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cs105 stanford

cs105 stanford

Description

School: Stanford University
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course: Intro to Computers
Professor: Patrick young
Term: Fall 2017
Tags: Computing
Cost: Free
Name: Computer 1
Description: READ WELL FOR IT TRAINS YOU ON HOW TO USE YOUR PC
Uploaded: 08/20/2017
60 Pages 85 Views 0 Unlocks
Reviews



1: Sending and receiving emailWhat is email?




2: Searching the internetWhy usea search engine?




2: Searching the internetWhy use a search engine?



start here A beginner’s guide to using computers and the internet Beginner’s Guideclick each section below Contents Introduction •  Welcome  1 1. Using a computer 1.1 Switching on your computer 3  1.2 Using a mouse 5  1.3 Desktop and icons 10     1.4 Using a keyboard 16 2. Using the internet 2.1 What the internet is 21  Don't forget about the age old question of usf organic chemistry
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2.2 Searching the internet 27  2.3 Staying safe online 32 3. Using email 3.1 Sending and receiving email 37 4. Further help for beginners 4.1 Jargon Buster – a glossary of useful terms 45  4.2 Know the basics? Want to learn more? 49     4.3  More places to get help 50content page WelcomeIf you think computers and the internet are not for you, you’re not alone. If you think you’re too old or too stupid to use it, you’re not alone. There are millions of people who feel the same way. Computers and the internet have become  a part of everyday life – from staying in touch with friends and family and sharing photographs to booking holidays and doing your shopping online. It’s all really useful… if you know how! That is why the BBC has created this guide to help those people who have never used  a computer or the internet to understand  and enjoy the benefits they offer. It takes you step-by-step through the very basics like using a mouse and a keyboard, through to searching the internet and  sending emails. To help you practise these new skills, a number of the topics include links to interactive activities on the BBC WebWise website. As your confidence grows, you will be able to download more topics from the First Click website to include in your guide. It really is easier than you think… so get ready to take your first click. Disclaimer: The BBC has created First Click materials to help support local partners to run beginners’ courses to using computers  and the internet. The courses where these materials will be used will not be run or delivered by the BBC. 1 content page 1: Using a computer 1.1 Switching on your computer 1.2 Using a mouse 1.3 Desktop and icons 1.4 Using a keyboard“I really want to use the internet, but I need to get to grips with some  computer basics 1: Using a computer content page 1.1: Switching on your computerThis is a basic introduction to  different types of computers and how to switch them on. This section covers: • Switching on a computer • The difference between a desktop  computer and a laptop To switch your computer on, you need to press the  power button. 1. Using a computer 3 content page 1.1: Switching on your computerThe main difference between a desktop and a laptop is that a laptop is smaller and  portable. Laptops also have a touchpad which can be used instead of a mouse but you can connect a mouse to a laptop if you prefer. Monitor Desktop  computer Keyboard Laptop Mouse Touchpad 1. Using a computer 4 content page 1.2: Using a mouseThis section is all about the mouse and  how you use it to control your computer. This section covers: • What a mouse is for • How to hold a mouse • How to use a mouse to select, open and move items  on your computer What you need to have covered already: • Switching on your computer  1. Using a computer 5 content page 1.2: Using a mouseWhat a mouse is for A mouse is one of the main  ways to control your computer. Most mouse designs have two  buttons – a left button and a  right button. A mouse needs to be flat on a surface with the end with the  buttons pointing towards the  computer. Most people find it easier to position the mouse  to the side of the keyboard. To hold the mouse you rest  your hand over it and put your  index finger on the left button and rest your thumb on the side. If you are left-handed you may  find it easier to put the mouse on the left-hand side of your  keyboard and use your middle  finger for the left button. 1. Using a computer 6 content page 1.2: Using a mouseWhat a mouse is for You only need to use the  left button for this section.  If you click on the right button  – don’t worry. Just click on  the left button again. When you move the mouse  it moves a pointer or ‘cursor’  on the screen. The cursor will change shape  depending on what you are  doing. 1. Using a computer 7 content page 1.2: Using a mouseGetting to know your mouse An arrow lets you select things  and move them around. A hand lets you open a link on  the internet. An hourglass (if using Windows  Vista this will appear as a  revolving circle) is asking you  to wait while the computer  does a task. 1. Using a computer 8 content page 1.2: Using a mouseUsing the mouse to do tasks You can use your mouse to do  a variety of tasks – select things,  open things and move things. To select things, move your  cursor over the item, click once  with the left button and let go. To open things click twice on  the left button – think ‘knock,  knock’ on a door. To move things, you need to  ‘drag and drop’. Hold down  the left button as you ‘drag’  the mouse along. Let go of  the button once you have  positioned the item where  you want it. You can practise your mouse  skills with the BBC WebWise  game, Clicky Mouse.  