×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UMD - PSYC 221 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UMD - PSYC 221 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

umd psych

umd psych

Description

School: University of Maryland - College Park
Department: Psychology
Course: Social Psychology
Professor: Dylan selterman
Term: Spring 2016
Tags: Psychology and SocialPsychology
Cost: 50
Name: Exam 1 Study Guide
Description: Study Guide for the first PSYC221 test
Uploaded: 09/29/2017
19 Pages 5 Views 5 Unlocks
Reviews


Exam 1 Study Guide 


What are the Basics of Social Psyc?



Basics of Social Psyc (weeks 1 & 2):

● Social psychology  is the scientific study of how we think about, feel, and behave  towards others, and how our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors influence and are  influenced by the other people in our lives

● Social facilitation ­ people  perform better when others are present

○ Triplett: had people race on bikes against each other and in timed trials ■ People were faster consistently when racing against others instead of the 

clock

● Triplett’s study included observational, experimental, and correlational methods ○ Started w/ observations of bicycle races 

○ Found that when raced against other person raced faster than against timed trial ○ Then did experimental fishing rod study 

● Kurt lewin ­ field theory ­ the behavior of people is always a function of the field of 


What is Social facilitation?



forces in which they find themselves

○ B = f(individual*situation) 

● Attribution

○ Heider (1958)

■ Internal attribution 

■ External attribution 

■ Naïve psychology ­ humans love to figure out why people do what they do ■ Balance theory ­ the triangle of likes and dislikes Don't forget about the age old question of british literature final exam study guide

● Important Names to know: 

○ Norman triplett ­ first social psyc experiment

○ Gordon allport ­ first to write a textbook on and define social psyc 

○ Kurt lewin ­ field theory and importance of situation 

○ Heider ­ attribution and balance theory 

● The journal of personality and social psychology is the premier journal for social psyc  research today

● Research objectives

○ To describe 

○ To predict 

○ To explain 

● Deception­ withholding info about the true purpose and or procedure of a study ○ May produce emotional harm to participants 


What is Kurt Lewin's field theory?



○ May produce negative attitudes toward research in psychology If you want to learn more check out wcu csd

○ Shouldn’t be used to convince people to take part in the experimentDon't forget about the age old question of a front is a narrow zone of transition between air masses that contrast in

● P­hacking is adding more data sets and makes it  more likely to lead to type 2 errors ● Type 1 error ­ rejecting a true null hypothesis 

● Type 2 error ­ retaining a false null hypothesis 

● Reasons for non­replication 

○ Falsification 

○ Statistical problems 

■ Sample size 

■ P hacking 

○ Change in the conceptual variable 

○ Scientist error 

● How to fix it 

○ Change in priorities 

■ Academic careers 

■ Publications 

○ Registering studies 

■ Based off of methods not results 

● How is naive scientist related to Lewin’s field theory: 

○ Naive scientist ­ we want to know why people do what they do and we tend to 

discount either individual or situational reason

○ Field theory ­ situational and individual reasons come together to explain why  people do what they do

Social Cognition and Attitudes (week 3):

● The social thinker

○ Feelings are affected by thoughts 

■ Ex. we think to see if compliment is genuine or sarcastic and feel angry or 

mad based on outcome of thought process

● The naive scientist 

○ Fritz Heider 

○ All humans are all trying to be scientists and figure out why everyone does what  If you want to learn more check out what is the ideal temperature for pathogens to flourish

they do

● The cognitive miser 

○ We always try to save our cognitive power 

○ Not quite accurate 

■ Ex. you focus better when watching tv than in class b/c that's what is  If you want to learn more check out mmgeg

important to you

Automatic Thinking w/ Schemas

● Automatic thinking­ nonconscious, unintentional, effortless, involuntary ○ Schemas ­ mental structures people use to organize their knowledge about the 

social world and that influence the info people notice, think about, and remember

