×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Clemson - COOP 3900 - Class Notes - Week 7
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Clemson - COOP 3900 - Class Notes - Week 7

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

CLEMSON / Education and Teacher Studies / COOP 3900 / What role does your race/ethnicity play in who you are?

What role does your race/ethnicity play in who you are?

What role does your race/ethnicity play in who you are?

Description

School: Clemson University
Department: Education and Teacher Studies
Course: Student Development Theory
Professor: Leasa evinger
Term: Spring 2014
Tags: philosophy
Cost: 25
Name: EDC 3900 Student Theory
Description: These materials will help you progress through student developmental theory.
Uploaded: 05/11/2017
46 Pages 163 Views 0 Unlocks
Reviews



He asked us: “what do you believe in enough to sacrifice?




But what gives leaders this special power?




The important question we should all ask ourselves is what is leadership to me?



Andrew Larson EDC 3900 January 30th, 2014 Leasa Evinger & Lloyd Graham Leadership Philosophy Statement A leader may be one of the single most important roles to be filled in a society.  Leaders demonstrate how to act, teach us how to think, and the best of them show us how we We also discuss several other topics like Coke has recently developed two new energy drink products. What are they?
Don't forget about the age old question of benedict's reagent color scale
We also discuss several other topics like virginia technical institute
Don't forget about the age old question of A linear programming model consists of?
If you want to learn more check out Yolland Wha­, Ow! Who are you two­?
If you want to learn more check out What is a measure of the decision maker’s optimism?
too can lead. Through the ages of man there have been thousands of instrumental  leaders that have shaped the way life is today in more ways we can measure. The  interesting thing about leadership is how diverse a trait it is. No two leaders lead the same way. Some lead harshly and expect perfection; anything short of that is met with severe  repercussions. Some lead with grace and compassion and would rather be loved than  feared. Different situations call for different leaders, and just because one type of  leadership worked once does not mean that it will work again. The important question we should all ask ourselves is what is leadership to me? The dictionary definition of leadership is: “the power or ability to lead other  people” (“Leadership”). But what gives leaders this special power? I think that a  community should choose its own leader collectively instead of having one person assert  their dominance over the group. One such case was George Washington and the Second  Continental Congress during the American Revolution. Washington was a known  military general and leader. The congress had the initial idea to make Washington the very first king of America, but Washington declined the throne. Washington said that a  monarchy was one of the reasons that we left Britain and that we needed a new form of  government without absolute rule. This quality of selflessness is one of the most vital  characteristics of a great leader. Washington gave up becoming the most powerful man in the western hemisphere and keeping that power in his family for generations for the  greater good of his new home and his new brothers of America (Boaz). The ability of a  leader to give up such insane amounts of power like George Washington did is something we can all admire and respect him for. I was once chosen to be a leader of a patrol in boy  scouts. It’s the only time I have ever been elected by my peers to a leadership position in  a somewhat formal setting. I felt a great deal of pride and accomplishment when I was  chosen. Being patrol leader it was my job to ensure everyone had his own responsibilities handled for the campout weeks ahead. We needed tents and to make sure the tents were  not broken, we needed meal plans that allowed us to carry little but have plenty to eat,  among other things and it was my job to make sure our patrol was ready. If we weren’t  ready we wouldn’t be allowed to go on the campout and all the blame would fall on me.  The way that I led that patrol was mainly by example and encouragement. I wanted to be  loved by the other guys in my patrol and I wanted us to excel together. I think that this  also is a necessary trait for leaders; desire for the needs of the many over the needs of the  few. George Washington certainly lived by this philosophy and so shall I. Our patrol  worked together and although I was technically the leader I didn’t let it get to my head. I  was just another helping hand readying us for the road ahead. We ended up being patrol of the month and we all received special merit for it. I’m still proud of that patrol and  how we grew together to shine as a group. I attended the 2012 encampment of Palmetto Boys’ State in South Carolina at  Anderson University the summer before my senior year of high school. If there is such a  thing as leadership training camp, then this was it. A week straight of learning exercises  and teamwork would be the only way to survive. There is no “me” at Palmetto Boys’  State. Throughout the week we had special guest speakers come to us, many of them had  also been citizens at previous encampments of PBS and they told us how profound an  effect that week would have on our lives. The speaker that really got through to me was  Trey Gowdy. Mr. Gowdy is a United States Representative for the 4th congressional  district of South Carolina. During his speech he told us a story of a man named Arlen  Williams. On January 13, 1982 Flight 90 was on its way from Washington National  Airport in Arlington County, VA to Fort Lauderdale, FL when it crashed into the  Potomac River. The crash killed all by 6 of its passengers and Arlen Williams. Trey  Gowdy and his father were in helicopter that had been sent to save the survivors from the  icy waters. They lowered the rope ladder and watched as Arlen Williams grabbed it and  handed it to the nearest person to him. The two watched the man as he again caught the  ladder and handed it to the closest person to him, allowing them to climb up next to  safety. Four more times they watched the sequence in amazement. The seventh and final  time they threw the rope ladder down to the icy river they were too late. Arlen Williams  drowned in the cold Potomac that day. He asked us: “what do you believe in enough to  sacrifice?” What are you willing to sacrifice? What is our breaking point? We can give up our money, our friends, our reputation, some believe enough to give up their lives.  Arlen Williams believe that, soldiers in our military believe that, do we? Being a leader  as a Resident Assistant hopefully will never present me with the decision to give up my  life for what I believed in, but if it came down to it and I thought about what Mr. Trey  Gowdy said to me at PBS in 2012 and I really truly believed then I would be ready for  that. I think that leaders need to be willing to sacrifice in order to do what is best for those that have trusted them with leadership. If you are chosen as a leader it is because the  people who have chosen you believe that you will be willing to sacrifice for everyone  who has chosen to follow you. Trey Gowdy’s hero is and forever will be Arlen Williams. That was the day I  truly learned what leadership was about. It’s not about the leader, but about those that  they lead. Trey’s most powerful quote that is permanently locked into my brain is: “real  leaders stand up for what they believe in, alone, if necessary. When nobody is following  you and you are all alone will you still have the bravery to stand up for your beliefs?” I  had tears in my eyes sitting in that audience, and Trey had tears in his eyes giving that  speech, and I will never forget it. Real leaders really do stand up alone if they have to.  