×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Cornell - HIST 1540 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Cornell - HIST 1540 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

CORNELL / History / HIST 1540 / Who is Kenneth Pomeranz?

Who is Kenneth Pomeranz?

Who is Kenneth Pomeranz?

Description

History Study Guide 


Who is Kenneth Pomeranz?



The Great Divergence: Why Europe? 

● In the 16th century, most of the world’s wealth was in the East (India, China etc.) ● The West owned less than 18% of the total wealth 

● By the 19th century, the world’s wealth had shifted to Europe 

● Europe owned about 40% of total wealth by 1913 

Niall Ferguson: Endogenous factors 

● British Historian 

● Takes a Euro­centric approach to explaining Europe’s success 

● He linked the success of Europe to internal factors that he called Killer Apps ● Killer Apps 

○ Scientific Breakthrough: The formation of scientific clubs, public lectures for wide  access to knowledge 

○ Protestant Ethic: This allowed for more extensive and intensive labour, as well as increased savings, which could be put back into businesses for further growth ○ Market Demand: Created a demand for market goods, made luxury goods  (sugar) into everyday goods 


Who is Thomas Malthus ?



○ Representative government and Rule of Law: This protected the wealth of  capitalists, it was a system based on secure property rights

Kenneth Pomeranz If you want to learn more check out what is Biopsychosocial approach?

● American Historian on China 

● Studied at Cornell 

● Stressed exogenous factors that helped Europe succeed 

● Criticism of Ferguson 

○ Too Eurocentric an approach. The “Killer Apps” were important and necessary,  but not sufficient to explain The Great Divergence

○ He points out that the West’s technological advances were vastly exaggerated:  India and China had some larger urban centres and fast transport systems ○ The East was also going through a rapid period of expansion and were at parity  with the West in terms of industrialization

Thomas Malthus 

● English cleric and scholar 

● Came up with the theory of the Malthusian Trap 

● This is the theory that society would reach its ecological constraints and be forced to go  back to its original state. The population growth of a place would eventually deplete all  the resources available.


Who is Niall Ferguson?



We also discuss several other topics like Where are ionotropic receptors found?

● The ecological limits stood in the way of progress 

● This included food, fuel, fiber and building materials

● According to Pomeranz, Europe escaped this trap by gaining access to new and  unlimited resources via their New World colonies. They provided an infinite supply of  goods

○ Cotton and Sugar were the main goods that ultimately helped Europe  

Sugar 

● Sugar was not widely consumed in the 17th and and early 18th century ● It was seen as a good only consumed by the rich by virtue of its medicinal value ● However, towards the mid 18th century, sugar consumption increased a lot because it  was made accessible to the mass of the people

● It had a positive effect on workers’ productivity  

● It served as a brilliant food substitute  

● The people consumed it like crazy and there was a very high demand for it in the  European market

● It proved well for the people whose caloric intake had been declining 

Sugar Production in the 17th century sugar factories 

● Europe used its colonies in the Caribbean islands 

● Apart from the production of sugar, the islands had nothing. So, they had to import  everything from Europe, giving a huge impetus to the European market

○ Asia was a bad trade partner for Europe because they were fairly self­sufficient  and had no need to import everything from Europe

● The owners of the plantations were entrepreneurs at the cutting edge of capitalism ● They hired both skilled and unskilled labour, that was extensive. They had large  amounts of capital We also discuss several other topics like What are the 6 special properties of water?

Plantation Agriculture 

● The Glorious Revolution of 1688 signified a new arrangement between the monarchs  and the property owners. 

○ Secure property rights and control over taxation 

○ In exchange for: cheap credit for the Crown and an ability to borrow on a massive scale, allowing British trade to grow exponentially 

○ More state control 

● This made England the most secure place to buy bonds 

● They built an active stock exchange, borrowing from the Dutch at very low interest ● Marriage of fire power and trade 

○ A large naval base was beneficial for trade 

○ Simply the threat of naval power was sufficient to improve financial interests  ○ The ability to wage war and commercial dynamism went hand in hand ○ Having a strong Navy was key in commercial interests  

● England’s mainland colonies 

○ England’s most important colony was the Caribbean because of the sugar Trade

○ In the 17th century, the Spanish and The Dutch did not want to expand North in  the New World

○ This allowed England to do so 

○ They found an important cash crop­ Tobacco 

○ There was a huge demand for Tobacco in Europe, and The Chesapeake became the main supplier of it We also discuss several other topics like What are the Type of Negotiable Instruments?

