×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Rutgers - Psychology 101 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Rutgers - Psychology 101 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

RUTGERS / Psychology / PSY 101 / What is Introspection?

What is Introspection?

What is Introspection?

Description

School: Rutgers University
Department: Psychology
Course: Principles of Psychology 101
Professor: Allyson meloni
Term: Winter 2016
Tags: psych, #psych, #Psychology, Psychology, #psych101, psych101, psychology101, #psychology101, Principlesofpsychology, and Intro to Psychology
Cost: 50
Name: Psychology 101 Study Guide
Description: These notes cover what's going to be on our next exam.
Uploaded: 10/03/2017
29 Pages 13 Views 9 Unlocks
Reviews


1


What is Introspection?



Study Guide Exam 1 

Psychology 101 

Professor Wise

What is the research technique of introspection? How was it used?

 Introspection is the contemplation of your own thoughts and desires and conduct  it reported on sensations and other elements of experience in reaction to  stimuli 

 Titchener used these introspective reports to build a view of the mind’s structure  He engaged people in self­reflective introspection (looking inward),  training them to report elements of their experience as they looked at a 

rose, listened to a metronome, smelled a scent, or tasted a substance. What were their immediate sensations, their images, their feelings? And how did these relate to one another? Alas, introspection proved somewhat 

unreliable. It required smart, verbal people, and its results varied from  person to person and experience to experience. As introspection waned, so did structuralism.


Who defined psychology as "Science of Mental Life"?



What is naturalistic observation?

 Naturalistic observations

 Descriptive technique of observing and recording behavior in naturally  occurring situations without trying to change or control the situation ­ Records behavior in natural environment

­ Describes but does not explain behavior

­ Can be revealing

1

2

 What is a case study?

 Case Studies

 Descriptive technique in which one person is studied in depth in the hope  of revealing universal principles

­ Examines one individual in depth

­ Provides fruitful ideas

­ Cannot be used to generalize

Who was William Wundt and why was he important?

 Wilhelm Wundt (1832­1920) 

 Defined psychology as “science of mental life” 

­ Added two key elements to enhance scientific nature of 

psychology 


Who studied how humans use perception to function in our environment?



­ Elements included carefully measured observations and 

experiments

­ Wilhelm Wundt established the first psychology laboratory at the  University of Leipzig, Germany.

 Wundt was seeking to measure “atoms of the mind”—the fastest and  simplest mental processes. So, began the first psychological laboratory,  staffed by Wundt and by psychology’s first graduate students. If you want to learn more check out What are the types of Types of Depository Institutions?

American psychologist emphasized the study of observable behavior during which period of time? 

 American psychologist emphasized the study of observable behavior from  the 1920’s to 1960’s If you want to learn more check out What is the difference between traditional and artificial myth?

Who was William James?  Why was he important?

 William James studied how humans use perception to function in our  environment 

 Trained as a physician and taught philosophy Don't forget about the age old question of What is Sustainability?

 Established the first teaching lab in America (1875)

 Thought introspection was useless

2

3

 Sought to discover how consciousness was fundamental to human  survival

 Wrote Principles of Psychology (still used today)

 Stream of consciousness

 Selective attention

What is behaviorism? 

 Behaviorism

 a natural science approach to psychology that focuses on the study of  environmental influences on observable behavior 

 A reaction to psychoanalysis

 If psychology is a science, we have to focus on that which can be  measured ­ the world we can access through our senses

 the view that psychology should by an objective science and study  behavior without reference

What is natural selection?

 Natural Selection

 Explains changes in a population that occur when organisms with favorable  variations survive. 

 Survival of the fittest

 Some organisms have an advantage over others.

 Results in adaptations that allow populations to survive in their 

environments.

 From among chance variations, nature selects traits that best enable an organism  to survive and reproduce in a particular environment.  

What is cognitive neuroscience?

 Cognitive neuroscience 

 is the scientific field that is concerned with the study of the biological  processes and aspects that underlie cognition We also discuss several other topics like What is nucleic acid and its function?

­ with a specific focus on the neural connections in the brain which  are involved in mental processes. 

 discipline geared towards understanding how the brain works, how brain structure and function affect behavior and how the brain enables the mind 

3

4

 The interdisciplinary field of cognitive neuroscience ties the science of  mind (cognitive psychology) and the science of the brain (neuroscience)  and focuses on brain activity underlying mental activity

What is the nature – nurture debate? 

 Nature VS. Nurture We also discuss several other topics like More than half of the private sector companies in the United States go out of business within how many years?