One of these leaders was Rosa Parks. We all know her story and she certainly was not  afraid to stand up for what she believed in. She went to jail and stood up against years of  oppression to help kick start one of the greatest movements in American history and to  free all blacks from being mistreated. Without those leaders who were willing to sacrifice everything, some their lives, including Martin Luther King Jr. we might not have created  the equal society that America is all about.What is leadership to me? I think the most important trait is that a leader should  lead by example. Why would anyone follow a leader who does not follow himself? When I set standards for others to follow, I also follow them. I think that a leader must also be a  friend. I plan on developing close and good relationships with all my residents. I think  that if I make the extra effort to make sure that they know I care about their well being  and time here at Clemson, then they will be willing to follow the rules and want to have a healthy learning community. It’s also important for a leader to focus on the issue or  behavior not on the person. We should work to eliminate behaviors and issues, not  people. Nobody should be alienated from the group. A leader needs to maintain positive  self­esteem and promote it among their residents as a resident assistant. We need to  recognize when someone is in need of help and address it as soon as possible and get help from other resources at the university such as counselors if they are needed. Lastly, I  think that another huge component of being a leader is the drive to always get better  whether it’s personally or as a group. Leading is something humans have done for thousands of years. Without leaders  who knows where we would be now. There comes a time in every person’s life to be a  leader and a time to be led. We trust that these people will fulfill the role well and to the  best of their ability. Sometimes we get some bad eggs, but many times people discover  new ways of thinking and become more selfless than they ever thought possible. Works Cited Boaz, David. "The Man Who Would Not Be King." Cato Institute. N.p., n.d. Web. 29  Jan. 2014. "Leadership." Merriam­Webster. Merriam­Webster, n.d. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.Mahvash I <3 you, Larson Questions: What would you consider your social identity to be with regard to your  race and/or ethnicity? How has your race/ethnicity affected your interactions here at  Clemson? What role does your race/ethnicity play in who you are? Can you describe experiences/interactions with others at Clemson that  identify similar to you in terms of your race/ethnicity? What stereotypes if any do you think are associated with your  race/ethnicity and how have they affected you? What types of stereotypes, discrimination, or challenging situations  have you personally experienced due to your race/ethnicity? If you could change your race/ethnicity would you? Why or why not? How you feel about this identity in general? Does this identity provide you with opportunities or challenges? Why is this identity significant to you? What experiences whether they be positive or negative do you  consider to be significant in relation to your identity? How are your thoughts, behaviors, beliefs, etc. influenced by this  identity?Mahvash I <3 you, Larson  Love you too Larson! Mahvash Questions: What would you consider your social identity to be with regard to your race and/or ethnicity? Indian. How has your race/ethnicity affected your interactions here at  Clemson? I have had a lot of very positive interactions at Clemson University  because of my ethnicity. I have been able to get involved with various  minority organizations including a mentoring group. It has been  awesome being able to share my culture with other people who are  interested.  What role does your race/ethnicity play in who you are? I think that it plays big role in who I am because I have strong ties with  my culture. I speak Hindi at home, enjoy Bollywood movies, and visit  India frequently.  Can you describe experiences/interactions with others at  Clemson that identify similar to you in terms of your  race/ethnicity? I am a part of MSA (Muslim Student Association) so I participate in  volunteer and social activitites with them. The Indian Association is not extremely active nor do they put on many events.  What stereotypes if any do you think are associated with your  race/ethnicity and how have they affected you? None, other than being Muslim I have not been discriminated on this  campus.  What types of stereotypes, discrimination, or challenging  situations have you personally experienced due to your  race/ethnicity?Due to my religion I have been asked a lot of inappropriate questions  and I have gotten weird stares when people find out my last name.  If you could change your race/ethnicity would you? Why or why not? Never… it is a huge part of who I am, there is no reason to change who I am.  How you feel about this identity in general? It is pretty awesome… :)  Does this identity provide you with opportunities or  challenges? There are challenges that come with any identity and anytime you are  different from the majority but also with it comes a great opportunity  to stand out and make a difference.  Why is this identity significant to you? It is something I was raised with and is a part of who I am. It is the  color of my skin and in my facial features so there is really no running  from it.  What experiences whether they be positive or negative do you  consider to be significant in relation to your identity? ? I am not sure what you mean… How are your thoughts, behaviors, beliefs, etc. influenced by  this identity? I am able to view things from a different perspective and my opinions  are many times different from the majority opinion especially in  Clemson. However everyone holds the right to have an opinion and  that’s what makes our country great. REM: Intentional Interaction Log Andrew Larson with Mahvash Husain EDC 3900 3/13/14 Interaction One: Mahvash came into my room to inform us about a hall  get together later that night and asked us to join her, I took the  opportunity to ask her a couple of the questions from the list I  discussed with Lloyd. I lead off with asking her if she spoke multiple  languages. She replied that other than English she spoke Spanish and  Hindi very well, and could read Arabic well, and speak it decently. Then I lead into the bigger questions: What would you consider your social identity to be with regard to your race and/or ethnicity? Indian. How has your race/ethnicity affected your interactions here at  Clemson? I have had a lot of very positive interactions at Clemson University  because of my ethnicity. I have been able to get involved with various  minority organizations including a mentoring group. It has been  awesome being able to share my culture with other people who are  interested.  What role does your race/ethnicity play in who you are? I think that it plays a big role in who I am because I have strong ties  with my culture. I speak Hindi at home, enjoy Bollywood movies, and  visit India frequently.  Interaction Two: Mahvash and I ran into each other in the hallway  pretty late at night like 11:30 after a little bit of small talk I asked her if I could ask her some more questions. Can you describe experiences/interactions with others at  Clemson that identify similar to you in terms of your  race/ethnicity? I am a part of MSA (Muslim Student Association) so I participate in  volunteer and social activities with them. The Indian Association is not  extremely active nor do they put on many events.  What stereotypes if any do you think are associated with your race/ethnicity and how have they affected you? I know the stereotypes of being overly intelligent or a terrorist but  other than being Muslim I have not been discriminated on this campus. I don’t let anything ignorant affect me. What types of stereotypes, discrimination, or challenging  situations have you personally experienced due to your  race/ethnicity? Due to my religion I have been asked a lot of inappropriate questions  and I have gotten weird stares when people find out my last name, but  I don’t let it affect me because the conclusions that they draw are  uninformed and I let it roll off my back. Interaction Three: I knocked on Mahvash’s door around 4 after we  completed the first day of the Pursuit here on campus. The Pursuit is  essentially a gigantic scavenger hunt around the university with  multiple clues about Clemson leading you places. Both Mahvash and I  completed the course and were on the same route so we frequently  saw each other and may or may not have helped each other out on  occasion. I asked her a couple more of the questions and I finally felt  like I was really getting to know her as a person because she wanted to learn about me too, and started asking me some questions. If you could change your race/ethnicity would you? Why or why not? Never. It is a huge part of who I am; there is no reason to change who I  am.  How you feel about this identity in general? It is pretty awesome. :)  Does this identity provide you with opportunities or  challenges? There are challenges that come with any identity and anytime you are  different from the majority, but also with it comes a great opportunity  to stand out and make a difference. Interaction Four: this was my last interaction with Mahvash. I again  knocked on her door later one night when I knew that she was home  and I think she was actually please to see me. She seemed to enjoy talking about her identity and very comfortable talking to me about it. I asked her these last questions: Why is this identity significant to you? It is something I was raised with and is a part of who I am. It is the  color of my skin and in my facial features so there is really no running  from it.  