○ The prices of Tobacco dropped but it was still highly profitable for England ● Tobacco 

○ This was bought by labourers as a way to relax 

○ It transformed from a commodity to a drug consumed by the majority ○ The expansion of Tobacco led to more demand for labour 

○ First, people hired indentured servants (white men who were poor and would be  freed after a few years)

○ However, towards the end of the 17th century, slaves became the more popular  option. Slaves were cheaper and better for social reasons as well. They did not  rebel and they did not want land. 

○ Bacon’s Rebellion: The Whites rebelled to protect their kind from being servants.  This scared slave owners and gave an impetus to slaves over indentured  servants

○ The English people wanted to eventually own land 

○ The slaves did not come in their way as much as indentured servants ○ As the slave population increased, owners became afraid of rebellion and the  rules for slaves became very strict Don't forget about the age old question of What is Protestant Reformation:?

○ By the end of the 18th century, NE was the leading exporter of Tobacco ● Rice If you want to learn more check out How do you find the equilibrium quantity?

○ The conquerors established a colony in Carolina 

○ It attracted poor people with the promise of land, work and food  

○ The weather in Carolina was conducive to the growth of a popular cash crop­ rice ○ By the mid­1700s, rice export had grown exponentially 

● Indigo 

○ Indigo was in high demand in the English clothing industry 

○ Rice and Indigo were not in competition so Carolina became very profitable ○ They were both labour intensive and the number of slaves increased in those  years

○ The English also grew politically exploiting the large slave population ● Characteristics of plantation agriculture 

○ Specialization in a single, profitable crop 

○ All agriculture was almost exclusively commercial agriculture 

○ Increasing emphasis on labour beyond the family 

○ The emergence of race as a defining social category 

○ Units of labour grew due to the economies of scale 

● “Societies with Slaves” 

○ Slaves did not have to control their slaves very strictly 

○ The master­slave relation was not seen as an exemplar for labour relations ○ The slaves were only one type of labour in society 

○ Slavery was marginal to the larger industry

● “Slave Societies” 

○ The master­slave relationship became the exemplar for labour relations ○ The master had complete control over the slaves’ lives 

○ The number of slaves increased drastically 

○ The previously permeable lines between slavery and freedom were completely  impossible 

○ Other forms of labour were minimal  

○ Slave rights were basically abolished  

○ Slaves became associated with racial identities 

The Economy of the American Colonies: New England 

● Characteristics of NE agriculture 

○ Diversified crops and economy 

○ Distinct gender division of labour 

○ Family labour 

○ Distinct demography 

○ Smaller land and farms 

○ Commercial export staples were not very important 

○ NE consisted of people who wanted to get away from slave markets  ○ They were a society with slaves 

○ They did not have one commodity that they could mass produce 

○ There was more of a focus on being self­sufficient 

○ Because NE was not exporting, they were less vulnerable to market fluctuations ● Pelts 

○ NE trade developed very slowly 

○ They could hardly afford the British goods circulating in their economy ○ So, they began to export animal pelt as a way to pay for the goods 

○ But, the population of beaver eventually depleted 

○ By the end of the 17th century, the found fish as a successful export good ● Fish 

○ NE was capturing six million pounds of fish  

○ This served as a basis for international trade 

○ They also began exporting timber and produce 

○ There was a shift from internal to international trade 

○ NE was forced to accept new currency 

○ They became enmeshed in the global economy, which made their economy  more prosperous 

○ Helped NE to majorly diversify 

History Study Guide

The Great Divergence: Why Europe?

