receptors are protein 

1.

kinases 

2.

Kinases act in 3 ways:

a.

Adding phosphate from ATP to  themselves

3.

Adding phosphate from ATP to  another compound (like an 

intracellular protein to activate it)

4.

Adding phosphate from ATP to  themselves, then another 

a.

compound

Common in eukaryotes

Involved in synthesis of cAMP (secondary  messenger)

Receptor: transmembrane, 7­pass protein Traverses the membrane 7 times

G­Protein: lipid­anchored

Subunits ­ ­GTP and  ­dimer βɣ  

Signal binds with GPCR receptor

Receptor undergoes conformational change Opens up active site to G­protein (needs the help of the G­protein to perform function)

G­Protein originally inactive (bound to GDP)  ●

releases GDP and binds to GTP and becomes  active

G­protein splits into ­GTP and  ­ βɣ  

dimer

Depending on nature of signal and cell, either ­GTP or  ­dimer acts (usually ?­ βɣ  

GTP)

When signal disappears: 

1. ?­GTP recognizes loss of signal

2. Hydrolyzes GTP and binds with GDP 3. This recruits  ­dimer to bind with ­ βɣ  GTP  (dimerization)

Ligand: signaling 

molecule

Noncovalently associated  to receptor

Ex: ionic bond

Very specific 

Ligand­gated ion 

channels: transport 

proteins that also function  as receptors

Only open when ligand  binds to it

Important in neurons

1.

2.

3.

a.

Inactive when bound together

Intracellular receptors

Receptors in Nucleus

Receptors in Cytosol

Direct intracellular signaling 

Receptors for steroid hormones

Ex: estrogen

Estrogen receptor found in nucleus

1.

Estrogen (tiny and nonpolar) diffuses through  plasma and nuclear membrane into nucleus

2.

3.

Bind to receptor → Estrogen-receptor  complex formation

2 estrogen­receptor complexes dimerize and form 

4.

a dimer

Dimer directly binds to specific DNA sequences to

a.

induce transcription

5.

mRNA translated into protein that affects cell  structure and function

6.

Indirect intracellular signaling 

Receptors are large proteins

Ex: auxin

Auxin receptor found outside of nucleus, in  cytosol

Auxin binds to receptor

Auxin­receptor complex enters through nuclear  pore 

Auxin­receptor complex binds to inhibitor protein on the DNA

Indirectly bound to DNA

A­R complex breaks down inhibitory protein,  releasing DNA segment and inducing transcription mRNA translated into protein that affects cell  structure and function

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF)

● In animal cells, receptor tyrosine kinases (example of enzyme­linked receptors) activate a signal

transduction pathway which ultimately alters gene transcription

○ Example: EGF

■ Growth factor: hormone that acts to stimulate cell growth or division

      Process: 

● Receptor Activation, Signal transduction, Cellular response

1. EGF (signal)  binds to EGF receptor

a. Receptors dimerize (come together)

2. Tyrosine, located at the intracellular domains of receptors, is activated and hydrolyzes ATP 3. Tyrosine is phosphorylated

4. Phosphorylation of tyrosine activates relay proteins

a. Grb undergoes conformation change

b. Causes Sos to undergo conformation change

c. Causes Ras to release GDP and bind to GTP

5. RAS has GTP, and can move to activate MAPK (Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases) a. Raf phosphorylates Mek with two phosphates

b. Mek phosphorylates Erk with two phosphates

6. Erk moves into the nucleus and tells Myc and Fos to get phosphorylated (Myc and Fos are 

transcription factors)

a. Activates transcription

b. mRNA is translated into proteins that are involved with cell division (mitosis) **possible test questions: 

● Q: How are relay proteins in EGF activated?

○ A: Conformational changes

● Q: How is the protein kinase cascade in EGF activated?

