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BYU - PHY S 100 - Phy S 100, Week 1 Notes - Class Notes

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BYU - PHY S 100 - Phy S 100, Week 1 Notes - Class Notes

School: Brigham Young University
Department: OTHER
Course: Physical Science
Professor: Patricia Ackroyd
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: Physics
Name: Phy S 100, Week 1 Notes
Description: Newton's laws of motion, velocity and acceleration; clarifies common misconceptions
Uploaded: 09/15/2017
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background image Chapter Two: Laws Governing Motion  *While a force of some kind is necessary to create motion, force is not necessary to sustain it. * 
  
First Law of Motion  •  "An object at rest tends to stay at rest, and an object in motion tends to stay in motion, unless 
acted upon by a force" 
•  Uniform motion: motion at a constant speed in a straight line (no acceleration)  That constant speed could be a constant speed of zero (at rest) or any other constant speed.  •  State of motion: an object's speed and direction     Velocity and Acceleration  •  Velocity = speed + direction  Distance in a particular direction covered in a certain time  •  Acceleration: a change in velocity  •  Acceleration has magnitude and direction   Centripetal acceleration: acceleration at a right angle to an object's velocity, changing 
direction but not speed  
▪  Example: earth orbiting the Sun; any circular path  Acceleration: rate at which speed or direction changes     Intro to Second Law of Motion  •  Force: push or pull on an object (in a direction); shown by arrows  •  Net force: sum of all forces present on an object  •  Acceleration is caused by force, but force is NOT caused by acceleration  Balanced-out forces = net force of 0 (no change in state of motion)  Ex: gravity keeps you in your seat. Gravity is a force, but it's not accelerating you into the 
ground because the chair equally pushes upward on you. You don't change your state of 
motion (laziness :P ) 
Acceleration is caused by unbalanced forces  •  Force measured in pounds (lbs.) or newtons (N) in metric system     Mass  •  A property/characteristic of a body which determines how much it accelerates when a force is 
applied 
Which would you rather push to a gas station: a semi or a scooter? Yeah, me too. Since you 
are an equal amount of force on the semi and the scooter, the fact remains that the scooter 
will accelerate more than the semi with the equal force applied to it.  
The difficulty of getting an object to change its state of motion  MASS IS NOT WEIGHT. Weight is the force of gravity on a particular mass, which can change 
with location (ex: earth vs. mars). No matter location, mass WILL NOT CHANGE.  
  
 
 
 
  

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School: Brigham Young University
Department: OTHER
Course: Physical Science
Professor: Patricia Ackroyd
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: Physics
Name: Phy S 100, Week 1 Notes
Description: Newton's laws of motion, velocity and acceleration; clarifies common misconceptions
Uploaded: 09/15/2017
2 Pages 12 Views 9 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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