×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Long Beach State - CH 425 - Class Notes - Week 4
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Long Beach State - CH 425 - Class Notes - Week 4

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

csulb ebscohost

csulb ebscohost

Description

School: California State University Long Beach
Department: Chemical Engineering
Course: Human Sexuality and Sex Education
Professor: Wendy nomura
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: health, nutrition, and human sexuality
Cost: 25
Name: Notes and Powerpoints
Description: Notes for discussion boards and syllabus
Uploaded: 05/28/2017
70 Pages 275 Views 1 Unlocks
Reviews


HSC 425 Paper 2 Multidisciplinary Analysis of Human Sexuality and Diversity Learning Objectives 1. Critically analyze information from academic/professional sources. 2. Use electronic data bases to find articles. 3. Practice reading professional writing and recognize valid research and understand the results. 4. Practice using good writing techniques to support a thesis. 5. Use multiple perspectives to look at a single issue of culture and gender. 6. Practice reflection and self­assessment on how research on a topic influences personal opinion. General Instructions Select one of the topics listed below and develop a paper that analyzes issues of human  sexuality from multidisciplinary perspectives. Apply concepts from three distinctly different  disciplines of human study to analyze the particular phenomenon, see listing below one from each  column.  Incorporate theoretical frameworks, theoretical constructs and other “explanations” that  have been used by these disciplines to create a perspective that will provide a possible “explanation”  for the issue. This should be the way the discipline approaches the topic, it should not be a listing of  findings.  For example do not give a historic account of the topic but rather how historians synthesize  the historical significance of the phenomenon.  The last part of the paper is reflective.  Please read all  of the material provided in this document before starting your paper. Selected Topics  The topics presented here are broad categories; you should narrow it down for example body image  could be narrowed down the portrayal of body image in comic books/graphic novels. (Additional topics can be used with instructor approval)  ∙ Human pair bonding ∙ Romantic love  ∙ Infidelity ∙ Gender roles ∙ Promiscuity ∙ Marriage and divorce ∙ Homosexuality Rev 7/16∙ Pornography ∙ Prostitution ∙ Sex education formal and informal ∙ Atypical sexual behavior ∙ Sexuality in the elderly or disabled ∙ Body image 1 ∙ Disciplines/Perspectives Social Sciences Applied Sciences Diversity Component (must use a view different from own personal experience) Psychology Sociology History Evolutionary Theory/Anthropology Journalism, Media Studies &  Communication Biology/Physiology Law/Political Science Education Medicine/Health Sciences Economics/Game Theory Cultural & Ethnic Studies Gender & Women Studies Religious Studies Queer Theory/Studies


What do these tell you about the main points of the article?



Don't forget about the age old question of stephen robertson smu

Content of your Paper Please use subject headings when you change topics. When writing, make sure to clearly  demonstrate which disciplines’ perspective you are analyzing. You should have a minimum of one  source for each discipline.  Suggested Outline of paper A. Title page (include word count) B. Introduction  ∙ Introduce topic ∙ Introduce the chosen disciplines/perspectives ∙ Thesis statement in Italics C. Social Sciences discipline (choose one) ∙ In­depth look at the disciplines perspective of the topic ∙ Comment on how this perspective is different from other disciplines  D. Applied Sciences discipline (choose one) ∙ In­depth look at the disciplines perspective of the topic ∙ Comment on how this perspective is different from other disciplines  E. Diversity framework (choose one) ∙ Use insights from own cultural rules and biases to examine the topic, clearly defining  cultural background from which personal biases originate. ∙ Use at least one additional, from own, United States culture/gender/ethnicity/religion’s framework to examine the topic. F. Self­reflection (1st person) ∙ Reflection on how self­perspective of the topic is changed after researching the topic ∙ Reflection on self as a learner; what skills were acquired from the assignment, new  insights into the research and writing processes.  ∙ Evaluate own learning from perspective of envisioning future improved self; what will you do differently next time. G. Conclusion ∙ Draw conclusion(s) by combining theories from the examined disciplines/perspectives ∙ Clearly show how the disciplines are similar and different, do not merely list them. H. References in correct APA, 6th edition styleFormatting & Requirements for Paper 2 1. Length: Paper length is 1500 words minimum (excluding title page, references, and any  graphics/tables or charts), to get a grade of a C.  Length should be determined by coverage of  topics, some authors will need more than the minimum word count to appropriately cover all of  the assignment requirements. 2. Resources:  This is a research based assignment, sources must be scholarly, use of web sites is  allowed but they must be reliable and use references (i.e. they cite where there information came  from).  Minimum of 6 academic sources, (for each discipline you must have two sources and one of which must be a peer reviewed journal article) to get a grade of a C.  Your text book,  encyclopedias and dictionaries do not count for the referencing minimum (they may be used as  additional sources).  Wikipedia is not an academic source; you also may not use ProCon. To be  considered an academic source for this assignment the source must have a date and an author. Please see below: evaluation of sources and finding articles. 3. Thesis:  Your thesis (in italics) should clearly state your opinion and not be a topic/introductory  sentence.  4. Formatting:  ∙ Typed, double spaced, Times Roman font, 1 inch margins, font size 12. ∙ Title page: including name, class section number, name of the assignment, your specific title  for the assignment, and word count (excluding title page and references).   ∙ The entire assignment should be strictly double­spaced, with no additional space before or  after each line (check you paragraph settings).  ∙ Papers must have running headers and page numbers, on every page. This is in the header  not the body of the document. ∙ Subject headings are required and should indicate the subject that will follow. APA format  for a level one heading is; centered, boldfaced, with title case capitalization. You do not need a heading for your introduction. ∙ Citations must be in APA citation format for both in text citations and reference list. Cite all  sources you use. When referring to a source cited in an article do not cite the original article  if you did not read it, use “as cited in”. 5. The assignment must use college­level writing including spelling, verb usage and tense, grammar, vocabulary, sentence formation and paragraph development.  Third person should be used for all  sections of the paper except for the reflection part.  Use of direct quotes should be limited (not  more than 10% of paper excluding title and references), paraphrasing is preferred for most  situations.  6. Please submit paper to the drop box timely to avoid “computer malfunctions”; it can be done any  time in the semester before the due time. To access Turnitin go to BeachBoard and find the Paper  2 drop box.  Turnitin can only read MSWord, Word Perfect PostScrip, Acrobat PDF, HTML, RIF and Plain text files.  It is your responsibility to be sure it is a file type that it can read, papers  submitted in the incorrect format will be considered late.  It will not tell you if it cannot read it.   Double check that you paper has been submitted by checking your Turnitin Report (not Receipt). Preferred submission is MSWord. 7. Use the rubric to check your work for omissions.  Do not submit the rubric.8. Plagiarism will not be tolerated, if in doubt cite. Direct quotations (meaning the authors  words) require quotation marks as well as citations.  Not understanding the need to use  quotation marks is not a defense if you do not understand proper citation of quotes please see the  instructor during office hours. Evaluation of Sources Sources should be from academic or professional backgrounds. Some good places to start looking are peer review journal articles or credible web sources. For example Centers for Disease Control  (CDC.gov) or National Institutes of Health (NIH.gov) for medical related information.  For  international health/social issues the World Health Organization or Amnesty International are good  places to start. When evaluating a web base source be sure to take into consideration who is  sponsoring the web page (are they making a profit or have a specific agenda). Wikipedia is not an  acceptable source. Sources such as Wikipedia may have accurate information but due to the constant  flux they are not considered academic. Often these types of web pages have citations of sources that  can help you find the academically acceptable information you are looking for.  Finding Articles:  You may search by topic. Through COAST (library) electronic data bases  (www.csulb.edu/library/eref/eref­index.html) you can use a search engine such as Pubmed or  Medline.  These two data bases will give you full listings of the journal articles written on your topic  in medical journals (abstracts are usually available).  You will then have to locate the article.   Some articles are available electronically through COAST for free. You will need to search  for data bases that carry the journal you are looking for.  For example LexisNexis and Academic  Search Complete have many full text articles.  Some journals are available in the reference section of  the library and you can photo copy the article you need.   If you want a particular article that is not available at our library you can submit a request to  interlibrary loan (this can be done electronically through COAST). All electronic library services  require a library Pin number and an active CSULB ID number (this is different from your MyCSULB Pin). If you need help finding an article please see me during office hours, also the reference  librarians may be able to help. Take a print out of the instructions with you so they can better help  you find a selection that meets the assignment requirements.  Quoting, Summarizing and Paraphrasing  Quotations For this assignment quotations should be kept to a minimum, and only used when alternative  phrasing changes the meaning or when the direct quotation is needed to support your critique.  Guidelines for quoting: 1. Quotes should be short, enclosed in quotation marks, and cited. 2. Quotes should be well integrated into your sentence structure, if you have to adjust the text to fit  into a sentence use ellipses (…) to indicated that words were omitted from the quotation and  brackets  to indicated that a word has been changed (eg: [was], for will). 3. Long quotations put in block format are not appropriate for this assignment. Summarizing and paraphrasingSummarizing and paraphrasing are essential skills for academic writing, especially in a critical  review of research. To summarize means to reduce a text to its main points and it most important  ideas. The best way to summarize is to: 1. Scan the text.  Look for information that can be deduced for the introduction, conclusion and the  title and headings. What do these tell you about the main points of the article? 2. Locate the topic sentences and highlight the main points as you read. 3. Reread the text and make separate notes of the main points. Examples and evidence do not need  to be included in the summary; they are usually ued selectively in your critique. Paraphrasing means putting someone else’s phrases into your own words.  They still require  citations as the words are yours but the ideas are someone else’s. Substituting synonyms for the  original author’s words doesn’t make the passage yours, and is considered plagiarism. Paraphrasing  offers an alternative to using direct quotations in your summary and critique. The best way to  paraphrase is to: 1. Review your summary notes. 2. Rewrite them in your own words and in complete sentences. 3. Use reporting verbs and phrases (eg; the authors describe…, Cole argues that…). 4. If you include exact, unique or specialist phrasing from the text, use quotation marks around those phrases. 5. Make sure there is a smooth transition from your voice to sources point of view. Basic APA Citation Resources Matkovich, S. (2012). APA made easy (3rd ed.). Dacono, CO: www.YouVersusTheWrold.com.  CSULB Library Style Manuals and Citation Methods: APA & Plagiarism: Understanding Plagiarism  (2016). Retrieved from Library Guides (http://csulb.libguides.com/style) (see individual tabs). Purdue University. (2016). The OWL at Purdue: APA Style. Retrieved from The Owl at Purdue (https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/). In-text citations:  For journal articles and books cite author(s) last name(s), year of publication, page numbers. If it is 6 or more authors use et al. If you have 3 or more authors after the first citation use 1st authors name  and et al, after the initial citation.  If you use the author(s) names in the text just give date and page  numbers. Periods go after the citation and quotation marks do not enclose the citation. Examples: (Jones & Smith, 2011, p. 234). (Jones et al., 2011, p. 234). Per Jones (2011) “…“ (p. 234). For electronic sources give the authors name and publication date or date website was last updated, if it is a PDF with page numbers cite as above for books and journals.  If there is no author use the  sponsor of the web site or name of web site. Examples: (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2011). (WebMD, 2012) Reference List Listed in Alphabetical order, under the title “References,” use a hanging indent of 5 spaces. The preferred method for referencing journal articles follows, use the DOI if available.Ledema, J., Cooks, L., & Keuzendamp, S. (2010). Multiple dimensions of attitudes about  homosexuality. Journal of Homosexuality, 57(2), 123­134.  doi:10.1080/00918369.2010.517069 Journal Article No DOI available: Sayegh, M. A. (2011). Teen pregnancy in Texas: 2005­2015. Maternal Child Health Journal, 14(2),  94­101. Retrieved from http://www.ebscohost.com.mee1.library.csulb.edu/  Books:  Koop, C. E., & Johnson, T. (1992). Let’s talk. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House. Web sites (remove hyperlinks):  WebMD. (2012). Breast Cancer Health Center: Symptoms & types. Retrieved May 8, 2012, from  http://www.webmd.com/breast­cancer/guide/breast­cancer­symptoms­and­types Developing a Thesis Statement What is a Thesis Statement A thesis statement advances a conclusion the writer will defend with evidence. A thesis statement declares what you believe and what you intend to prove.  A good tentative thesis will help you focus your search for information. You may not know how you  will stand on an issue until you have examined the evidence. You will likely begin your research with a working, preliminary or tentative thesis, which you will continue to refine until you are certain of  where the evidence leads. ∙ The thesis statement is typically located at the end of your opening paragraph. ∙ The function of the thesis is to  o Establish a claim to control & focus the entire paper o Provide unity & sense of direction o Specify to the reader the point of the research Attributes of a Good Thesis Statement ∙ It should take on a subject upon which reasonable people could disagree. ∙ It should deal with a subject that can be adequately investigated given the nature of the  assignment. ∙ It should express one main idea. ∙ It should assert your conclusions about a subject. ∙ It should not state the obvious, Example: Cancer is a life threatening disease. ∙ See how to develop a thesis at http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/thesis_statement.shtml Examples of Thesis statements ∙ Health care in America is for the rich, causing our poor infant mortality rate. ∙ Menopause has a detrimental affect on the marital relationship. ∙ Making prostitution legal would decrease the spread of STIs.Checklist for the Final Thesis 1. Does the thesis express your position in a full, declarative statement that is not a question, not  a statement of purpose, & not merely a topic? 2. Does it limit the subject to a narrow focus that grows out of research? 3. Does it establish and investigation, interpretation, or theoretical presentation? 4. Does it point forward to your findings and a discussion of the implications in your  conclusion?HSC 425 Paper 2 Multidisciplinary Analysis of Human Sexuality and Diversity Learning Objectives 1. Critically analyze information from academic/professional sources. 2. Use electronic data bases to find articles. 3. Practice reading professional writing and recognize valid research and understand the results. 4. Practice using good writing techniques to support a thesis. 5. Use multiple perspectives to look at a single issue of culture and gender. 6. Practice reflection and self­assessment on how research on a topic influences personal opinion. General Instructions Select one of the topics listed below and develop a paper that analyzes issues of human  sexuality from multidisciplinary perspectives. Apply concepts from three distinctly different  disciplines of human study to analyze the particular phenomenon, see listing below one from each  column.  Incorporate theoretical frameworks, theoretical constructs and other “explanations” that  have been used by these disciplines to create a perspective that will provide a possible “explanation”  for the issue. This should be the way the discipline approaches the topic, it should not be a listing of  findings.  For example do not give a historic account of the topic but rather how historians synthesize  the historical significance of the phenomenon.  The last part of the paper is reflective.  Please read all  of the material provided in this document before starting your paper. Selected Topics  The topics presented here are broad categories; you should narrow it down for example body image  could be narrowed down the portrayal of body image in comic books/graphic novels. (Additional topics can be used with instructor approval)  ∙ Human pair bonding ∙ Romantic love  ∙ Infidelity ∙ Gender roles ∙ Promiscuity ∙ Marriage and divorce ∙ Homosexuality Rev 7/16∙ Pornography ∙ Prostitution ∙ Sex education formal and informal ∙ Atypical sexual behavior ∙ Sexuality in the elderly or disabled ∙ Body image 1 ∙ Disciplines/Perspectives Social Sciences Applied Sciences Diversity Component (must use a view different from own personal experience) Psychology Sociology History Evolutionary Theory/Anthropology Journalism, Media Studies &  Communication Biology/Physiology Law/Political Science Education Medicine/Health Sciences Economics/Game Theory Cultural & Ethnic Studies Gender & Women Studies Religious Studies Queer Theory/Studies