○ A: Phosphorylation

Second Messengers

● First messenger: extracellular signals that bind to cell surface

● Second messenger: intracellular signals that relay signal inside the cell

○ often formed by signal transduction pathways

● cAMP 

○ Cyclic Adenosine MonoPhosphate

○ Different from AMP because phosphate group (on first carbon) also attaches to 3rd carbon by an

ester bond

○ 2 advantages: Signal amplification and Speed 

1. Signal amplification: more signals. One extracellular signal can produce many cAMP 2. Speed: faster signaling. Ex: seratonin

● Ca2+

● Diacylglycerol (DAG)

● Inositol Triphosphate (IP3)

Signal Transduction involving cAMP

● GPCR receptors involved in synthesis of cAMP

● Examplel: Epinephrine

      Process 

1. Signal binds to GPCR receptor

a. Receptor undergoes conformational change

2. G­protein becomes activated (GDP released, GTP taken in) and splits into ­GTP and   

βɣ βɣ ­dimer (can ignore  ­dimer, not relevant)

3. ?­GTP binds with adenylyl cyclase and activates it (conformational change)

a. Adenylyl cyclase is a transmembrane protein

4. Adenylyl cyclase synthesizes cAMP by hydrolyzing ATP

5. cAMP activates protein kinase A (pKA)

a. Made of 2 regulatory subunits sitting on top of 2 catalytic subunits

b. cAMP binds to regulatory subunits, releasing and activating the catalytic subunits 6. Catalytic subunits of pKA activate a cellular response by phosphorylating specific proteins a. Proteins differ depending on the signal

b. For epinephrine: either troponin or phospholamban

Epinephrine

7. cAMP activated PKA to phosphorylate either troponin or phospholamban 

a. Troponin: when troponin is phosphorylated, calcium channels are activated, calcium is released 

into the sarcoplasm (facilitated diffusion), calcium binds with troponin

i. Muscles contract (Ca2+ causes contraction)

**note: sarcoplasm = cytosol of cardiac muscle; sarcoplasmic reticulum = smooth ER in cardiac muscle 

b. When phospholamban is phosphorylated, calcium ATPase pump is activated, Ca2+ is pumped 

into sarcoplasmic reticulum from sarcoplasm

i. Troponin is inactivated (no more Ca2+ to bind with it)

ii. Muscles relax

iii. Phospholamban acts as inhibitor of Ca2+

● Epinephrine (aka adrenaline) called “fight or flight” hormone

○ Digestion stops, pupils dilate, blood vessels dilate, muscles have accelerated rate of glycolysis, 

heart rate increases

● Epinephrine increases heart rate

○ Constant influx of cAMP → constant activation of pKA → phosphorylates  

phospholamban and troponin at the same time

○ Reduces the gap between “lub” and “dub”

● Beta­adrenergic receptor: the specific type of GPCR receptor for epinephrine that helps  increase rate of cAMP synthesis

Loss of signal

● When the signal leaves:

1. ?­GTP recognizes loss of signal

a. ?­GTP hydrolyzes GTP and makes GDP and becomes inactive

b. ?­GTP and  ­dimer dimerize and form an inactive G protein. βɣ

2. Adenyl cyclase stops producing cAMP 

a. Residual cAMP remains

3. Remaining cAMP is converted to AMP

a. Phosphodiesterase breaks down ester bonds at third carbon

4. Regulatory subunits come back and sit on catalytic subunits and form inactivated pKA 5. Protein phosphatase remove phosphates from target proteins

The Cellular Response of Skeletal Muscle to Epinephrine

1. cAMP activates PKA

2. Phosphate group is attached to phosphorylase kinase → becomes active 3. Phosphate group is attached to glycogen phosphorylase → becomes active a. Glycogen breakdown is stimulated 

4. Phosphate group is attached to glycogen synthase → becomes inactive a. Glycogen synthesis is inhibited 

b. Shows how phosphorylating proteins doesn’t always mean activating them; depends on need and nature of cell

Signal Transduction via Ca2+, DAG, and IP3

● Cells maintain a very large Ca2+ gradient

● Ca2+ concentration is lower in cytosol and higher outside of the cell or in SER ○ Exit cell through primary active transport (pumps)

○ Enter cytosol through ion­gated channels

● Influx of Ca2+ acts as second messenger

● Examples: phototropism, gravitropism, etc.