 The question that what extent are our traits already set in place at birth  (our “Nature”)? 

 And to what extent do our traits develop in response to our environment/  experience (our “Nurture”)? Don't forget about the age old question of How does the brain relate to the mind?

 Nature

 Plato: (428­348 BCE) Character and intelligence inherited; some ideas  inborn

 Descartes: Some ideas are intuitive

 Darwin: Some traits, behaviors, and instincts are part of species; natural  selection

 Experiment: Because identical twins have the same genes, they are ideal  participants in studies designed to shed light on hereditary and environmental  influences on intelligence, personality, and other traits. Studies of identical and 

fraternal twins provide a rich array of findings—described in other modules—that underscore the importance of both nature and nurture.

 Nurture

 Aristotle: (384–322 B.C.E.) Content of mind comes through senses  Locke: Mind is blank slate

The debate over the nature­nurture issue is ancient*

Nurture works on what nature endows. *

What is the biopsychosocial approach to psychology? 

4

5

Biopsychosocial approach

 an integrated perspective that incorporates biological, psychological, and social cultural levels of analysis. 

 Each of us is a complex system that is part of a larger social system. But  each of us is also composed of smaller systems, such as our nervous  system and body organs, which are composed of still smaller systems—

cells, molecules, and atoms. These tiered systems suggest different levels  of analysis, which offer complementary outlooks. 

­ It’s like explaining horrific school shootings. 

∙ Is it because the shooters have brain disorders or genetic 

tendencies that cause them to be violent? 

∙ Because they have been rewarded for violent behavior? 

∙ Because we live in a gun­promoting society that accepts 

violence?  

o Such perspectives are complementary because 

“everything is related to everything else” Together, 

different levels of analysis form an integrated 

biopsychosocial approach, which considers the 

influences of biological, psychological, and social

cultural factors. Each level provides a valuable 

playing card in psychology’s explanatory deck. It’s 

a vantage point for looking at a behavior or mental 

process, yet each by itself is incomplete. 

 Humans are biopsychosocial systems in which biological, psychological, and  social­cultural factors interact to influence behavior. 

What is evolutionary psychology?

Evolutionary Psychology

 How the natural selection of traits has promoted the survival of genes   How does evolution influence behavior tendencies? 

 Focuses on how humans are alike because of common biology and evolutionary  history 

 Darwin’s explained that nature selects traits that best enable an organism to  survive and reproduce in a particular environment. 

5

6

 Today’s psychologists explore the relative contributions of biology and  experience. They ask, for example, how are we humans alike because of our  common biology and evolutionary history? 

 The focus of evolutionary psychology is:

 How are we humans alike because of our common biology and  evolutionary history?  

 And how are we diverse because of our differing genes and environments?  How are intelligence and personality differences influenced by heredity  and by environment? 

Cognitive psychology?

 How we encode, process, store, and retrieve information 

 How do we use information in remembering? Reasoning? Solving  problems? 

 Cognitive neuroscience; clinical; counseling; industrial­organizational

Social­cultural psychology?

 How behavior and thinking vary across situations and cultures  

 How are we alike as members of one human family? How do we differ as  products of our environment? 

 Developmental; social psychology; clinical; counseling 

What is the testing effect? 

 Actively processing material and retrieving material helps master it (testing  effect) 

How do students learn best?

 Students learn best by

 Testing 

­ Testing boosts retention of material

 Actively processing material and retrieving material helps master it  6

7

­ (testing effect)

 Spaced rehearsal, interspaced with other subjects, is more efficient than  cramming

 Concept familiarity is not effective enough

 Countless experiments reveal that people learn and remember best when they put  material in their own words, rehearse it, and then retrieve and review it again.  SQ3R is an acronym for its five steps: Survey, Question, Read, Retrieve,  Review. 

What is contemporary psychology as a science? 

 Contemporary psychology 

 Contemporary psychology of science is a branch of the studies of science  that includes philosophy of science, history of science, and sociology  of science or sociology of scientific knowledge. The  

psychology of science is defined most simply as the scientific study  of scientific thought or behavior. 

 Contemporary psychologists study both overt behavior and covert thoughts.  contemporary psychologists approach the scientific study of behaviors and mental processes from a variety of perspectives, and each perspective  offers an important piece of the psychology puzzle. As we study these  perspectives, we should keep in mind that all the approaches are valid and  each has advantages and disadvantages. 

 In contemporary science, the nature–nurture tension dissolves: Nurture works on  what nature endows.  