What do these tell you about the main points of the article?



If you want to learn more check out sts 2331 class notes

Content of your Paper Please use subject headings when you change topics. When writing, make sure to clearly  demonstrate which disciplines’ perspective you are analyzing. You should have a minimum of one  source for each discipline.  Suggested Outline of paper A. Title page (include word count) B. Introduction  ∙ Introduce topic ∙ Introduce the chosen disciplines/perspectives ∙ Thesis statement in Italics C. Social Sciences discipline (choose one) ∙ In­depth look at the disciplines perspective of the topic ∙ Comment on how this perspective is different from other disciplines  D. Applied Sciences discipline (choose one) ∙ In­depth look at the disciplines perspective of the topic ∙ Comment on how this perspective is different from other disciplines  E. Diversity framework (choose one) ∙ Use insights from own cultural rules and biases to examine the topic, clearly defining  cultural background from which personal biases originate. ∙ Use at least one additional, from own, United States culture/gender/ethnicity/religion’s framework to examine the topic. F. Self­reflection (1st person) ∙ Reflection on how self­perspective of the topic is changed after researching the topic ∙ Reflection on self as a learner; what skills were acquired from the assignment, new  insights into the research and writing processes.  ∙ Evaluate own learning from perspective of envisioning future improved self; what will you do differently next time. G. Conclusion ∙ Draw conclusion(s) by combining theories from the examined disciplines/perspectives ∙ Clearly show how the disciplines are similar and different, do not merely list them. H. References in correct APA, 6th edition styleFormatting & Requirements for Paper 2 1. Length: Paper length is 1500 words minimum (excluding title page, references, and any  graphics/tables or charts), to get a grade of a C.  Length should be determined by coverage of  topics, some authors will need more than the minimum word count to appropriately cover all of  the assignment requirements. 2. Resources:  This is a research based assignment, sources must be scholarly, use of web sites is  allowed but they must be reliable and use references (i.e. they cite where there information came  from).  Minimum of 6 academic sources, (for each discipline you must have two sources and one of which must be a peer reviewed journal article) to get a grade of a C.  Your text book,  encyclopedias and dictionaries do not count for the referencing minimum (they may be used as  additional sources).  Wikipedia is not an academic source; you also may not use ProCon. To be  considered an academic source for this assignment the source must have a date and an author. Please see below: evaluation of sources and finding articles. 3. Thesis:  Your thesis (in italics) should clearly state your opinion and not be a topic/introductory  sentence.  4. Formatting:  ∙ Typed, double spaced, Times Roman font, 1 inch margins, font size 12. ∙ Title page: including name, class section number, name of the assignment, your specific title  for the assignment, and word count (excluding title page and references).   ∙ The entire assignment should be strictly double­spaced, with no additional space before or  after each line (check you paragraph settings).  ∙ Papers must have running headers and page numbers, on every page. This is in the header  not the body of the document. ∙ Subject headings are required and should indicate the subject that will follow. APA format  for a level one heading is; centered, boldfaced, with title case capitalization. You do not need a heading for your introduction. ∙ Citations must be in APA citation format for both in text citations and reference list. Cite all  sources you use. When referring to a source cited in an article do not cite the original article  if you did not read it, use “as cited in”. 5. The assignment must use college­level writing including spelling, verb usage and tense, grammar, vocabulary, sentence formation and paragraph development.  Third person should be used for all  sections of the paper except for the reflection part.  Use of direct quotes should be limited (not  more than 10% of paper excluding title and references), paraphrasing is preferred for most  situations.  6. Please submit paper to the drop box timely to avoid “computer malfunctions”; it can be done any  time in the semester before the due time. To access Turnitin go to BeachBoard and find the Paper  2 drop box.  Turnitin can only read MSWord, Word Perfect PostScrip, Acrobat PDF, HTML, RIF and Plain text files.  It is your responsibility to be sure it is a file type that it can read, papers  submitted in the incorrect format will be considered late.  It will not tell you if it cannot read it.   Double check that you paper has been submitted by checking your Turnitin Report (not Receipt). Preferred submission is MSWord. 7. Use the rubric to check your work for omissions.  Do not submit the rubric.8. Plagiarism will not be tolerated, if in doubt cite. Direct quotations (meaning the authors  words) require quotation marks as well as citations.  Not understanding the need to use  quotation marks is not a defense if you do not understand proper citation of quotes please see the  instructor during office hours. Evaluation of Sources Sources should be from academic or professional backgrounds. Some good places to start looking are peer review journal articles or credible web sources. For example Centers for Disease Control  (CDC.gov) or National Institutes of Health (NIH.gov) for medical related information.  For  international health/social issues the World Health Organization or Amnesty International are good  places to start. When evaluating a web base source be sure to take into consideration who is  sponsoring the web page (are they making a profit or have a specific agenda). Wikipedia is not an  acceptable source. Sources such as Wikipedia may have accurate information but due to the constant  flux they are not considered academic. Often these types of web pages have citations of sources that  can help you find the academically acceptable information you are looking for.  Finding Articles:  You may search by topic. Through COAST (library) electronic data bases  (www.csulb.edu/library/eref/eref­index.html) you can use a search engine such as Pubmed or  Medline.  These two data bases will give you full listings of the journal articles written on your topic  in medical journals (abstracts are usually available).  You will then have to locate the article.   Some articles are available electronically through COAST for free. You will need to search  for data bases that carry the journal you are looking for.  For example LexisNexis and Academic  Search Complete have many full text articles.  Some journals are available in the reference section of  the library and you can photo copy the article you need.   If you want a particular article that is not available at our library you can submit a request to  interlibrary loan (this can be done electronically through COAST). All electronic library services  require a library Pin number and an active CSULB ID number (this is different from your MyCSULB Pin). If you need help finding an article please see me during office hours, also the reference  librarians may be able to help. Take a print out of the instructions with you so they can better help  you find a selection that meets the assignment requirements.  Quoting, Summarizing and Paraphrasing  Quotations For this assignment quotations should be kept to a minimum, and only used when alternative  phrasing changes the meaning or when the direct quotation is needed to support your critique.  Guidelines for quoting: 1. Quotes should be short, enclosed in quotation marks, and cited. 2. Quotes should be well integrated into your sentence structure, if you have to adjust the text to fit  into a sentence use ellipses (…) to indicated that words were omitted from the quotation and  brackets  to indicated that a word has been changed (eg: [was], for will). 3. Long quotations put in block format are not appropriate for this assignment. Summarizing and paraphrasingSummarizing and paraphrasing are essential skills for academic writing, especially in a critical  review of research. To summarize means to reduce a text to its main points and it most important  ideas. The best way to summarize is to: 1. Scan the text.  Look for information that can be deduced for the introduction, conclusion and the  title and headings. What do these tell you about the main points of the article? 2. Locate the topic sentences and highlight the main points as you read. 3. Reread the text and make separate notes of the main points. Examples and evidence do not need  to be included in the summary; they are usually ued selectively in your critique. Paraphrasing means putting someone else’s phrases into your own words.  They still require  citations as the words are yours but the ideas are someone else’s. Substituting synonyms for the  original author’s words doesn’t make the passage yours, and is considered plagiarism. Paraphrasing  offers an alternative to using direct quotations in your summary and critique. The best way to  paraphrase is to: 1. Review your summary notes. 2. Rewrite them in your own words and in complete sentences. 3. Use reporting verbs and phrases (eg; the authors describe…, Cole argues that…). 4. If you include exact, unique or specialist phrasing from the text, use quotation marks around those phrases. 5. Make sure there is a smooth transition from your voice to sources point of view. Basic APA Citation Resources Matkovich, S. (2012). APA made easy (3rd ed.). Dacono, CO: www.YouVersusTheWrold.com.  CSULB Library Style Manuals and Citation Methods: APA & Plagiarism: Understanding Plagiarism  (2016). Retrieved from Library Guides (http://csulb.libguides.com/style) (see individual tabs). Purdue University. (2016). The OWL at Purdue: APA Style. Retrieved from The Owl at Purdue (https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/). In-text citations:  For journal articles and books cite author(s) last name(s), year of publication, page numbers. If it is 6 or more authors use et al. If you have 3 or more authors after the first citation use 1st authors name  and et al, after the initial citation.  If you use the author(s) names in the text just give date and page  numbers. Periods go after the citation and quotation marks do not enclose the citation. Examples: (Jones & Smith, 2011, p. 234). (Jones et al., 2011, p. 234). Per Jones (2011) “…“ (p. 234). For electronic sources give the authors name and publication date or date website was last updated, if it is a PDF with page numbers cite as above for books and journals.  If there is no author use the  sponsor of the web site or name of web site. Examples: (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2011). (WebMD, 2012) Reference List Listed in Alphabetical order, under the title “References,” use a hanging indent of 5 spaces. The preferred method for referencing journal articles follows, use the DOI if available.Ledema, J., Cooks, L., & Keuzendamp, S. (2010). Multiple dimensions of attitudes about  homosexuality. Journal of Homosexuality, 57(2), 123­134.  doi:10.1080/00918369.2010.517069 Journal Article No DOI available: Sayegh, M. A. (2011). Teen pregnancy in Texas: 2005­2015. Maternal Child Health Journal, 14(2),  94­101. Retrieved from http://www.ebscohost.com.mee1.library.csulb.edu/  Books:  Koop, C. E., & Johnson, T. (1992). Let’s talk. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House. Web sites (remove hyperlinks):  WebMD. (2012). Breast Cancer Health Center: Symptoms & types. Retrieved May 8, 2012, from  http://www.webmd.com/breast­cancer/guide/breast­cancer­symptoms­and­types Developing a Thesis Statement What is a Thesis Statement A thesis statement advances a conclusion the writer will defend with evidence. A thesis statement declares what you believe and what you intend to prove.  A good tentative thesis will help you focus your search for information. You may not know how you  will stand on an issue until you have examined the evidence. You will likely begin your research with a working, preliminary or tentative thesis, which you will continue to refine until you are certain of  where the evidence leads. ∙ The thesis statement is typically located at the end of your opening paragraph. ∙ The function of the thesis is to  o Establish a claim to control & focus the entire paper o Provide unity & sense of direction o Specify to the reader the point of the research Attributes of a Good Thesis Statement ∙ It should take on a subject upon which reasonable people could disagree. ∙ It should deal with a subject that can be adequately investigated given the nature of the  assignment. ∙ It should express one main idea. ∙ It should assert your conclusions about a subject. ∙ It should not state the obvious, Example: Cancer is a life threatening disease. ∙ See how to develop a thesis at http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/thesis_statement.shtml Examples of Thesis statements ∙ Health care in America is for the rich, causing our poor infant mortality rate. ∙ Menopause has a detrimental affect on the marital relationship. ∙ Making prostitution legal would decrease the spread of STIs.Checklist for the Final Thesis 1. Does the thesis express your position in a full, declarative statement that is not a question, not  a statement of purpose, & not merely a topic? 2. Does it limit the subject to a narrow focus that grows out of research? 3. Does it establish and investigation, interpretation, or theoretical presentation? 4. Does it point forward to your findings and a discussion of the implications in your  conclusion?HSC 425 Paper 2 Multidisciplinary Analysis of Human Sexuality and Diversity Learning Objectives 1. Critically analyze information from academic/professional sources. 2. Use electronic data bases to find articles. 3. Practice reading professional writing and recognize valid research and understand the results. 4. Practice using good writing techniques to support a thesis. 5. Use multiple perspectives to look at a single issue of culture and gender. 6. Practice reflection and self­assessment on how research on a topic influences personal opinion. General Instructions Select one of the topics listed below and develop a paper that analyzes issues of human  sexuality from multidisciplinary perspectives. Apply concepts from three distinctly different  disciplines of human study to analyze the particular phenomenon, see listing below one from each  column.  Incorporate theoretical frameworks, theoretical constructs and other “explanations” that  have been used by these disciplines to create a perspective that will provide a possible “explanation”  for the issue. This should be the way the discipline approaches the topic, it should not be a listing of  findings.  For example do not give a historic account of the topic but rather how historians synthesize  the historical significance of the phenomenon.  The last part of the paper is reflective.  Please read all  of the material provided in this document before starting your paper. Selected Topics  The topics presented here are broad categories; you should narrow it down for example body image  could be narrowed down the portrayal of body image in comic books/graphic novels. (Additional topics can be used with instructor approval)  ∙ Human pair bonding ∙ Romantic love  ∙ Infidelity ∙ Gender roles ∙ Promiscuity ∙ Marriage and divorce ∙ Homosexuality Rev 7/16∙ Pornography ∙ Prostitution ∙ Sex education formal and informal ∙ Atypical sexual behavior ∙ Sexuality in the elderly or disabled ∙ Body image 1 ∙ Disciplines/Perspectives Social Sciences Applied Sciences Diversity Component (must use a view different from own personal experience) Psychology Sociology History Evolutionary Theory/Anthropology Journalism, Media Studies &  Communication Biology/Physiology Law/Political Science Education Medicine/Health Sciences Economics/Game Theory Cultural & Ethnic Studies Gender & Women Studies Religious Studies Queer Theory/Studies


