×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Texas State - BIO 4301 - Class Notes - Week 5
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Texas State - BIO 4301 - Class Notes - Week 5

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

TEXAS STATE / Biomed Engr/Joint / BIO 4301 / What if new positive mutation (a) is additive?

What if new positive mutation (a) is additive?

What if new positive mutation (a) is additive?

Description

School: Texas State University
Department: Biomed Engr/Joint
Course: Evolution
Professor: James ott
Term: Spring 2017
Tags:
Cost: 25
Name: BIO 4301 Exam Prep
Description: This guide will help you study for exam 1
Uploaded: 09/29/2017
50 Pages 88 Views 6 Unlocks
Reviews


Evolution Study Guide Exam 1


What if new positive mutation (a) is additive?



Darwin

­ Responsible for “paradigm shift”

­ “Principles of Geology” convinced him that earth was ancient

­ Wrote “Origin of Species” in 1859

o Diversity originated from previous forms

o Primarily result from natural selection

 A mechanism

Natural Selection

­ Gradual process

­ Contrasted greatly with biblical accounts

­ Scientific paradigm shift is still reflected today

Evolution: a process of change in a certain direction

Biological Evolution: change in a population’s allele frequency over time

­ Evolutionary biology seeks an understanding of the origin and maintenance of biological  diversity


What if new positive mutation (a) is recessive?



If you want to learn more check out What is a segmentary lineage system?
We also discuss several other topics like How did the athenian democracy work?

­ Direction is not implied

­ Evolution can sometimes cause increased complexity, but do not become “advanced” Population: all individuals of the same species living in a particular area at the same time Allele Frequency: proportion of gene copies in a population that are a given allele

Microevolution: evolutionary change within a species or small group of organisms, especially  over a short period

­ Several mechanisms

­ Natural selection

o Survival of the fittest

­ Fitness: relative reproductive ability of individuals  If you want to learn more check out What is ritornello form and what characterizes it?

Creationism: tied to and requires religious belief

­ A theory! Not testable, because God’s plan is unknown and not falsifiable  ­ Evolutionary theory has specific predictions that are testable


What causes linkage disequilibrium?



­ For a theory to be considered scientific, it must be testable

Evolutionary biology seeks to understand the origin and maintenance of biological diversity.

­ See Coyne, pg. 3 and pg. 14

Phenotypic Change

­ Takes several thousand generations for large­scale phenotypic changes to occur o Usually gradualism 

­ Reasons for phenotypic change

o Generation time

o Population size

o Variation in selection pressure

Macroevolution: major evolutionary change

­ Patterns:

o Stasis

o Character change

o Speciation 

Speciation/Common Ancestry

­ Flip sides of the same coin

­ All of life shares a common ancestor ­ Diversity arose from speciation 

See Coyne pg. 5

­ If creationism was true: organisms would not have common ancestry Homologies Common to All Life Don't forget about the age old question of What is collateral sprouting?

­ DNA Codes

­ Biochemical pathways

­ Transcriptions/transitions

­ Pattern of homology is not random

Darwin’s 4 Postulates – natural selection cannot occur unless all are true

1) Individuals in a population must vary 

2) Variation has a genetic basis (heritable)

3) More individuals are produced than can survive

4) Survival and reproduction are non­random

a. Individuals that survive and reproduce are those with most favorable variations ­ Natural selection requires only that individuals of a species vary genetically in their  ability to survive and reproduce in their environment

Mutation types

­ Somatic: not passed on

­ Germ Line: carried by gametes 

Natural Selection is a process

­ Requires 3 things Don't forget about the age old question of What are the advantages of hedonism?

o Variation

 Inherited and heritable

o Heritability

o Genetic variation must affect an individual’s probability of leaving offspring

Heritability: proportion of all variation due to genetic differences among individuals  VG = VG + VE

VG/VP = VG/(VG + VE)

Narrow­Sense Heritability: proportion of VP that results from additive genetic variations hN^2 = VA/VP

Heritability is a proportion

­ 0­1

­ If it was 0, it would result in environmental differences

­ If it was 1, it would be 100% genetic factors

­ Calculating it

o Parent­Offspring regression

o The slope of the regression line provides information about the magnitude of  narrow­sense heritability

 Regress means offspring phenotype onto mean parental phenotype

 hN^2 = b = slope of regress

­ Measuring it

o The mid­parent (average of mom and dad) offspring regression slopes (standard  method) If you want to learn more check out What key quality is responsible for the moon and mercury being geologically dead?

 Measure ‘trait values’ for parents

 Measure ‘trait values’ for offspring (grown) 

∙ If difference between parents is genetic, reflected in offspring

∙ If difference between parents is environmental, it won’t be

Genetic variation ultimately comes from

­ DNA mutations

­ Point mutations: single base is changed

o Must be in gene to effect physical change

o Synonymous: no change in amino acid

o Nonsynonymous: change in amino acid

 All 2nd site substitutions

 Most 1st site substitutions

 Most 3rd site substitutions result in different evolutionary rates 

Structural Mutations

­ Affect more than one DNA base (a few or a billion)

­ Deletions: occur when a segment of chromosome is left out 

­ If in a gene  frameshift

o If not a multiple of three

­ Cystic fibrosis: deletion of 3 bases in sodium channel gene

­ Insertions: segment of DNA added

o Not a multiple of 3  frameshift

o Is a multiple of 3  problematic 

 Huntington’s disease 

­ Duplication: 2nd copy of gene in a genome

­ Inversions: chromosome breaks in two places and “flips around”

­ Reciprocal translocations: exchange of chromosome segments between two  nonhomologous chromosomes

­ Chromosomal fusions: two nonhomologous chromosomes joined (fuse together to make  one)

­ Chromosomal fissions: chromosome splits

­ Whole­genome duplication: speciation

Mutation Rates

­ DNA replication is extremely accurate, but varies across organisms

­ Per gene

o Higher than per nucleotide

 Genes have lots of these

­ Per genome

o Higher than per gene

o About 30 new point mutations scattered throughout genome

­ Effects:

o Pleiotropy: single gene mutation affects multiple traits

 Dwarfism

o Effects on fitness: number of offspring organism leaves in next generation Variation Under Nature

­ Species concepts

o No one is convinced as to what a species is

­ Heritable variation is important for evolution to occur

­ Polymorphic genera: the species present has an inordinate amount of variation o Has a genetic component

­ Before Darwin, people thought that species were immutable

Population Genetics

­ Natural selection acts on individuals within a generation

­ Heritable response to natural selection is by populations and occurs between generations