 Every psychological event (every thought, every emotion) is simultaneously a  biological event. 

What was the cognitive revolution in psychology?

 A shift in psychology ­ beginning in the 1950s ­ from the behaviorist approach to  an approach in which the main thrust was to explain behavior in terms of the  mind. One of the outcomes of the cognitive revolution was the introduction of the  information­processing approach to studying the mind. 

 The cognitive revolution occurred in 1960 and focus returned to  interest in mental processes.

 Cognitive psychology scientifically explored ways in which information  is perceived, processed, and remembered.

7

8

­ “In the 1960s, the cognitive revolution led the field back to its  early interest in mental processes, such as the importance of how  our mind processes and retains information. Cognitive psychology scientifically explores the ways we perceive, process, and  remember information. The cognitive approach has given us new  ways to understand ourselves and to treat disorders such as 

depression. Cognitive neuroscience was birthed by the marriage of 

cognitive psychology (the science of mind) and neuroscience (the 

science of brain). This interdisciplinary field studies the brain 

activity underlying mental activity.”

What is hindsight bias?  Why is it important?

 Hindsight bias

 Tendency to believe, after learning an outcome, that we could have predicted it  Also known as the I­knew­it­all­along phenomenon

 More than 800 scholarly papers have documented this phenomenon  

­ Ex. When drilling the Deepwater Horizon oil well in 2010, oil 

industry employees took some shortcuts and ignored some warning

signs, without intending to harm the environment or their 

companies’ reputations. 

 After the resulting Gulf oil spill, with the benefit of 20/20 hindsight, the  foolishness of those judgments became obvious.

What is critical thinking and why is that important?

 Thinking critically

 Critical thinking refers to a more careful style of forming and evaluating  knowledge than simply using intuition.  

 In addition to the scientific method, critical thinking helps develop more  effective and accurate ways to figure out what makes people do, think, and feel the things they do.

 The scientific attitude prepares us to think smarter. 

­ Smart thinking, called critical thinking, examines assumptions, 

8

9

appraises the source, discerns hidden values, evaluates evidence,  and assesses conclusions. 

∙ Critical thinkers ask questions such as How do they know  that? What is this person’s agenda? Is the conclusion 

based on anecdote and gut feelings, or on evidence? Does 

the evidence justify a cause–effect conclusion? What 

alternative explanations are possible?

 Examples—critical thinking

­ Climate change

∙ Does it exist?

∙ Does it threaten our future?

∙ Is it caused by humans?

o Rather than having their understanding of climate 

change swayed by today’s weather, or by their own  political views, critical thinkers say, 

 “Show me the evidence.” 

∙ Over time, is the Earth actually 

warming? 

∙ Are the polar ice caps melting? 

∙ Are vegetation patterns changing? 

∙ And is human activity spewing gases that would lead us to expect such 

changes? 

o When contemplating such 

issues, critical thinkers will 

consider the credibility of 

sources. They will look at the

evidence (Do the facts 

support them, or are they just

makin’ stuff up?). 

o They will recognize multiple 

perspectives. And they will 

expose themselves to news 

sources that challenge their 

preconceived ideas.

9

10

 CRITICAL THINKING: Analyzing, rather than simply accepting, information  Determining if flaw in information collection exists

 Considering alternative explanations for facts or results

 Searching for hidden assumption and deciding if you agree

 Looking for hidden bias, politics, values, or personal connections  Discarding personal assumptions and biases and viewing the evidence

What are the three key attitudes of scientific inquiry?

 Three key attitudes of scientific inquiry are: 

 curiosity, skepticism and humility 

 Scientific inquiry has revealed surprising findings

 Massive losses of brain tissue early in life may actually have minimal  long­term effects. 

 Within days, newborns can recognize their mother by her odor.

 After brain damage, a person may be able to learn new skills yet be  completely unaware of such learning. 

 Diverse groups—men and women, old and young, rich and middle class,  those with disabilities and those without—report roughly comparable  levels of personal happiness.

 Scientific inquiry as also debunked popular assumptions

 Research shows that:

 sleep­walkers are not acting out their dreams. 

 Our past experiences are not all recorded verbatim in our brains; with  brain stimulation or hypnosis, one cannot simply “hit the replay button”  and relive long­buried or repressed memories.

 Most people do not suffer from low self­esteem, and high self­esteem is  not all good

 Opposites do not generally attract

What is an empirical approach?

 Empirical approach

10

11

 study conducted via careful observations & scientifically based research. ­ scientific approach in which psychology is researched.