∙ In the 16th century, most of the world’s wealth was in the East (India, China etc.) ∙ The West owned less than 18% of the total wealth

∙ By the 19th century, the world’s wealth had shifted to Europe

∙ Europe owned about 40% of total wealth by 1913

Niall Ferguson: Endogenous factors

∙ British Historian

∙ Takes a Euro­centric approach to explaining Europe’s success

∙ He linked the success of Europe to internal factors that he called Killer Apps ∙ Killer Apps

o Scientific Breakthrough: The formation of scientific clubs, public lectures for wide  access to knowledge 

o Protestant Ethic: This allowed for more extensive and intensive labour, as well as increased savings, which could be put back into businesses for further growth o Market Demand: Created a demand for market goods, made luxury goods  (sugar) into everyday goods 

o Representative government and Rule of Law: This protected the wealth of  capitalists, it was a system based on secure property rights

Kenneth Pomeranz

∙ American Historian on China

∙ Studied at Cornell

∙ Stressed exogenous factors that helped Europe succeed

∙ Criticism of Ferguson

o Too Eurocentric an approach. The “Killer Apps” were important and necessary,  but not sufficient to explain The Great Divergence

o He points out that the West’s technological advances were vastly exaggerated:  India and China had some larger urban centres and fast transport systems o The East was also going through a rapid period of expansion and were at parity  with the West in terms of industrialization

Thomas Malthus

∙ English cleric and scholar

∙ Came up with the theory of the Malthusian Trap

∙ This is the theory that society would reach its ecological constraints and be forced to go  back to its original state. The population growth of a place would eventually deplete all  the resources available.

∙ The ecological limits stood in the way of progress

∙ This included food, fuel, fiber and building materials

History Study Guide 

The Great Divergence: Why Europe? 

● In the 16th century, most of the world’s wealth was in the East (India, China etc.) ● The West owned less than 18% of the total wealth 

● By the 19th century, the world’s wealth had shifted to Europe 

● Europe owned about 40% of total wealth by 1913 

Niall Ferguson: Endogenous factors 

● British Historian 

● Takes a Euro­centric approach to explaining Europe’s success 

● He linked the success of Europe to internal factors that he called Killer Apps ● Killer Apps 

○ Scientific Breakthrough: The formation of scientific clubs, public lectures for wide  access to knowledge 

○ Protestant Ethic: This allowed for more extensive and intensive labour, as well as increased savings, which could be put back into businesses for further growth ○ Market Demand: Created a demand for market goods, made luxury goods  (sugar) into everyday goods 

○ Representative government and Rule of Law: This protected the wealth of  capitalists, it was a system based on secure property rights

Kenneth Pomeranz 

● American Historian on China 

● Studied at Cornell 

● Stressed exogenous factors that helped Europe succeed 

● Criticism of Ferguson 

○ Too Eurocentric an approach. The “Killer Apps” were important and necessary,  but not sufficient to explain The Great Divergence

○ He points out that the West’s technological advances were vastly exaggerated:  India and China had some larger urban centres and fast transport systems ○ The East was also going through a rapid period of expansion and were at parity  with the West in terms of industrialization

Thomas Malthus 

● English cleric and scholar 

● Came up with the theory of the Malthusian Trap 

● This is the theory that society would reach its ecological constraints and be forced to go  back to its original state. The population growth of a place would eventually deplete all  the resources available.

● The ecological limits stood in the way of progress 

● This included food, fuel, fiber and building materials

● According to Pomeranz, Europe escaped this trap by gaining access to new and  unlimited resources via their New World colonies. They provided an infinite supply of  goods

○ Cotton and Sugar were the main goods that ultimately helped Europe  

Sugar 

● Sugar was not widely consumed in the 17th and and early 18th century ● It was seen as a good only consumed by the rich by virtue of its medicinal value ● However, towards the mid 18th century, sugar consumption increased a lot because it  was made accessible to the mass of the people

● It had a positive effect on workers’ productivity  

● It served as a brilliant food substitute  

● The people consumed it like crazy and there was a very high demand for it in the  European market

● It proved well for the people whose caloric intake had been declining 

Sugar Production in the 17th century sugar factories 

● Europe used its colonies in the Caribbean islands 

● Apart from the production of sugar, the islands had nothing. So, they had to import  everything from Europe, giving a huge impetus to the European market

○ Asia was a bad trade partner for Europe because they were fairly self­sufficient  and had no need to import everything from Europe

● The owners of the plantations were entrepreneurs at the cutting edge of capitalism ● They hired both skilled and unskilled labour, that was extensive. They had large  amounts of capital

Plantation Agriculture 

● The Glorious Revolution of 1688 signified a new arrangement between the monarchs  and the property owners. 