○ Accessibility ­ what's easiest to remember in your brain 

○ If one part of schema becomes more accessible, the whole schema becomes more 

accessible

○ Priming ­ process of making something more accessible 

Implicit Attitudes Don't forget about the age old question of delta g naught prime

● IAT (implicit association test)

○ Attitude ­ evaluation of an object 

○ Test of implicit bias not heuristic 

Persistence of Schemas

● Perseverance effect: people’s beliefs persist even after the evidence supporting these 

beliefs is discredited

○ Backfire effect ­ contradicting info reinforces existing schema 

■ Ex. if gets award, must have bribed someone, is even more evil 

○ Confirmation bias 

Hueristics

● Mental shortcuts people use to make judgments quickly and efficiently ○ Availability heuristic­ hear about things more so think they’re more common ○ Representativeness heuristic ­ use stereotypical info to make a judgement instead 

of base rate info (info about the frequency of members of different categories in 

the population)

■ Ex. deep tan and mellow = from california 

○ Opposite of algorithm, uses limited info to make judgement 

○ Anchoring and Adjustment Heuristic 

■ Tversky & Kahneman, 1974 

● Had people spin wheel w/ numeric values 

● Then asked question w/ numeric answer 

● Made judgement based off anchor (number spun) and adjusted up 

or down logically

Experiment:

● Need to find sources that have same IV or DV

● Doing new research 

● Can do conceptual replication of study w/ same hypothesis 

● Creating actual experimental proposal 

○ Must be doable and ethical 

■ Can be expensive or hard 

Controlled Thinking

● Thinking that is conscious, voluntary, intentional, and effortful

○ Ex. studying, paying attention in class, etc. 

● Complex, unusual situation for which you have no preexisting knowledge or where the 

implications are very important

● Thought suppression 

○ When try to not think of something, ironically prime it and think about it more  ● Counterfactual thinking ­ mentally changing what happened in the past ○ Ex. what if this had happened instead of that? 

○ Medvec and Savistky (1997) 

■ Students preferred grade farther from cut­off to grade letter than grade 

closer to the cut­off for letter grade 

● Rather get an 87% than an 89% 

Affect and Cognition

● Affect ­ feeling state

○ Ex. emotions 

● Affect affects cognition  

○ Schwarz & Clore, 1983 

■ Asked about life satisfaction 

■ Knew whether of the place 

■ Life satisfaction was significantly lower on a cloudy day 

Self and Identity & Self­Regulation and Conscientiousness (week 4): thinking about oneself

● We naturally look to others in order to define ourselves 

● Our identity is often influenced by the social situation  

● Self­concept (the “me”) ­ collection of beliefs and attitudes about oneself ○ Self­schema ­ guide the processing of self­relevant information 

● Most likely to use social comparison theory on things that are subjective  ○ How “good” you are, not what your gpa is 

● Study on self­perception: pen in mouth pen in teeth (strack et al)  

○ Perceive yourself as happy or sad and like/dislike the cartoon based on where the  pen is

No concept of self

● Recognizing yourself in the mirror (Gallup 1977)

○ Metacognition 

○ “The looking­glass self” ­ we come to know ourselves by imagining what others 

think of us

● Self­awareness 

● Theory of mind 

Culture

● Independent vs interdependent self

○ Interdependence ­ collectivistic  

■  Ex. I go to UMD, I’m a twin  

○ Independent ­ not affected by anything else 

■ Ex. I love my family, I am smart 

● Some cultures are more independent and some are more interdependent  The Origins of Self­Concept

● Introspection ­ knowing what you like and how you feel about things

○ You know what you like b/c you think about it and feel it 

○ Ex. study w/ socks: show people socks from same pack and ask to choose favorite

even though the socks are the same b/c of biases 

● Implicit egotism ­ situation affects things they like 

● Affective forecasting ­ forecasting how you’ll feel in the future 

Intrinsic vs Extrinsic Motivation

● Intrinsic = individual 

○ Part of identity 

● Extrinsic = situation 

● Kids that got stickers for drawing unexpectedly drew more than kids that got no stickers  for drawing and they drew more than kids that expected the sticker for drawing The origins of the Self