How are your thoughts, behaviors, beliefs, etc. influenced by  this identity? I am able to view things from a different perspective and my opinions  are many times different from the majority opinion especially in  Clemson. However everyone holds the right to have an opinion and  that’s what makes our country great. I engaged Mahvash in conversations mostly by stepping out of  my comfort zone and out of nowhere just showing up at her dorm and  interviewing her, after the first two times I showed up I think she knew  to expect another visit from her favorite resident. The conversation  was meaningful because not only did I get insight into her identity as a  Muslim and Indian student here at Clemson, but she also got insight  into my life, my identity, and who I am. Knowing the different  ethnicities here at Clemson will help me a lot once I have my own  residents to look after. I highly doubt they will all be the same  ethnicity, come from the same background, and have the same beliefs  so knowing how to understand their differences and levels of  development will help me to better personally construct a plan to help  them succeed many ways here at Clemson as an individual. This  experience made me feel really good. I thoroughly enjoyed getting to  know Mahvash and about her own identity. I also liked that she wanted  to learn about me and took the time to ask me questions in return.  If I could do it over again I would because it was in every way a  positive experience. Having these interactions is important because I  know a lot more about my RA and she knows a lot more about me and  so now if I ever need help academically or personally Mahvash knows  enough about me to understand what I might need and how to help me through it. I also know about Mahvash and am also very comfortable  around her. I know the rules of Mahvash’s floor and how not to make  her want to kill me, which is important, and I think overall this has  helped our relationship grow into a new phase. I think it will help me in  my RA role because now I will be able to have these intentional  interactions with my residents in order to learn about them, and for  them to learn about me so that we can be comfortable with one  another and so that I know how to help them as an individual.Intentional Interaction Log Reflection Paper Andrew Larson EDC 3900 3/13/14 First I would like to state that I really enjoyed doing this  assignment and getting to know my RA on a deeper level. As a Muslim  and Indian student she is very unique and it was very interesting to  have the opportunity to know her better. Some of the patterns that I  observed while we were talking was she is clearly very proud of where  she comes from, she is firm in her beliefs, and she thinks that Clemson  is a very diverse and welcoming place for all types of students.  Mahvash is very proud of where her heritage lies. She is Indian by  heritage and now obviously her and her immediate family live here in  America. She visits India frequently to continue to learn more about  her own culture and make it a defining part of who she is. Mahvash  also is very firm in her beliefs as a Muslim. She follows the pillars of  Islam and loves her religion and I respect that so much. After 9/11  much of America fears and hates Muslims, but we have to remember  that it is not the normal everyday Muslim who attacked us, or continue  to attack the world today that is responsible. These people were radical and extremists taking their beliefs far beyond the intensions and they  do not reflect the whole of Muslims worldwide. As a Christian we  obviously do not share the same religion, but it is in no way a barrier  for us. Both of us believe in an afterlife, and the way to make it to heaven is through believing in your own God, and living everyday in a  kind and loving way. We in no way butt heads over what is usually a  very sensitive topic, we both respect one another and see similarities  rather than differences. Lastly Mahvash and I both believe that  Clemson is a very accepting and open place for people of all ethnicities and religions. Clemson has numerous groups that are easy to find for  people seeking others of their ethnicity or of their religion and I think  that is great. I love the diversity of our university and so does she.  Clemson reflects the best traits of America. Traits of freedom,  acceptance, and kindness everywhere you look and attempting to  destroy ignorance and intolerance. I was easily able to connect with Mahvash, I even shortened her  name and now simply call her “Mav” and she seems to like it. We  connected over the similarities of our religions as discussed above as  well as having very similar majors. Mahvash is a biochemistry major  and I am a microbiology major so most of the classes I am currently  enrolled in she took last year. Things like freshman biology and  chemistry and also EDC 3900. We both are also on a pre-medical path  because we both would like to go to medical school after graduating  from Clemson. We were able to talk about the past, present, and future and connect the entire time and it was very cool. There wasn’t really  much about her identity that I was unable to connect to. The hardest  thing would be that she is of Indian descent whereas I am Eastern  European and know nearly nothing about India other than stereotypical things I’ve seen on TV and in movies that I kept to myself in order to  prevent being ignorant and possibly offending Mahvash. In hindsight I  would like to ask her about the places she travels in India. That will  have to be intentional interaction five; coming soon to a classroom  near you.  I learned a lot about Mahvash. I learned about the languages she speaks, where she travels, what she studies, her plans for the future,  what she believes, and even some less personal things like books she  enjoys and movies and TV shows she likes to watch. We connected  over the TV show New Girl and that made me happy because it is by  far one of my favorites. I started it last semester and have watched all  the episodes and caught up to the live show, which actually comes on  tonight. Can you tell I like it? Mahvash also learned a lot about me and  I think that is what made the interactions so special, because now  Mahvash and I can continue to connect and possibly RA in the same  building one year. In interactions with my residents, they will all be  boys so yes there probably will be slight changes. We can talk more  about sports and video games if they are into those types of things.  Mahvash didn’t really have those interests other that Clemson athletics which we all love. With my residents I think it would be really cool to  start a fantasy football league and try to get as many involved as  possible hopefully everyone likes the NFL. I as the RA would of course be league commissioner and I would thoroughly enjoy being able to  have that fun experience and share my love of football or any sports  with them. Mahvash and I connected well through these interactions other  than the real interaction we had she has not given me any feedback on the experience other than the positive comments I get from her in the  hallways. I think she enjoyed this as much as I did, and I think both of  us have a new close friend here at Clemson.Andrew Larson The Lynching of Anthony Crawford  Date Attended: 3/27/14 Out of Class Leadership Assignment (REM) EDC 3900 Leasa Evinger & Lloyd Graham 4/3/14 On Thursday March 27th I attended presentation on the lynching  of Anthony Crawford, which occurred in Abbeville, South Carolina on  October 21st, 1916. Anthony Crawford was a successful and land owning cotton farmer in the town. Over the years he had accrued  anywhere from 400-600 acres of prime cotton land. He grew his cotton  on it with his family and sold it just like any other landowner would. On  October 21st he went to market to sell his cotton. At the market a white storeowner said that he would only pay him three fourths of what the  cotton was worth. The two got into an altercation over the price, and  Crawford was taken to jail, Probably for his own protection as a mob of  white men was already building. He was stolen away from the jail by a  mob of nearly 200 white men. They dragged him by a rope tied around his neck through the black part of town and then stole a lumber wagon from a black driver. They took Crawford to an open field and hung him  by his neck from the tree and used his as body as target practice.  