○ Secure property rights and control over taxation 

○ In exchange for: cheap credit for the Crown and an ability to borrow on a massive scale, allowing British trade to grow exponentially 

○ More state control 

● This made England the most secure place to buy bonds 

● They built an active stock exchange, borrowing from the Dutch at very low interest ● Marriage of fire power and trade 

○ A large naval base was beneficial for trade 

○ Simply the threat of naval power was sufficient to improve financial interests  ○ The ability to wage war and commercial dynamism went hand in hand ○ Having a strong Navy was key in commercial interests  

● England’s mainland colonies 

○ England’s most important colony was the Caribbean because of the sugar Trade

○ In the 17th century, the Spanish and The Dutch did not want to expand North in  the New World

○ This allowed England to do so 

○ They found an important cash crop­ Tobacco 

○ There was a huge demand for Tobacco in Europe, and The Chesapeake became the main supplier of it

○ The prices of Tobacco dropped but it was still highly profitable for England ● Tobacco 

○ This was bought by labourers as a way to relax 

○ It transformed from a commodity to a drug consumed by the majority ○ The expansion of Tobacco led to more demand for labour 

○ First, people hired indentured servants (white men who were poor and would be  freed after a few years)

○ However, towards the end of the 17th century, slaves became the more popular  option. Slaves were cheaper and better for social reasons as well. They did not  rebel and they did not want land. 

○ Bacon’s Rebellion: The Whites rebelled to protect their kind from being servants.  This scared slave owners and gave an impetus to slaves over indentured  servants

○ The English people wanted to eventually own land 

○ The slaves did not come in their way as much as indentured servants ○ As the slave population increased, owners became afraid of rebellion and the  rules for slaves became very strict

○ By the end of the 18th century, NE was the leading exporter of Tobacco ● Rice 

○ The conquerors established a colony in Carolina 

○ It attracted poor people with the promise of land, work and food  

○ The weather in Carolina was conducive to the growth of a popular cash crop­ rice ○ By the mid­1700s, rice export had grown exponentially 

● Indigo 

○ Indigo was in high demand in the English clothing industry 

○ Rice and Indigo were not in competition so Carolina became very profitable ○ They were both labour intensive and the number of slaves increased in those  years

○ The English also grew politically exploiting the large slave population ● Characteristics of plantation agriculture 

○ Specialization in a single, profitable crop 

○ All agriculture was almost exclusively commercial agriculture 

○ Increasing emphasis on labour beyond the family 

○ The emergence of race as a defining social category 

○ Units of labour grew due to the economies of scale 

● “Societies with Slaves” 

○ Slaves did not have to control their slaves very strictly 

○ The master­slave relation was not seen as an exemplar for labour relations ○ The slaves were only one type of labour in society 

○ Slavery was marginal to the larger industry

● “Slave Societies” 

○ The master­slave relationship became the exemplar for labour relations ○ The master had complete control over the slaves’ lives 

○ The number of slaves increased drastically 

○ The previously permeable lines between slavery and freedom were completely  impossible 

○ Other forms of labour were minimal  

○ Slave rights were basically abolished  

○ Slaves became associated with racial identities 

The Economy of the American Colonies: New England 

● Characteristics of NE agriculture 

○ Diversified crops and economy 

○ Distinct gender division of labour 

○ Family labour 

○ Distinct demography 

○ Smaller land and farms 

○ Commercial export staples were not very important 

○ NE consisted of people who wanted to get away from slave markets  ○ They were a society with slaves 

○ They did not have one commodity that they could mass produce 

○ There was more of a focus on being self­sufficient 

○ Because NE was not exporting, they were less vulnerable to market fluctuations ● Pelts 

○ NE trade developed very slowly 

○ They could hardly afford the British goods circulating in their economy ○ So, they began to export animal pelt as a way to pay for the goods 

○ But, the population of beaver eventually depleted 

○ By the end of the 17th century, the found fish as a successful export good ● Fish 

○ NE was capturing six million pounds of fish  

○ This served as a basis for international trade 

○ They also began exporting timber and produce 

○ There was a shift from internal to international trade 

○ NE was forced to accept new currency 

○ They became enmeshed in the global economy, which made their economy  more prosperous 