What do these tell you about the main points of the article?



We also discuss several other topics like math 251 unlv

Content of your Paper Please use subject headings when you change topics. When writing, make sure to clearly  demonstrate which disciplines’ perspective you are analyzing. You should have a minimum of one  source for each discipline.  Suggested Outline of paper A. Title page (include word count) B. Introduction  ∙ Introduce topic ∙ Introduce the chosen disciplines/perspectives ∙ Thesis statement in Italics C. Social Sciences discipline (choose one) ∙ In­depth look at the disciplines perspective of the topic ∙ Comment on how this perspective is different from other disciplines  D. Applied Sciences discipline (choose one) ∙ In­depth look at the disciplines perspective of the topic ∙ Comment on how this perspective is different from other disciplines  E. Diversity framework (choose one) ∙ Use insights from own cultural rules and biases to examine the topic, clearly defining  cultural background from which personal biases originate. ∙ Use at least one additional, from own, United States culture/gender/ethnicity/religion’s framework to examine the topic. F. Self­reflection (1st person) ∙ Reflection on how self­perspective of the topic is changed after researching the topic ∙ Reflection on self as a learner; what skills were acquired from the assignment, new  insights into the research and writing processes.  ∙ Evaluate own learning from perspective of envisioning future improved self; what will you do differently next time. G. Conclusion ∙ Draw conclusion(s) by combining theories from the examined disciplines/perspectives ∙ Clearly show how the disciplines are similar and different, do not merely list them. H. References in correct APA, 6th edition styleFormatting & Requirements for Paper 2 1. Length: Paper length is 1500 words minimum (excluding title page, references, and any  graphics/tables or charts), to get a grade of a C.  Length should be determined by coverage of  topics, some authors will need more than the minimum word count to appropriately cover all of  the assignment requirements. 2. Resources:  This is a research based assignment, sources must be scholarly, use of web sites is  allowed but they must be reliable and use references (i.e. they cite where there information came  from).  Minimum of 6 academic sources, (for each discipline you must have two sources and one of which must be a peer reviewed journal article) to get a grade of a C.  Your text book,  encyclopedias and dictionaries do not count for the referencing minimum (they may be used as  additional sources).  Wikipedia is not an academic source; you also may not use ProCon. To be  considered an academic source for this assignment the source must have a date and an author. Please see below: evaluation of sources and finding articles. 3. Thesis:  Your thesis (in italics) should clearly state your opinion and not be a topic/introductory  sentence.  4. Formatting:  ∙ Typed, double spaced, Times Roman font, 1 inch margins, font size 12. ∙ Title page: including name, class section number, name of the assignment, your specific title  for the assignment, and word count (excluding title page and references).   ∙ The entire assignment should be strictly double­spaced, with no additional space before or  after each line (check you paragraph settings).  ∙ Papers must have running headers and page numbers, on every page. This is in the header  not the body of the document. ∙ Subject headings are required and should indicate the subject that will follow. APA format  for a level one heading is; centered, boldfaced, with title case capitalization. You do not need a heading for your introduction. ∙ Citations must be in APA citation format for both in text citations and reference list. Cite all  sources you use. When referring to a source cited in an article do not cite the original article  if you did not read it, use “as cited in”. 5. The assignment must use college­level writing including spelling, verb usage and tense, grammar, vocabulary, sentence formation and paragraph development.  Third person should be used for all  sections of the paper except for the reflection part.  Use of direct quotes should be limited (not  more than 10% of paper excluding title and references), paraphrasing is preferred for most  situations.  6. Please submit paper to the drop box timely to avoid “computer malfunctions”; it can be done any  time in the semester before the due time. To access Turnitin go to BeachBoard and find the Paper  2 drop box.  Turnitin can only read MSWord, Word Perfect PostScrip, Acrobat PDF, HTML, RIF and Plain text files.  It is your responsibility to be sure it is a file type that it can read, papers  submitted in the incorrect format will be considered late.  It will not tell you if it cannot read it.   Double check that you paper has been submitted by checking your Turnitin Report (not Receipt). Preferred submission is MSWord. 7. Use the rubric to check your work for omissions.  Do not submit the rubric.8. Plagiarism will not be tolerated, if in doubt cite. Direct quotations (meaning the authors  words) require quotation marks as well as citations.  Not understanding the need to use  quotation marks is not a defense if you do not understand proper citation of quotes please see the  instructor during office hours. Evaluation of Sources Sources should be from academic or professional backgrounds. Some good places to start looking are peer review journal articles or credible web sources. For example Centers for Disease Control  (CDC.gov) or National Institutes of Health (NIH.gov) for medical related information.  For  international health/social issues the World Health Organization or Amnesty International are good  places to start. When evaluating a web base source be sure to take into consideration who is  sponsoring the web page (are they making a profit or have a specific agenda). Wikipedia is not an  acceptable source. Sources such as Wikipedia may have accurate information but due to the constant  flux they are not considered academic. Often these types of web pages have citations of sources that  can help you find the academically acceptable information you are looking for.  Finding Articles:  You may search by topic. Through COAST (library) electronic data bases  (www.csulb.edu/library/eref/eref­index.html) you can use a search engine such as Pubmed or  Medline.  These two data bases will give you full listings of the journal articles written on your topic  in medical journals (abstracts are usually available).  You will then have to locate the article.   Some articles are available electronically through COAST for free. You will need to search  for data bases that carry the journal you are looking for.  For example LexisNexis and Academic  Search Complete have many full text articles.  Some journals are available in the reference section of  the library and you can photo copy the article you need.   If you want a particular article that is not available at our library you can submit a request to  interlibrary loan (this can be done electronically through COAST). All electronic library services  require a library Pin number and an active CSULB ID number (this is different from your MyCSULB Pin). If you need help finding an article please see me during office hours, also the reference  librarians may be able to help. Take a print out of the instructions with you so they can better help  you find a selection that meets the assignment requirements.  Quoting, Summarizing and Paraphrasing  Quotations For this assignment quotations should be kept to a minimum, and only used when alternative  phrasing changes the meaning or when the direct quotation is needed to support your critique.  Guidelines for quoting: 1. Quotes should be short, enclosed in quotation marks, and cited. 2. Quotes should be well integrated into your sentence structure, if you have to adjust the text to fit  into a sentence use ellipses (…) to indicated that words were omitted from the quotation and  brackets  to indicated that a word has been changed (eg: [was], for will). 3. Long quotations put in block format are not appropriate for this assignment. Summarizing and paraphrasingSummarizing and paraphrasing are essential skills for academic writing, especially in a critical  review of research. To summarize means to reduce a text to its main points and it most important  ideas. The best way to summarize is to: 1. Scan the text.  Look for information that can be deduced for the introduction, conclusion and the  title and headings. What do these tell you about the main points of the article? 2. Locate the topic sentences and highlight the main points as you read. 3. Reread the text and make separate notes of the main points. Examples and evidence do not need  to be included in the summary; they are usually ued selectively in your critique. Paraphrasing means putting someone else’s phrases into your own words.  They still require  citations as the words are yours but the ideas are someone else’s. Substituting synonyms for the  original author’s words doesn’t make the passage yours, and is considered plagiarism. Paraphrasing  offers an alternative to using direct quotations in your summary and critique. The best way to  paraphrase is to: 1. Review your summary notes. 2. Rewrite them in your own words and in complete sentences. 3. Use reporting verbs and phrases (eg; the authors describe…, Cole argues that…). 4. If you include exact, unique or specialist phrasing from the text, use quotation marks around those phrases. 5. Make sure there is a smooth transition from your voice to sources point of view. Basic APA Citation Resources Matkovich, S. (2012). APA made easy (3rd ed.). Dacono, CO: www.YouVersusTheWrold.com.  CSULB Library Style Manuals and Citation Methods: APA & Plagiarism: Understanding Plagiarism  (2016). Retrieved from Library Guides (http://csulb.libguides.com/style) (see individual tabs). Purdue University. (2016). The OWL at Purdue: APA Style. Retrieved from The Owl at Purdue (https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/). In-text citations:  For journal articles and books cite author(s) last name(s), year of publication, page numbers. If it is 6 or more authors use et al. If you have 3 or more authors after the first citation use 1st authors name  and et al, after the initial citation.  If you use the author(s) names in the text just give date and page  numbers. Periods go after the citation and quotation marks do not enclose the citation. Examples: (Jones & Smith, 2011, p. 234). (Jones et al., 2011, p. 234). Per Jones (2011) “…“ (p. 234). For electronic sources give the authors name and publication date or date website was last updated, if it is a PDF with page numbers cite as above for books and journals.  If there is no author use the  sponsor of the web site or name of web site. Examples: (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2011). (WebMD, 2012) Reference List Listed in Alphabetical order, under the title “References,” use a hanging indent of 5 spaces. The preferred method for referencing journal articles follows, use the DOI if available.Ledema, J., Cooks, L., & Keuzendamp, S. (2010). Multiple dimensions of attitudes about  homosexuality. Journal of Homosexuality, 57(2), 123­134.  