Law of Segregation: alleles at a single gene; separate the gametes into haploid Law of Independent Assortment: genes separate onto different chromosomes independently Genotype Frequency = # individuals with genotype/total # individuals

Allele Frequency = # of copies of an allele/total # of alleles

­ Determine this by counting all alleles

***adding up all genotypes in the population gives the total # of individuals in the population

Genotype

# Individuals

Genotype Frequency

AA

Aa

aa

Total

Hardy­Weinberg Equilibrium

­ Null: no evolutionary change

­ Allele frequency will not change if

o Population is infinite

o Mating is random

o No mutation

o No natural selection

­ F(AA) = p^2

­ F(Aa) = 2pq

­ F(aa) = q^2

Chi­Square Test

Recombination: process that combines an allele at one locus from mom with an allele at another  locus from dad, in a single gamete

­ During meiosis

­ r = probability that recombination occurs between a given pair of loci  o ranges from 0­0.5

o 0 = crossover never occurs

o 0.5 = so far apart they are unlinked

***one round of random mating puts genotype frequencies back into HWE

Linkage Disequilibrium: the association of two alleles at two (or more) loci more frequently (or  less) than predicted by individual frequencies

­ Recombination erodes this

­ Takes more than one round of recombination to put populations back into linkage  disequilibrium 

PAB = frequency of gametes carrying A2 and B2

PA = frequency of gametes carrying A2

PB = frequency of gametes carrying B2

D = linkage disequilibrium

­ = PAB ­ PAPB

IF:

D = 0

­ No genetic equilibrium

­ Knowing genotype at A tells us nothing about genotype probability of B D = positive

­ If gamete carries A2, increase chance of carrying B2

D = negative

­ If gamete carries A2, less likely to carry B2

***as r increases, D decreases at a faster rate

Most common way to get linkage disequilibrium: linkage!

­ Recombination fixes this

­ Also, epistasis: suppression of the effect of one such gene by another

Absolute Fitness: mean number of offspring an individual of a particular genotype has 

­ Whether a genotype has increased or decreased fitness depends on fitness of others ­ W

Relative fitness: degree to which individuals of a particular genotype reproduce relative to  individuals with other genotypes

­ w

Selection Coefficient: (s) a measure of the strength of natural selection for or against a specific  phenotype, genotype or an allele

­ rate of adaptation: change in p = (s)(p)(1­p)/ w

­ the lower the s = the longer it will take

­ the higher the s = the quicker it will be

Fitness effect of alleles can be dominant or recessive

­ can affect speed at which alleles are fixed

­ what does this look like?

o Depends on mode of selection or relative fitness of AA, Aa, aa

­ What if new positive mutation (A) is additive?

o Selection starts immediately increasing its frequency, but cannot go to fixation  because there is still (a)

o AA>Aa>aa

­ What if new positive mutation (a) is recessive?

o It eventually does go to fixation

o AA=Aa<aa

­ Dominant, recessive and additive can result in directional selection

o One allele is consistently favored over the other

o Will drive favored allele to fixation

­ Directional selection kills variation

o Balancing selection: selection that maintains genetic variation within a population  Overdominance: heterozygote advantage

 Can serve to maintain genetic diversity

 Heterozygote is more fit than homozygote

o Underdominance: heterozygote disadvantage

 A1 goes to fixation

 Heterozygote is less fit than homozygote

Frequency Dependent Selection

­ Can increase genetic diversity

­ Positive or negative

­ Positive: fitness associated with a trait that increases as frequency of the trait increases ­ Negative: as frequency of a trait increases, fitness of the trait decreases o Each allele is favored when rare

***mutations are the ultimate source of variation upon which selection can act

­ Most are neutral/deleterious

­ Can stick around at appreciable frequency 

­ p=u/s

Genetic drift: evolution occurring through random changes in allele frequency over time –  effects are strongest in small populations

­ consider an individual: 

o when gametes are made, each contains one of two alleles for each trait o which of those alleles gets passed on is completely at random

­ consider a population:

o 50/50

o Because of random union of gametes, some are passed on more than expected o “random death”

o Allele frequencies fluctuate generation to generation

5 Principles of Drift

1) Drift is unbiased (allele can go up or down in frequency)

2) Effects of drift are larger in small populations

3) Drift causes genetic variation to be lost

4) Drift causes populations that are initially identical to become different (speciation)  Expected heterozygosity decreases

Interaction between genetic drift and natural selection

­ s = 0.01

­ 1/Ne

­ If s > 1/Ne, drift has little effect on evolution

­ If s < 1/Ne, drift has a large effect on evolution

­ Genetic drift counteracts effects of natural selection

o Decreases genetic variation

o Cause increases in alleles that lead to low fitness

Conditions where we expect genetic drift to play an important role

­ Populations that are small and have been that way for a long time ­ Conditions where populations were once large, but are now small ­ Habitat fragmentation

o Results in loss of genetic diversity and inbreeding depression ­ Population bottlenecks

o Population becomes temporarily small

o Has lasting impacts

Evolution Study Guide Exam 1

Darwin

­ Responsible for “paradigm shift”

­ “Principles of Geology” convinced him that earth was ancient

­ Wrote “Origin of Species” in 1859

o Diversity originated from previous forms

o Primarily result from natural selection

 A mechanism

Natural Selection

­ Gradual process

­ Contrasted greatly with biblical accounts

­ Scientific paradigm shift is still reflected today

Evolution: a process of change in a certain direction

Biological Evolution: change in a population’s allele frequency over time

­ Evolutionary biology seeks an understanding of the origin and maintenance of biological  diversity

­ Direction is not implied

­ Evolution can sometimes cause increased complexity, but do not become “advanced” Population: all individuals of the same species living in a particular area at the same time Allele Frequency: proportion of gene copies in a population that are a given allele

Microevolution: evolutionary change within a species or small group of organisms, especially  over a short period

­ Several mechanisms

­ Natural selection

o Survival of the fittest

­ Fitness: relative reproductive ability of individuals 

Creationism: tied to and requires religious belief

­ A theory! Not testable, because God’s plan is unknown and not falsifiable  ­ Evolutionary theory has specific predictions that are testable

­ For a theory to be considered scientific, it must be testable

Evolutionary biology seeks to understand the origin and maintenance of biological diversity.