○ Helped NE to majorly diversify  

The British Imperial Crisis and The American Revolution 

● The emergence of the middle colonies 

○ Britain began expanding its middle colonies along with NE and The Chesapeake  between the late 17th and early 18th centuries

○ The middle colonies were slave societies, which was less the case in the  countryside

○ They mainly produced grain, but also other products, that directly fed the British  economy 

● The British Imperial System and the Navigation Acts 

○ The colonies were a big part of the booming English economy  

○ The British wanted to achieve parity with Spain, Denmark and France  ○ Navigation Acts (mid 17th century): 

■ This cemented the British commercial system 

■ Denmark was not allowed to bring trade from abroad into England ■ This allowed England to have exclusive sea ports where they could bring  in American imports 

■ American colonial exports rose to 40% of British imports  

■ The English colonies could only acquire European goods via England,  which increased their shipping costs and time

■ Goods from the colonies in America could only be transported by English  ships to English ports, and heavy duties had to be paid on these goods  ○ The colonies were becoming increasingly important to British trade ○ The British provided a loose free trade system for America, which Benjamin  Franklin saw the benefits of. 

● Seven Years War (French and Indian War) 

○ This was a war that involved almost the entire world at the time 

○ Great Britain came out on top, acquiring many new colonies and territories ○ Spain and France lost many of their colonies 

○ It was the beginning of British supremacy over the world  

○ Because of the colonies and trade empire that England had set up, it was the  most taxed country in the world. 

○ It had an enormous debt and no way to raise money to pay off the debt ○ They also had military constraints which added to the debt 

○ This caused Britain to raise taxation in the colonies in order to pay for their debts  at home

● The Imperial Crisis: Economic Reasons for American Independence ○ The power of the British state was limited by distance 

○ They had a loose system of governance in the colonies, which allowed the rulers  to bend rules from England. This made it harder for England to establish control ○ England’s administrative power proved greatly inefficient because of taxation  without representation

○ The Spanish and French colonies that England had acquired were not as hard to  control

○ The Indian colonies tried to rebel, but the English banned all trade to India  ○ Stamp Act (1765): This charged duties on all legal forms of paper, playing cards  and newspapers

■ There was huge pushback against this act 

■ It was eventually repealed 

○ There was also the Townsend Act, which imposed duties.  

○ The people in the colonies came together to protest against these acts and  boycott English goods

○ The Boston tea party was the most famous of these rebellions 

○ The colonies had a common enemy and came together in Philadelphia to  orchestrate formal opposition to England

○ People of lower classes were also becoming politically aware and helping in the  revolution, giving it a lot more influence and manpower 

● Short term factors 

○ High taxes 

○ Restriction on colonial trade: All exports to Europe had to go through England  (Navigation Act), which majorly increased their shipping costs. 

● Long­Term factors 

○ Maybe the colonies were thinking of their future and the benefits of political  independence from England

○ Territorial expansion­ American society was expanding and becoming more  politically aware. Many agrarians sensed the benefits of territorial expansion.  People like Jefferson recognised the benefits of land and realised how 

transformational it would be for American society. 

○ The Growth of Manufacturing­ manufacturing in the colonies was very hard  because the British forced them to buy cheap English goods. They provided too  much competition for the local artisans to deal with. Navigation acts also  prohibited the production of many good within the colonies. There was also poor  infrastructure and dispersed markets. The Americans realised that they needed  to protect their people from foreign competition and expand local manufacturing.

The Political Economy of the New Nation 

● Revolution is as much about home rule as much as it is about who rules at home” ­ Carl  Becker

● Capitlasim 

○ Many definitions, none are completely correct 

○ Private property ownership 

○ Market dependence and relations to sustain themselves  

○ Commodification of goods including land, labour and money. This involves not  knowing where these things were produced or who produced them. They are  simply commodities for trade

○ Adam Smith: Trade of goods in the market, subdivision of labour, emphasis on  the market and push to increase productivity (not like Martha Ballard)

○ Marx: Relations of production and wage labour. A society in which some owners  capitalise the means of production

○ Max Weber: The Protestant ethic of being neighborly, not just about supply and  demand, self­denial, profits are saved to be re­invested

● Capitalisation  

○ The act in which everything in society including people, urban spaces, cultures  and other things are transformed into units that may be sold and valued  according to their profit generating margin.