doi:10.1080/00918369.2010.517069 Journal Article No DOI available: Sayegh, M. A. (2011). Teen pregnancy in Texas: 2005­2015. Maternal Child Health Journal, 14(2),  94­101. Retrieved from http://www.ebscohost.com.mee1.library.csulb.edu/  Books:  Koop, C. E., & Johnson, T. (1992). Let’s talk. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House. Web sites (remove hyperlinks):  WebMD. (2012). Breast Cancer Health Center: Symptoms & types. Retrieved May 8, 2012, from  http://www.webmd.com/breast­cancer/guide/breast­cancer­symptoms­and­types Developing a Thesis Statement What is a Thesis Statement A thesis statement advances a conclusion the writer will defend with evidence. A thesis statement declares what you believe and what you intend to prove.  A good tentative thesis will help you focus your search for information. You may not know how you  will stand on an issue until you have examined the evidence. You will likely begin your research with a working, preliminary or tentative thesis, which you will continue to refine until you are certain of  where the evidence leads. ∙ The thesis statement is typically located at the end of your opening paragraph. ∙ The function of the thesis is to  o Establish a claim to control & focus the entire paper o Provide unity & sense of direction o Specify to the reader the point of the research Attributes of a Good Thesis Statement ∙ It should take on a subject upon which reasonable people could disagree. ∙ It should deal with a subject that can be adequately investigated given the nature of the  assignment. ∙ It should express one main idea. ∙ It should assert your conclusions about a subject. ∙ It should not state the obvious, Example: Cancer is a life threatening disease. ∙ See how to develop a thesis at http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/thesis_statement.shtml Examples of Thesis statements ∙ Health care in America is for the rich, causing our poor infant mortality rate. ∙ Menopause has a detrimental affect on the marital relationship. ∙ Making prostitution legal would decrease the spread of STIs.Checklist for the Final Thesis 1. Does the thesis express your position in a full, declarative statement that is not a question, not  a statement of purpose, & not merely a topic? 2. Does it limit the subject to a narrow focus that grows out of research? 3. Does it establish and investigation, interpretation, or theoretical presentation? 4. Does it point forward to your findings and a discussion of the implications in your  conclusion?California State University, Long Beach HSC 425: Human Sexuality and Sex Education January 15, 2016 Title of Paper Title of the Assignment (ex; Multidisciplinary Paper) Your Name ID #1000000 Word Count:  _fill in_ Words excluding, title page, tables, and referencesHEADER OF YOUR LAST Name and first initial 2 Heading Level 1 All paragraphs should be indented 5 spaces. If you cut and paste a direct quote please be  sure to change font to Times New Roman, size 12 and black. Heading Level 2 This is a sample paper for you to view formatting and use as a template, if you need it.  There is no additional before or after spacing between paragraphs or between headings.HEADER OF YOUR LAST Name and first initial 3 References Bogart, H. (2011). Example of a reference for book. La Verne, CA: Secret Publishers. Ledema, J., Cooks, L., & Keuzendamp, S. (2010). Sample of a Journal Article Citation.  Journal  of Homosexuality, 57(2), 123­134. doi:10.1080/00918369.2010.517069 WebMD. (2012). Sample of a Web Page Name of Web page. Retrieved May 8, 2012,  fromhttp://www.webmd.com/breast­cancer/guide/breast­cancer­symptoms­and­typesHSC 425 F16 Nomura College of Health and Human Services Department of Health Science Human Sexuality and Sex Education  Spring 2017 HSC 425, Section 04 & 08, Code 2446 & 5983, Units 3 General Information Instructor Wendy Nomura, P.T., M.P.H., Ed.D. Office Phone 562.985.1537 (only during office hours) E­mail Wendy.Nomura@csulb.edu Office Hours Tuesday 9:30­11:30 AM Thursday 9:30­10:30 AM & by Appointment Office Location HHS2­FOA­9 Mailbox Located in Health Science Office, HHS2­115 Course Time & Place Online Asynchronous

We also discuss several other topics like If Joe wants to earn an annual rate of return of 12% on this investment, how much should he offer to buy the stock at?

Course Description Biomedical, sociological, and psychological aspects of human sexuality, the communication of  sexual information, the implementation, content, and evaluation of family life and sex education in  schools. Prerequisites: Completion of the G.E. Foundation, one or more Explorations courses, and upper  division status. Student Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to: 1. Discuss human sexuality from biological, psychological, sociological, cultural, economic, &  scientific perspectives. 2. Analyze bio­medical, psychosocial, & socio­behavioral factors affecting sexual roles, identities  & behaviors. 3. Discuss the bio­medical, social and behavioral characteristics of reproductive system disorders. 4. Assess bio­medical and psychosocial aspects of the human sexual response. 5. Appraise the physical, mental­emotional & social changes that occur during pregnancy &  childbirth. 6. Evaluate methods of birth control including related bio­medical, public health, cultural, &  economic issues. 7. Examine consequences of sexually transmitted diseases/infections upon the health of the  individual, family & society. 8. Discuss the physical, mental­emotional and social changes in sexuality throughout the life cycle. Rev 1/17 1HSC 425 F16 Nomura 9. Examine theories & concepts of love & sexual attraction in individuals, couples, families &  society. 10. Appraise the communication process as it relates to sexuality, conflict resolution and culture. 11. Investigate the effects of sexual crimes/coercion on the victim and society. Evaluate family life education in the home, school and community. Rev 1/17 2HSC 425 F16 Nomura Course Materials/Access Required Text Yarber, W. L. & Sayad, B. W. (2016).  Human Sexuality: Diversity in contemporary America, 9th edition. New York, NY: McGraw Hill. Electronic versions are acceptable.  You do not need textbook (McGraw Hill) website access.  The text  is needed the first week of class. The text is available at the Library Reserve Desk for either 1 or 3 hour  check out. Optional Text/Resources on APA Style:  Matkovich, S. (2012). APA made easy (3rd ed.). Dacono, CO: www.YouVersusTheWrold.com.  CSULB Library Style Manuals and Citation Methods: APA & Plagiarism: Understanding Plagiarism  (2016). Retrieved from Library Style Guides (http://csulb.libguides.com/style) (see individual  tabs) Purdue University. (2016). The OWL at Purdue: APA Style. Retrieved from The Owl at Purdue (https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/) Technology Requirements Internet, word processing (Microsoft word is preferred submission), Java Script, Adobe Acrobat Reader, Flash Player, and FireFox browser.  Microsoft Office 365 is available to Students for free from CSULB  Software Depot @ http://web.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/academic_technology/ats/software/. Some films  used in the course require access to the Library server for Kanopy.  You will need a library password. If  you view the film directly on campus using the campus wi­fi or a campus computer, you do not need to  sign in.  To get a library pass word go to My Library Account @  https://coast.library.csulb.edu/patroninfo Beach Board Students must have a CSULB account in order to access the course on BeachBoard.  It is your  responsibility to check your BeachBoard account regularly (daily, if possible), as it will be used for  communication, posting of important documents, posting of grades, etc.  If something is not working in  BeachBoard the most common culprit is using the wrong browser. FireFox is the preferred browser for  BeachBoard. Use of Explorer and Safari have resulted in difficulty with downloading documents,  broken links, failure of quizzes to be recorded, and difficulty uploading files. BeachBoard help may be  acquired through the Technology Help Desk (562.985.4959 or helpdesk@csulb.edu). Turnitin.com All students will be turning in papers to Turnitin, which is a plagiarism detection service.  To access Turnitin go to Beach Board under drop box you will find an area for each assignment.  Turnitin can     only read     MSWord, Word Perfect PostScript, Acrobat PDF, HTML, RIF and Plain text files.  It is  your responsibility to be sure it is a file type that it can read.  It will not tell you if it cannot read it.  Preferred submission is MSWord. After submission, you must check you Turnitin Report (not  receipt) to be sure you submission has gone through. It is your responsibility to assure the correct  file has been submitted and accepted by Turnitin before the due date (if there is a problem resubmit  to the late/mess up drop box with a note as to why it is there). Assignments must be named in the  following fashion before submitting to BeachBoard drop box “Joe Student 425 Paper 1.docx”. Rev 1/17 3HSC 425 F16 Nomura Contacting Instructor Email is the most efficient way to contact me.  All emails MUST contain your name & class title.   Emails will not be responded to if there is no subject or student information.  Please be advised that my  work week is Monday to Thursday.  I do on occasion respond to emails outside of that time but please  do rely on it.  Assignment questions will not be responded to if they are received so late that it is  impractical to implement the response before the due date.  I will respond to phone calls only if in my  office at the time, such as during office hours. My phone is shared so confidentiality cannot be assured  so please do not leave voice mails, send an email instead.  If you are having difficulty with the material  or assignments, please come see me or call me during office hours.  Generally, a few minutes in office  hours can save you time in the long run.  I will see students outside of office hours as long as it doesn’t  conflict with my other obligations, please verify with me in advance of my availability. Assignments and Class Grading Assignments Source Requirements for all Written Assignments For this class all sources used must be cited in APA with appropriate quotation marks, in­text  citations, and reference list.  Wikipedia, all Wiki type sources and Pro/Con are not allowed for  this class as sources.  All sources must have an author and a date.  For sources published by  groups/agencies the group because the author for example the Kaiser Family Foundation or the  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention may be considered authors.  Websites last day  updated becomes the date. Discussion Boards The great advantage of online discussion is that it can happen almost anytime, anywhere; it can  deepen your understanding of the course material, and it can help you forge stronger connections  with your classmates. You will have 10 200­400 word postings with 2 responses to other students.  Please see Beach Board for detailed instructions.