Your course leader can help  you find it and get star ted with the game. www.bbc.co.uk/firstclick 1. Using a computer 9 content page 1.3: Desktop and iconsGetting to know your desktop and icons This section is all about explaining what you see when you turn your computer on. This section covers: • What you will find on your desktop • Where to find your star t button, taskbar, menu bar  and toolbar • How to move between  windows • How to hide a window, make  a window bigger and close a  window What you need to have covered already: • Switching on your computer • Using a mouse A desktop is what you see when  the computer is turned on. When you open programs  or files they appear on your desktop.  From your desktop, you can  use shor tcuts to find files and programs on your computer. An icon represents a file, folder or program. Icons look different for each  type of file or program. 1. Using a computer 10 content page 1.3: Desktop and iconsGetting to know your desktop and icons The start button lets you open  programs and files on your computer. The taskbar shows which  programs and folder or  documents you have open. 1. Using a computer 11 content page 1.3: Desktop and iconsGetting to know your folders and windows A folder stores files such as documents or pictures. When you open a folder or  file by clicking twice on it with your mouse, its contents will  appear in a window. You can use the scroll bars to  move around the window. 1. Using a computer 12 content page 1.3: Desktop and iconsGetting to know your folders and windows The title bar displays the name  of the folder, document or  program. The menu bar has commands  where you choose what to do  with your folder, document or  program. The tool bar has shortcuts  to the commands in the  menu bar. 1. Using a computer 13 content page 1.3: Desktop and iconsMoving between windows You can have more than one  window open at a time. The active window has a  highlighted title bar and is in  front of the other windows. The open windows are  displayed as buttons on the  taskbar. The active window  button will be a different colour. To move between windows  click on a window or on the  button on the taskbar. 1. Using a computer 14 content page 1.3: Desktop and iconsMoving between windows To hide a window, click on the  minimise button in the top  right hand corner. To bring back the window,  click on its button on the  taskbar. To make a window larger and  fill the screen, click on the maximise button. To close a window click on  the close button. You have now covered  ‘Desktop and icons’. 1. Using a computer 15 content page 1.4: Using a keyboardHow to put information (words and numbers) into your computer This section covers: • What a keyboard looks like • What the different keys do and how to use them What you need to have covered already: • Switching on your computer • Using a mouse • Desktop and icons 1. Using a computer 16 content page 1.4: Using a keyboardWhat a keyboard looks like A keyboard is for putting information such as letters,  words and numbers into your computer. The keys are  the individual buttons you press when you type.  The symbol keys  The number keys  run across the top  of the keyboard and  are also on the right  of the keyboard. to the right of the  letters include  symbols such as  the question mark  and full stop. The keys that surround  the letters, numbers  and symbol keys on the  left, right and bottom of  the keyboard, help you  to choose where and  how you type. The letter  keys are in the  centre of the  keyboard. 1. Using a computer 17 content page 1.4: Using a keyboardUsing the keys When you open a document  or click in a box to type, you  will see a flashing ver tical line. This is the cursor. It tells you  where you are going to start  typing on the page or screen. Cat Press the letter keys for letters.  You will notice they are laid  out in a non-alphabetical order. This is called a QWERTY layout. Press the number keys  for numbers and press the  symbol keys for symbols.  1. Using a computer 18 content page 1.4: Using a keyboardUsing the keys Pressing the Shift key lets you type capital letters  and the symbols at the top of the keys. The Shift keys are on the left and right of the  keyboard, with the arrow pointing upwards. For capital letters, press down the shift key and  hold and then type the letter. For symbols at the top of a number key, press  down the shift key and then type the symbol. You can use the Shift key to type any symbol at  the top of a key. When you let go of the Shift key you will begin  to type lower case letters and numbers again. The Caps Lock key lets you write in capital letters.  To turn it on, press it once and then type.  To turn it off, press it again. The Caps  Lock key The  Shift key The  Shift key 1. Using a computer 19 content page 1.4: Using a keyboardPutting in spaces, moving your cursor and deleting text The space bar puts a space between words.  You press it once to put in a space. The Tab key puts a bigger space between words.  You press it once to put in a space.  