­ See Coyne, pg. 3 and pg. 14

Phenotypic Change

­ Takes several thousand generations for large­scale phenotypic changes to occur o Usually gradualism 

­ Reasons for phenotypic change

o Generation time

o Population size

o Variation in selection pressure

Macroevolution: major evolutionary change

­ Patterns:

o Stasis

o Character change

o Speciation 

Speciation/Common Ancestry

­ Flip sides of the same coin

­ All of life shares a common ancestor ­ Diversity arose from speciation 

See Coyne pg. 5

­ If creationism was true: organisms would not have common ancestry Homologies Common to All Life

­ DNA Codes

­ Biochemical pathways

­ Transcriptions/transitions

­ Pattern of homology is not random

Darwin’s 4 Postulates – natural selection cannot occur unless all are true

1) Individuals in a population must vary 

2) Variation has a genetic basis (heritable)

3) More individuals are produced than can survive

4) Survival and reproduction are non­random

a. Individuals that survive and reproduce are those with most favorable variations ­ Natural selection requires only that individuals of a species vary genetically in their  ability to survive and reproduce in their environment

Mutation types

­ Somatic: not passed on

­ Germ Line: carried by gametes 

Natural Selection is a process

­ Requires 3 things

o Variation

 Inherited and heritable

o Heritability

o Genetic variation must affect an individual’s probability of leaving offspring

Heritability: proportion of all variation due to genetic differences among individuals  VG = VG + VE

VG/VP = VG/(VG + VE)

Narrow­Sense Heritability: proportion of VP that results from additive genetic variations hN^2 = VA/VP

Heritability is a proportion

­ 0­1

­ If it was 0, it would result in environmental differences

­ If it was 1, it would be 100% genetic factors

­ Calculating it

o Parent­Offspring regression

o The slope of the regression line provides information about the magnitude of  narrow­sense heritability

 Regress means offspring phenotype onto mean parental phenotype

 hN^2 = b = slope of regress

­ Measuring it

o The mid­parent (average of mom and dad) offspring regression slopes (standard  method)

 Measure ‘trait values’ for parents

 Measure ‘trait values’ for offspring (grown) 

∙ If difference between parents is genetic, reflected in offspring

∙ If difference between parents is environmental, it won’t be

Genetic variation ultimately comes from

­ DNA mutations

­ Point mutations: single base is changed

o Must be in gene to effect physical change

o Synonymous: no change in amino acid

o Nonsynonymous: change in amino acid

 All 2nd site substitutions

 Most 1st site substitutions

 Most 3rd site substitutions result in different evolutionary rates 

Structural Mutations

­ Affect more than one DNA base (a few or a billion)

­ Deletions: occur when a segment of chromosome is left out 

­ If in a gene  frameshift

o If not a multiple of three

­ Cystic fibrosis: deletion of 3 bases in sodium channel gene

­ Insertions: segment of DNA added

o Not a multiple of 3  frameshift

o Is a multiple of 3  problematic 

 Huntington’s disease 

­ Duplication: 2nd copy of gene in a genome

­ Inversions: chromosome breaks in two places and “flips around”

­ Reciprocal translocations: exchange of chromosome segments between two  nonhomologous chromosomes

­ Chromosomal fusions: two nonhomologous chromosomes joined (fuse together to make  one)

­ Chromosomal fissions: chromosome splits

­ Whole­genome duplication: speciation

Mutation Rates

­ DNA replication is extremely accurate, but varies across organisms

­ Per gene

o Higher than per nucleotide

 Genes have lots of these

­ Per genome

o Higher than per gene

o About 30 new point mutations scattered throughout genome

­ Effects:

o Pleiotropy: single gene mutation affects multiple traits

 Dwarfism

o Effects on fitness: number of offspring organism leaves in next generation Variation Under Nature

­ Species concepts

o No one is convinced as to what a species is

­ Heritable variation is important for evolution to occur

­ Polymorphic genera: the species present has an inordinate amount of variation o Has a genetic component

­ Before Darwin, people thought that species were immutable

Population Genetics

­ Natural selection acts on individuals within a generation

­ Heritable response to natural selection is by populations and occurs between generations

Law of Segregation: alleles at a single gene; separate the gametes into haploid Law of Independent Assortment: genes separate onto different chromosomes independently Genotype Frequency = # individuals with genotype/total # individuals

Allele Frequency = # of copies of an allele/total # of alleles

­ Determine this by counting all alleles

***adding up all genotypes in the population gives the total # of individuals in the population

Genotype

# Individuals

Genotype Frequency

AA

Aa

aa

Total

Hardy­Weinberg Equilibrium

­ Null: no evolutionary change

­ Allele frequency will not change if

o Population is infinite

o Mating is random

o No mutation

o No natural selection

­ F(AA) = p^2

­ F(Aa) = 2pq

­ F(aa) = q^2

Chi­Square Test

Recombination: process that combines an allele at one locus from mom with an allele at another  locus from dad, in a single gamete

­ During meiosis

­ r = probability that recombination occurs between a given pair of loci  o ranges from 0­0.5

o 0 = crossover never occurs

o 0.5 = so far apart they are unlinked

***one round of random mating puts genotype frequencies back into HWE

Linkage Disequilibrium: the association of two alleles at two (or more) loci more frequently (or  less) than predicted by individual frequencies

­ Recombination erodes this

­ Takes more than one round of recombination to put populations back into linkage  disequilibrium 

PAB = frequency of gametes carrying A2 and B2

PA = frequency of gametes carrying A2

PB = frequency of gametes carrying B2

D = linkage disequilibrium

­ = PAB ­ PAPB

IF:

D = 0

­ No genetic equilibrium

­ Knowing genotype at A tells us nothing about genotype probability of B D = positive

­ If gamete carries A2, increase chance of carrying B2

D = negative

­ If gamete carries A2, less likely to carry B2

***as r increases, D decreases at a faster rate

Most common way to get linkage disequilibrium: linkage!

­ Recombination fixes this

­ Also, epistasis: suppression of the effect of one such gene by another

Absolute Fitness: mean number of offspring an individual of a particular genotype has 

­ Whether a genotype has increased or decreased fitness depends on fitness of others ­ W

Relative fitness: degree to which individuals of a particular genotype reproduce relative to  individuals with other genotypes

­ w

Selection Coefficient: (s) a measure of the strength of natural selection for or against a specific  phenotype, genotype or an allele

­ rate of adaptation: change in p = (s)(p)(1­p)/ w

­ the lower the s = the longer it will take

­ the higher the s = the quicker it will be

Fitness effect of alleles can be dominant or recessive

­ can affect speed at which alleles are fixed

­ what does this look like?

o Depends on mode of selection or relative fitness of AA, Aa, aa

­ What if new positive mutation (A) is additive?

o Selection starts immediately increasing its frequency, but cannot go to fixation  because there is still (a)

o AA>Aa>aa

­ What if new positive mutation (a) is recessive?

o It eventually does go to fixation

o AA=Aa<aa

­ Dominant, recessive and additive can result in directional selection

o One allele is consistently favored over the other

o Will drive favored allele to fixation

­ Directional selection kills variation

o Balancing selection: selection that maintains genetic variation within a population  Overdominance: heterozygote advantage