If you want to learn more check out ecu grade calculator

Chapter Quizzes Objective (multiple choice) quizzes will be given for each individual chapter to assure  understanding of the reading material.  These will be done in the quiz section on Beach Board.   There are 10 questions per quiz and you will have 20 minutes to complete each quiz.  Quizzes will  close when the deadline is reached even if you have not completed it.  The first quiz is on APA  style.  You may take this quiz for up to 10 attempts; the highest score will be reported. Please see  content for resources on APA citation style. For Chapter quizzes there will be three attempts per  quiz, the highest score will be recorded.  It is suggested that you read the chapter before attempting  the quiz.  You may take any of the quizzes ahead of time.  Please see schedule for due date and  time.  There are 18 chapter quizzes worth 6 points each but you will only receive a maximum of  100 points for the quizzes (see quiz total in the grade book).  You may continue to take the quizzes  after reaching 100 points for study purposes but you will not get any extra credit.   Exams The Exam 1 has two parts:  a rough draft of your Thesis for Paper 2, that will be on the discussion  board and require peer review of other students and a multiple choice section in quizzes.  Exam 2  includes an outline of your paper and 3 sources in the drop box and a multiple choice section in  quizzes. The final consists of Case Studies and multiple choice questions done in the Quiz section of Rev 1/17 4HSC 425 F16 Nomura BeachBoard, and is comprehensive.  Multiple choice questions for all 3 exams will be based on the  readings, lessons, and videos from the modules.   Papers There are 2 writing assignments: Paper 1: Sexual Identity, and Paper 2: Multidisciplinary Paper.  It  is expected that the writing assignments will be well written, the style is scientific writing.   1. The assignments will take revision and proof reading by a colleague is recommended.  2. All assignments must be original compositions for this class (i.e. not previously submitted to another class).   3. Detailed instructions are available on Beach Board.  Rubrics are used for all papers and are  available on Beach Board.  4. Please review them before submitting your papers to check your work for completeness. 5. The assignment must use college­level writing including spelling, verb usage and tense,  grammar, vocabulary, sentence formation and paragraph development. 6. References: APA bibliographic entries for the source and any web sources used. In text  citations are required. 7. Use the rubrics to check your work for omissions.  8. Plagiarism will not be tolerated, if in doubt cite. Direct quotations (meaning the  authors words) require quotation marks as well as citations. Please see basic APA  guidelines, and paraphrasing and quoting hints on Paper assignment instructions. Assignment Submission Assignments must be submitted to the drop box or discussion boards before due time.  It is your  responsibility to verify your assignment was submitted and to submit it in the form that Turnitin  can read, for drop box submissions. You must verify that the submission has cleared Turnitin  before the deadline. You do this by reviewing your Turnitin Report (not the drop box receipt).  If  you have submitted the wrong assignment, you can resubmit an assignment to the Mess Up drop  box before it is due, otherwise it will be graded as submitted or considered late (please see late  policy).  Please plan for “computer difficulties”.  The drop boxes (except exams) and discussion  boards are open from the start of the semester; any assignment can be submitted early. All  assignments that are submitted to the drop box must have the following format for the file name:  Last Name, first initial and assignment title.  Here is an example of a file name in Word:  Nomura_W_Paper_1.docx.  Computer error or human error is not an excused late submission.  No  assignments will be accepted by email. Percentage of total grade per requirement Rev 1/17 5HSC 425 F16 Nomura Assignment Points possible % of Grade Discussion Boards 150 15 Paper 1: Sexual Identity (1,000 words minimum) 150 15 Paper 2: Multidisciplinary (1,500 words minimum) 250 25 Open Book Chapter Quizzes  100 10 2 Exams @ 100 points each 200 20 Final Exam 150 15 Total 1000 100