The Enter key moves your cursor down  a line. The arrow keys let you move your cursor in all  directions on the page or screen – up, down,  left and right. To delete your typing you need to put your cursor  to the right of a word. Press the Backspace button  to delete your word. The cursor will move to the  left and delete as it goes. Practise your keyboard skills You can practise your keyboard skills with the  BBC WebWise Keyboard Shooting Gallery Game.  Your course leader can help you find it and get started with the game. www.bbc.co.uk/firstclick Keyboard Shooting Gallery Game 1. Using a computer 20 content page 2: Using the internet 2.1 What the internet is 2.2 Searching the internet  2.3 Staying safe online Pat “I like finding new recipes online and find websites a great way to find out more about the things  that interest me.” 2: Using the internet content page 2.1: What the internet is Understanding how the internet works The internet is a  worldwide network of On the internet you This section covers: • Understanding how the internet works • Using a web browser • Browsing the internet  What you need to have covered already: • Switching on your computer • Using a mouse • Desktop and icons • Using the keyboard computers all connected  to each other by telephone lines, cables and satellites. It’s like a huge library of information.can read the news, shop, pay bills, send emails, watch television programmes and more. 2. Using the internet 21 content page 2.1: What the internet isUsing a web browser The information on the  internet is contained in  websites and on webpages. To connect to the internet you  need an Internet Service  Provider or ISP. Your mobile phone company,  home phone, cable television  provider or even your local  supermarket chain can offer  you an internet connection. A broadband internet  connection allows you to  access the internet.  The address bar has the address  of the website you are on.  Every website has an address,  which is also called a URL. For example, the URL for the  BBC website is: www.bbc.co.uk  The www stands for World  Wide Web. Most websites  have this at the beginning. The BBC is the name of  the website. The .uk shows the BBC website  is in the United Kingdom. 2. Using the internet 22 content page 2.1: What the internet isUsing a web browser You view websites and webpages in a  web browser. A web browser is simply  a way of being able to view webpages. All web browsers have similar features.  http://bbc.co.uk/news You can normally open your web browser  from a shortcut on your desktop. Two of the most popular browsers are  Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox. Internet Explorer Mozilla Firefox 2. Using the internet 23 content page 2.1: What the internet isUsing a web browser At the top of the browser you will  find an address bar. To go to a website you need to put  its address into the address bar. To do this click with your  cursor and type the address  www.bbc.co.uk directly into  the address bar.  If there is already an address  in the address bar, click on it  to highlight it and start to  type.The new address will  start to appear.  Press the Enter key  to go to the website. 2. Using the internet 24 content page 2.1: What the internet isUsing a web browser A web browser also  has a toolbar. You use the toolbar buttons to  move around websites  and update webpages. Click the Home button to go to  the first page you see when you open your web browser. The  home button looks like a house. Click the Back button to go  back to a page you have already  visited. Click the Forward button to go  to the page you were on before  you pressed the back button. Click the Refresh button to  reload or update a page you  are on. Click the History button to see  what websites and webpages  you have already visited. 2. Using the internet 25 content page 2.1: What the internet isBrowsing the internet and using links To explore inside a  website you need to click on links. This is called ‘browsing’  or surfing the web. A website is like a book  which has a front cover or home page, and lots of other pages, which are called webpages. A link can take you to a  webpage in the website. A link can also take you to a  different website. A link can be text, a button  or an image.  Links are highlighted so you can  spot them. Your cursor will change to a  hand when it moves over a link. You have now covered  ‘What the internet is’. 2. Using the internet 26 content page 2.2: Searching the internetWhy use a search engine? This section covers: • Why use a search engine • Opening and using a search engine • Making your search better What you need to have covered already: • Switching on your computer • Using a mouse • Desktop and icons  • Using a keyboard • What the internet is 2. Using the internet 27 content page 2.2: Searching the internetWhy usea search engine? Theinternethasmillionsofwebsites andwebpages.Youcansearchfor almostanything–fromrecipes andlocalnews,tohistoryand gardeningtips. To search the internet effectively you need a  search engine. •  A search enginewillscanthroughthousandsof websites and webpages on the internet and  collect and organise the information it thinks is  most relevant to you. •  Someofthe mostpopularsearchenginesare: Google www.google.com Yahoo www.yahoo.com Bing www.bing.com 2. Using the internet 28 content page 2.2: Searching the internetOpening and using a search engine •  To use a search engine, for example Internet