      Process 

1. Signal binds to GPCR receptor

a. Receptor undergoes conformational change

2. G­protein becomes activated (GDP released, GTP taken in) and splits into ­GTP and   

βɣ βɣ ­dimer (can ignore  ­dimer, not relevant)

3. ?­GTP activates phospholipase C

a. Breaks down a phospholipid into DAG and IP3

4. Cellular response occurs via PKC or Calmodulin

a. DAG and Ca2+ together activate Protein Kinase C 

i. Phosphorylates proteins → cellular response

ii. Ex: proteins involved in muscle contraction

b. IP3 and Ca2+ together activate Calmodulin 

i. IP3 acts as a ligand and allows calcium influx into the cytosol

1. IP3 binds to channel, channel opens, Ca2+ comes out of SER into cytosol ii. 4 calcium binds to calmodulin → calmodulin is activated

1. Calmodulin phosphorylates downstream proteins → cellular response 2. Ex: proteins involved in carb metabolism in liver cells

CHAPTER 10 ­ MULTICELLULARITY

Overview 

● Multicellular: composed of more than one cell

● Think:

○ Cell specialization (different organs have different functions)

○ Sexual reproduction (meiosis)

○ Complex genome

■ 3 billion genes

■ Complex proteome for: cell communication, cell specialization, and cell organization  (arrangement and attachment)

Extracellular Matrix

● ECM: network of substances that form meshwork outside of cell

● Composed of 2 major macromolecules:

○ Proteins → strength and flexibility; form large fibers

○ Carbohydrates → strength and bulk; give a gel­like character

● Functions of ECM

○ Strength

■ Ex: our joints are protected by proteins and carbs so bones don’t touch

○ Support

■ Ex: cartilage and bones

○ Organization

○ Cell communication

Proteins of ECM

1. Adhesive Proteins

● Help cells adhere to ECM

a. Fibronectin

i. Connected to carbohydrates in the ECM (like collagen)

b. Laminin

i. Connected to basal lamina in a specialized ECM near epithelial cells

1. Alpha subunit: connects epithelial cells to basal lamina

2. Beta and gamma subunits: connect basal lamina to ECM

2. Structural Proteins

● Form large fibers

a. Collagen

i. Gives the ECM tensile strength 

ii. Pre­collagen synthesized in ER lumen

1. 3 alpha chains form a procollagen triple helix

2. Extention sequences on ends to prevent triple helix procollagen from getting too large so it can 

be exported from trans golgi

iii. Trans­golgi exports procollagen outside of cell

1. Extension sequences are removed 

2. Forms: pre-collagen fibrils → collagen fibrils → collagen fibers (fibrils  

assembled together).  

b. Elastin

i. Gives ECM elasticity 

ii. Cells are dynamic, but have a limit

iii. 2 long elastin chains connected by a covalent crosslink

1. Allows movement, stretching, contracting and relaxing

Carbs of ECM

1. Glycosaminoglycans: long chains of polysaccharides with repeating disaccharides a. Negatively charged → attract ions and water → cement like substance i. Ex: cartilage

b. Proteoglycans: glycosaminoglycans linked with proteins

2. Chitin: polysaccharide containing carbs and nitrogen

a. Exoskeleton

Plant Cell Wall

● Cell wall = ECM in plants

● Mostly consist of carbohydrates (very little proteins)

Primary Cell Wall

Secondary Cell Wall

Time of synthesis: Soon after daughter cells are formed in  mitosis

After the cell reaches maximum  growth

Description: ●

Primary cell wall grows with the cell →

very flexible 

Composition:

Thick layer of cellulose (made of beta  ○

glucose units)