We also discuss several other topics like utd email

900­100 points “A” ­ Performance of the student has been at the highest level, showing sustained  excellence in meeting all course requirements and exhibiting an unusual degree of intellectual  initiative. 800­899 points “B” ­ Performance of the student has been at a high level, showing consistent and  effective achievement in meeting course requirements. 700­799 points “C” ­ Performance of the student has been at an adequate level, meeting the basic  requirements of the course. 600­699 points “D” ­ Performance of the student has been less than adequate, meeting only the  minimum course requirements.  Below 600 points “F” ­ Performance of the student has been such that minimal course requirements  have not been met. COURSE POLICIES Statement of Non­discrimination California State University, Long Beach is committed to maintaining an inclusive learning community  that values diversity and fosters mutual respect.  All students have the right to participate fully in  university programs and activities free from discrimination, harassment, sexual violence, and retaliation. Students who believe they have been subjected to discrimination, harassment, sexual violence, or  retaliation on the basis of a protected status such as age, disability, gender, gender identity/expression,  sexual orientation, race, color, ethnicity, religion, national origin, veteran/veteran status or any other  status protected by law, should contact the Office of Equity & Diversity at (562) 985­8256, University  Student Union (USU) Suite 301, Link to Office of Equity & Diversity (http://www.csulb.edu/depts/oed/).  Statement of Accessibility All instructors shall be familiar with best practices in making their syllabus and course documents  accessible to all students and upon request provide the format need for the student.   Accommodation It is the student’s responsibility to notify the instructor in advance of the need for accommodation of a  university verified disability (PS 11­07, Course Syllabi and Standard Course Outlines). Rev 1/17 6HSC 425 F16 Nomura Students needing special consideration for class format and schedule due to religious observance or  military obligations must notify the instructor in advance of those needs. Students who require additional time or other accommodation for assignments must secure  verification/assistance from the CSULB Disabled Student Services (DSS) office located at 270 Brotman Hall.  The telephone number is (562)985.5401.  Accommodation is a process in which the student, DSS, and instructor each play an important role.   Students contact DSS so that their eligibility and need for accommodation can be determined.  DSS  identifies how much time is required for each exam.  The student is responsible for discussing his/her  need with the instructor and for making appropriate arrangements.  Students who are eligible to receive  accommodation should present an Accommodation Cover Letter and a DSS Student/Teacher Testing  Agreement Form to the instructor as early in the semester as possible, but no later than a week before  the first test.  (It takes one week to schedule taking an exam at the DSS office.)  The instructor  welcomes the opportunity to implement the accommodations determined by DSS.  Please ask the  instructor if you have any questions. Cheating and Plagiarism (CSULB Catalog, AY 2015­2016, pp. 49­51) Definition of Plagiarism Plagiarism is defined as the act of using the ideas or work of another person or persons as if they were  one's own, without giving credit to the source. Such an act is not plagiarism if it is ascertained that the  ideas were arrived at through independent reasoning or logic or where the thought or idea is common  knowledge. Acknowledge of an original author or source must be made through appropriate references,  i.e., quotation marks, footnotes, or commentary. Examples of plagiarism include, but are not limited to,  the following: the submission of a work, either in part or in whole, completed by another; failure to give  credit for ideas, statements, facts or conclusions which rightfully belong to another; in written work,  failure to use quotation marks when quoting directly from another, whether it be a paragraph, a  sentence, or even a part thereof; or close and lengthy paraphrasing of another's writing or programming.  A student who is in doubt about the extent of acceptable paraphrasing should consult the instructor.  Students are cautioned that, in conducting their research, they should prepare their notes by (a) either  quoting material exactly (using quotation marks) at the time they take notes from a source; or (b)  departing completely from the language used in the source, putting the material into their own words. In  this way, when the material is used in the paper or project, the student can avoid plagiarism resulting  from verbatim use of notes. Both quoted and paraphrased materials must be given proper citations. Definition of Cheating Cheating is defined as the act of obtaining or attempting to obtain or aiding another to obtain academic  credit for work by the use of any dishonest, deceptive or fraudulent means. Examples of cheating during an examination would include, but not be limited to the following: copying, either in part or in whole,  from another test or examination; discussion of answers or ideas relating to the answers on an  examination or test unless such discussion is specifically authorized by the instructor; giving or  receiving copies of an exam without the permission of the instructor; using or displaying notes; "cheat  Rev 1/17 7HSC 425 F16 Nomura sheets," or other information or devices inappropriate to the prescribed test conditions, as when the test  of competence includes a test of unassisted recall of information, skill, or procedure; allowing someone  other than the officially enrolled student to represent the same. Also included are plagiarism as defined  and altering or interfering with the grading procedures. It is often appropriate for students to study  together or to work in teams on projects. However, such students should be careful to avoid use of  unauthorized assistance, and to avoid any implication of cheating, by such means as sitting apart from  one another in examinations, presenting the work in a manner which clearly indicates the effort of each  individual, or such other method as is appropriate to the particular course. Academic Action “One or more of the following academic actions are available to the faculty member who finds a student has been cheating or plagiarizing. These options may be taken by the faculty member to the extent that  the faulty member considers the cheating or plagiarism to manifest the student's lack of scholarship or to reflect on the student's lack of academic performance in the course. These actions may be taken without  a request for or before the receipt of a Report from the Academic Integrity Committee. A. Review – no action. B. An oral reprimand with emphasis on counseling toward prevention of further occurrences; C. A requirement that the work be repeated; D. Assignment of a score of zero (0) for the specific demonstration of competence, resulting in the  proportional reduction of final course grade; E. Assignment of a failing final grade; F. Referral to the Office of Judicial Affairs for possible probation, suspension, or expulsion.” Attendance Policy Students may have a valid reason to miss an online­submission date. When any of the following reasons directly conflict with submission time, students are responsible for informing the instructor of the reason for the unavailability and for arranging to make up missed assignments, tests, quizzes, and work insofar  as this is possible. If the excused absence is known in advance the expectation is that the work is  submitted ahead of time. Excused absences include, but are not limited to:  A. Illness or injury to the student  B. Death, injury, or serious illness of an immediate family member or the like  C. Religious reasons (California Education Code section 89320)  D. Jury duty or government obligation  E. University sanctioned or approved activities (examples include: artistic performances, forensics  presentations, participation in research conferences, intercollegiate athletic activities, student  government, required class field trips, etc.)  Late work  Rev 1/17 8HSC 425 F16 Nomura One late written assignment will be accepted for a maximum grade of a 75%, if within one week of due date and NO credit after that time.  This excludes: quizzes, exams, extra credit, and discussion  boards. It is to your benefit to submit work on­time.  If a second assignment is submitted late the  assignment will not be graded, switching of late assignments is not permitted. Any excused deviation  from the schedule must be made prior to the assignment’s due date.  To receive full credit for any work  that is turned in late, due to an excusable absence (see below), you must submit documentation of  excusable absence such as medical excuse, funeral program, flight tickets, etc. (or copies of) to the  excused absence folder in the drop box within a week of due date.  Assignments should be turned into  the drop box early if it is known in advance that a deadline would be missed due to University events,  doctor’s appointments, work etc. Non­emergency doctor’s appointments are not excused. Withdrawal Policy Regulations governing the refund of student fees in the California State University system are  prescribed by the CSU Board of Trustees; see California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Education,  Section 41802. Withdrawal during the first two weeks of instruction:  Students may withdraw during this period and the course will not appear on their permanent records. If  the decision is made to drop the class it is the student’s responsibility to do the paperwork to drop (or  electronically).  The instructor cannot drop you except if you do not attend the first class. The deadline  to withdraw from a class without a “W” for the Spring term is February 5, 2017. Please consider if  online learning is for you during this period.  There are self­assessments on BeachBoard to help you  determine if the online learning environment is for you. Withdrawal after the second week Withdrawal after the second week of instruction and prior to the final three weeks of the regular  semester (20% of a non­standard session) of instruction: Withdrawals during this period are permissible  only for serious and compelling reasons.  The approval signatures of the instructor and department chair  are required.  The request and approvals shall state the reasons for the withdrawal.  Students should be  aware that the definition of "serious and compelling reasons" as applied by faculty and administrators  may become narrower as the semester progresses.  Failure to do well in the course is not considered a  reason for withdraw. Copies of such approvals are kept on file by Enrollment Services.  Withdrawal during the final three weeks of instruction Withdrawal during the final three weeks of instruction are not permitted except in cases such as accident or serious illness where the circumstances causing the withdrawal are clearly beyond the student's  control and the assignment of an Incomplete is not practical.  Ordinarily, withdrawal in this category  will involve total withdrawal from the campus except that a Credit/No Credit grade or an Incomplete  may be assigned for other courses in which sufficient work has been completed to permit an evaluation  to be made.  Request for permission to withdraw under these circumstances must be made in writing on  forms available from Enrollment Services.  The requests and approvals shall state the reasons for the  withdrawal.  These requests must be approved by the instructor of record, department chair (or  designee), college dean (or designee), and the academic administrator appointed by the president to act  in such matters.  Copies of such approvals are kept on file by Enrollment Services. Limits on Withdrawal No undergraduate student may withdraw from more than a total of 18 units.  This restriction extends  throughout the entire undergraduate enrollment of a student at CSULB for a single graduation, including Rev 1/17 9HSC 425 F16 Nomura special sessions, enrollment by extension, and re­enrolling after separation from the University for any  reason.  The following exceptions apply: ∙ Withdrawals prior to the end of the second week of a semester (13%) of instruction at CSULB, ∙ Withdrawals in terms prior to fall 2009 at CSULB, ∙ Withdrawals at institutions other than CSULB, and ∙ Withdrawals at CSULB for exceptional circumstances such as serious illness or accident (the  permanent academic record will show these as a WE to indicate the basis for withdrawal). Medical Withdrawal CSULB may allow a student to withdraw without academic penalty from classes if the following criteria are met: ∙ A completed Medical Withdrawal Form, including any required documentation, is submitted to  Enrollment Services before the end of the semester, and ∙ The student presents evidence to demonstrate that a severe medical or debilitating psychological  condition prevented the student from attending and/or doing the required work of the courses to the  extent that it was impossible to complete the courses. Campus Behavior Civility Statement California State University, Long Beach, takes pride in its tradition of maintaining a civil and non violent learning, working, and social environment. Civility and mutual respect toward all members of  the University community are intrinsic to the establishment of excellence in teaching and learning. They also contribute to the maintenance of a safe and productive workplace and overall healthy campus  climate. The University espouses and practices zero tolerance for violence against any member of the  University community (i.e., students, faculty, staff, administrators, and visitors). Violence and threats of  violence not only disrupt the campus environment, they also negatively impact the University’s ability  to foster open dialogue and a free exchange of ideas among all campus constituencies (CSULB Catalog,  AY 2015­2016, p. 855). Preferred Gender Pronoun This course affirms people of all gender expressions and gender identities. If you prefer to be called a  different name than what is on the class roster, please let me know. Feel free to correct me on your  preferred gender pronoun. You may also change you name for BeachBoard and MyCSULB without a  legal name change, to submit a request go to MyCSULB/Personal Information/Names. If you have any  questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me. Accommodations for Religious Holidays & Military Service Students needing special consideration for class schedules due to religious observance or military  obligations must notify the instructor at least one week in advance, for those established religious  observances the instructor should be notified during the first week of instruction.  Classroom Expectations All students of the California State University system must adhere to the Student Conduct Code as  stated in Section 41301 of the Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations as well as all campus rules,  Rev 1/17 10HSC 425 F16 Nomura regulations, codes and policies.  Students as emerging professionals are expected to maintain courtesy,  respect for difference, and respect for the rights of others  Unprofessional and Disruptive Behavior It is important to foster a climate of civility in the classroom where all are treated with dignity and  respect.  Therefore, students engaging in disruptive or disrespectful behavior in class will be counseled  about this behavior.  If the disruptive or disrespectful behavior continues, additional disciplinary actions  may be taken. Rev 1/17 11HSC 425 F16 Nomura Tentative Semester Schedule Fall 2017 Due dates may change day of the week, please be sure you look at the due date and not assume it is due on a particular day of the week (see  week before spring break and finals).  There are also some allowances made for getting the text book in beginning of the term.   All assignments are due at 5:00 PM on the date listed. Wee k Dates 2017 Module Drop Box BB Assignment & due date Reading Chapter Quizzes BB  Due Date: Quiz Discussion Board Forum Initia l post due 2 Response posts due 1. 1/23­1/30 1) Perspectives of Human  Sexuality

1

1 1/27  1/30 2. 1/31/­2/6 1) Perspectives & Writing  Skills

2

2 2/2 2/6 3. 2/7­2/13 2) Anatomy

3 & 4 2/13: Ch1­4, APA  & Plagiarism 3 2/9 2/13 4. 2/14­2/20 3) Sexual Identity Paper 1: 2/20 5

4 2/16 2/20 5. 2/21­2/27 3) Sexual Identity

6 & 7 2/27: Ch 5­7 5 2/23 2/27 6. 2/28­3/6 Exam 1

3/6: Exam 1 Thesis 3/2 3/6 7. 3/7­3/13 4) Relationships

8

8. 3/14­3/20 4) Relationships

9 3/20: Ch 8­9 6 3/16 3/20 9. 3/20­3/26  5) Reproduction

11

7 3/24 3/26

3/27­4/3 Spring Break No Class

10. 4/4­4/10 5) Reproduction

12 4/10: Ch 11­12

11. 4/11­4/17 Exam 2 Thesis/Outline/Sources Paper 2: 4/13

4/17: Exam 2

12. 4/18­4/24 6) Sexual Pathology Paper 2: 4/24 13 & 14

8 4/20 4/24 13. 4/25­5/1 6) Sexual Pathology

15 & 16 5/1: Ch 13­16 9 4/27 5/1 14. 5/2­5/8 7) Sexual Practices Extra Credit: 5/8  10 & 17

10 5/4 5/8 15. 5/9­5/14  7) Sexual Practices

18 5/14: Ch 10, 17­18

16. 5/15­5/17 Finals

5/17 Final Exam

Rev 1/17HSC 425 F16 Nomura Highlighted dates do not fall on a Monday or a Thursday or as expected due to holidays and finals schedule. Suggestion:  Print this page out and keep handy so you do not have to turn on the computer to be aware of Due Dates!! Rev 1/17HSC 425 F16 Nomura Module Chapter Assignments 1) Perspectives of  Sexuality Ch 1 Perspectives on Human  Sexuality Ch 2 Studying Human Sexuality Chapters Quizzes & Reading: 1 & 2, APA & Plagiarism Discussion Forum: 1 & 2 Lectures/Videos:  Academic Writing Presentation (18 mins) Lesson on History of Sex (22 mins) Lesson on Researching Sex (20 mins) Video: History of Sex (choose one film from options in Content) 2) Anatomy &  Physiology Ch 3 Female Sexual Anatomy,  Physiology & Response Ch 4 Male Sexual anatomy,  Physiology & Response Chapters Quizzes & Reading: 3 & 4 Discussion Forum: 3 Lectures/Videos: Lessons Anatomy Part 1 (17 mins) & Part 2 (11 mins) Lesson Sexual Response [PDF or Power Point (ADA accessible) read  only] Videos: Don’t Die Young Series 2: The Male Reproductive Organs (29  mins) and The Female Reproductive Organs (30 mins) 3) Sexual Identity Ch 5 Gender and Gender Roles Ch 6 Sexuality in Childhood and  Adolescence Ch 7 Sexuality in Adulthood. Chapters Quizzes & Reading: 5, 6, & 7 Discussion Forum: 4 & 5 Lectures/Videos: Lesson on Gender Roles [PDF or Power Point (ADA accessible) read  only] Lesson on Sex Orientation (17 mins) Lesson on Sexual Development Part 1 (13 mins) & Part 2 (15 mins) Video: Dr. Money & the boy with no penis (50 mins) or The Role of  Gender (27 mins) Video: Still Killing Us Softly 4 (40mins) or Miss Representation  (70mins) Video: Tough Guise 2 (Abridged) Violence, Manhood & American  Culture (55 Mins)