Explorer or Mozilla Firefox, you need to open  your web browser •  Type in the address of the search engine you want to use in the address bar •  Click the arrow key on the address bar or press the enter key on the keyboard. This will take you  to the search engine •  The search engine has a searchboxorsearch field 2. Using the internet 29 content page 2.2: Searching the internetOpening and using a search engine •  To search you type key words into the search box and press the search button •  Key words are words that describe what you are looking for in the most simple and direct  way, for example “growing tomatoes”  •  The result from your search will appear as a list of websites and links. The most popular or  relevant will be at the top of the list • To visit a site, click on a link 2. Using the internet 30 content page 2.2: Searching the internetMaking your search better You can make your searching more effective by followinga few handy tips: •Use key words not fullsentences or questions. For example, instead of typing “I need tips for growing  tomatoes” simply type “growing tomatoes” •  Ifyoucan’tfindwhatyouwant,trytouse different words or a different way of expressing it • Practise putting key words into the search box  and pressing the search button • A list of search results will appear, with the most  popular websites near the top of the list • To view a website, simply click on the link Practise searching the internet You can practise your searching skills with the BBC  WebWise Searching the internet challenge game. www.bbc.co.uk/firstclick Your course leader can help you find it and get started with the game.  2. Using the internet 31 content page 2.3: Staying safe onlineThis section is all about how to stay safe when using the internet. This section covers: • Software that keeps your information safe on your computer • How to recognise and prevent suspicious emails • How to create strong passwords for use on websites • How to shop safely on the internet • Where else to go for more information What you need to have covered already: • Switching on your computer • Using a mouse • Desktop and icons • Using a keyboard • What the internet is The internet is a wonderful tool that has lots of benefits and can make your life better. Unfortunately, the features that make it easy for honest people to use can also be exploited by criminals and people intending to cause disruption. But you should not let fear stop you using the internet. There are a few simple precautions that can keep you and your password information safe. 2. Using the internet 32 content page 2.3: Staying safe onlineMaking sure your computer is secure It’s important that your computer at home is protected.  You do this with special programmes: • Firewall software • Anti-virus software • Anti-spyware software You can also find other tips for keeping your computer safe at www.bbc.co.uk/webwise or www.getsafeonline.org 2. Using the internet 33 content page 2.3: Staying safe onlineKeeping an eye on emails People may send you emails to try and access your private information such as bank account or credit card details. You may also get SPAM emails which are sent to thousands of people and usually advertise products or services. To protect yourself against these types of emails follow these tips: • Don’t open an email from someone you have never heard of.  Delete it immediately • If you do open it by accident, don’t click on any links.  Never reply to a SPAM email • You can put a block on unwanted SPAM email on your email  account – this will also block most fraudulent emails too • Use an up-to-date web browser as these can warn you against  sites that may try to gain your information fraudulently • Don’t give away your password or any personal information.  No legitimate company will ever ask you for your password PLEASE NOTE In Section 3 you will learn all  about sending and receiving emails. 2. Using the internet 34 content page 2.3: Staying safe onlineUsernames and passwords Sometimes you need usernames and passwords to register on  certain websites. A username can be anything you want it to be. You might not  want to use your real name as this will help keep your identity  unknown and safe. Choose a password that is memorable and not easy for someone  else to guess. The best type of passwords mix letters and numbers. This is  known as a strong password as it is a lot more difficult to work out what it would be. Examples of a bad password: password  michaelsmith Examples of a good password: he770Mum Mik35th • It is safer to have different passwords for different websites. • You use your username and password to log in to a website • After you have used a website you should always log off • Remember – never give your password to anyone Practise creating a strong password using the BBC WebWise game,  Password High Striker. You can find it at www.bbc.co.uk/firstclick Your course leader can help you find it and get star ted with the game. Password High Striker 2. Using the internet 35 content page 2.3: Staying safe onlineShopping on the internet One of the benefits of the internet is the ability to shop from a wide range of stores and buy items on auction sites. To protect yourself when shopping online follow these tips: • Use retailers that have a good reputation as ‘high street’ shops,  or established brands • Follow the security advice carefully on websites that you