Crawford was shot multiple times and died a terribly brutal death. The  next day the town coroner cut his body down and stated that he had  died: “at the hands of parties unknown.” The men who participated in  the lynching were never punished. After the lynching and death of Anthony Crawford his oldest son  wrote the to governor of South Carolina asking for protection from the  town. The town had put in article in the local paper that the Crawford  family must be gone by November 15th or else. The governor  responded to Crawford’s son stating that although he thinks what has  happened was deplorable; I cannot help or protect you. The Crawford’s were forced to give up everything they had built and owned in South  Carolina and flee north. Crawford’s family escaped to the north away from the lynch  mobs of the south and continued to tell his story and make sure his  memory lived on through them. His great-great-granddaughter was the speaker at the presentation and she has worked tirelessly to make a  statement about lynching that has occurred in the United States. She  petitioned congress for a formal apology and after years of denial  finally got one, but its not enough for her. She said this act will never  be reconciled and certainly never forgotten. She also stated that  according to the NAACP there are 5,000 documented lynching events  many of which of gruesome photos accompanying them, and there are  two to three time that many undocumented lynching events.  The family of Anthony Crawford refused to accept the oppression and terrible acts that had been committed against them because of  their race. They held onto their ancestor’s memory and story and  continually demanded they receive an apology from the United State government, and when they got it they continued to carry on Anthony  Crawford’s legacy.  The four learning goals of the Residence Experience Model are  Self-Exploration, Living in Community, Intellectual Engagement, and  Global Citizenship. The two main goals that this story and lesson  speaks to are Living in Community and Global Citizenship. Living in  Community is a student’s ability to meaningfully interact and form  positive relationships with others (REM). It focuses on interpersonal  engagement and how it is so critical to developing long lasting and  supportive communities. The ability to interact with others with  different beliefs than you, or that look different from you can show  students how useful differences can be and that in a group setting  differences in view point can really add to group dynamics and success overall. Different people with difference views working toward a  common goal in their community is what this learning goal is all about.  The community that Anthony Crawford lived in was not in any way  representative of this learning goal. The people were extremely  prejudiced and did not believe in any way that a black man or black  family could contribute to the community in the way that a white man  or family could. If this society thought they way that REM teaches then  this event would not have happened at all.  The other learning goal that this story really hits on is Global  Citizenship. Global Citizenship is a student’s awareness of the issues impacting the community and world; as well as the desire to take  action to make positive sustainable change in the community or world  (REM). A significant issue in Anthony Crawford’s day was racism and it  plagued much of the “civilized” world. Anthony Crawford and  thousands of other African Americans were lynched for the color of  their skin and that is a stain on the reputation of our great nation. The  family of Anthony Crawford became global citizens. They were aware  of this significant issue and decided to make continual efforts for  change. They desired a world in which all races could live in harmony  and all could have equal chance and opportunity to succeed. During  the presentation the speaker said that many of the black men and  women who were lynched were community leaders who wanted to  change the status quo. They wanted to get rid of racism and open the  eyes of their communities to show that the color of skin was far less  important than what was on the inside of a person such as their  beliefs, ideas, or values. This desire to change the status quo in order  to benefit the community is the definition of global citizenship. I can use this story and example of striving to change the status  quo in order to benefit the community to teach my residents about  standing up for something that you believe in, and not taking no for an  answer. I think that many freshman entering Clemson are afraid of the  unknown that awaits them and are still trying to find out exactly who  they are. I know I still am. If those residents had someone they knew believed in them and would support their ideas to better their  community, then I think that they will be more encourage to get  involved on campus and get the full Clemson experience that Clemson  Home wants for each and everyone enrolled at this great university.  Also talking to my residents about living in community and being able  to form deep and meaningful relationships with those around them will  not only be great for my specific floor, but also Byrnes Hall, and  eventually the entire campus. If every student learned how to deal with differences that they may not have been presented with then the  entire campus will be a place of acceptance and diversity.Andrew Larson EDC 3900 January 30th, 2014 Leasa Evinger & Lloyd Graham Leadership Philosophy Statement A leader may be one of the single most important roles to be filled in a society.  Leaders demonstrate how to act, teach us how to think, and the best of them show us how we too can lead. Through the ages of man there have been thousands of instrumental  leaders that have shaped the way life is today in more ways than we can measure. The  interesting thing about leadership is how diverse a trait it is. No two leaders lead the same way. Some lead harshly and expect perfection; anything short of that is met with severe  repercussions. Some lead with grace and compassion and would rather be loved than  feared. Different situations call for different leaders, and just because one type of  leadership worked once does not mean that it will work again. The important question we should all ask ourselves is what is leadership to me? The dictionary definition of leadership is: “the power or ability to lead other  people” (“Leadership”). But what gives leaders this special power? I think that a  community should choose its own leader collectively instead of having one person assert  their dominance over the group. One such case was George Washington and the Second  Continental Congress during the American Revolution. Washington was a known  military general and leader. The congress had the initial idea to make Washington the very first king of America, but Washington declined the throne. Washington said that a  monarchy was one of the reasons that we left Britain and that we needed a new form of  government without absolute rule. This quality of selflessness is one of the most vital  characteristics of a great leader. Washington gave up becoming the most powerful man in the western hemisphere and keeping that power in his family for generations for the  greater good of his new home and his new brothers of America (Boaz). The ability of a  leader to give up such insane amounts of power like George Washington did is something we can all admire and respect I was once chosen to be a leader of a patrol in boy scouts.  It’s the only time I have ever been elected by my peers to a leadership position in a  somewhat formal setting. I felt a great deal of pride and accomplishment when I was  chosen. A patrol leader it was my job to ensure everyone had his own responsibilities  handled for the campout weeks ahead. We needed to make sure the tents we used were  not broken. We needed meal plans that allowed us to carry little but have plenty to eat. It  was my job to make sure our patrol was ready. If we weren’t ready we wouldn’t be  allowed to go on the campout and all the blame would fall on me. The way that I led that  patrol was mainly by example and encouragement. I wanted to be loved by the other guys in my patrol and I wanted us to excel together. I think that this also is a necessary trait for leaders; desire for the needs of the many over the needs of the few. George Washington  certainly lived by this philosophy and so shall I. The philosophy I am referring to is  called Utilitarianism and is mostly know to be made famous by Jeremy Bentham. It  simply states the goal of utilitarianism is to maximize happiness and minimize suffering  in a population (Driver). Our patrol worked together and although I was technically the leader I didn’t let it get to my head. I was just another helping hand readying us for the  road ahead. We ended up being patrol of the month and we all received special merit for  it. I’m still proud of that patrol and how we grew together to shine as a group. I attended the 2012 encampment of Palmetto Boys’ State in South Carolina at  Anderson University the summer before my senior year of high school. If there is such a  thing as leadership training camp, then this was it. A week straight of learning exercises  and teamwork would be the only way to survive. There is no “me” at Palmetto Boys’  State. Throughout the week we had special guest speakers come to us, many of them had  also been citizens at previous encampments of PBS and they told