Rev 1/17HSC 425 F16 Nomura Rev 1/17HSC 425 Paper 1 Human Sexuality Paper 1: Sexual Identity ∙ Write a page minimum 1,000 words (excluding title page, references, & charts/graphics/tables).  ∙ Submit to the Turnitin in Beach Board’s digital drop box for paper 1.  Do not attach rubric. ∙ Please see the APA citation information and paraphrasing and quoting guidelines at the end of this  document and the PowerPoint on Academic Writing. Formatting & Requirements:  1. Minimum length 1,000 Words excluding title page and references. Note: This is a minimum  requirement; to get a C you must write 1,000 words, padding the paper with long quotes will hurt your  grade. Include the word count on your title page. 2. Formatting:  ∙ Typed, double spaced, Times Roman font, 1 inch margins, font size 12. ∙ The entire assignment should be strictly double­spaced, with no additional space before or after  each line (check you paragraph settings).  ∙ Title page must include your name, section number, assignment name, title, and word count. ∙ Papers must have left hand running headers with your name (not the title of the paper) and page  numbers, on every page. This is in the header not the body of the document. ∙ Subject headings are required and should indicate the subject that will follow. APA format is  each heading should be centered, boldfaced. You do not need a heading for your introduction. 3. Writing Style: ∙ Needs to have & introduction, body & conclusion (one introduction and conclusion for the entire  paper).  Format should be essay not question answer. Paragraphs should be well developed. ∙ The assignment must use college­level writing including spelling, verb usage and tense,  grammar, vocabulary, sentence formation and paragraph development. ∙ Voice is personal. It is appropriate to use “I”.  ∙ Do not use generalizations (see below) 4. References:  ∙ APA in text citations and bibliographic entries for sources are required. Please be advised that  APA generators such as Refworks and Endnote do make mistakes and you are responsible for  proofreading the references. ∙ References should be scholarly  o include an author and a date (no date is not an academic source) o DO NOT USE Wikipedia or Pro/Con.  o All statistics, facts and ideas of others must be cited and referenced ∙ Plagiarism will not be tolerated, if in doubt cite. Direct quotations (meaning the authors  words) require quotation marks as well as citations.  Direct quotations should be very limited  paraphrasing is preferred. 5. Use the rubric to check your work for omissions. DO NOT ATTACH TO PAPER. 6. Submission:  ∙ Name you file: LastName_FirstName_Paper1.docx ∙ Please submit paper timely to avoid “computer malfunctions”; it can be done any time in the  semester before the due date. ∙ To access Turnitin go to BeachBoard and find the Paper 1 drop box (do not go to the Turnitin  website). Your submission will be submitted by the drop box to Turnitin for plagiarism detection. You are only allowed a single submission.  Rev 7/16HSC 425 Paper 1 ∙ Please submit as a .doc or .docx if possible. If not htlm or PDf files can be submitted. Turnitin  can only read MSWord, Word Perfect PostScrip, Acrobat PDF, HTML, RIF and Plain text  files.  It is your responsibility to be sure it is a file type that it can read, and that the submission  has gone through.  Papers not accepted by Turnitin will be considered late.  The drop box will not tell you if Turnitin can read it.  Double check that your paper has been submitted by reviewing  your Turnitin report (not BeachBoard receipt).   ∙ If you need to resubmit for any reason­­submit to the late/mess up drop box before the due date,  be sure to include the reason for the submission in this drop box in the text box along with your  submission. ∙ BeachBoard help may be acquired through the Technology Help Desk (562.985.4959 or  helpdesk@csulb.edu). Learning Objectives 1. Application of information and concepts presented in class to personal awareness of gender and sexual  identity. 2. Practice writing a coherent essay that is based on multiple points of analysis. 3. Critically view a source of an opposing view. General Instructions Write an essay on your personal philosophy of sexual identity. There are several topics that you need to  review; religion, gender roles, media and relationships. How much of a focus is given to each topic is up to  your personal experience. You are not required to answer every question listed, but rather they are there as  a starting point for your exploration of your personal views. Part two (separate part, not integrated but same paper) of the paper consist of looking at a legal issue, there are several legal issues listed, you need to  explore one. For the legal issue you pick you must include 2 scholarly sources one supporting your view  and one opposing your view (they must be opposing views not just facts). Do not pick a topic that you  cannot objectively look at both sides. This paper should not be a question answer format but rather an  essay. This is a single paper with two different writing styles (personal and research) but should have one  introduction and one reference list. For clarity, the following definitions are the ones to be used in your paper (so not substitute with definitions from your text or other sources), do not to state them, you need to understand them and use the terms  appropriately in your paper: Sexual Identity­ and individual’s sexual orientation, gender identity, gender roles, sexual preferences and how they define their individual sexuality Sexual Orientation­Erotic and romantic attraction to one or both sexes (heterosexual, bisexual,  homosexual or asexual) Gender roles­are culturally defined behaviors, attitudes, emotions, traits, mannerisms, appearances and  occupations that are seen as appropriate for males and females Gender identity – a person’s view of herself or himself as female or male Topics Rev 7/16HSC 425 Paper 1 Part 1: Personal View All four topics required (hint here are four of your subject headings) Religion: ∙ How has your religion (or spiritualty) affected your sexuality?  o I was raised in a Christian home. I went to private Christian school my entire life until I  started at Long Beach State. In the Christian faith it is a sin to be involved sexually with a  member of the same sex. It is not allowed to show sexual relations between member of the  same sex in most private schools. This had an affect on my sexual identity because I was  unaware of how common same­sex couples were. I did not know that it was accepted in  society to be gay or bisexual since I never saw it at school. When I came to Long Beach  State there were same sex couples all over campus. At first I was in a state of culture  shock. It did not bother me because I am against the concept, it just was a shock to me that  people were so open about it.  ∙ Are there issues of sexuality where you disagree with your religion? If so how do you rectify your  personal opinion with the doctrines of your religion? o Just because I practice Christianity does not mean that I agree with every part of it. I do not believe that those who are part of the LGBT community should be shunned. Not all  Christian churches ban LGBT members, but some do. I believe that each person should be  able to love whomever he or she chooses. No one can tell us who to love and we should be  free to choose. It is a sin to be gay, but it is also a sin to lie. Religious people look down  upon people for being gay but then if someone lies it is not a big deal. All sins are equal  and should be treated that way.  Gender Roles: (Reminder gender role is not sexual orientation) ∙ How has your culture and family upbringing influenced your gender role today?  o My family has a traditional view of gender roles. When I was growing up my mother  stayed at home with my brothers and I while my dad worked. My mother wasn’t viewd as  masculine in any way and my father was the one who handed out punishments.  ∙ Are there any other outside influences that have shaped your gender role? o My parents got a divorce when I was in high school and it changed my view on gender  roles greatly. My mother became both the father and mother in the household because my  father left. My mother did not do well at this and I became more of the masculine figure in  the house. I was the one who did the hard house work and I gave out punishments to my  brothers. I worked and helped pay the bills, just like a father should. I personally see  myself as both masculine and feminine. I raised myself for the most part through high  school and developed a strong masculine side to protect my family since my father was not around. I wish that I had the chance to be more feminine and did not have to grow up so  fast.  Media: [media includes television, movies, ads, and print (magazines, books, etc.)] ∙ How has the media influenced your personal sexuality on how you feel about modesty, body  image, premarital sex, infidelity, and atypical sexual behaviors?  o Growing up in a Christian home and school, modesty was common. The only way that I  saw or heard about sex and nudity was through media. Since I was sheltered and my  mother filtered what I watched on television, it made me more interested in infidelity and  the LGBT community. Watching the show Secret Life of the American Teenager changed  my views on a lot of topics. I did not know that it was seen as normal to be gay. I was  unaware of how common infidelity and cheating was. When watching this show and others it opened my mind to the world around me. It made me question my personal views and  Rev 7/16HSC 425 Paper 1 pre­mature judgments I have made. If it were not for watching these shows when I was  growing up, the culture shock in college would have been more of a struggle for me.  I have always had issues with body image. I used to read a lot of magazines such  as Teen Vogue and Seventeen magazines. These magazines made me judge myself a lot  harder than I had before. I wore uniforms in school so I never saw how my classmates  dressed outside of school. The magazines showed me how people dress and it made me  want to dress and look like them. When I was younger, I did not realize that the models in  magazines and advertisements were usually edited. I had an unrealistic view of what I  strived to look like.  Relationships:  ∙ What are your personal expectations from relationships?   I have high expectations in any relationship I put myself into. I have a lot of  acquaintances but I try to keep my close friend group small and selective. When it  comes to romantic relationships, I choose carefully. I am not one to date. I have  had three long­term relationships. I do not believe in wasting time with someone if  you do not see a future with him. The goal of romantic relationships is to  eventually get married, if you do not see yourself marrying someone then you are  wasting each others time. I have different issues when it comes to relationships and friendships. Since I lost my dad when I was young and raised myself for the most  part, I have control and attachment issues. I tend to spend all of my time with my  significant other and it causes problems. I also do not like being told what to do  and have to be in control. Being a woman dating a man, that causes conflicts. The  man needs to feel that he is needed but if I do everything myself he feels useless.  My last relationship ended in a very intense heartbreak for me. This is the longest I have been single in my life and I still struggle with being alone every day. I do not  date or go out with men because I am now terrified of becoming attached. The pain that was inflicted on me seven months ago is an experience I never want to go  through again. Because of this experience, I am now completely guarded and do  not let anyone get past first­base. I have not slept with a man since my boyfriend  and I broke up. I cannot fathom having sex with someone I do not love. The  “hook­up” lifestyle of our society is a topic I will never fully comprehend. I  understand that you can have sex with someone without loving him, but to me it is  not worth it. Each time you sleep with someone you leave a piece of yourself with  him/her and you only have so many pieces to give. I concluded that I would rather  be alone than risk going through this process again. I know that one day I will try  again, but it will not be for a long time. I need to focus on myself and find  happiness in myself before I try to make someone else happy again.  Part 2: Legal Issue Choose one of the following issues.  It should be introduced in your introduction and included in your  conclusion.  You need two opposing (one pro and one con) views with academic sources of the view. Abortion: ∙ Look at abortion from different perspectives of yourself. What is your legal perspective? What is  your religious/spiritual perspective? What is your personal perspective (what would you do if you  had an unplanned pregnancy)?  ∙ How are these perspectives a part of you?  ∙ Should personal and religious views be the standpoint for law? Rev 7/16HSC 425 Paper 1 Abortion notes: ∙ “The abortion rates are arguably the most controversial and politicized of all the women’s  reproductive health outcomes.” Page 610 ∙ (CITE) It is proven that economic, political, and religious factors affect women’s choices when it  comes to abortion.  ∙ Kimball, R., & Wissner, M. (2015). Religion, Poverty, and Politics: Their Impact on  Women's Reproductive Health Outcomes. Public Health Nursing, 32(6), 598­612.  doi:10.1111/phn.12196 ∙ STETTNER, S., & DOUVILLE, B. (2016). "In the Image and Likeness of God":  Christianity and Public Opinion on Abortion in The Globe and Mail during the 1960s.  Journal Of Canadian Studies, 50(1), 179­213. CHINN, S. (2015). UNIVERSAL ARGUMENTS AND PARTICULAR ARGUMENTS ON  ABORTION RIGHTS. Maryland Law Review, 75(1), 247­270. Basic APA Citation Matkovich, S. (2012). APA made easy (3rd ed.). Dacono, CO: www.YouVersusTheWrold.com.  CSULB Library Style Manuals and Citation Methods: APA & Plagiarism: Understanding Plagiarism  (2016). Retrieved from Library Style Guides (http://csulb.libguides.com/style) (see individual tabs) Purdue University. (2016). The OWL at Purdue: APA Style. Retrieved from The Owl at Purdue (https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/) In-text citations:  For articles and books cite author(s) last name(s), year of publication, page numbers. If it is 6 or more  authors use et al. If you have 3 or more authors after the first citation use 1st authors name and et al, after  the initial citation.  If you use the author(s) names in the text just give date and page numbers. Periods go  after the citation and quotation marks do not enclose the citation. Examples: (Jones & Smith, 2011, p. 234).   (Jones et al., 2011, p. 234).   According to Jones and Smith (2011) “direct quote here” (p 234). For electronic sources give the authors name and publication date or date website was last updated, if it is a PDF with page numbers cite as above for books and journals.  If there is no author use the sponsor of the  web site or name of web site. Examples: (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2011). (WebMD, 2012) Reference List Listed in Alphabetical order, under the title References (realize the references will not be included in page  count), use a hanging indent of 5 spaces. For every citation in the text there must be a corresponding  reference and vice versa. The preferred method for citing journal articles follows, use the DOI if available. Ledema, J., Cooks, L., & Keuzendamp, S. (2010). Multiple dimensions of attitudes about homosexuality.  Journal of Homosexuality, 57(2), 123­134. doi:10.1080/00918369.2010.517069 Journal Article No DOI available: Rev 7/16HSC 425 Paper 1 Sayegh, M. A. (2011). Teen pregnancy in Texas: 2005­2015. Maternal Child Health J 14, 94­101.  Retrieved from http://www.ebscohost.com.mee1.library.csulb.edu/  Books:  Koop, C. E., & Johnson, T. (1992). Let’s talk. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House. Web sites (remove hyperlinks, use sponsor of web site if no author is available):  Giacobbe, A. (n.d.). Alyssa giacobbe: Writer + editor. Retrieved from  http://alyssagiacobbe.com/About.html WebMD. (2012). Breast Cancer Health Center: Symptoms & types. Retrieved May 8, 2012, from  http://www.webmd.com/breast­cancer/guide/breast­cancer­symptoms­and­types Videos: Laureate Education. (Producer). (Year). Name of program [Webinar].  Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu Quoting, Summarizing and paraphrasing Quotations For this assignment quotations should be kept to a minimum, and only used when alternative phrasing  changes the meaning or when the direct quotation is needed to support your critique.  Guidelines for quoting: 1. Quotes should be short, enclosed in quotation marks and cited. 2. Quotes should be well integrated into your sentence structure, if you have to adjust the text to fit into a  sentence use ellipses (…) to indicated that words were omitted from the quotation and bracket to  indicated that a word has been changed (example.: [was], for will). 3. Long quotations put in block format are not appropriate for this assignment as you should summarize  the article. Summarizing and paraphrasing Summarizing and paraphrasing are essential skills for academic writing, especially in a critical review of  research. To summarize means to reduce a text to its main points and it most important ideas.  The best way to summarize is to: 1. Scan the text.  Look for information that can be deduced for the introduction, conclusion and the title  and headings. What do these tell you about the main points of the article? 2. Locate the topic sentences and highlight the main points as you read. 3. Reread the text and make separate notes of the main points. Examples and evidence do not need to be  included in the summary; they are usually used selectively in your critique. Paraphrasing means putting someone else’s phrases into your own words.  They still require citations as  the words are yours but the ideas are someone else’s. Substituting synonyms for the original author’s words doesn’t make the passage yours, and is considered plagiarism. Paraphrasing offers an alternative to using  direct quotations in your summary and critique. The best way to paraphrase is to: 1. Review your summary notes. 2. Rewrite them in your own words and in complete sentences. 3. Use reporting verbs and phrases (example; the authors describe…, Cole argues that…). 4. If you include exact, unique or specialist phrasing from the text, use quotation marks around those  phrases. 5. Make sure there is a smooth transition from your voice to sources point of view. Rev 7/16Gender and Gender Roles THIS PRESENTATION IS READ ONLY. PLEASE PROGRESS THROUGH THE SLIDES  AT YOUR OWN PACE. I SUGGEST YOU WATCH THE FILM; SEX UNKNOWN  FIRST.Gender & Gender Roles Take a look at these babies—which ones are boys and which are girls?Sex verses Gender • Sex and Gender are frequently used as synonyms in  our culture but they do have different meanings. • Sex - the biological aspects of being male or female • Gender - the behavioral, psychological and social characteristics associated with being male or  female • You can teach or modify gender, you can’t modify  sex without surgery.8 Definitions or Dimensions of Sex/Gender Definition MALE FEMALE 1. Chromosomes XY XX 2. Gonads testes ovaries 3. Hormones Androgens Testosterone (mostly) Estrogens/progestin (mostly) 4. Internal Sexual Accessory Organs Prostate, vas deferens,  ejaculatory duct, seminal vesicle Uterus, fallopian tubes 5. External Sex organs penis, scrotal sac clitoris, vagina 6. Rearing “It’s a boy” "It's a girl" 7. Identity _X__ Male ___Female ___ Male __X_ Female 8. Gender Role Masculine behavior Feminine behavior