 Can serve to maintain genetic diversity

 Heterozygote is more fit than homozygote

o Underdominance: heterozygote disadvantage

 A1 goes to fixation

 Heterozygote is less fit than homozygote

Frequency Dependent Selection

­ Can increase genetic diversity

­ Positive or negative

­ Positive: fitness associated with a trait that increases as frequency of the trait increases ­ Negative: as frequency of a trait increases, fitness of the trait decreases o Each allele is favored when rare

***mutations are the ultimate source of variation upon which selection can act

­ Most are neutral/deleterious

­ Can stick around at appreciable frequency 

­ p=u/s

Genetic drift: evolution occurring through random changes in allele frequency over time –  effects are strongest in small populations

­ consider an individual: 

o when gametes are made, each contains one of two alleles for each trait o which of those alleles gets passed on is completely at random

­ consider a population:

o 50/50

o Because of random union of gametes, some are passed on more than expected o “random death”

o Allele frequencies fluctuate generation to generation

5 Principles of Drift

1) Drift is unbiased (allele can go up or down in frequency)

2) Effects of drift are larger in small populations

3) Drift causes genetic variation to be lost

4) Drift causes populations that are initially identical to become different (speciation)  Expected heterozygosity decreases

Interaction between genetic drift and natural selection

­ s = 0.01

­ 1/Ne

­ If s > 1/Ne, drift has little effect on evolution

­ If s < 1/Ne, drift has a large effect on evolution

­ Genetic drift counteracts effects of natural selection

o Decreases genetic variation

o Cause increases in alleles that lead to low fitness

Conditions where we expect genetic drift to play an important role

­ Populations that are small and have been that way for a long time ­ Conditions where populations were once large, but are now small ­ Habitat fragmentation

o Results in loss of genetic diversity and inbreeding depression ­ Population bottlenecks

o Population becomes temporarily small

o Has lasting impacts

Evolution Study Guide Exam 1

Darwin

­ Responsible for “paradigm shift”

­ “Principles of Geology” convinced him that earth was ancient

­ Wrote “Origin of Species” in 1859

o Diversity originated from previous forms

o Primarily result from natural selection

 A mechanism

Natural Selection

­ Gradual process

­ Contrasted greatly with biblical accounts

­ Scientific paradigm shift is still reflected today

Evolution: a process of change in a certain direction

Biological Evolution: change in a population’s allele frequency over time

­ Evolutionary biology seeks an understanding of the origin and maintenance of biological  diversity

­ Direction is not implied

­ Evolution can sometimes cause increased complexity, but do not become “advanced” Population: all individuals of the same species living in a particular area at the same time Allele Frequency: proportion of gene copies in a population that are a given allele

Microevolution: evolutionary change within a species or small group of organisms, especially  over a short period

­ Several mechanisms

­ Natural selection

o Survival of the fittest

­ Fitness: relative reproductive ability of individuals 

Creationism: tied to and requires religious belief

­ A theory! Not testable, because God’s plan is unknown and not falsifiable  ­ Evolutionary theory has specific predictions that are testable

­ For a theory to be considered scientific, it must be testable

Evolutionary biology seeks to understand the origin and maintenance of biological diversity.

­ See Coyne, pg. 3 and pg. 14

Phenotypic Change

­ Takes several thousand generations for large­scale phenotypic changes to occur o Usually gradualism 

­ Reasons for phenotypic change

o Generation time

o Population size

o Variation in selection pressure

Macroevolution: major evolutionary change

­ Patterns:

o Stasis

o Character change

o Speciation 

Speciation/Common Ancestry

­ Flip sides of the same coin

­ All of life shares a common ancestor ­ Diversity arose from speciation 

See Coyne pg. 5

­ If creationism was true: organisms would not have common ancestry Homologies Common to All Life

­ DNA Codes

­ Biochemical pathways

­ Transcriptions/transitions

­ Pattern of homology is not random

Darwin’s 4 Postulates – natural selection cannot occur unless all are true

1) Individuals in a population must vary 

2) Variation has a genetic basis (heritable)

3) More individuals are produced than can survive

4) Survival and reproduction are non­random

a. Individuals that survive and reproduce are those with most favorable variations ­ Natural selection requires only that individuals of a species vary genetically in their  ability to survive and reproduce in their environment

Mutation types

­ Somatic: not passed on

­ Germ Line: carried by gametes 

Natural Selection is a process

­ Requires 3 things

o Variation

 Inherited and heritable

o Heritability

o Genetic variation must affect an individual’s probability of leaving offspring

Heritability: proportion of all variation due to genetic differences among individuals  VG = VG + VE

VG/VP = VG/(VG + VE)

Narrow­Sense Heritability: proportion of VP that results from additive genetic variations hN^2 = VA/VP

Heritability is a proportion

­ 0­1

­ If it was 0, it would result in environmental differences

­ If it was 1, it would be 100% genetic factors

­ Calculating it

o Parent­Offspring regression

o The slope of the regression line provides information about the magnitude of  narrow­sense heritability

 Regress means offspring phenotype onto mean parental phenotype

 hN^2 = b = slope of regress

­ Measuring it

o The mid­parent (average of mom and dad) offspring regression slopes (standard  method)

 Measure ‘trait values’ for parents

 Measure ‘trait values’ for offspring (grown) 

∙ If difference between parents is genetic, reflected in offspring

∙ If difference between parents is environmental, it won’t be

Genetic variation ultimately comes from

­ DNA mutations

­ Point mutations: single base is changed

o Must be in gene to effect physical change

o Synonymous: no change in amino acid

o Nonsynonymous: change in amino acid

 All 2nd site substitutions

 Most 1st site substitutions

 Most 3rd site substitutions result in different evolutionary rates 

Structural Mutations

­ Affect more than one DNA base (a few or a billion)

­ Deletions: occur when a segment of chromosome is left out 

­ If in a gene  frameshift

o If not a multiple of three

­ Cystic fibrosis: deletion of 3 bases in sodium channel gene

­ Insertions: segment of DNA added

o Not a multiple of 3  frameshift

o Is a multiple of 3  problematic 

 Huntington’s disease 

­ Duplication: 2nd copy of gene in a genome

­ Inversions: chromosome breaks in two places and “flips around”

­ Reciprocal translocations: exchange of chromosome segments between two  nonhomologous chromosomes

­ Chromosomal fusions: two nonhomologous chromosomes joined (fuse together to make  one)