us how profound an  effect that week would have on our lives. The speaker that really got through to me was  Trey Gowdy. Mr. Gowdy is a United States Representative for the 4th congressional  district of South Carolina. During his speech he told us a story of a man named Arlen  Williams. On January 13, 1982 Flight 90 was on its way from Washington National  Airport in Arlington County, VA to Fort Lauderdale, FL when it crashed into the  Potomac River. The crash killed all but 6 of its passengers and Arlen Williams. Trey  Gowdy and his father were in a helicopter that had been sent to save the survivors from  the icy waters. They lowered the rope ladder and watched as Arlen Williams grabbed it  and handed it to the nearest person to him. The two watched the man as he again caught  the ladder and handed it to the closest person to him, allowing them to climb up next to  safety. Four more times they watched the sequence in amazement. The seventh and final  time they threw the rope ladder down to the icy river they were too late. Arlen Williams  drowned in the cold Potomac that day. Mr. Gowdy asked us: “what do you believe in enough to sacrifice?” What are you willing to sacrifice? What is our breaking point? We  can give up our money, our friends, our reputation, and some believe enough to give up  their lives. Arlen Williams believed that. Soldiers in our military believe that. Do we?  Hopefully as a Resident Assistant I will never have to decide if I am willing to give up  my life for what I believe in. If it came down to it and I thought about what Mr. Trey  Gowdy said to me at PBS in 2012, then I really truly believed then I would be ready for  that. I think that leaders need to be willing to sacrifice in order to do what is best for those that have trusted them with leadership. If you are chosen as a leader it is because the  people who have chosen you believe that you will be willing to sacrifice for everyone  who has chosen to follow you. Trey Gowdy’s hero is and forever will be Arlen Williams. That was the day I  truly learned what leadership was about. It’s not about the leader, but about those that  they lead. Trey’s most powerful quote that is permanently locked into my brain is: “real  leaders stand up for what they believe in, alone, if necessary. When nobody is following  you and you are all alone will you still have the bravery to stand up for your beliefs?” I  had tears in my eyes sitting in that audience and Trey had tears in his eyes giving that  speech and I will never forget it. Real leaders really do stand up alone if necessary. One  of these leaders was Rosa Parks. We all know her story and she certainly was not afraid  to stand up for what she believed. She went to jail and stood up against years of  oppression to help kick start one of the greatest movements in American history and to  free all blacks from being mistreated. Without those leaders who were willing to sacrificeeverything, some their lives, including Martin Luther King Jr, we might not have created  the equal society that America is today. What is leadership to me? I think the most important trait is that a leader should  lead by example. Why would anyone follow a leader who does not follow himself? When I set standards for others to follow, I also follow them. I think that a leader must also be a  friend. I plan on developing close and good relationships with all my residents. I think  that if I make the extra effort to make sure that they know I care about their well being  and time here at Clemson, then they will be willing to follow the rules and want to have a healthy learning community. It’s also important for a leader to focus on the issue or  behavior, not on the person. We should work to eliminate behaviors and issues, not  people. Nobody should be alienated from the group. A leader needs to maintain positive  self­esteem and promote it among their residents as a resident assistant. We need to  recognize when someone is in need of help and address it as soon as possible and get help from other resources at the university such as counselors if they are needed. Lastly, I  think that another huge component of being a leader is the drive to always get better  whether it’s personally or as a group. As this class year has gone on we have learned about many different types of  development and been introduced to several different philosophies. I think that these are  vital to a Resident Assistant.  Chickering’s Model of development states that there are  seven vectors of identity development that a person must go through before they realize  what their personal identity entails. The seven vectors are really divided into two groups.  The first four are more basic and lower level development. They are things like competence, managing emotions, moving towards interdependence, and developing  mature interpersonal relationships. These four really enhance a person, if a person is able  to really understand themselves and manage real connection with others, then they will be better prepared to find purpose, integrity, and establish their real identity which are  Chickering’s last three vectors (Evinger). Another developmental model we discussed was Astin’s model of involvement. I  think one of the most important things to do as a freshman is get involved in something.  Getting involved with an organization with real meaning like environmental concern,  research, or even supporting athletics can really give a student a sense of belonging and  help them develop new college relationships. Astin states that there are three elements:  input, environment, and outcome. They all relate to different aspects of getting involved  as discussed in class. Astin also lists five postulates that talk about involvement and how  essentially the student will get as much out of involvement as they are willing to put in  (Evinger). Nobody can force someone to want to get involved, but if a student does want  it then they will gain valuable relationships, experience, and understanding of how the  world works. I think knowledge of both Chickering’s and Astin’s theories will benefit me when I am trying to lead my hall of freshman residents down the right track. I want them  to get the most out of the intentional experience that has been laid out around them as  they can. Leading is something humans have done for thousands of years. Without leaders  who knows where we would be now. There comes a time in every person’s life to be a  leader and a time to be led. We trust that these people will fulfill the role well and to the best of their ability. Sometimes we get some bad eggs, but many times people discover  new ways of thinking and become more selfless than they ever thought possible.  I enjoyed your reflection! You did well incorporating your thoughts, personal experiences and actual leaders throughout history. I think your focus on actual leaders overshadowed  your style and I would love to hear more about that. I did appreciate discovering the  motivation for why your definition of leadership is the way it is.  If you were to receive a grade on this today you would receive a 9/10  due to grammar so make sure you watch that. Also, make sure you  look at the rubric to make sure what you are writing coincides with it.Works Cited Boaz, David. "The Man Who Would Not Be King." Cato Institute. N.p., n.d. Web. 29  Jan. 2014. Driver, Julia. "The History of Utilitarianism." Stanford University. Stanford University,  27 Mar. 2009. Web. 12 Apr. 2014. <http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/utilitarianism history/>. Evinger, Leasa, and Lloyd Graham. "Identity Development and Its Promotion." EDC  3900. Stadium Suites, Clemson. Reading. "Leadership." Merriam­Webster. Merriam­Webster, n.d. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.Cultural Experience and Reflection Andrew Larson EDC 3900 Leasa Evinger and Lloyd Graham 4/10/14 - 4/17/14 Prepared Questions and Answers: ∙ How you feel about this identity in general? o I think my blindness is viewed as a debilitating injury by  most of society, but I choose not to see it that way. I think  that I have grown from it, and become a much better  person because of it. ∙ Does this identity provide you with opportunities or challenges? o Definitely challenges. Everyday is a struggle and presents  new hills to climb, but with the help of my family I carry on  just fine. ∙ How has your blindness changed the way that you analyze  people? o Being blind has allowed me to be able to forget  appearance and be able to understand a person based on  their beliefs and opinions. I get to “see” the parts of them  that others may miss due to their appearance whether it is  what society views as good or bad. ∙ What qualities of people are you most focused on when you meet them? o I am most interested with what opinions a person has and  how they back them up. Just because I am blind does not  make me an idiot and those who can logically back up  what they say are of interest to me. ∙ How has your life changed since your blindness? o I obviously can no longer see so much of my life is relying  on others. I was terrible at relying on anyone other than  myself when I was younger and refused to trust anyone or  accept any type of help. Now I am able to put my trust in  others, even complete strangers. I also have to rely on  others for help every single day and through that I’ve  learned to trust them and count on them to care for me  when I cannot care for myself. The ability to trust others is  something I cherish now. ∙ What do you most value in people?o I most value honesty and a hardworking attitude. I think  that the truth no matter what will always be the best policy. I respect people who aren’t afraid to speak the truth even if it hurts. The truth is the truth and it shouldn’t be withheld.  