×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UWO - CRI 270 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UWO - CRI 270 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UWO / Criminal Justice / CRIM JUS 270 / What is the definition of redlining?

What is the definition of redlining?

What is the definition of redlining?

Description

School: University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh
Department: Criminal Justice
Course: introduction to criminal law
Professor: Colleen olsen
Term: Fall 2017
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: Criminal Law Quiz #2 Study Guide
Description: this is a study guide of key concept and key terms that have been covered in the past 3 weeks that will be the material that is going to be on our upcoming quiz. I have also put together a 27 question study guide to test yourself on how well you know the material.
Uploaded: 10/05/2017
26 Pages 47 Views 2 Unlocks
Reviews


    Criminal Law     Quiz #2 Study Guide: Made by Megan 


What is the definition of redlining?



Blue Highlight = Key Concepts 

Yellow Highlight = Key Terms (Definitions) 

Purple Highlight = Wisconsin Sentencing  

Wisconsin Sentencing notes: Chapter 1: 

­ Prosecutorial discretion: Policies

­ It is an abuse of their discretion if they charge someone without enough evidence ­ It is also abuse of their discretion if they charge someone with a more serious crime with  the motive to scare the public 

­ (charges of doubtful merit to get the D to plead to a less serious offense)

­ Example of charging decision: battery, disorderly conduct, criminal damage to property, bail  jumping, endangering safety by reckless use of a weapon


How is egalitarianism depicted in criem and punishment?



Don't forget about the age old question of What does survival of the fittest state about every state?

­ If someone is in a bar fight, the prosecutor could charge the defendant with every single  one of these charges!

­ Sentencing law and sentencing outcomes: (what legislature has passed; penalties that come  with it)

­ There are 72 counties in Wisconsin and almost ½ of them have only one judge. We also discuss several other topics like What are the five classifications of manner of articulation?

­ Sentencing hearing:

­ Pre­sentence report

­ Protection of the public

­ Gravity of offense

­ Rehabilitative needs of the defendant

­ Recommendations of the parties

­ The DA and the defense attorney

­ Right to allocution

­ At a sentencing, the defendant has the right to say something


What does the us constitution state about ex post facto law?



If you want to learn more check out Why do penetrating solutes cause a short-term effect?

­ Condemnation of crime

­ Responsibility to others

­ Probation and conditions

­ Very intricate and complex part of the sentencing process

­ Fine

­ Incarceration

­ Redlining 

­ Discriminated from 2008­2010 against black and hispanic borrowers in Wisconsin,  Illinois, and Minnesota

­ Definition: different sections of an area get discriminated against solely based on  location of a person.

­ 3 ideas about crime and punishment 

­ Populism ­ what the people want 

­ Usually based on emotion “everyone should be punished.” We also discuss several other topics like Which propositions a positional view of a system?

­ Managerialism ­ probation and parole officers, criminologists

­ Would decide who would get off early and who would not

­ We now have truth in sentencing so it doesn’t really exist anymore

­ Judicialism ­ judge has broad discretion

­ Egalitarianism ­ pg. 43 ­ criminals are to be really a part of the community, and are not  morally screwed.

­ There are some crimes that will not allow offenders to be back in the community  and they will sit their life in prison

­ First principle of Criminal Law: 

­ “The principle of legality”

­ Definition of the first principle of criminal law: No conviction or punishment unless the  law has defined the crime and prescribed the punishment before the person  engaged in the behavior (on exam) 

­ Rule of law and principle of criminal liability are DIFFERENT (will have to know the  difference between the 3 for the exam)

­ 3 parts of the first principle of criminal law:

­ 1. Ban on ex post facto laws

­ Can’t make a law today and charge someone from last week

­ U.S. Constitution

­ 2. Due process void­for­vagueness doctrine

­ If you make a law that nobody really understands, then it would be considered  vague and you will not be held criminally responsible for it If you want to learn more check out Where does carl jung believe ego to be?

­ 3. Rule of lenity

­ If there is something in the law that is ambiguous, the defendant gets the win if  there is a tie.

­ Ban on ex post facto laws: where does it come from? 

­ U.S. Constitution states that there will be no bill or ex post facto law that can ever be  passed.

­ Wisconsin Constitution prohibits it as well

­ Date of conduct of act that determines whether or not we get to use the ban on ex post  facto laws

­ Cannot be passed retroactively

­ Punishment must be written out before put into law

­ Takes away a defense for that conduct

­ Applies to self­defense laws as well

­ Why do we have a ban on ex post facto laws?

­ 1. Protecting individuals by ensuring that the legislature provide fair warning about what  is criminal or not

­ 2. Prevents the legislature from passing arbitrary and vindictive laws

­ Second Part of the first principle of criminal law: Void­for­Vagueness Doctrine ­ Concept of Due Process** Don't forget about the age old question of What happens through the five stages of sleep?

­ Two purposes:

­ Fair warning

­ Prohibit arbitrary and discriminatory enforcement

­ If one has to guess on a law’s meaning and it could be interpreted differently between  two people, it would be considered vague and unconstitutional.

­ Kolender v. Lawson

­ San Diego had a law that made it ok for police to stop ANY pedestrian for 

absolutely no apparent reason to check their ID.