­ Chromosomal fissions: chromosome splits

­ Whole­genome duplication: speciation

Mutation Rates

­ DNA replication is extremely accurate, but varies across organisms

­ Per gene

o Higher than per nucleotide

 Genes have lots of these

­ Per genome

o Higher than per gene

o About 30 new point mutations scattered throughout genome

­ Effects:

o Pleiotropy: single gene mutation affects multiple traits

 Dwarfism

o Effects on fitness: number of offspring organism leaves in next generation Variation Under Nature

­ Species concepts

o No one is convinced as to what a species is

­ Heritable variation is important for evolution to occur

­ Polymorphic genera: the species present has an inordinate amount of variation o Has a genetic component

­ Before Darwin, people thought that species were immutable

Population Genetics

­ Natural selection acts on individuals within a generation

­ Heritable response to natural selection is by populations and occurs between generations

Law of Segregation: alleles at a single gene; separate the gametes into haploid Law of Independent Assortment: genes separate onto different chromosomes independently Genotype Frequency = # individuals with genotype/total # individuals

Allele Frequency = # of copies of an allele/total # of alleles

­ Determine this by counting all alleles

***adding up all genotypes in the population gives the total # of individuals in the population

Genotype

# Individuals

Genotype Frequency

AA

Aa

aa

Total

Hardy­Weinberg Equilibrium

­ Null: no evolutionary change

­ Allele frequency will not change if

o Population is infinite

o Mating is random

o No mutation

o No natural selection

­ F(AA) = p^2

­ F(Aa) = 2pq

­ F(aa) = q^2

Chi­Square Test

Recombination: process that combines an allele at one locus from mom with an allele at another  locus from dad, in a single gamete

­ During meiosis

­ r = probability that recombination occurs between a given pair of loci  o ranges from 0­0.5

o 0 = crossover never occurs

o 0.5 = so far apart they are unlinked

***one round of random mating puts genotype frequencies back into HWE

Linkage Disequilibrium: the association of two alleles at two (or more) loci more frequently (or  less) than predicted by individual frequencies

­ Recombination erodes this

­ Takes more than one round of recombination to put populations back into linkage  disequilibrium 

PAB = frequency of gametes carrying A2 and B2

PA = frequency of gametes carrying A2

PB = frequency of gametes carrying B2

D = linkage disequilibrium

­ = PAB ­ PAPB

IF:

D = 0

­ No genetic equilibrium

­ Knowing genotype at A tells us nothing about genotype probability of B D = positive

­ If gamete carries A2, increase chance of carrying B2

D = negative

­ If gamete carries A2, less likely to carry B2

***as r increases, D decreases at a faster rate

Most common way to get linkage disequilibrium: linkage!

­ Recombination fixes this

­ Also, epistasis: suppression of the effect of one such gene by another

Absolute Fitness: mean number of offspring an individual of a particular genotype has 

­ Whether a genotype has increased or decreased fitness depends on fitness of others ­ W

Relative fitness: degree to which individuals of a particular genotype reproduce relative to  individuals with other genotypes

­ w

Selection Coefficient: (s) a measure of the strength of natural selection for or against a specific  phenotype, genotype or an allele

­ rate of adaptation: change in p = (s)(p)(1­p)/ w

­ the lower the s = the longer it will take

­ the higher the s = the quicker it will be

Fitness effect of alleles can be dominant or recessive

­ can affect speed at which alleles are fixed

­ what does this look like?

o Depends on mode of selection or relative fitness of AA, Aa, aa

­ What if new positive mutation (A) is additive?

o Selection starts immediately increasing its frequency, but cannot go to fixation  because there is still (a)

o AA>Aa>aa

­ What if new positive mutation (a) is recessive?

o It eventually does go to fixation

o AA=Aa<aa

­ Dominant, recessive and additive can result in directional selection

o One allele is consistently favored over the other

o Will drive favored allele to fixation

­ Directional selection kills variation

o Balancing selection: selection that maintains genetic variation within a population  Overdominance: heterozygote advantage

 Can serve to maintain genetic diversity

 Heterozygote is more fit than homozygote

o Underdominance: heterozygote disadvantage

 A1 goes to fixation

 Heterozygote is less fit than homozygote

Frequency Dependent Selection

­ Can increase genetic diversity

­ Positive or negative

­ Positive: fitness associated with a trait that increases as frequency of the trait increases ­ Negative: as frequency of a trait increases, fitness of the trait decreases o Each allele is favored when rare

***mutations are the ultimate source of variation upon which selection can act

­ Most are neutral/deleterious

­ Can stick around at appreciable frequency 

­ p=u/s

Genetic drift: evolution occurring through random changes in allele frequency over time –  effects are strongest in small populations

­ consider an individual: 

o when gametes are made, each contains one of two alleles for each trait o which of those alleles gets passed on is completely at random

­ consider a population:

o 50/50

o Because of random union of gametes, some are passed on more than expected o “random death”

o Allele frequencies fluctuate generation to generation

5 Principles of Drift

1) Drift is unbiased (allele can go up or down in frequency)

2) Effects of drift are larger in small populations

3) Drift causes genetic variation to be lost

4) Drift causes populations that are initially identical to become different (speciation)  Expected heterozygosity decreases

Interaction between genetic drift and natural selection

­ s = 0.01

­ 1/Ne

­ If s > 1/Ne, drift has little effect on evolution

­ If s < 1/Ne, drift has a large effect on evolution

­ Genetic drift counteracts effects of natural selection

o Decreases genetic variation

o Cause increases in alleles that lead to low fitness

Conditions where we expect genetic drift to play an important role

­ Populations that are small and have been that way for a long time ­ Conditions where populations were once large, but are now small ­ Habitat fragmentation

o Results in loss of genetic diversity and inbreeding depression ­ Population bottlenecks

o Population becomes temporarily small

o Has lasting impacts

Evolution Study Guide Exam 1

Darwin

­ Responsible for “paradigm shift”

­ “Principles of Geology” convinced him that earth was ancient

­ Wrote “Origin of Species” in 1859

o Diversity originated from previous forms

o Primarily result from natural selection

 A mechanism

Natural Selection

­ Gradual process

­ Contrasted greatly with biblical accounts

­ Scientific paradigm shift is still reflected today

Evolution: a process of change in a certain direction

Biological Evolution: change in a population’s allele frequency over time

­ Evolutionary biology seeks an understanding of the origin and maintenance of biological  diversity

­ Direction is not implied

­ Evolution can sometimes cause increased complexity, but do not become “advanced” Population: all individuals of the same species living in a particular area at the same time Allele Frequency: proportion of gene copies in a population that are a given allele

Microevolution: evolutionary change within a species or small group of organisms, especially  over a short period

­ Several mechanisms

­ Natural selection

o Survival of the fittest

­ Fitness: relative reproductive ability of individuals 

Creationism: tied to and requires religious belief

­ A theory! Not testable, because God’s plan is unknown and not falsifiable  ­ Evolutionary theory has specific predictions that are testable

­ For a theory to be considered scientific, it must be testable

Evolutionary biology seeks to understand the origin and maintenance of biological diversity.