Hard work is another necessity to me in a person. I  consider myself hardworking even though I cannot do a  number of tasks I can still help with what little I can do.  Hard work will take you places. ∙ Do you consider you blindness to always be a weakness? o No I do not. Being blind yes is a weakness in the sense that I cannot defend myself or perform some simple tasks, but I  also now possess an entirely different perspective on the  world. I can see without seeing. When my vision was fading I was terribly depressed and couldn’t imagine living without it. I now realize that I am given a unique ability to take the  world and everyone who lives in it at a much deeper level  than face value. I don’t like someone simply because  they’re attractive or vice versa. I get to know people by  learning about the true person that they are inside, and I  am not falsely swayed one way or another based upon  appearance. ∙ If you could reverse it now, would you? o Yes I certainly would, because I believe I would still  maintain the same ability to understand others on a  deeper level, and I could help myself more. There are  hundreds of new things I would like to see. ∙ Your identity would be “disabled” do you think we could all  benefit from being “disabled” for a while? o Yes I do. If everyone were blind for a week, month, or even  year then they would come to the same conclusion I have.  That there is more to others than what you can see, and  the most important parts of a person are invisible. ∙ How are your thoughts, behaviors, beliefs, etc. influenced by this  identity? o At first I was very depressed about blindness. I knew it was  coming and as it progressed I continued to be sad about it.  When I was completely blinded I started to learn a new way of living. Being blind has changed me into a new person. I  am a much more calm and aware person instead of the  loose cannon I was when I was young. I believe in the inner good of all people now, which was something I never saw before. I accept that I’m blind and although it’s very  frustrating at times I continue to work at it and grow  because of it.Cultural Experience and Reflection Andrew Larson EDC 3900 Leasa Evinger and Lloyd Graham 4/10/14 - 4/17/14 The cultural experience I chose to explore was physical ability. I  wanted to see life through the eyes of someone else. In this case it  meant not seeing at all. My grandfather is blind and has been for a  very long time. I chose to interview him because I believe that this  blindness has changed my grandfather. My grandmother talks about  how he was so different before, and how much of a better man he has  become today. I called my grandfather and had a long phone call with  him the other day because he lives in Dorr, Michigan with most of my  family and I am here in Clemson.  Before I made the call I thought about my grandfather’s  blindness and how he has changed since I have known him. He has  been completely blind my entire life so for the most part he has  remained the same except that he obviously continues to age. I never  thought about how he might feel about his blindness, or how it might  have changed him. He has always been the same tough old blind man  to me. During the call I realized that my grandfather is one of the  smartest people I know. He may not have more than a high school  diploma, but he knows more about life and how it works than anyone  else I know. He has lived through so much history and experienced so  much. There is so much I can learn from him and when we take our  yearly trip up to Michigan this year I’ll be sure to talk to him as much  as I can. After the phone call was over I reflected on everything we had talked about and what he was trying to teach me. I learned about how  his outlook on the world changed so much as he was going blind and  learning to adapt to it. I learned about how he dealt with depression  and knowing that sooner or later he was going to completely lose sight. He has been through nearly everything and I’m sure his advice is  something I could benefit from.  I wouldn’t say my values really changed but rather my eyes were opened to a whole new way of living and new outlook on people in  general. We as a society don’t realize how much appearance factors  into our feelings towards others. Appearance for the most part is very  shallow and does not reflect the type of person that they are inside at  all. Those who go through any part of their life blind realize how  superficial appearance is and how we shouldn’t weigh it so heavily in  our assessment of others. I also learned how people could change.  From what my mother and grandmother told me my grandfather was  extremely independent when he was younger. He refused help from others and had trouble trusting people.  Since he became blind he was forced to depend on others to lead him  the correct way. In a way he was forced to change from a leader who  followed the beat of his own drum. He now had to follow someone else  and depend entirely on them because he had no way to help himself  and I know that was difficult for him. Trusting others came after  depending on them. He had learned to depend on someone, my  grandmother, for so much that he now trusted her with anything. I  think she helped him learn to trust everyone. My grandmother is a very sweet and trusting woman. She trusts just about everyone, which can  be dangerous, but I think it’s just because she believes in everyone’s  innate good. My grandfather was the opposite when he met my  grandmother and as they say opposites attract. My grandmother has  been working on him for decades and you can see where her work has  made an impact. My grandfather trusts nearly everyone now like my  grandmother does.  I learned that I spend too much time focusing on things that  don’t matter so much. I tend to be a person that puts too much value  on the appearance of people I associate with regularly. I should take  the time to learn about someone’s beliefs and opinions before I make a final conclusion about them. I think a lot of society does this  unintentionally. We don’t mean to but we give preferential treatment to attractive people, much in the way that white people are given  unwritten power solely due to their skin color. I also learned that I am  one who is also very independent and is very slow to completely trust  others. When something that can directly affect my future or me is put  into the hands of someone else I get very anxious and nervous. I don’t  trust their ability to complete the task to my qualifications so I often do the assignment myself or ask to edit their work after they complete it. I need to learn to trust people and become more of a team player that  holds others accountable. In group work I need to allow others to make mistakes or prove to me that they are capable. If I start to do this I will  start to trust others competency and learn to be dependent when I  need to be a team player and not an individual.  This activity reinforced my beliefs about blindness, or all physical disabilities. I think that anyone who has lost something important to  them like their hearing, sight, or ability to walk learns from it and  shares that wisdom with the world. I think the wisdom they gather  needs to be shared because it helps us not take what most of us are  given for granted. Simple things like your legs, heart, or ears that we  all count on to help us everyday. Some have had these taken away, or  were never given a chance. I cannot imagine not being able to listen to music anymore because my ears were damaged. I think physically  disabled people have a lot to offer the world and speaking to my  grandfather only reinforced that belief.With the information I have gained I am going to change the way  I act and learn from what my grandfather was trying to teach me. I  want to become more trusting, more dependent, and stop using  appearance as a major factor in my assessment of others. I also want  to try and communicate the things that I am learning to others. Some  may be the opposite of me and are too dependent on others. They  need to learn to be more independent and I think I could help them do  that also.  