 A study conducted via careful observations and scientifically based research. Significance: Allowed psychologists to conduct studies that have altered the way  we think.

­ i.e. Magician James Randi has used this empirical approach when  testing those claiming to see glowing auras around people’s bodies 

­ The magician James Randi exemplifies skepticism. 

­ He has tested and debunked supposed psychic phenomena

 Randi: Do you see an aura around my head?

 Aura seer: Yes, indeed.

 Randi: Can you still see the aura if I put this magazine in front of my face?  Aura seer: Of course.

 Randi: Then if I were to step behind a wall barely taller than I am, you  could determine my location from the aura visible above my head, right?  Randi once told me that no aura seer has agreed to take this simple test.

What is intuition?

 Intuition

 An effortless, immediate, automatic feeling or thought, as contrasted with explicit, conscious reasoning. 

 Knowing or sensing something without the use of reason; an insight

Why do people tend to underestimate the extent to which outcomes result from chance?  People tend to underestimate the extent to which outcomes result from chance because People perceive patterns to make sense of their world.

 Some happenings seem so extraordinary –such as winning the lottery twice—we  reject chance­related explanations 

 However, with a large enough sample, any outrageous thing is likely to  happen

 An event that happens to but 1 in 1 billion people every day occurs about  7 times a day, 2500 times a year.

11

12

­ Even in random, unrelated data people often find order, because  random sequences often do not look random.

­ People trust their intuition more than they should because intuitive  thinking is flawed.

 Why is intuition overused and errors made?

 Hindsight bias, overconfidence, and our tendency to perceive patterns in random  events often lead us to overestimate our intuition. 

What is skepticism and why is it important in science?

 Skepticism

 Doubting and questioning; this includes critical thinking abilities  Supports questions about behavior and mental processes:

­ What do you mean?

­ How do you know?

 THE AMAZING RANDI: Magician and skeptic James Randi has tested and  debunked a variety of psychic phenomena.

What is overconfidence?

 Overconfidence

 When people tend to think they know more than they do. 

 This occurs in academic and social behavior.

 Another example of why we need psychological science is 

overconfidence. We humans tend to think we know more than we do.  Asked how sure we are of our answers to factual questions (Is Boston  north or south of Paris?), we tend to be more confident than correct.

 Examples: 

 People in the past used to say 

­ “We don’t like their sound. Groups of guitars are on their way 

out.”

 “Computers in the future may weigh no more than 1.5 tons.”

­

12

13

 Decca Records, in turning down a recording contract with the Beatles in  1962

What is a theory and what does it do?

 Theory

 Explanation using an integrated set of principles that organizes  

observations and predicts behaviors or events 

 In science, a theory explains behaviors or events by offering ideas that organize what we have observed. By organizing isolated facts, a theory simplifies. By  linking facts with deeper principles, a theory offers a useful summary. As we  connect the observed dots, a coherent picture emerges.

 A theory about the effects of sleep on memory, for example, helps us organize  countless sleep­related observations into a short list of principles. Imagine that we observe over and over that people with good sleep habits tend to answer questions correctly in class, and they do well at test time. We might therefore theorize that  sleep improves memory. So far so good: Our principle neatly summarizes a list of facts about the effects of a good night’s sleep on memory.

 Yet no matter how reasonable a theory may sound—and it does seem reasonable  to suggest that sleep could improve memory—we must put it to the test.

What is a hypothesis and how is it used?

 Hypothesis

 Testable prediction, often implied by a theory 

­ A good theory produces testable predictions, called hypotheses.  Such predictions specify what results (what behaviors or events) 

would support the theory and what results would disconfirm it. To 

test our theory about the effects of sleep on memory, our 

hypothesis might be that when sleep deprived, people will 

remember less from the day before

What is an operational definition and why is it important?

 Operational definition

 Carefully worded statement of the exact procedures (operations) used in a  research study 

 To test that hypothesis, we might assess how well people remember course  materials they studied before a good night’s sleep, or before a shortened night’s 

13

14

sleep

What is the placebo effect?

 Placebo Effect

 Effect involves results caused by expectations alone.

 Where a patient sees a beneficial effect of a fake medication or treatment because  they have the expectation of it working. 

 is a positive non­specific / contextual effect of therapy (does not have to do with  the active ingredient or the procedure itself)

What is a representative sample? Why is it important?

 Representative Sample 

 A sample that represents a larger population to which the experiment is  targeted towards 

 A subset of the population carefully chosen to represent the proportionate  diversity of the population as a whole.