­ See Coyne, pg. 3 and pg. 14

Phenotypic Change

­ Takes several thousand generations for large­scale phenotypic changes to occur o Usually gradualism 

­ Reasons for phenotypic change

o Generation time

o Population size

o Variation in selection pressure

Macroevolution: major evolutionary change

­ Patterns:

o Stasis

o Character change

o Speciation 

Speciation/Common Ancestry

­ Flip sides of the same coin

­ All of life shares a common ancestor ­ Diversity arose from speciation 

See Coyne pg. 5

­ If creationism was true: organisms would not have common ancestry Homologies Common to All Life

­ DNA Codes

­ Biochemical pathways

­ Transcriptions/transitions

­ Pattern of homology is not random

Darwin’s 4 Postulates – natural selection cannot occur unless all are true

1) Individuals in a population must vary 

2) Variation has a genetic basis (heritable)

3) More individuals are produced than can survive

4) Survival and reproduction are non­random

a. Individuals that survive and reproduce are those with most favorable variations ­ Natural selection requires only that individuals of a species vary genetically in their  ability to survive and reproduce in their environment

Mutation types

­ Somatic: not passed on

­ Germ Line: carried by gametes 

Natural Selection is a process

­ Requires 3 things

o Variation

 Inherited and heritable

o Heritability

o Genetic variation must affect an individual’s probability of leaving offspring

Heritability: proportion of all variation due to genetic differences among individuals  VG = VG + VE

VG/VP = VG/(VG + VE)

Narrow­Sense Heritability: proportion of VP that results from additive genetic variations hN^2 = VA/VP

Heritability is a proportion

­ 0­1

­ If it was 0, it would result in environmental differences

­ If it was 1, it would be 100% genetic factors

­ Calculating it

o Parent­Offspring regression

o The slope of the regression line provides information about the magnitude of  narrow­sense heritability

 Regress means offspring phenotype onto mean parental phenotype

 hN^2 = b = slope of regress

­ Measuring it

o The mid­parent (average of mom and dad) offspring regression slopes (standard  method)

 Measure ‘trait values’ for parents

 Measure ‘trait values’ for offspring (grown) 

∙ If difference between parents is genetic, reflected in offspring

∙ If difference between parents is environmental, it won’t be

Genetic variation ultimately comes from

­ DNA mutations

­ Point mutations: single base is changed

o Must be in gene to effect physical change

o Synonymous: no change in amino acid

o Nonsynonymous: change in amino acid

 All 2nd site substitutions

 Most 1st site substitutions

 Most 3rd site substitutions result in different evolutionary rates 

Structural Mutations

­ Affect more than one DNA base (a few or a billion)

­ Deletions: occur when a segment of chromosome is left out 

­ If in a gene  frameshift

o If not a multiple of three

­ Cystic fibrosis: deletion of 3 bases in sodium channel gene

­ Insertions: segment of DNA added

o Not a multiple of 3  frameshift

o Is a multiple of 3  problematic 

 Huntington’s disease 

­ Duplication: 2nd copy of gene in a genome

­ Inversions: chromosome breaks in two places and “flips around”

­ Reciprocal translocations: exchange of chromosome segments between two  nonhomologous chromosomes

­ Chromosomal fusions: two nonhomologous chromosomes joined (fuse together to make  one)

­ Chromosomal fissions: chromosome splits

­ Whole­genome duplication: speciation

Mutation Rates

­ DNA replication is extremely accurate, but varies across organisms

­ Per gene

o Higher than per nucleotide

 Genes have lots of these

­ Per genome

o Higher than per gene

o About 30 new point mutations scattered throughout genome

­ Effects:

o Pleiotropy: single gene mutation affects multiple traits

 Dwarfism

o Effects on fitness: number of offspring organism leaves in next generation Variation Under Nature

­ Species concepts

o No one is convinced as to what a species is

­ Heritable variation is important for evolution to occur

­ Polymorphic genera: the species present has an inordinate amount of variation o Has a genetic component

­ Before Darwin, people thought that species were immutable

Population Genetics

­ Natural selection acts on individuals within a generation

­ Heritable response to natural selection is by populations and occurs between generations

Law of Segregation: alleles at a single gene; separate the gametes into haploid Law of Independent Assortment: genes separate onto different chromosomes independently Genotype Frequency = # individuals with genotype/total # individuals

Allele Frequency = # of copies of an allele/total # of alleles

­ Determine this by counting all alleles

***adding up all genotypes in the population gives the total # of individuals in the population

Genotype

# Individuals

Genotype Frequency

AA

Aa

aa

Total

Hardy­Weinberg Equilibrium

­ Null: no evolutionary change

­ Allele frequency will not change if

o Population is infinite

o Mating is random

o No mutation

o No natural selection

­ F(AA) = p^2

­ F(Aa) = 2pq

­ F(aa) = q^2

Chi­Square Test

Recombination: process that combines an allele at one locus from mom with an allele at another  locus from dad, in a single gamete

­ During meiosis

­ r = probability that recombination occurs between a given pair of loci  o ranges from 0­0.5

o 0 = crossover never occurs

o 0.5 = so far apart they are unlinked

***one round of random mating puts genotype frequencies back into HWE

Linkage Disequilibrium: the association of two alleles at two (or more) loci more frequently (or  less) than predicted by individual frequencies

­ Recombination erodes this

­ Takes more than one round of recombination to put populations back into linkage  disequilibrium 

PAB = frequency of gametes carrying A2 and B2

PA = frequency of gametes carrying A2

PB = frequency of gametes carrying B2

D = linkage disequilibrium

­ = PAB ­ PAPB

IF:

D = 0

­ No genetic equilibrium

­ Knowing genotype at A tells us nothing about genotype probability of B D = positive

­ If gamete carries A2, increase chance of carrying B2

D = negative

­ If gamete carries A2, less likely to carry B2

***as r increases, D decreases at a faster rate

Most common way to get linkage disequilibrium: linkage!