● Introspection 

● Self perception ­ figuring out yourself based on your past behaviors 

○ I.e. i spend all my time w/ Joe so I must have a crush on him  

● Social comparison theory­ people learn about their attitudes and abilities by comparing 

themselves to other people

○ When there is no objective standard to measure against and/or when they 

experience uncertainty about themselves in a particular area

○ Festinger 1954 

○ Upward comparison ­ comparing yourself w/ someone you feel is higher so it 

makes you feel lower

○ Downward comparison ­ comparing yourself w/ someone you feel is lower so it  makes you feel higher

Self­Presentation

● Self­monitoring ­ the tendency to change behavior in response to self­presentation 

concerns

○ People act differently in different situations to act as if they have different 

qualities

● High self­monitors are more likely to change to adapt to the situation ○ Not necessarily changing to conform, can also change to go against the norm ■ Ex. act shy at club/party to seem like a good girl  

Self­Esteem

● Attitudes about oneself 

● The self­evaluation made by each individual; one’s attitude toward oneself along a 

positive­negative dimension

● State self­esteem ­ fluctuates situationally  

● Trait self­esteem ­ stable characteristic over time 

Why?

● Tells people how they are doing "in the eyes of others"

○ Sociometer theory­ your self­esteem is measurement of your 

relationship with others

● To ensure self­preservation (terror­management theory)

○ Self esteem measures how well you keep yourself alive 

Self Discrepancy Theory

● You have 3 selves, 3 schemas of self

○ Actual self­ who you are right now 

○ Ought self­ who you should be

○ Ideal self­ who you want to be 

■ Ex. Actual: homely; ought: good; ideal: bombshell 

■ In general, negative aspects of your actual self tend to be strong. 

■ When you are good or decent at something, you don’t worry about it. 

■ Ideas of ought self come from others, societal standards 

Mechanisms of self­enhancement

● Self­serving biases (cognitions)

○ People tend to attribute positive outcomes to internal causes (their own abilities 

and dispositions) but negative outcomes to external factors

● Self­handicapping (jones and Berglas, 1978<­­research this) 

● Behaviors designed to sabotage one's own performance in order to provide a subsequent 

excuse for failure

○ Ex. Procrastination (in part) 

● Bask in reflected glory 

○ People associate themselves with successful others 

○ Ex. Day after football game, count how many people wearing Maryland gear next day based on win or loss of the game

Self­regulation vs. self­control

● Self­regulation

○ Standards­ what you want 

○ Monitoring­ how well you are doing 

○ Capacity­ ability to get what you want 

■ Ego depletion­ your ability to regulate is a fixed resource. If you deplete it,

you can’t do it later on.

● If you apply resources to one thing, you can’t use it on something 

else later

● One of biggest problems when discussing replication crisis 

● Is it a self­fulfilling prophecy? 

● Chocolate vs. radish experiment

Judgement and Decision Making & Motives and Goals (week 5):

Attitude changes through persuasion

Persuasive communication ­ communication advocating one side of an issue  Yale Communications Research Program (1940s and 1950s)