Look at these 8 definitions  of sex and gender. 1-5 are  definitions of sex and 6-8  are definitions of gender.  For most people they are  somewhat congruent.Some Key Take Away Points From Sex Unknown • What is the relationship between sex and gender? • Is gender more genetics and biology Nature • Or is it instead more social environment Nurture • Dr. John Money & the Bruce/Brenda story • Intersex is the term now used for those who are born with indefinite gender.  • The treatment of intersexed children with sex change operations often makes the  decision for the child before they reach puberty if they want to look normal or be able  to have biological children. Some intersexed are sterile but not all.  • David Reimer story being published as a success before he reached puberty, Foot Note • David Reimer committed suicide in 2004. His  mother suffered from depression and his  brother had overdosed on drugs 2 years before.  David had attempted suicide in his young adult  years as well and had bouts of depression most  of his life. It will never be known if his traumatic  experience as a child was the main cause of his  suicide but it was defiantly a contributing factor.  Some close to him say he often brooded on his  childhood experiences, and complained that he  was not really a man to his wife.When Gender Is Ambiguous: Intersexed • Sex Chromosomal abnormalities include Turner syndrome and Klinefelter  syndrome. • Hormonal disorders include androgen insensitivity syndrome, congenital  adrenal hyperplasia, and DHT deficiency. • Maternal hormone exposure: medications or androgen excessGender Roles versus Gender Traits • Gender Roles are culturally defined behaviors, attitudes, emotions, traits,  mannerisms, appearances and occupations that are seen as appropriate for males  and females.  • Gender Traits are biologically determined differences between males and females.  • There are some learning differences that are believed to be gender traits.  • Girls generally acquire language  • boys are better at visual spatial tasks (math).  • may be some inherent brain differences, but that these differences are often exaggerated by  socialization • Girls trained on Tetras improved their scores to match the males showing that environment  can influence some gender traitsSex, Gender, and Gender Roles • Although our culture encourages us to think that men and women are  “opposite” sexes, they are more similar than dissimilar. Some are advocating for  the term different gender instead of opposite gender. • Innate gender differences are generally minimal; differences are encouraged by  socialization. • Androgyny--Combines female and male traits into a more flexible pattern of  behavior. • Relationships between two androgynous individuals tend to be more rewarding  than relationships between feminine women & masculine men, when compared  to relationships between more gender polarized couples in Western culture.Environmental Influences on Gender ▪ Parents - most important source of learning in early childhood. They have  expectancies for their children based on their gender, and direct them into  gender appropriate activities. ▪ Teachers - early role models, often spend more waking hours with children than  do their parents. ▪ Peers - provide and encourage gender-role norms ▪ Media – influences almost continuously not just  what parents have control over.Gender Bias and Toys • The toy department is probably the most gender  biased place in town.  • Lets start with Barbie. She was originally designed  as a collector doll for young women.  • Compare her to Rescue Heroes designed for boys  the same age of girls playing with Barbie.  • So these toys teach boys to be rough and tough and  the girls to be soft and gentle.Teachers • Can reinforce and strengthen gender-based attitudes in the  culture. All teachers are different but they have found that they  often • Involve disruptive boys more in classroom activities • They punish girls faster for being disruptive • Encourage boys to think longer • There has been a change in the classroom to less hands on  activity which may favor girls who are more likely to be visual and  auditory learnersPeers • Peer pressure to conform to gender norms  can be very strong; they use praise,  imitation, and other indicators of approval • Gender differences in friendships • Boys tend to have larger groups of friends • Girls tend to have fewer but closer friendshipsMedia• Media Types • Advertisement • Music • Television • Movies • Magazines • Internet • Media is frequently presenting false norms. That leave many young people  feeling that they are not normal if they don’t live up with the images they  see portrayed. Women and Family Life • Traditional role is that primary satisfaction/identity  should be as wife and mother • Modern thought also insists on a career outside of the  home • Often feel guilt for not adequately meeting both  demands • Even in families where the female works as many hours  as the male she is generally more responsible for  household tasks and childcare.Men and Family Life • Fathers spend less time with their infants than  mothers, often not exposed to young children  prior to fatherhood. • Stay-at-home dads are becoming more common,  but social pressure suggests they should be in  the work force and labels them as “unemployed” • Less support for stay at home dads. Consider the  common toddler groups called “Mommy & Me” • More dads are becoming involved in home life  and chores.The Senior Years • Female with typical wife/mother role may experience  “empty nest syndrome” • Adjustment required at retirement if a large part of identity  was related to work, often a bigger problem for males. • More relaxed gender roles.  • roles of parents and breadwinners diminish • gender roles more relaxed • Medical issues often result in switching of jobs out of necessityGender Identity Definitions ▪ Gender identity – a person’s view of herself or himself as female or male ▪ Gender dysphoria – having one’s gender identity inconsistent with one’s  biological sex. ▪ Gender Identity Disorders (GID) – a transsexual who experiences high levels  of distress about being “trapped in the other gender’s body” ▪ Transgender – Individuals whose gender identity varies from their biological  sex. Now often used as a broad term to include all variations of gender  identity. ▪ Transsexual – A transgender person who has transitioned or is transitioning  from his or her biological sex to his or her self-identified gender through  actions, dress, hormone therapy, or surgery.Transgenderism: Living as the Other Sex • 10-15% of the population • Live the other gender’s role, full/part-time • Happy as their biological sex, but psychosocially pleasure dressing as the other sex  or living the role of the other sex • Relaxing and peaceful to cross-dress for some • Many women throughout history had to live as men for occupational reasons,  unknown if they were really transgendered or transsexuals or just wanted to be free  from male oppression. • “Tom” boys can be classified in this category because they are outside of the cultural  norms. What is transgendered in one culture may not be in a different culture.Billy Tipton • Billy Tipton was a well-known jazz pianist and saxophonist who  was discovered to be a female when he died in 1989. At the  time few women were jazz instrumentalists. • Adopted sons never knew until his death that really was a  female. Transsexualism: When Gender & Biology Don’t Agree • Feel their gender identity does not match their biological sex (Gender Dysphoria) • “Trapped” in the wrong body • More males than females experience this • Best practice for sex reassignment surgery  • psychological counseling • live as the other sex 1 year; name, dress, restroom use • hormones, multiple surgeries for secondary sex characteristics as well as for genitals  • Male to female: realistic results, orgasm more likely, been around longer and done more  often. • Female to male: still somewhat experimental  • Surgery not done to have sex but rather to feel whole. Transsexuals may be  heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual and many are asexual.Female to Male SurgeryMale to female surgeryNative American • Many cultures see gender as more fluid.  • Often accepting males in female roles • Sometimes considered two spirits having a shaman persona. • Other times completely accepted as the other gender • The Zuni Man-Woman reveals an American West strikingly  different from “cowboy-and-Indian” stereotypes. It was a  frontier of gender as well as culture, where an ambitious  woman like Matilda Stevenson could prove herself the equal  of men and where a visionary like Frank Cushing could find  the meaning of life by “going Native.” And it was a frontier  where a man dressed as a woman could earn the respect and  admiration of Indians and non-Indians alike.  A berdache of the Zuni Indians: These men dress And live as women in the tribesSex, Gender, and Gender Roles • Masculine and feminine stereotypes  assume heterosexuality. • If men or women do not fit the  stereotypes, they are likely to be  considered gay or lesbian. • Gay men and lesbians, however, are as  likely as heterosexuals to be masculine or  feminine.
Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here