 A sample that fairly represents a population because each member has an equal  chance of inclusion. Increases the likelihood that the sample represents the  population and that one can generalize the findings to the larger population.

What is random assignment? Random sampling? How are they different?  Random Assignment

 Assigning participants to experimental conditions in such a way that all  participants have equal chance of being chosen. 

 Uses random assignment to assign participants to different conditions (not random sampling)

 the procedure of assigning subjects to the experimental and control conditions by  chance in order to minimize preexisting differences between the groups.

What is a correlation? What is the difference between a positive and negative correlation?  Correlation

 To detect naturally occurring relationships; to assess how well one  variable predicts another  

14

15

 a measure of how closely two factors vary together, or how well you can  predict a change in one from observing a change in the other

 “Describing behavior is a first step toward predicting it. Naturalistic observations  and surveys often show us that one trait or behavior is related to another. In such  cases, we say the two correlates. A statistical measure (the correlation coefficient) helps us figure how closely two things vary together, and thus how well either one predicts the other. Knowing how much aptitude test scores correlate with school  success tells us how well the scores predict school success.”

 Positive correlation (between 0 and +1.00)

 Indicates a direct relationship, meaning that two things increase together  or decrease together 

 Negative correlation (between 0 and −1.00)

 Indicates an inverse relationship: As one thing increases, the other  decreases. 

What is an illusory correlation?

 Illusory correlation 

 Refers to the perception of a relationship between two variables when only a minor or no relationship actually exists 

 example= positive correlation of consumption of ice cream and murder rates   May be fed by regression toward the mean

What is a scatterplot and how is that used?

 Scatterplot

 a graphed cluster of dots, each representing the values of two variables ­ a depiction of the relationship between two variables by means of a graphed cluster of dots.

 Scatterplots, show patterns of correlation

 Correlations can range from +1.00 (scores on one measure increase in direct  proportion to scores on another), to 0.00 (no relationship), to –1.00 (scores on one measure decrease precisely as scores rise on the other).

15

16

What is regression to the mean and why is that important?

 Regression toward the mean

 Refers to the tendency for extreme or unusual scores or events to fall back  (regress) toward the average 

 Students who score much lower or higher on an exam than they usually do are  likely, when retested, to return to their average.

What is an experiment? 

 Research Strategies: Experimentation

 With experiments, researchers can focus on the possible effects of one or  more factors in several ways. 

­ Manipulating the factors of interest to determine their effects

­ Holding constant (“controlling”) other factors

­ Experimental group and control group

­ Uses random assignment to assign participants to different 

conditions (not random sampling)

An independent variable?  

 Independent variable in an experiment

 Factor that is manipulated; the variable whose effect is being studied 

A dependent variable?

 Dependent variable in an experiment

 Factor that is measured; the variable that may change when the independent  variable is manipulated 

What is replication? Why is it important?

 Replication

 Repeating the essence of a research study, usually with different  participants in different situations, to see whether the basic finding extends to other participants and circumstances 

What does this simplified reality of the laboratory allow researchers to do? 16

17

 The simplified reality of laboratory experiments is most helpful in  enabling develop general principles that help explain behavior. 

 The experimenter intends the laboratory experiment to be a simplified  

reality, one in which important features can be simulated and controlled.  The experiment's purpose is not to re­create the exact behaviors of  

everyday life but to test theoretical principles. It is the resulting principles —not the specific findings—that help explains everyday behavior. 

What is a normal curve?

 Normal curve (normal distribution): 

 Symmetrical, bell­shaped curve that describes the distribution of many  types of data; most scores fall near the mean  (about 68 percent fall within  one standard deviation of it) and fewer and fewer near the extremes

What are the measures of central tendency? 

 Measure of Central Tendency

 A single number that presents information about the “center” of a  frequency distribution.  

 Measures of central tendency include a single score that represents a set of scores.

What are the measures of variability?

 Variability

 Information about the spread of the scores in a distribution 

 These distributions have the same mean but different variability—the scores are  spread out differently. 

 The scores in the distribution that is “flatter” or more spread out have a higher  degree of variability

 Measuring Variability – The Normal Curve

17

18

How do extremes scores affect both measures of central tendency and measures of  variability?