trust  as its there to help you • Never download illegal software, music or videos • Make sure that you are on a secure site when you need to  give credit or debit card details • There will often be a padlock symbol either next to the address  or at the bottom right corner of the page • You can find out more information about staying safe on the internet by clicking on ‘Safety and privacy’ section  on www.bbc.co.uk/webwise PLEASE NOTE A secure site will start with  https:// The ‘s’ is what indicates  it’s a secure site. £ 2. Using the internet 36 content page 3: Using email 3.1 Sending and receiving emailGeoff “Learning how to use email has helped me to keep in  contact with family and friends who live abroad” 3: Using email content page 3.1: Sending and receiving emailWhat is email? This section covers: • What is email • Sending and receiving an email • Sending attachments • Forwarding an email and using contacts • Your email folders What you need to have covered already: • Switching on your computer • Using a mouse • Desktop and icons • Using a keyboard • What the internet is • Staying safe online 3. Using email 37 content page 3.1: Sending and receiving emailWhat is email? Electronic mail or email is a quick way of sending messages to people using the internet. You send an email to a person’s email address. An email address is made up of the following parts: •  tom is the person’s name or user name – the name they use •  The @ stands for the word ‘at’ and means that they are connected to the bbc.co.uk part of the  address •  After the @ is the name of the place where the person works or the place which provides the  email address •  .uk shows that the email address is for someone in the United Kingdom 3. Using email 38 content page 3.1: Sending and receiving emailSending and receiving an email An email appears in your inbox You can tell it is a new or unopened email as it  will appear in bold. You can see who the email  is from and the subject of the email. An email has the following features: •  An address bar where you put the email address •  A subject bar where you write what your email is about •  The main body of the email, where you write your message You can practise sending and receiving email  with the BBC WebWise game, Email with Dick  and Harry.  www.bbc.co.uk/firstclick Your course leader can help you find it and get started with the game.  3. Using email 39 content page 3.1: Sending and receiving emailSending and receiving an email You open an email by clicking twice on it, for  example in the subject line. Once an email is  open you can reply to it. You reply by clicking  on the Reply button. • This will open a new email •  The address will already be completed as you are replying to the email •  The subject line will be completed and will start with RE: •  You type out your message in the main body of the page • You send by clicking on the Send button •  To create a new email you click on the New button •  You type the email address in the address bar and a subject in the subject bar • Type in your message and then press Send 3. Using email 40 content page 3.1: Sending and receiving emailSending attachments An attachment is a type of file such as a photo or document. You can send an attachment with an email. To add an attachment you need to click on the Attach button. •  The Attach button often has a paperclip as its symbol •  When you click on the Attach button it opens up a new window •  The window shows you files and folders on your computer •  Find and then click on the file you want to attach and press OK •  The file will now show as an attachment in your email •  The name of the file will be shown next to a paperclip 3. Using email 41 content page 3.1: Sending and receiving emailForwarding an email and using contacts You forward an email when you want somebody else to see it, such as another friend. • To forward an email you need to open it first •  Next, click on the Forward button. A new email will open •  It has FW: in the subject line to show it is being forwarded. You can type the email address in  the address bar or find it in your contacts •  To find an address in contacts you click on the To button •  Choose your contact from the list that appears by ticking the box and clicking OK. The address  will appear in the address bar. •  You can write a message and then send the email to forward it to your contact Remember: When you  forward an email it’s  important to check that  you are only sending  information that you want  the other person to see.  3. Using email 42 content page 3.1: Sending and receiving emailYour email folders There are different folders that you use for email. These help you manage and organise your emails. •  TheInboxholdsemailsthatpeoplehavesenttoyou •  A Sent box holds emails that you have sent to people •  A Junk folder holds emails that your computer thinks are junk or SPAM •  A Trash can or folder holds emails that you no longer need and have deleted. To delete an email  you select it and then click on the Delete button •  A Contacts folder stores your email addresses and contact details of your friends, family  and colleagues 3. Using email 43 content page 3.1: Sending and receiving email Setting up an email account If you’re thinking of setting up an email account, there are a number of popular providers to consider: • Gmail (run by Google) •  Hotmail (run by Microsoft) • Yahoo! Mail (run by Yahoo) 3. Using email44 content page 4: Further help 4.1 Jargon Buster – a glossary of useful terms 4.2 Know the basics?  