­ Recombination fixes this

­ Also, epistasis: suppression of the effect of one such gene by another

Absolute Fitness: mean number of offspring an individual of a particular genotype has 

­ Whether a genotype has increased or decreased fitness depends on fitness of others ­ W

Relative fitness: degree to which individuals of a particular genotype reproduce relative to  individuals with other genotypes

­ w

Selection Coefficient: (s) a measure of the strength of natural selection for or against a specific  phenotype, genotype or an allele

­ rate of adaptation: change in p = (s)(p)(1­p)/ w

­ the lower the s = the longer it will take

­ the higher the s = the quicker it will be

Fitness effect of alleles can be dominant or recessive

­ can affect speed at which alleles are fixed

­ what does this look like?

o Depends on mode of selection or relative fitness of AA, Aa, aa

­ What if new positive mutation (A) is additive?

o Selection starts immediately increasing its frequency, but cannot go to fixation  because there is still (a)

o AA>Aa>aa

­ What if new positive mutation (a) is recessive?

o It eventually does go to fixation

o AA=Aa<aa

­ Dominant, recessive and additive can result in directional selection

o One allele is consistently favored over the other

o Will drive favored allele to fixation

­ Directional selection kills variation

o Balancing selection: selection that maintains genetic variation within a population  Overdominance: heterozygote advantage

 Can serve to maintain genetic diversity

 Heterozygote is more fit than homozygote

o Underdominance: heterozygote disadvantage

 A1 goes to fixation

 Heterozygote is less fit than homozygote

Frequency Dependent Selection

­ Can increase genetic diversity

­ Positive or negative

­ Positive: fitness associated with a trait that increases as frequency of the trait increases ­ Negative: as frequency of a trait increases, fitness of the trait decreases o Each allele is favored when rare

***mutations are the ultimate source of variation upon which selection can act

­ Most are neutral/deleterious

­ Can stick around at appreciable frequency 

­ p=u/s

Genetic drift: evolution occurring through random changes in allele frequency over time –  effects are strongest in small populations

­ consider an individual: 

o when gametes are made, each contains one of two alleles for each trait o which of those alleles gets passed on is completely at random

­ consider a population:

o 50/50

o Because of random union of gametes, some are passed on more than expected o “random death”

o Allele frequencies fluctuate generation to generation

5 Principles of Drift

1) Drift is unbiased (allele can go up or down in frequency)

2) Effects of drift are larger in small populations

3) Drift causes genetic variation to be lost

4) Drift causes populations that are initially identical to become different (speciation)  Expected heterozygosity decreases

Interaction between genetic drift and natural selection

­ s = 0.01

­ 1/Ne

­ If s > 1/Ne, drift has little effect on evolution

­ If s < 1/Ne, drift has a large effect on evolution

­ Genetic drift counteracts effects of natural selection

o Decreases genetic variation

o Cause increases in alleles that lead to low fitness

Conditions where we expect genetic drift to play an important role

­ Populations that are small and have been that way for a long time ­ Conditions where populations were once large, but are now small ­ Habitat fragmentation

o Results in loss of genetic diversity and inbreeding depression ­ Population bottlenecks

o Population becomes temporarily small

o Has lasting impacts

Evolution Study Guide Exam 1

Darwin

­ Responsible for “paradigm shift”

­ “Principles of Geology” convinced him that earth was ancient

­ Wrote “Origin of Species” in 1859

o Diversity originated from previous forms

o Primarily result from natural selection

 A mechanism

Natural Selection

­ Gradual process

­ Contrasted greatly with biblical accounts

­ Scientific paradigm shift is still reflected today

Evolution: a process of change in a certain direction

Biological Evolution: change in a population’s allele frequency over time

­ Evolutionary biology seeks an understanding of the origin and maintenance of biological  diversity

­ Direction is not implied

­ Evolution can sometimes cause increased complexity, but do not become “advanced” Population: all individuals of the same species living in a particular area at the same time Allele Frequency: proportion of gene copies in a population that are a given allele

Microevolution: evolutionary change within a species or small group of organisms, especially  over a short period

­ Several mechanisms

­ Natural selection

o Survival of the fittest

­ Fitness: relative reproductive ability of individuals 

Creationism: tied to and requires religious belief

­ A theory! Not testable, because God’s plan is unknown and not falsifiable  ­ Evolutionary theory has specific predictions that are testable

­ For a theory to be considered scientific, it must be testable

Evolutionary biology seeks to understand the origin and maintenance of biological diversity.

­ See Coyne, pg. 3 and pg. 14

Phenotypic Change

­ Takes several thousand generations for large­scale phenotypic changes to occur o Usually gradualism 

­ Reasons for phenotypic change

o Generation time

o Population size

o Variation in selection pressure

Macroevolution: major evolutionary change

­ Patterns:

o Stasis

o Character change

o Speciation 

Speciation/Common Ancestry

­ Flip sides of the same coin

­ All of life shares a common ancestor ­ Diversity arose from speciation 

See Coyne pg. 5

­ If creationism was true: organisms would not have common ancestry Homologies Common to All Life

­ DNA Codes

­ Biochemical pathways

­ Transcriptions/transitions

­ Pattern of homology is not random

Darwin’s 4 Postulates – natural selection cannot occur unless all are true

1) Individuals in a population must vary 

2) Variation has a genetic basis (heritable)

3) More individuals are produced than can survive

4) Survival and reproduction are non­random

a. Individuals that survive and reproduce are those with most favorable variations ­ Natural selection requires only that individuals of a species vary genetically in their  ability to survive and reproduce in their environment

Mutation types

­ Somatic: not passed on

­ Germ Line: carried by gametes 

Natural Selection is a process

­ Requires 3 things

o Variation

 Inherited and heritable

o Heritability

o Genetic variation must affect an individual’s probability of leaving offspring

Heritability: proportion of all variation due to genetic differences among individuals  VG = VG + VE

VG/VP = VG/(VG + VE)

Narrow­Sense Heritability: proportion of VP that results from additive genetic variations hN^2 = VA/VP

Heritability is a proportion

­ 0­1

­ If it was 0, it would result in environmental differences

­ If it was 1, it would be 100% genetic factors

­ Calculating it

o Parent­Offspring regression

o The slope of the regression line provides information about the magnitude of  narrow­sense heritability

 Regress means offspring phenotype onto mean parental phenotype

 hN^2 = b = slope of regress

­ Measuring it

o The mid­parent (average of mom and dad) offspring regression slopes (standard  method)

 Measure ‘trait values’ for parents

 Measure ‘trait values’ for offspring (grown) 

∙ If difference between parents is genetic, reflected in offspring

∙ If difference between parents is environmental, it won’t be

Genetic variation ultimately comes from

­ DNA mutations

­ Point mutations: single base is changed

o Must be in gene to effect physical change

o Synonymous: no change in amino acid

o Nonsynonymous: change in amino acid

 All 2nd site substitutions

 Most 1st site substitutions

 Most 3rd site substitutions result in different evolutionary rates 

Structural Mutations

­ Affect more than one DNA base (a few or a billion)