● Work on mass communication for the army during WW2

○ The rational deliberate process involved in attitude change 

■ Attending to the message 

■ Comprehending it 

■ Incorporating it into previous knowledge and beliefs  

■ Accepting and remembering it 

○ 3 components of the persuasive message 

■ WHO ­ source of the message 

● Source characteristics are more important than the content of the 

message

○ Attractiveness 

○ Distraction 

○ Expertise 

○ Trustworthiness  

■ Sleeper effect ­ memorable message from unreliable

source can have an effect later on

■ WHAT ­ the content of the message 

● Message characteristics 

○ Desirable yet novel consequences of taking action in 

response to the message

○ Straightforward messages 

○ Explicit conclusions OR implicit arguments that will allow 

a knowledgeable audience to reach its own conclusions

○ Vivid info, emotional reach rather than stats and facts 

■ Identifiable victim effect ­ people more moved by 

one individual’s story 

■ WHOM ­ the audience or target 

● Receiver characteristics 

○ Mood 

■ Message content should match the goals and 

content of the mood

○ Age 

■ Young people are more susceptible to persuasion 

Bounded

● Rationality

● Willpower 

● Self­interest 

● Ethicality 

● Awareness  

● We are naive b/c we discount important info when we make judgements ● Ex. Blame actions on personality 

The cognitive processes underlying persuasion 

● Elaboration Likelihood Model (petty & Cacioppo, 1986) and Heuristic Systematic Model

(Chaiken, 1987)

○ Dual process models of persuasion 

● ELM and HSM 

○ Whether persuasion occurs through one route or the other depends on people’s 

motivation and cognitive resources

● Central(ELM)/systematic(HSM) route of persuasion 

○ The arguments are what persuades you 

○ When you have high motivation and or cognition capacities 

○ Also called system 2 

○ Cold cognition ­ unemotional  

● Peripheral(ELM)l/Heuristic(HSM) route of persuasion 

○ People attend to superficial cues unrelated to the message arguments 

○ Used when low motivation or cognition capacities 

○ Also called system 1 

○ Hot cognition ­ very emotional 

Petty and Cacioppo (1979)

● Participants read a persuasive communication advocating for comprehensive 

exams

○ Strong vs weak arguments 

■ Manipulate the WHAT 

○ High vs low involvement 

■ Manipulate the WHOM 

Persuasion

● Unimodel (Kruglaski)

○ Subjective relevance 

○ Motivation to process 

○ Difficulty of processing 

○ Ability to process 

○ Biasing motivations 

○ Processing sequence 

When Attitudes Resist Change

● Forewarning and resistance

○ Inoculation hypothesis (McGuire 1964) 

■ Exposure to weak arguments increases later resistance to those messages ○ Reactance (Brehm, 1966) 

■ When people feel that their freedom to perform a certain behavior is  threatened, an unpleasant state of reactance is aroused, which can be 

reduced by performing the threatened behavior

Vocabulary:

Why Science? 

Correlation 

Measures the association between two variables, or how they go together. Dependent variable 

The variable the researcher measures but does not manipulate in an experiment. Independent variable 

The variable the researcher manipulates and controls in an experiment. Longitudinal study 

A study that follows the same group of individuals over time. 

Operational definitions 

How researchers specifically measure a concept. 

Participant demand 

When participants behave in a way that they think the experimenter wants them to  behave. 

Placebo effect 

When receiving special treatment or something new affects human behavior. Random assignment

Assigning participants to receive different conditions of an experiment by chance. 

Social Cognitions and Attitudes 

Affective forecasting 

Predicting how one will feel in the future after some event or decision. Attitude 

A psychological tendency that is expressed by evaluating a particular entity with  some degree of favor or disfavor. 

Automatic 

A behavior or process has one or more of the following features: unintentional,  uncontrollable, occurring outside of conscious awareness, and cognitively efficient. Availability heuristic 

A heuristic in which the frequency or likelihood of an event is evaluated based on  how easily instances of it come to mind. 

Directional goals 

The motivation to reach a particular outcome or judgment. 

Evaluative priming task 

An implicit attitude task that assesses the extent to which an attitude object is  associated with a positive or negative valence by measuring the time it takes a person to label an adjective as good or bad after being presented with an attitude object. Explicit attitude 

An attitude that is consciously held and can be reported on by the person holding the  attitude. 

Heuristics 

A mental shortcut or rule of thumb that reduces complex mental problems to more  simple rule­based decisions.