Want to learn more? 4.3 More places to get helpTahira “I’ve been learning for a little while now but  I still get stumped by all the computer and  internet jargon!” 4: Further help content page 4.1: Jargon BusterAddress Book Part of your email software  where you store details of your  ‘friends and contacts’ email  addresses so you don’t have to  remember them! Anti-virus Anti-virus software helps  protect your computer from  viruses. Application Another word for computer  program. For example,  Word, which is used for  creating documents is a word  processing application. Archive The place on a website where  you find old ar ticles, stories etc. 4. Further help Attachment A file which is ‘attached’ and sent with a standard text email  message. Often photographs  or Word documents are  attached to emails. Backup A technical term for copying  files onto disk or CD-ROM for safe keeping so that they are  kept in more than one place.  Bcc Means Blind carbon copy.  The Bcc box allows you to  send an email to more than  one person but their email  addresses are hidden from  other recipients. Broadband A permanent high-speed  internet connection. It receives  digital information at about  100 times faster than a dial-up  modem and is “always-on”. Browser A program you use to view  web pages and ‘browse’  websites. Internet Explorer  and Mozilla Firefox are two  of the most popular browsers. Bugs Errors in a piece of software  or web page that can make it  break or work strangely. Cc Typing an email address or  string of email addresses in the  ‘Cc’ box will send your mail to  those additional addresses as  well as the main recipient.  Crash When your computer  temporarily stops working.  It may pause or ‘freeze’ up,  or tell you to restart or quit. Cursor The flashing ver tical line on the screen that shows you where  you are and where the next  character you type will appear. Cut and paste Selecting text, images or files and deleting them from one  place while putting them in  another. 45 content page 4.1: Jargon BusterDigital Cameras A camera that takes photographs  and stores them on disks or  smart cards rather than on  film.The photos can then be downloaded onto a computer  where the images can be  printed, put on a web page  or emailed.  Driver Software which runs hardware  attached to your computer like  a modem, printer or scanner.  New hardware normally  comes with a CD containing  the necessary drivers to install  on your computer. Download Getting a file onto your computer from another  computer on the internet. 4. Further help Drag and drop Clicking on an icon or  selection, holding the mouse  button down and moving the  mouse to ‘drag’ the selection  to a new location. When the  mouse button is released the  item is ‘dropped’. Email Electronic mail. Messages  (sometimes with attachments)  sent over the internet from  one email address to another. Error message A ‘complaint’ by the computer  that something has gone  wrong, maybe including an  ‘error code’.  FAQ Frequently Asked Questions.  A list of standard answers to  questions which newcomers  to a topic or website may have. File Data stored on a disk. There  are two types: ‘program files’ (with instructions that make  up software applications, e.g.  Word) and ‘data files’ (files created by you and me, e.g.  a letter or photo). Firewall A program which sits between  your computer and the  internet and watches for  hacking, viruses or unapproved  data transfer. Flash A plug-in application you  download which allows your  browser to show animations.  Hacking Unauthorised access to  a computer, its files and programs by a ‘hacker’, a  computer expert who can  break through its security.  Hard drive/Hard disk The place inside your  computer where you  save documents, pictures,  applications, etc. Homepage The ‘front page’ of a website,  where you’re told what’s on  the site, how to get around it  and how to search for things  that’ll interest you. 46 content page 4.1: Jargon BusterHypertext Text which is arranged in a  non-linear fashion and which  you continue reading by  clicking on links.  Icon A small picture which, when  you click on it launches an  application, program or acts like  a link on the World Wide Web.  Inbox The folder in your email  program / webmail where you  get your incoming emails.  Internet Millions of computers around  the world connected together  by telephone lines, cables or  satellites.  4. Further help Internet Explorer One of the most popular  web browsers, designed by  Microsoft. ISP Internet Service Provider.  An ISP is the company that  provides internet connections. Junk email Direct marketing sent by email  rather than by the post.  Laptop A small, portable computer  which can be battery operated  as well as run from the mains.  Link Words or pictures you can  click on which take you from  somewhere (an internet  page, an email message etc.)  to somewhere else (another  page, a picture etc.). Logging in Using a username and  password to prove your  identity so that you can enter  your computer or internet  account. Macintosh/Mac A family of computers  developed by Apple.  Mailbox The folder which contains a  person’s individual items such  as an inbox, outbox, sent items,  notes and calendar.  