­ Deletions: occur when a segment of chromosome is left out 

­ If in a gene  frameshift

o If not a multiple of three

­ Cystic fibrosis: deletion of 3 bases in sodium channel gene

­ Insertions: segment of DNA added

o Not a multiple of 3  frameshift

o Is a multiple of 3  problematic 

 Huntington’s disease 

­ Duplication: 2nd copy of gene in a genome

­ Inversions: chromosome breaks in two places and “flips around”

­ Reciprocal translocations: exchange of chromosome segments between two  nonhomologous chromosomes

­ Chromosomal fusions: two nonhomologous chromosomes joined (fuse together to make  one)

­ Chromosomal fissions: chromosome splits

­ Whole­genome duplication: speciation

Mutation Rates

­ DNA replication is extremely accurate, but varies across organisms

­ Per gene

o Higher than per nucleotide

 Genes have lots of these

­ Per genome

o Higher than per gene

o About 30 new point mutations scattered throughout genome

­ Effects:

o Pleiotropy: single gene mutation affects multiple traits

 Dwarfism

o Effects on fitness: number of offspring organism leaves in next generation Variation Under Nature

­ Species concepts

o No one is convinced as to what a species is

­ Heritable variation is important for evolution to occur

­ Polymorphic genera: the species present has an inordinate amount of variation o Has a genetic component

­ Before Darwin, people thought that species were immutable

Population Genetics

­ Natural selection acts on individuals within a generation

­ Heritable response to natural selection is by populations and occurs between generations

Law of Segregation: alleles at a single gene; separate the gametes into haploid Law of Independent Assortment: genes separate onto different chromosomes independently Genotype Frequency = # individuals with genotype/total # individuals

Allele Frequency = # of copies of an allele/total # of alleles

­ Determine this by counting all alleles

***adding up all genotypes in the population gives the total # of individuals in the population

Genotype

# Individuals

Genotype Frequency

AA

Aa

aa

Total

Hardy­Weinberg Equilibrium

­ Null: no evolutionary change

­ Allele frequency will not change if

o Population is infinite

o Mating is random

o No mutation

o No natural selection

­ F(AA) = p^2

­ F(Aa) = 2pq

­ F(aa) = q^2

Chi­Square Test

Recombination: process that combines an allele at one locus from mom with an allele at another  locus from dad, in a single gamete

­ During meiosis

­ r = probability that recombination occurs between a given pair of loci  o ranges from 0­0.5

o 0 = crossover never occurs

o 0.5 = so far apart they are unlinked

***one round of random mating puts genotype frequencies back into HWE

Linkage Disequilibrium: the association of two alleles at two (or more) loci more frequently (or  less) than predicted by individual frequencies

­ Recombination erodes this

­ Takes more than one round of recombination to put populations back into linkage  disequilibrium 

PAB = frequency of gametes carrying A2 and B2

PA = frequency of gametes carrying A2

PB = frequency of gametes carrying B2

D = linkage disequilibrium

­ = PAB ­ PAPB

IF:

D = 0

­ No genetic equilibrium

­ Knowing genotype at A tells us nothing about genotype probability of B D = positive

­ If gamete carries A2, increase chance of carrying B2

D = negative

­ If gamete carries A2, less likely to carry B2

***as r increases, D decreases at a faster rate

Most common way to get linkage disequilibrium: linkage!

­ Recombination fixes this

­ Also, epistasis: suppression of the effect of one such gene by another

Absolute Fitness: mean number of offspring an individual of a particular genotype has 

­ Whether a genotype has increased or decreased fitness depends on fitness of others ­ W

Relative fitness: degree to which individuals of a particular genotype reproduce relative to  individuals with other genotypes

­ w

Selection Coefficient: (s) a measure of the strength of natural selection for or against a specific  phenotype, genotype or an allele

­ rate of adaptation: change in p = (s)(p)(1­p)/ w

­ the lower the s = the longer it will take

­ the higher the s = the quicker it will be

Fitness effect of alleles can be dominant or recessive

­ can affect speed at which alleles are fixed

­ what does this look like?

o Depends on mode of selection or relative fitness of AA, Aa, aa

­ What if new positive mutation (A) is additive?

o Selection starts immediately increasing its frequency, but cannot go to fixation  because there is still (a)

o AA>Aa>aa

­ What if new positive mutation (a) is recessive?

o It eventually does go to fixation

o AA=Aa<aa

­ Dominant, recessive and additive can result in directional selection

o One allele is consistently favored over the other

o Will drive favored allele to fixation

­ Directional selection kills variation

o Balancing selection: selection that maintains genetic variation within a population  Overdominance: heterozygote advantage

 Can serve to maintain genetic diversity

 Heterozygote is more fit than homozygote

o Underdominance: heterozygote disadvantage

 A1 goes to fixation

 Heterozygote is less fit than homozygote

Frequency Dependent Selection

­ Can increase genetic diversity

­ Positive or negative

­ Positive: fitness associated with a trait that increases as frequency of the trait increases ­ Negative: as frequency of a trait increases, fitness of the trait decreases o Each allele is favored when rare

***mutations are the ultimate source of variation upon which selection can act

­ Most are neutral/deleterious

­ Can stick around at appreciable frequency 

­ p=u/s

Genetic drift: evolution occurring through random changes in allele frequency over time –  effects are strongest in small populations

­ consider an individual: 

o when gametes are made, each contains one of two alleles for each trait o which of those alleles gets passed on is completely at random

­ consider a population:

o 50/50

o Because of random union of gametes, some are passed on more than expected o “random death”

o Allele frequencies fluctuate generation to generation

5 Principles of Drift

1) Drift is unbiased (allele can go up or down in frequency)

2) Effects of drift are larger in small populations

3) Drift causes genetic variation to be lost

4) Drift causes populations that are initially identical to become different (speciation)  Expected heterozygosity decreases

Interaction between genetic drift and natural selection

­ s = 0.01

­ 1/Ne

­ If s > 1/Ne, drift has little effect on evolution

­ If s < 1/Ne, drift has a large effect on evolution

­ Genetic drift counteracts effects of natural selection

o Decreases genetic variation

o Cause increases in alleles that lead to low fitness

Conditions where we expect genetic drift to play an important role

­ Populations that are small and have been that way for a long time ­ Conditions where populations were once large, but are now small ­ Habitat fragmentation

o Results in loss of genetic diversity and inbreeding depression ­ Population bottlenecks

o Population becomes temporarily small

o Has lasting impacts

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here