 Extreme scores affect the mean 

What is the median of a distribution?  What is the mode? The mean?  Median: 

 Middle score in a distribution; half the scores are above it and half are  below it 

 Mode: 

 Most frequently occurring score(s) in a distribution 

 Mean: 

 Arithmetic average of a distribution, obtained by adding the scores and  then dividing by the number of scores; can be distorted by few atypical  scores 

When looking at the graph, why is imported to notice the range and size of the scale  values?

 The size of the scale values can either make the range look too high or too low. 

What is a statistically significant difference between two sample groups? How do we test  for that?

 When is an observed difference significant?

 When sample averages are reliable and difference between them is  relatively large, the difference has statistical significance.  

 Observed difference is probably not due to chance variation between the samples.  In psychological research, proof beyond a reasonable doubt means that the odds  of its occurrence by chance are less than 5 percent.

 Statistical significance indicates the likelihood that a result will happen by chance. But this does not say anything about the importance of the result.  (example new  drug for female sexual desire!)

What was phrenology? What did it succeed in focusing attention on about the brain?  Phrenology 

 Phrenology revealed mental abilities and character traits 

18

19

 Franz Gall proposed that phrenology, studying bumps on the skull, could reveal a  person’s mental abilities and character traits

  The “science” of phrenology remains known today as a reminder of our need for  critical thinking and scientific analysis.  

What do dendrites do? Axons?

 Dendrites

 Neuron extensions that receive messages and conduct them toward the cell body 

­ They are listeners

∙ Listen to other neurons

 Axon

 axon fibers pass the message through its terminal branches to other  neurons or to muscles or glands. 

­ They do the speaking

­ Whether to another neuron, muscles, or to receptors that affect the  body, glands

Dendrites listen. Axons speak. 

What is a synapse?

 The Synapse

 Junction between one neuron’s axon and another’s dendrites/cell body  Neurotransmitters cross the synapse

 Plays a fundamental role in the communication between neurons  Anatomy of the synapse

 Presynaptic neuron’s axons end in terminal buttons

 Terminal buttons contain synaptic vesicles

 Synaptic vesicles contain neurotransmitters

 Neurotransmitters are chemicals that transmit information across the  synaptic gap (cleft)

 Postsynaptic neuron’s dendrites contain receptor sites

 Receptor sites fit certain neurotransmitters

19

20

What does the myelin sheath do?

 Some axons are encased in a myelin sheath, which enables faster  transmission. 

What is an action potential?

 Action potential:

 Neural impulse that travels down an axon like a wave 

What are ions? How are they involved in neural transmission?

 ions

 electrically charged atoms 

 In the neuron’s chemistry­to­electricity process, ions are exchanged  The fluid outside an axon’s membrane has mostly positively charged sodium ions; a resting axon’s fluid interior has mostly negatively charged ions. This positive outside/negative­inside state is called the resting potential. Like a tightly guarded  facility, the axon’s surface is very selective about what it allows through its gates.   When a neuron fires, however, the security parameters change: The first section  of the axon opens its gates, rather like sewer covers flipping open, and positively  charged sodium ions flood in. The loss of the inside/outside charge difference,  called depolarization, causes the next axon channel to open, and then the next,  like falling dominos, each tripping the next. This temporary inflow of positive 

20

21

ions is the neural impulse—the action potential.

 Ions

 electrically charged particles

 Positive ions

 sodium ions on the OUTSIDE 

 Negative ions

 potassium ions on the INSIDE 

How does the brain represent the intensity of a stimulus? 

 A strong stimulus can trigger more neurons to fire, and to fire more often. But it  does not affect the action potential’s strength or speed. Squeezing a trigger harder  won’t make a bullet go faster. 

What does reuptake refer to in regard to neurotransmitters?

 Reuptake

 Neurotransmitter’s reabsorption by the sending neuron 

 the neurotransmitter unlocks tiny channels at the receiving site, and electrically  charged atoms flow in, exciting or inhibiting the receiving neuron’s readiness to  fire. The excess neurotransmitters then drift away, are broken down by enzymes,  or are reabsorbed by the sending neuron—a process called reuptake. 

What does acetylcholine do? Serotonin? Dopamine ? GABA?

 Acetylcholine (ACh) 

 Enables muscle action, learning, and memory 

­ E.x. With Alzheimer’s disease, ACh ­ producing neurons 

deteriorate.

 Serotonin

 Affects mood, hunger, sleep, and arousal  

 E.x. Undersupply linked to depression. Some drugs that raise serotonin  levels are used to treat depression.

 Dopamine 

 Influences movement, learning, attention, and emotion 

21

22

­ E.x. Oversupply linked to schizophrenia. Undersupply linked to  tremors and loss of motor control in Parkinson’s disease. 