Hot cognition 

The mental processes that are influenced by desires and feelings. 

Implicit Association Test 

An implicit attitude task that assesses a person’s automatic associations between  concepts by measuring the response times in pairing the concepts. 

Implicit attitude 

An attitude that a person cannot verbally or overtly state. 

Implicit measures of attitudes 

Measures of attitudes in which researchers infer the participant’s attitude rather than  having the participant explicitly report it. 

Mood­congruent memory 

The tendency to be better able to recall memories that have a mood similar to our  current mood. 

Need for closure 

The desire to come to a decision that will resolve ambiguity and conclude an issue. Primed 

A process by which a concept or behavior is made more cognitively accessible or  likely to occur through the presentation of an associated concept. 

Representativeness heuristic 

A heuristic in which the likelihood of an object belonging to a category is evaluated  based on the extent to which the object appears similar to one’s mental representation of the category. 

Schema 

A mental model or representation that organizes the important information about a  thing, person, or event (also known as a script).

Social cognition 

The study of how people think about the social world. 

Stereotypes 

Our general beliefs about the traits or behaviors shared by group of people. 

Self and Identity: 

Autobiographical reasoning 

The ability, typically developed in adolescence, to derive substantive conclusions  about the self from analyzing one’s own personal experiences. 

Big Five 

A broad taxonomy of personality trait domains repeatedly derived from studies of  trait ratings in adulthood and encompassing the categories of (1) extraversion vs.  introversion, (2) neuroticism vs. emotional stability, (3) agreeable vs.  disagreeableness, (4) conscientiousness vs. nonconscientiousness, and (5) openness  to experience vs. conventionality. By late childhood and early adolescence, people’s  self­attributions of personality traits, as well as the trait attributions made about them  by others, show patterns of intercorrelations that confirm with the five­factor  structure obtained in studies of adults. 

Identity 

Sometimes used synonymously with the term “self,” identity means many different  things in psychological science and in other fields (e.g., sociology). In this module, I  adopt Erik Erikson’s conception of identity as a developmental task for late  adolescence and young adulthood. Forming an identity in adolescence and young  adulthood involves exploring alternative roles, values, goals, and relationships and  eventually committing to a realistic agenda for life that productively situates a person in the adult world of work and love. In addition, identity formation entails 

commitments to new social roles and reevaluation of old traits, and importantly, it  brings with it a sense of temporal continuity in life, achieved though the construction  of an integrative life story. 

Narrative identity 

An internalized and evolving story of the self designed to provide life with some  measure of temporal unity and purpose. Beginning in late adolescence, people craft  self­defining stories that reconstruct the past and imagine the future to explain how  the person came to be the person that he or she is becoming. 

Reflexivity 

The idea that the self reflects back upon itself; that the I (the knower, the subject)  encounters the Me (the known, the object). Reflexivity is a fundamental property of  human selfhood. 

Self as autobiographical author 

The sense of the self as a storyteller who reconstructs the past and imagines the  future in order to articulate an integrative narrative that provides life with some  measure of temporal continuity and purpose. 

Self as motivated agent 

The sense of the self as an intentional force that strives to achieve goals, plans,  values, projects, and the like. 

Self as social actor 

The sense of the self as an embodied actor whose social performances may be  construed in terms of more or less consistent self­ascribed traits and social roles. Self­esteem 

The extent to which a person feels that he or she is worthy and good. The success or  failure that the motivated agent experiences in pursuit of valued goals is a strong  determinant of self­esteem. 

Social reputation

The traits and social roles that others attribute to an actor. Actors also have their own  conceptions of what they imagine their respective social reputations indeed are in the  eyes of others. 

The “I” 

The self as knower, the sense of the self as a subject who encounters (knows, works  on) itself (the Me). 

The “Me” 

The self as known, the sense of the self as the object or target of the I’s knowledge  and work. 