In my residential community I think that students would benefit  from hearing about how appearance is only skin deep and there are  other things to focus on when meeting someone. There will be  residents who will be open minded and accept everyone for who they  are regardless of appearance, but there also will be residents that  could benefit from the story of my grandfather and apply it to there  lives and the many new people that they will meet here at Clemson. I  hope that residents will take this information to heart and learn to  balance independence and dependence. I also hope that they will truly  factor out appearance in their judgment of others and learn to be  trusting. Being trusting can possibly lead to being fooled, but that  doesn’t mean we should mistrust those who give us no reason not to  trust them.  This experience makes me a more complete leader. I have grown personally and I am willing to work on parts of my personality that I  wish to change. By working on myself I will be better able to help  others work on themselves. I also am leading by example. If I can  change myself and become a better person overall, then everyone who looks up to me will see that and believe that they can also regardless if it is the same type of personality changes or not. I think that everyone  needs to constantly work to change themselves as a person by  critically assessing themselves, committing to a change, and then  reflecting on that process as a whole. The cultural experience project has allowed me to gain insight to  a new group of people in the world with different views on what it  means to live. There are components of the way my grandfather lives  that I would like to implement in my life and I will start to make them a  part of me. This experience is a positive one and I want to continue to  do this to better myself so that I can have the largest and most  positive impact on my residents that I can.Cultural Experience and Reflection Andrew Larson EDC 3900 Leasa Evinger and Lloyd Graham 4/10/14 - 4/17/14 Planning Stage I think that the most significant identities are physical ability and  age. I think that as a person changes physically on the outside they  also undergo significant changes on the outside. I want to learn most  about physical ability although I think both are interesting. I want to  learn more about this identity because I am blessed to be in perfect  health, and I have played sports my whole life, which I think has really  affected my personality. I am extremely competitive and I think that  comes from all the sports that I have played. I would like to learn the  types of things that drive people who may not have played many  sports and get their perspective on life. I would like to speak to my  grandfather who has just recently moved down here with my  grandmother from Pennsylvania. My grandfather is blind from Vietnam. He was present when Agent Orange was used to destroy foliage in the  dense jungles. It got into his body’s nervous system and destroyed his  optic nerves. He has been partially/completely blind for 30 years and it  has definitely changed him.  Prepared Questions: ∙ How has your blindness changed the way that you analyze  people? ∙ You have never actually seen what I look like, but you like me,  what about me or anyone else tells you to like me? ∙ What qualities of people are most focused on when you meet  them? ∙ How has your life changed since your blindness? ∙ What do you most value in people? ∙ Do you consider you blindness to always be a weakness? ∙ If you could reverse it now, would you? ∙ Your identity would be “disabled” do you think we could all  benefit from being “disabled” for a while? ∙ How you feel about this identity in general? ∙ Does this identity provide you with opportunities or challenges? ∙ Why is this identity significant to you? ∙ What experiences whether they be positive or negative do you  consider to be significant in relation to your identity.∙ How are your thoughts, behaviors, beliefs, etc. influenced by this  identity?Leadership Professional Development Plan Andrew Larson 4/23/14 Leasa Evinger & Lloyd Graham The first concept that really stuck to me in our class was the  Social Change Model of Leadership. The goals of that are to enhance  students and encourage development in self-knowledge and leadership competence. An overall effect would be to carry out actions that will  help the community function more efficiently. It is concerned with  positive social change and I think that is a great thing. It looks at  leadership development in three ways: the individual perspective,  group perspective, and community perspective. Through these three  viewpoints and through the model we are carefully shown things to  help as develop into better and better-rounded leaders. The 7 C’s of  leadership are also important, some of them are particularly important  to me. I think congruence, common purpose, and consciousness of self  are the most important to me. Realizing that I as an individual have  certain beliefs, but I can work with others to accomplish group goals. I  think discovering yourself is one of the most important parts of the  college experience, and also learning to be congruent with that I  believe and show/speak it.  Another important thing to me was the MBTI personality test that judges your values and how you act in order to determine your  personality. I was ESTJ meaning that I was more concerned with  extroversion, sensing, thinking, and judging instead of introversion, intuition, feeling, and perception. I think this test will help me become  more conscious of myself as well as help me be a more effective  leader. This test would be something I would consider asking my  residents to do in order to get to better know them and how I can mold REM around them. A groundbreaking lesson we went over in class was White  Privilege. I never would have thought that the color of my skin as white gave me some unwritten dominance over others that I definitely do not deserve. White Privilege also taught me that for me it is easy to see  plenty of people that look like me here at Clemson, but for others who  are not white finding a group of people who have the same racial  identity as them could be much more difficult. This will help me with  residents who aren’t white by possibly suggesting on campus  organizations that could help them find others who identify as they do. The social identity wheel that we constructed at the beginning of  the year also helped me think about the many types of identities that I  was excluding. Things like body size, mental/physical ability, and  national origin would not be things I included in part of a person’s  identity. I am glad that we did it because it has opened my eyes to the  many different facets of identity and how I can better use them to  connect my residents. The two theories that we have covered that most resonate with  me are Chickering’s Theory of Identity Development and his seven vectors. The different stages that he lists of development are spot on  and I think that they will help me see where my residents might fit into  the model and what I can do to keep them on the right track. I think all  of the vectors are extremely important especially things like  developing mature interpersonal relationships, moving through  autonomy towards interdependence, and developing purpose. These  three vectors are majorly important in a person’s ability to really  become what we would consider an adult. Yes most students are  legally adults by age, but do they act and think like adults most of the  time? Entering freshman most likely do not, but through the use of this  model, and REM we can put them on the right track to get there. The other big theory that hit me was Astin’s theory of  involvement. Getting involved at college is imperative. If a student is  uninvolved and has no real connections to anything other than  classwork, then they can very easily begin to feel homesick or  disconnected from Clemson and not want to stay. We want students to  stay and experience the beautiful place that Clemson is for student  development and enrichment. When a student leaves that has to make the university a little sad, because something usually pushes a student away and they most likely we not exposed to the parts of Clemson that keep us all coming back. Astin tells us to get involved and that the  quantity of involvement will direct affect the quality of the return you  gain from it. If you get really connected to something, then you are going to get a lot out of it. If you are only mildly connected to many  things and only sample each one on a surface level then you can gain  no real depth or take no pride in anything you worked to accomplish. The final thing that hit me well in this class was the cycle of  socialization. It explains to us how the things that we are exposed to  from the people we put trust in like our parents, siblings, and close  friends can imprint on us and stay with us for our entire life. Things like racism, sexism, and other prejudices can manifest this way. The people we trust can corrupt us before we are even given a chance to think for  ourselves. It also important because there is a point in the cycle that  always holds the option for us to break the cycle of socialization and no longer wish to believe and accept things like sexism with the people  that we may still be surrounded by who still hold these prejudices. We  don’t have to put up with ignorance and mistreatment, we can break  the cycle of socialization and really change the way that people are  thinking about one another to better our communities. When I leave Clemson University I think that I will still hold onto  these important theories and ways of thinking listed above. The tools I  have gained from this class and will continue to work on as an RA will  be essential in interactions with others my entire life. I am also a part  of the REM process here at Clemson and through that I will be able to  progress through and build on many pieces of Chickering’s Model. I  think that finding my identity while here at Clemson will be a huge benefit in the world after college, all the skills I learn and develop here  at college do not stop when I go out into the world with my degree.  