 GABA (gamma­aminobutyricacid)

 A major inhibitory neurotransmitter 

­ E.x Undersupply linked to seizures, tremors, and insomnia.

What are endorphins?

 Endorphins

 Endorphins are natural opiates released in response to pain and exercise. 

What receptors do opiate drugs bind with?

 Bind to neurotransmitters 

 Opiate drugs agonists that amplify normal sensations of arousal/pleasure 

 When flooded with opiate drugs such as heroin and morphine, the brain, to maintain its chemical balance, may stop producing its own natural opiates. When the drug is withdrawn, the brain may then be deprived of any form  of opiate, causing intense discomfort.

 For suppressing the body’s own neurotransmitter production, nature  charges a price. Drugs and other chemicals affect brain chemistry, often  by either exciting or inhibiting neurons’ firing. Agonist molecules 

increase a neurotransmitter’s action. Agonists may increase the production or release of neurotransmitters, or block reuptake in the synapse.

 Other agonists may be similar enough to a neurotransmitter to bind to its  receptor and mimic its excitatory or inhibitory effects. Some opiate drugs  are agonists and produce a temporary “high” by amplifying normal  sensations of arousal or pleasure.

What is an agonist? An antagonist?

 Agonist

 Molecule that increases a neurotransmitter’s action 

 Antagonist

 Molecule that inhibits or blocks a neurotransmitter’s action 

22

23

Where are neurotransmitters released from?

 Neurotransmitters have their own pathways which deliver specific messages that  influence behavior and emotions.

 Molecules of neurotransmitters are stored in small "packages" called  vesicles. Neurotransmitters are released from the axon terminal when their  vesicles "fuse" with the membrane of the axon terminal, spilling  

theneurotransmitter into the synaptic cleft. 

What is surgical destruction of brain tissue called?

 Surgical destruction of brain tissue is called a

 lesion 

What does the reticular formation do?

 Reticular Formation

 Plays a role in arousing you to a state of alertness when someone nearby  mentions your name 

What is the limbic system?

 The Limbic System

 the overall system of the brain that regulates emotions and controls  behavior. Includes the Hippocampus, amygdala, hypothalamus, and other  structures 

What is the hippocampus and what is its function?

 Hippocampus

 a component of the limbic system involved in establishing long term  memories (Limbic system) 

What is the nucleus accumbens?

 Nucleus accumbens

 neural pathway that increases dopamine levels. triggers laughter and  smiling. 

23

24

What is the brainstem? What is the function of the medulla?

 Brainstem

 Responsible for automatic survival functions; made of the hypothalamus, pons,  thalamus, medulla, reticular formation, cerebellum 

 Medulla

 A brain­stem structure that controls breathing and heart rate. The sensory and  motor pathways cross here. (brain stem) 

What is the hypothalamus?

 Hypothalamus

 A limbic structure that serves as the brains blood testing laboratory,  constantly monitoring the blood to determine the condition of the body,  detects changes in body fluids (Limbic System) 

What is the role of malfunctioning reward centers in vulnerability to addiction?

 The experience of pleasure is derived from stimuli originating inside or outside of the body that increase dopamine in the nucleus accumbens (primary reward center of the human brain) 

 reward ­> release of dopamine 

cells receiving dopamine ­> happy (homer) 

ie. thirsty ­­ drink water 

 Desire to feel "Peak" ­ Avoid punishment "Valley" 

this is emotional because you will want to continue to feel good, so you  will repeat the experience. 

Addictive disorders may stem from malfunction in natural brain systems for pleasure and  well­being. People genetically predisposed to this syndrome may crave whatever  provides that missing pleasure or relieves negative feelings.

What area of the brain did Olds and Milner find by accident that animals and people will  stimulate for pleasure?

 The Pleasure Center

24

25

What does the cerebellum do?

 Cerebellum

 voluntary movement and balance

The amygdala?

 Amygdala

 A limbic system structure involved in memory and emotion, particularly  fear and agression (Limbic System)

How is functional MRI (fMRI) used to learn about brain functioning?  Functional magnetic resonance imaging or functional MRI (fMRI)   measures brain activity by detecting changes associated with blood flow. ­ When an area of the brain is in use, blood flow to that region also  increases. 

What is an EEG?

 An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test used to find problems related to  electrical activity of the brain.  

 It tracks and records brain wave patterns. Small metal discs with thin  wires (electrodes) are placed on the scalp, and then send signals to a  computer to record the results 

What are the major divisions of the brain in terms of lobes? And what specific functions  do these lobes have?