Thin layer of hemicellulose

(polysaccharide made of 

monosaccharides other than glucose) Pectins → negatively charged  carbs

Glycans → branched  

polysaccharides  

give organization to cell wall

Located between primary cell wall and plasma membrane

Rigid (will not grow with the cell) Composition:

Formed of many different carbs  2 most common components: Cellulose

Lignin (phenolic secondary  metabolite)

Cell Junctions

● Structure that are present along cells that form tissues 

● In animal cells

● Junctions in animal cells are proteinaceous by nature

1. Tight junctions

a. Prevent ECM from leaking between adjacent cells

b. NO gap between cells (like in anchoring junctions)

i. So tight that not even gases can leak between cells

ii. If substances need to pass through → must diffuse through the cell c. Made by 2 proteins: occludin and claudin

d. Tight junctions are often bordered by cadherin anchor junctions (adherens and desmosomes) 

because they can easily unwind

2. Communicating junctions

a. Like holes between cells → substances can move between cells so cell can  

function as one unit

b. Small gap between plasma membranes of two adjacent cells at junction

c. Six identical connexin proteins protruding from each of the two cells

i. When they come together, they form one connexon

ii. Connexon: dynamic structure → can open and close

d. Small in diameter → allow only small proteins, ions, and carbs to move through,  

prevent large bacterial proteins cannot move through

e. In damaged cells: gap junctions will close to prevent infection

3. Anchoring junctions

a. Made by proteins

b. Rely on cell adhesion molecules (proteins)

i. Cadherin and Integrin

Anchoring 

junction:

Cell­adhesion 

molecule

Type of junction

Intracellular 

cytoskeletal 

protein

Adherens junction

Cadherin

Cell­cell

Actin

Desmosome

Cadherin

Cell­cell

Intermediate 

filaments

Focal Adhesion

Integrin

Cell­ECM

Actin

Hemidesmosome

Integrin

Cell­ECM

Intermediate 

filaments

Cadherin

● Cell­cell junctions

● Adhesion proteins that protrude outside of the cell and bind to each other, sealing the gap  between two adjacent cells (same type of cell)

○ Calcium­mediated adherens molecule: calcium ions necessary to cement the two cadherins 

together

○ Linker proteins connect cadherins to cytoskeleton

○ Tissue­specific adherens molecules

■ Homodimerization

■ Different types of cadherins for each type of tissue

Integrins

● Cell­ECM junctions

● Cell adhesion protein that also functions as a receptor (cell communication) ● Transmembrane protein with intracellular and extracellular domains

○ Extracellular domain

■ Attaches to ECM (fibronectin)

○ Intracellular domain

■ Attaches to cytoskeletal (actin)

● Inside to outside signaling

1. Integrin receptors detect signal from inside and change conformation 2. Integrin temporarily disconnects from ECM and cytoskeleton (both domains) ● Occurs when cell is getting ready to move or divide

● Outside to inside signaling

1. Integrin receptors detect signal from outside to inside and change conformation 2. Integrin re­connects to ECM and cytoskeleton

Middle Lamella

● Serve the function of tight and anchoring junctions in plant cells

● Synthesized even before the primary cell wall

● Composition:

○ Pectins (negatively charged)

■ Attract positively charged ions and water

■ Form cement­like substance between two cells

● Ethylene (endocrine signaling) is secreted by the plant and breaks down pectin by activating 

pectinase

○ Why fruits become less firm when they ripen!

Plasmodesmata

● Serve as the communicating junction in plant cells

○ Allow passage of ions and molecules between adjacent cells

● Structure:

○ Channels → cytosolic connections allow diffusion

○ Desmotubules → central tubule connecting SER membranes ■ Bordered by cell wall and plasma membrane

● Can open and close!

○ When damaged, close to prevent water and nutrient loss

● Unlike gap junctions in animal cells, plasmodesmata have a big opening →  very quick spread of infection in plants

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here