They can continue to show through me, I can continue to live by my  beliefs and use my knowledge to try to always make the people near  me, and my community a better place. One leadership experience I had was attending the Lynching of  Anthony Crawford seminar. They took Crawford to an open field and  hung him by his neck from the tree and used his as body as target  practice. Crawford was shot multiple times and died a terribly brutal  death. The next day the town coroner cut his body down and stated  that he had died: “at the hands of parties unknown.” The men who  participated in the lynching were never punished. This occurred  because he was a black landowner who got into an argument with a  white storeowner over price. This story is an important one to illustrate how we have learned and continue to learn how to develop close and  mature relationships with others that are different than us. . The ability to interact with others with different beliefs than you, or that look  different from you can show students how useful differences can be  and that in a group setting differences in view point can really add to  group dynamics and success overall. Different people with difference  views working toward a common goal in their community is a major  component of REM and something we want to make sure all students  have learned before they graduate.Another leadership experience I had was my service learning  experience. I participated in Clemson Sweep and along with an army of other volunteers with rakes, wheelbarrows, and pitchforks. Together we moved hundreds of pounds of mulch and covered memorial park and  accomplished a huge goal. It was a very enriching experience. I met a  lot of other future RAs and we bonded over moving pile after pile of  mulch. Two things came out of that experience. One I was happy to do  some physical work with instant reward and feel that sense of  accomplishment. Two I was able to build relationships with other  people at Clemson who are older than me, have different majors than  me, and have different views than me. I genuinely enjoyed working  with them and meeting them and now we are friends! I think that’s  part of the intentional experience you have built here, and it definitely  works. These experiences have helped me gain insight into different  identities and further understand them, as I will continue to do my  entire life. I like being able to talk with someone on the deeper level  than just meaningless small talk and analyzing identity allows me to do so. By analyzing identity and asking people about themselves I think as a leader it will offer huge reward. I will be able to understand and use  this understanding to help frame REM around each one of my specific  residents by exposing them to things on campus that could interest  them, and that they could get real reward. Getting involved here at Clemson is essential to getting the full experience. Those who may be  different than me will continue to respect me and trust me because I  try to get to know them on a deeper level. If someone actively tries to  get to know you on a real level I think that you will trust them and  know that they have your best interests at heart. I think that my  residents will all know me well and know that I want them to succeed  both socially and academically here at Clemson. The ability to break  down the barriers of differing identities and use them as things we  celebrate together, not hide from one another will play a huge role in  leading my residents who will be different than I am. I will continue to implement the ability to lead by example as  much as possible especially when it comes to academics. I think many  freshman students come to college out of an easy senior year in high  school and have forgotten all of the important study habits that they  are desperately going to need to succeed here at a top 25 public  university. I will encourage them to go to the Jump Start classes  available at the Academic Success Center before the year officially  begins and I will offer to go with them. I also want to show them the  library and how it works because it is far from a simple building.  Utilizing the tools here at Clemson presented to you such as SI,  tutoring, the library, etc. can help everyone no matter how prepared  they might be. I will lead my floors charge on focusing on school work  and ensuring that everyone understands blackboard, online homework,and most importantly time management skills. Proper time  management will make or break you in college. Allocating time for  tasks on busy days allows you to turn those busy days into less busy  days, and lets you have very open days where you can relieve stress  how you chose. I would also like to continue to implement and improve being able to diffuse situations. I will live on a floor with all boys, there  is bound to be some initial discomforts before everyone understands  one another. I will enforce rules such as quiet hours especially since  many of the boys will desperately need sleep if they are pledging a  fraternity, which many choose to do. I want to focus on mutual respect  and focusing on the golden rule style of thinking. I would like my  residents to act as they would have others act towards them, and  create a floor of respect for others no matter what. I will continue to be an RA if circumstances allow and continue to  use the experience to grow both as an individual and as a leader. I will  also attempt to become more involved in leadership related activities  like honors mentoring and honors ambassadors. Taking more roles as a leader here at Clemson will allow me to grow into the leader that my  leadership philosophy statement describes. That is my ultimate goal as a Clemson university student employee. I would also like to continue to utilize the programs available to me next year such as workshops at  the Gantt Center or seminars hosted by speakers who speak of leading and following and how to do either in an effective and meaningful way.I will not allow social injustice to go on around me if I have seen  it. I will challenge those who commit social injustices to enlighten me  about their beliefs and why they have chosen to do such a thing. Then  if I am being congruent with my beliefs I will tell them what I believe  and why I think what they are doing is wrong and that they should  reconsider the way they act the next time. In areas of diversity I will  challenge myself to learn as much as I can. I would love to learn about  a religion I know nothing about and move through acceptance and into  the celebration of someone else’s personal beliefs. I would also be  happy that they were congruent with their beliefs and were willing to  share with me. I also would like to become constantly conscious of  white privilege and try to break down its barriers. I don’t want the  privilege because I have done nothing to earn it. I would rather be  admired by others as someone with power because they respect me  for my hard work, or my focus, or kindness. Not something I did  nothing to earn myself.  I can utilize the Academic Success Center, Gantt Center for  Student Life, Leasa Evinger, Lloyd Graham, my supervisor, and my  residents for feedback on my growth as a youth professional. Many of  these people listed will be given the chance to meet me multiple times  as the months pass and they will be able to witness how I am  progressing as REM affects me too. Both positive and negative criticism will help me and strengthen me to continue to be the best RA I can be and to help my residents develop into meaningful members of our  great university.

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here