○ Why was America not Capitalist?

■ In England, 70% of land was leased out to tenants, and so it was treated  like a capital asset that generated revenues

■ In America, 70% of free people owned land, free and clear. The land was  not seen as a revenue but a way to support the household, and not to  generate a cash income

● Education of Alexander Hamilton 

○ He was greatly influenced by Adam Smith  

○ He grew up in the West Indies island of St. Croix, which was a sugar island ○ He witnessed a lot of slave auctions and took down the prices of slaves ○ He did not support slavery, but this influenced him later on  

○ He worked as a clerk for prominent NYC merchants where he learnt accounting  and international commerce

● The Logic of Propertied Independence 

○ Hamilton thought that land should be thought of in terms of its propensity to yield  profit

○ Richard Peter, head of the society for promotion of agriculture, rejected this  notion because he was anti­capitalist

○ However, slaves were managed as capitalised labour, which fueled Hamilton’s  life projects.

● Hamilton’s reports 

○ Hamilton saw the American Revolution as a way to apply shock therapy to  society

○ As society was organised presently, taxation was collected very loosely and the  banks copiously printed money, making it easier for debtors to pay back their  debt

○ This shielded farmers from producing extra cash crops for profit 

● Report on Public Credit 

○ Hamilton saw debt as a way to fuel future economic development 

○ He wanted to get investors on his side, and create an American elite that would  have a stake in the government 

○ He wanted to create capital stock to facilitate trade and investment ○ Also to establish the creditworthiness of the US, making it a safe place for people to invest their money

○ Need to generate tax revenues to fuel the debt 

● Report on a National Bank 

○ Bank as a private profit driven organisation  

○ Bank to lend money to investors to expand economy further 

● Report on Manufactures 

○ Using the government to create a manufacturing base in the nation, using  women and children as the employees

○ This was the least successful 

● Hamilton wanted to use the State to move to a capitalist society by transforming the  political framework

● Public debt gave the state a stake in nurturing a capitalist economy ● Synergy between private actors and the state

● Making the US safe for investors 

○ Article 1 section 10 

○ Prohibiting the state from printing paper money 

○ Prohibiting the state from making laws that protected farmers from paying off  debt (Eg: using land to pay creditors)

○ Senators and judges were elected for a lifetime, insuring the least corruption  ○ Pro­creditor documents were encouraging for investors  

The Rise of King Cotton 

● Jefferson and his vision for an empire of liberty 

○ He was anti­capitalist, but had a progressive agrarian view of expansion ○ He wanted to have free trade, Westward expansion and the integration the US  economy into the global economy

○ He borrowed 68 million Francs from France in 1803 in order to acquire Louisiana  from France and expand Westward (This was using Hamiltonian ways)

○ But, this failed in the South  

○ Proponent for mixed commercial agriculture where farmers benefitted from  exporting goods

● The Industrial Revolution in England 

○ There was a wave of technological change that had a huge impact on labour  productivity

○ It increased by 3000, due to machines such as the spinning Spinning Jenny and  Flying Shuttle etc

○ This gave a huge rise in the demand for cotton  

○ Cotton manufactures soon represented 1/5th of all British exports 

○ There was a lot of land and labour needed to produce cotton  

○ There was a big rise in the industry 

● The Rise of the King Cotton Kingdom and its contribution to the American economy ○ In the late 19th century, cotton production grew immensely  

○ It spread all across the country 

○ It represented almost 60% of all US exports by the 1860 

● The Plantation as an enterprise  

○ The planters of cotton had quotas of cotton that they had to reach everyday  ○ Violence and coercion was used as a way to incentivise them to work harder ○ Violence was used rationally and systematically, and not governed by emotions ○ Slave and owner relations were better 

○ There was a huge foreign demand for cotton that was ever growing  

○ The plantation owners had to keep up with this ever increasing demand  ● Why did the US emerge the world’s largest cotton producer? 

○ Land: The Americans had a lot of land thanks to Jefferson. They acquired all the  land that Native Americans owned. They did this using power from the state  (Hamiltonian principle). The land was soon privatised to use for cotton production

○ Labour: Slave trade became a well­established and formal business. Atlantic  slaves were banned, so there was a huge expansion in US based slaves. About 

a million slaves were moved to the South during this period. There were multiple  slave revolts in the years, which scared slave owners. 

