×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Towson - ANTH 207 - Study Guide - Final
Join StudySoup
Get Full Access to Towson - ANTH 207 - Study Guide - Final

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

TOWSON / Anthropology / ANTH 207 / How tributary-based societies differ from kinship-based societies?

How tributary-based societies differ from kinship-based societies?

How tributary-based societies differ from kinship-based societies?

Description

School: Towson University
Department: Anthropology
Course: Cultural Anthropology
Professor: Samuel collins
Term: Spring 2016
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: ANTH 207 Final Exam Study Guide
Description: This study guide covers each question in detail that will be on the exam.
Uploaded: 05/17/2017
4 Pages 155 Views 2 Unlocks
Reviews


Final Exam


How tributary-based societies differ from kinship-based societies?



Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Spring 2017

1. Describe how tributary based societies differ from kinship based societies in how  they approach economics, politics, and religion.  Draw on our study of the Incas,  China, and Hindu India to illustrate your key points.  (50 points)

Kinship

Economics

Politics

Religion

Incas

­ King – 

Patrilineal; 

marries his sister ­ Use parallel 

cousins for 

territorial and 

political heads

­ Use cross 

cousins for priests ­ Exogamy

­ Polygyny

­ Vertical 

economy

­ Combining 

horticulture with  hunting and 

gathering with 

pastoralism

­ Balanced 

reciprocity

­ Monarchy with  sole ruler

­ Used kinship to  organize the 

political hierarchy  (see kinship)

­ Human sacrifice ­ Temple to Inti in the center of the  kingdom

­ Viracocha – 

creator

India

­ Caste system

­ Endogamy

­ Monogamy

­ Deep well 

irrigation

­ Cows

­ Manually 

intensive

­ Kshatriya can 

demand taxes – 

wealth moves 

towards the center ­ Kshatriya share  wealth with 

Brahmin

­ Hindu temples – Monumental 

architecture

­ Vishnu, Shive,  Ganesh – gods

­ Mass 

Pilgrimages

­ Food offerings ­ No human 

sacrifice

China

­ Patrilineal

­ Exogamy

­ Monogamy

­ Irrigation and  wet rice 

agriculture

­ Peasant and 

tenant farming

­ Negative 

reciprocity

­ Emperor: High  priest of heaven

­ Sash­bearing 

Confucian Literati ­ Wealthy, 

landowning gentry class

­ Peasants

­ Trade with other  nations

­ Pangu

­ Five cardinal 

points

­ Five elements –  Life­giving and  negative cycles

­ No human 

sacrifice

­ Food Offerings


How muehlmann’s ethnography can be applied to us and mexican drug policy?



If you want to learn more check out What is the effect of heroin?

∙ Kinship

o All of these have hierarchies

∙ Economics

o All have tribute and wealth (made possible by excess – tax) –  Two forms – Excess labor and surplus of agriculture

∙ Politics

o All have full­time military – Laws – coercive force

o All have political hierarchy

∙ Religion

o All have full­time priests that work in temples

o Rituals on a grander scale

2. Define Globalization, explain who are the agents, when it started, and how it  organizes the world into connected parts. (25 points)


What is the definition of criminal justice perspective?



∙ Globalization – (Chanda) The increased velocity in the transfer of ideas  and products long with the increased volume of consumers and products  and an increased variety of products that are much more visible than ever  before

o Velocity – We can connect a lot more quickly

o Volume – We have more access more often

o Variety – We can choose between what we do and don’t want o Visible – We see it all around us Don't forget about the age old question of How do you find the mean with an even amount of numbers?
Don't forget about the age old question of What was ebbinghaus experiment?

∙ Agents – Adventurers, missionaries, warriors, and traders

∙ When it Started – 1400s and begins with the Spanish and the Portuguese –  trade for profit Don't forget about the age old question of Which account appears on the income statement column of the worksheet?

o Didn’t start talking about it until the late 1990s because we didn’t  feel it until then

∙ How it Organizes the World – Core (capital – wealth), semi­periphery  (Mid­level labor and mid­level consumers), and periphery (cheap labor  and cheap raw materials) 

o Dependency theory – Poorer nations depend on richer nations for  materials and goods, causing the richer nations to exploit them –  wealth dependent on others’ poverty Don't forget about the age old question of How do you communicate with your team and keep them engaged?

∙ Recognize that we are environmentally connected (pollution in the air,  deforestation) – what we do affects other people, economically connected,  politically connected (Ex. North Korea), and religiously connected

3. Describe in detail the specific impact of the war on drugs on the rural poor that  are the focus of Muehlmann’s ethnography.  Include in your description the  differential impact on women and men.  (40 points)

∙ Take specific examples from the book about the different types of women  and different men

∙ Women:

o Older women – Stash houses, mules, money laundering bank  accounts

o Mothers – Stash houses, children get killed or go to prison (she has to support them because she has to bribe people and he no longer  supports the family)

o Wives/Girlfriends – Have to find another means of support

o Machiadoras – more vulnerable; abused

∙ Men:

o Cartels (directly sucked in) – Often go to jail

o Truck drivers – Coerced into taking the drugs over the border o Launderers – Loss of jobs/unemployment We also discuss several other topics like How long does information last in sensory memory?

o Addicts – Proliferation of the trade

∙ Children/Families

o Victims of violence

∙ Many of the poor have no option but to get involved. They either get  threatened by the cartels or die because they didn’t have the money to  support themselves. 

∙ Women:

o Dona Paz – Mother of Andres  He’s in jail so she bribes the  guards and works with El Gordo to stay on good terms with him  and make extra money. She also has to sell her (not so good) 

tamales to support herself and her son.

o Isabella – Andres’ girlfriend (until she moves on to El Chibo)  Dreams of being a narco­wife

∙ Men:

o Andres – Dona Paz’s son  In jail because he was caught with  drugs; works for El Gordo; once out of jail, refuses to go back into  the narco­business

o El Chibo – Truck driver and Isabella’s second boyfriend 

Willingly carries drugs over the border (he has either the option to  carry them and get paid or carry them and not get paid and not 

know they’re there)

o Cruz – Methamphetamine Addict  Buys his drugs from the cartels o El Gordo – Cartel  Andres worked under him

4. Discuss how Muehlmann’s ethnography can be applied to US and Mexican drug  policy.  What changes does her work suggest would be beneficial to human  flourishing on both sides of the border.  (35 points)

∙ Incarceration, usage, and violence have all increased since the  criminalization of drugs

∙ She suggests decriminalization

o Reduces the violence and profit (makes it taxable)

o Gives people the help that they need (all the money that’s directed  towards suppressing consumption can go towards treatment)  Make treatment on demand available to people

1. Public Policy Perspective

o Useful for relations with other nations because there would be less  people in jail and less money spent

o Originally banned because minority groups used them

2. Medical Perspective

o 80%­90% of people who use drugs aren’t addicted – No one uses  once and becomes addicted

o Offer attractive alternatives to decrease drug use

o Poverty and crime still exist even without the drugs

o Science should drive drug policy and education

o Addiction does not equal dependency

3. Criminal Justice Perspective

o Since declaring the war on drugs, the problem has gotten worse o Prohibition causes what it’s trying to prevent

o When you prohibit something, you can’t regulate it

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here