Memory The storage and thinking parts  of your computer. More storage  memory on your hard disk  (ROM) means you can save  more files and more thinking memory (RAM) means your  computer can perform more  complex tasks quicker. Monitor The display screen on your  computer.  Offline Describes when your  computer is not connected  to the internet.  47 content page 4.1: Jargon BusterOnline Describes when your  computer is connected  to the internet.  Password A series of letters, numbers  and characters that you enter  to get into your computer,  internet connection, email  or websites that you are  registered with.  Refresh/Reload The button that you use to  download a web page again.  In Internet Explorer it’s called  “Refresh” and in Mozilla Firefox  “Reload”. You should press this  button if for some reason a  web page appears not to have  loaded correctly. 4. Further help Register Some websites ask you to give  your name, email address and  other personal information  in order to view pages. This is  called registering. Search engine A search engine is usually  a website which allows you  to search the internet for  information. The search engine  lists results that relate to your  key words.  Software Any programs such as word  processors, email applications  or internet browsers. SPAM Junk email sent to many  people at once, usually  involving advertising or offering  services. SPAM is very deeply  frowned upon by most  internet users, and where it  involves advertising or a false  return address it is particularly  disliked. URL Stands for Uniform Resource  Locator, the technical term  for the address of a website  or document on the web  (e.g. www.bbc.co.uk).  Username A series of letters and  numbers you type into your  computer, email account or  other computer network  service to tell it who you are.  Virus Pieces of code that are  designed to reproduce and  damage data or system  performance. There are  thousands of viruses and  the numbers keep growing. Web browser Software which allows you  to surf the internet.  48 content page 4.2: Know the basics? Want to learn more? First Click First Click aims to help people  who have never used a  computer before. The First Click website uses  the best of online BBC content,  like WebWise, to help people  take their first steps to getting started with computers and  the internet. WebWise WebWise offers lots of video  guides and activities to help  you practise new skills – from  using a mouse and keyboard,  through to searching the  internet and sending email. www.bbc.co.uk/webwise Tom Andrews Our friendly presenter, Tom  Andrews, is on hand to talk  you through each topic. With Tom you can try out  some simple games to help  you practise the basics.  As you become more  confident, you can download extra topics designed to help  you explore a range of popular  BBC websites and the internet  more widely.  You can add these to  your beginner’s guide for  a completely personalised  experience. www.bbc.co.uk/firstclick4. Further help 49 50 content page4.3: More places to get help UK online centres  www.ukonlinecentres.com The UK online centres network  was set up by government in  2000 to provide public access  to computers. It has a large  network of centres across  England providing help and  support to people wishing to  learn how to use computers  and the internet. Many use myguide and Online  basics to introduce people to  the world of computers. myguide www.myguide.gov.uk is  designed to make getting online  easy and intuitive. Online basics sits within  myguide as a first-steps course introducing people to the keyboard and mouse, email,  searching and internet safety.  Age UK www.ageuk.org.uk Age UK are working with  a network of community  projects which specialise  in computer and internet  training for older people.  The projects give straight forward training, using jargon free terms and aim to get as  many older people as possible  enjoying the advantages of  computers and the internet. www.ageuk.org.uk/work and-learning/technology-and internet/computer-training courses Digital Unite www.digitalunite.com Digital Unite specialise in  supporting older people to  use digital technologies – from  internet and email, to social  networking and blogs. They have  a network of tutors throughout  the UK who are specially trained  to deliver digital skills training. www.tutors.digitalunite.com/ faqs/book-a-lesson They work with everyone  from learners and trainers; to  public businesses and private  enterprises; to older people’s  friends and family, to promote  digital skills to learners of all ages.  www.learning.digitalunite.com/ category/beginners-help Next Step www.nextstep.direct.gov.uk Next Step provides information  and advice to help adults  make decisions about learning  and work opportunities. This  free service offers help via its  website, telephone hotline or  face-to-face advice. 4. Further help 50 content page Notescontent page Notescontent page Notescontent page Notescontent page Published in October 2010 by BBC Learning  Media Centre, Room MC4 A4, 201 Wood Lane, W12 7TQ www.bbc.co.uk/learning moc.ngise© BBC 2010 d999 yb dengiseThe BBC has created First Click materials to help support local partners to run beginners’ courses to using computers and the internet.  DThe courses where these materials will be used will not be run or delivered by the BBC. 56

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