The Early American State 

● Summary from last time: Creation of a new urban society with urban landscapes.  ○ Growing social stratification 

○ Vastly wealthy merchants and men of finance who controlled the banks  shifted their capital away from commerce into manufacturing (Boston  associates)

○ Working class of retail people, accountants etc. who handled the  paperwork for a new market society

○ Distinction between manual and non manual labour 

○ The making of things, the office as an important site for market production ○ Buying and selling became increasingly specialised unlike the earlier  period (where traders bought pretty much everything). They gained an  advance by focusing on a particular segment of the market ­ 

Specialisation and dependency 

○ Emergence of new spaces (brick and glass stores etc.) 

○ Specialised spaces for consumption removed from the sites of 

manufacturing, providing comfortable spaces for shoppers to observe  goods ­ grandiosity became a business principle and a form of aesthetic  ○ This created a division in class ­ separation between production and  consumption 

○ By the 1830s, American society was dazzling Europeans  

○ Alexis de Tocqueville­ surprised by Americans freedom of space and  movement of goods. Contrast between traditional French society. 

Americans were dynamic and on­the­move, as compared to the French  who were stable 

● Communication­ The US Postal Service  

○ People believed that government inactivity was the norm in the world,  with unregulated capitalism

○ But, government action pervaded all levels of society, including the  market. Not a big idea of “laissez faire” circulating

○ Eg: The government was stabilising slavery as a labour regime,  acquisition of land (Louisiana purchase, privatisation), state providing  credit to slaveowners (banking system, National Bank), the constitution as an economic document (regulated the federal government’s role in  commerce, allowed the government to collect tax revenues for the public  debt system, secured property rights­ makes the US safe for investors)

○ The first large ventures in America were public­ funded with public  money, extended across vast territories and envisioned a bold economic  system 

○ The biggest example of this was the US postal service­ it had almost  9000 postmasters. The system transmitted almost 14 million letters and  newspapers over a network of 116000 square miles. (No private 

organisations worked on such a large scale)

○ 1831 Tocqueville: astounded by the scale of postal service. He calculated that the average inhabitant of the Michigan (outskirts) territory received  more nonverbal communication than someone in the centre of France

○ Why was the US postal system so much larger than the British one?  ■ The American system was a mirror of the British system 

■ The Americans began to see the postal service as a way to have  informed citizens (political explanation)

● Engineering and Knowledge: The War Department 

○ The War Department created an army that could be used for constructive  civil purposes

○ Sylvanus Thayer: strong focus on training in Maths, Science and  Engineering. Soldier technologists who could build roads etc. 

○ General Survey Act: Put the war dept engineers to work. Most of these  were surveys of privately owned canals and then railways. By 1828, the  Westpoint group became a strong informing force 

○ The federal government exercised an influence on industrial development through these well trained men

● Transportation: Canals and Railroads  

○ Most energetic state involvement took place at the level of the individual  states

○ New York’s Erie canal in 1829­31: No other private ventures with this kind of magnitude 

■ Built by the state of NY 

■ DeWitt Clinton built this  

■ Carried manufactured goods Westward and got imports from the  East 

■ Poured a “river of gold” into NY, making it the world’s leading  commercial centre, taking over from Philadelphia 

○ The state issued bonds from London etc and financed these technological innovations 

○ After 1840, railroad construction was cheaper and better than canals  ○ Most of the capital came from public institutions 

● Law and regulation: federal and state government  

○ Law worked through legislation­ they chartered an increasing number of  corporations. Corporate charters allowed people to pull together large  amounts of capital

○ They included special favours such as tax exemption etc.  

○ State legislatures fostered development in areas under their jurisdiction  ○ Governments acted as regulators 

■ Police power for the betterment of the health, safety and general  welfare of inhabitants

■ Ensured public safety and security  

■ Controlled the policing of public spaces 

■ Restraints on public morals 

○ If one was poor and female/black, regulation was not pretty 

○ The point is that the government coloured all facets of early American  development 

○ Built on a strong foundation of power, law and government. No state, no  capitalism 

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here