 Frontal Lobes

 Include the prefrontal cortex, premotor area, and motor area of the brain.  These lobes function in voluntary muscle movement, memory, thinking,  decision­making, and planning. 

 Parietal Lobes

 Are responsible for receiving and processing sensory information. These  lobes also contain the somatosensory cortex, which is essential for  

processing touch sensations.  

 Occipital Lobes

 Are responsible for receiving and processing visual information from the  retina.  

25

26

 Temporal Lobes

 House limbic system structures including the amygdala, and hippocampus. These lobes organize sensory input, as well as aid in auditory perception,  memory formation, and language and speech production. 

What is plasticity in the brain? What are some examples? 

 Brain Plasticity

 the ability of the brain to change in response to experiences 

 The concept that some of our brain will attempt to reroute itself if damaged.  the brain's ability to adapt and change as a result of experience.

 is the brain’s ability to change and grow over time in response to its environment  Changes can happen either fast or slow, and they can be positive or negative.  Brain damage effects

 If one hemisphere is damaged early in life, other will assume many functions by  reorganizing or building new pathways

 Plasticity diminishes later in life.

 Brain sometimes mends itself by forming new neurons through neurogenesis  Neurogenesis­ the ability of the brain to birth/make new neurons  Examples If a blind person uses one finger to read Braille, the brain area 

dedicated to that finger expands as the sense of touch invades the visual cortex  that normally helps people see . Plasticity also helps explain why some studies  have found that deaf people have enhanced peripheral and motion­detection  vision . In deaf people whose native language is sign, the temporal lobe area  normally dedicated to hearing waits in vain for stimulation. Finally, it looks for  other signals to process, such as those from the visual system

What does the somatosensory cortex do?

 Somatosensory cortex

 A strip of the parietal lobe lying just behind the central fissure. Involved  with sensations of touch. (Parietal Lobe) 

What is the cerebral cortex?

 Cerebral Cortex

 The thin grey matter covering of the cerebral hemispheres, carries on the  major portion of higher metal processing, including thinking and  

perceiving. 

26

27

What happened to Phineas Gage?

 In 1848, Phineas Gage, then 25 years old, was using a tamping iron to pack  gunpowder into a rock. A spark ignited the gunpowder, shooting the rod up  through his left cheek and out the top of his skull, leaving his frontal lobes  

damaged. The rod not only damaged some of Gage’s left frontal lobe’s neurons,  but also about 11 percent of its axons that connect the frontal lobes with the rest  of the brain. To everyone’s amazement, he was immediately able to sit up and  speak, and after the wound healed he returned to work. But having lost some of  the neural tracts that enabled his frontal lobes to control his emotions, the affable,  soft­spoken man was now irritable, profane, and dishonest. This person, said his  friends, was “no longer Gage.” His mental abilities and memories were intact, but  his personality was not. (Although Gage lost his railroad job, he did, over time,  adapt to his injury and find work as a stagecoach driver

What are the association areas? Why are they important?

 Association areas of the cortex

 Are found in all four lobes 

 Found in the frontal lobes enable judgment, planning, and processing of  new memories 

 Damage to association areas 

 Results in different losses

 Connected to each other by the association tracts

27

28

 Surgically lesioned animals and brain­damaged humans bear witness that  association areas are not dormant. Rather, these areas interpret, integrate, and act  on sensory information and link it with stored memories—a very important part of thinking.

What is neurogenesis?

 Neurogenesis

 the ability of the brain to birth/make new neurons 

What does lateralization of functioning mean?

 functional differences between left and right hemisphere 

28

29

 Our brain’s look­alike left and right hemispheres serve differing functions. This  lateralization is apparent after brain damage. Research spanning more than a  century has shown that left hemisphere accidents, strokes, and tumors can impair  reading, writing, speaking, arithmetic reasoning, and understanding. Similar right  hemisphere damage has effects that are less visibly dramatic.

What is the corpus callosum?

 Corpus callosum

 Communication link between the left and right cerebral hemispheres 

What are some of the traits of left­handed people?

 Left­handedness more likely to have reading disabilities, allergies, and migraines  BUT more common among musicians, mathematicians, and many athletes and  artists 

 Pros and cons of left­handedness seem about equal

 Left­handers are more diverse. Seven in ten process speech in the left hemisphere, as right­handers do. The rest either process language in the right hemisphere or  use both hemispheres 

29

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here