Theory of mind 

Emerging around the age of 4, the child’s understanding that other people have  minds in which are located desires and beliefs, and that desires and beliefs, thereby,  motivate behavior. 

Self­Regulation and Conscientiousness: 

Conscientiousness 

A personality trait consisting of self­control, orderliness, industriousness, and  traditionalism. 

Ego depletion 

The state of diminished willpower or low energy associated with having exerted self regulation. 

Monitoring 

Keeping track of a target behavior that is to be regulated. 

Self­regulation 

The process of altering one’s responses, including thoughts, feelings, impulses,  actions, and task performance. 

Standards

Ideas about how things should (or should not) be. 

Judgement and Decision Making: 

Anchoring 

The bias to be affected by an initial anchor, even if the anchor is arbitrary, and to  insufficiently adjust our judgments away from that anchor. 

Biases 

The systematic and predictable mistakes that influence the judgment of even very  talented human beings. 

Bounded awareness 

The systematic ways in which we fail to notice obvious and important information  that is available to us. 

Bounded ethicality 

The systematic ways in which our ethics are limited in ways we are not even aware  of ourselves. 

Bounded rationality 

Model of human behavior that suggests that humans try to make rational decisions  but are bounded due to cognitive limitations. 

Bounded self­interest 

The systematic and predictable ways in which we care about the outcomes of others. Bounded willpower 

The tendency to place greater weight on present concerns rather than future concerns. Framing 

The bias to be systematically affected by the way in which information is presented,  while holding the objective information constant. 

Overconfident

The bias to have greater confidence in your judgment than is warranted based on a  rational assessment. 

System 1 

Our intuitive decision­making system, which is typically fast, automatic, effortless,  implicit, and emotional. 

System 2 

Our more deliberative decision­making system, which is slower, conscious, effortful, explicit, and logical. 

Motives and Goals: 

Balancing between goals 

Shifting between a focal goal and other goals or temptations by putting less effort  into the focal goal—usually with the intention of coming back to the focal goal at a  later point in time. 

Commitment 

The sense that a goal is both valuable and attainable 

Conscious goal activation 

When a person is fully aware of contextual influences and resulting goal­directed  behavior. 

Ego­depletion 

The exhaustion of physiological and/or psychological resources following the  completion of effortful self­control tasks, which subsequently leads to reduction in  the capacity to exert more self­control. 

Extrinsic motivation 

Motivation stemming from the benefits associated with achieving a goal such as  obtaining a monetary reward.

Goal 

The cognitive representation of a desired state (outcome). Schema related. Goal priming 

The activation of a goal following exposure to cues in the immediate environment  related to the goal or its corresponding means (e.g., images, words, sounds). Implemental phase 

The second of the two basic stages of self­regulation in which individuals plan  specific actions related to their selected goal. 

Intrinsic motivation 

Motivation stemming from the benefits associated with the process of pursuing a  goal such as having a fulfilling experience. 

Means 

Activities or objects that contribute to goal attainment. 

Motivation 

The psychological driving force that enables action in the course of goal pursuit. Nonconscious goal activation 

When activation occurs outside a person’s awareness, such that the person is unaware of the reasons behind her goal­directed thoughts and behaviors. 

Prevention focus 

One of two self­regulatory orientations emphasizing safety, responsibility, and  security needs, and viewing goals as “oughts.” This self­regulatory focus seeks to  avoid losses (the presence of negatives) and approach non­losses (the absence of  negatives). 

Progress

The perception of reducing the discrepancy between one’s current state and one’s  desired state in goal pursuit. 

Promotion focus 

One of two self­regulatory orientations emphasizing hopes, accomplishments, and  advancement needs, and viewing goals as “ideals.” This self­regulatory focus seeks  to approach gains (the presence of positives) and avoid non­gains (the absence of  positives). 

Self­control 

The capacity to control impulses, emotions, desires, and actions in order to resist a  temptation and adhere to a valued goal.

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here