­ Even if there is no crime or problem happening, literally can be a person walking  down the street, they can be stopped and asked for an ID

­ Lawson challenged the Supreme court that it was unconstitutional and he ended  up winning after 8 years of trying

­ Third part of the first principle of criminal law: The Rule of Lenity 

­ The rule of lenity requires courts to resolve every ambiguity in a criminal statute in favor  of the defendant 

­ Federal statute was passed as a result of massive accounting fraud in Enron case ­ If there is a tie, it goes to the defendant ­ always.

­ Very rare that this happens

Rule of Law: (definitions) 

­ Government power defined and limited by law

­ Everyone is equal before the law

­ Laws are transparent and enforced

­ Rules that define procedures and remedies

­ Constitutional democracy

­ Majority cannot make a law that violates the constitution (the law must be constitutional) ­ Bill of Rights protects minority from tyranny of the majority

­ Bill of Rights were the amendments to the constitution

The Bill of Rights and Criminal Law: 

­ Laws are presumed to be constitutional

­ The challenger must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that something is unconstitutional ­ The rule of law applies even when it allows guilty people go free and when innocent people are  convicted

Proving Criminal Conduct: because the stakes are high (we do not want to convict someone who is  innocent)

­ Presumption of innocence

­ Right to remain silent/right to testify

­ Jury trial/ order of trial

­ Unanimous verdict

­ Burden of proof

­ Counsel

­ Compulsory process

­ confrontation/cross examination

­ Jury instructions: law applied to the facts

First Amendment:

­ Rights to free speech; religion and association

­ Fundamental rights: compelling government interest narrowly tailored and least restrictive ­ Void­for­overbreadth doctrine

Second Amendment:

­ Right to bear arms

­ Prohibits:

­ Felons and mentally ill people from possession

­ No dangerous and unusual like weapons

­ Cannot carry in areas like schools or government buildings

­ Applied to the states in 2010 through the 14th amendment

­ Terry Stop: police can stop and question a person

­ In 2011, it was passed that you cannot give someone disorderly conduct just because  they have a gun on them

Right of privacy:

­ Not specifically stated in the U.S. Constitution

­ Griswold v. Connecticut (on exam)

­ There is a fundamental right to privacy within:

­ 1st amendment, 2nd amendment, 4th amendment, 9th amendment, 5th amendment, and 14th amendment

­ Lawrence v. Texas: (right of privacy)(on exam) pg. 62

­ Cops walked in on two men having sex with each other and end up getting arrested for sodamy  ­ Ruling: violated right to liberty under the due process clause

­ Cannot write laws about how to have sex with another individual

8th Amendment and Punishment:

­ Amendment VII: no excessive bail or excessive fines imposed and also no cruel and unusual  punishment

­ All against the 8th amendment:

­ Must be painless and instant

­ No mutilation

­ Cruel to use death penalty against anyone who is mentally retarded

­ Cruel for rape or even rape of a child

­ Cruel for any non­homicide offense

­ Felony murder

­ Cruel for person who is a juvenile

Death Penalty:

Buck v. Davis (2017)

­ Death penalty case

­ Jury decides whether this person gets the death penalty

­ A clinical psychologist went up to the stand (called by the defense attorney) ­ Identified that race and violence are correlated (black men)

Hurst v. Florida (2016)

­ Only a jury can decide on the death penalty as a sentence

Wisconsin Sentencing:

­ “Seventies synthesis”

­ End of the golden age of deliberative policy­making in Wisconsin

­ Pg. 60 : broad based worries are misplaced and blamed on criminals

­ Super easy to blame people that commit crimes and easy to put all of our problems on  them 

­ Just get rid of criminals and we’ll be fine

­ 1966: nothing works: exactly the answer populism was looking for

­ Wisconsin: less probation and parole and more judicial discretion, temper discretion with  guidelines (after the seventies synthesis)

­ 1977 Wisconsin Court of Appeals and Public Defender’s office was born

­ Difference between offend and reoffend

­ What might cause someone to offend in the first place might be different that why they  reoffend in the future

­ The twelve people who saved rehabilitation

­ RNR: risk/need/responsivity

Corpus delicti: a body of a victim of homicide

­ Also can be defined as the facts and circumstance or the “body” of the crime

Crime: 

­ Voluntary act (actus reus): first principle of criminal liability also known as physical element  ­ Physical element is the action

­ Every single case MUST have actus reus

­ Also includes omission and possession

­ Mens rea: mental state

­ Not all crimes need to have this

­ Concurrence: pg. 97, 126, 146

­ Attendant circumstances

­ Causation

­ Harm

General and Specific intent: 

­ Concepts that refer to the relationship between mental states and other elements of a crime ­ Conduct crimes = general intent

­ Result crimes = specific intent

­ Conduct crime = general intent: a voluntary act triggered by mental element (same as general  intent)

­ All the prosecutors have to prove is that the mental state triggered the voluntary act ­ Specific intent crime = result crime: must prove that there was a voluntary act, mental element, and an intent to cause harm.

­ More of a burden on the prosecutor

­ Battery charge would be a specific intent crime

­ Actus reus: punching someone

­ Mens rea: intent

­ Harm: actually hit the person

­ If the person swings and misses, they would not be charged with a 

battery charge

­ Whoever recklessly causes great bodily harm to another human being would be  a specific intent crime 

­ Must cause harm on top of intent

­ Strict Liability: voluntary act with NO mens rea

­ No mental state required

­ Just doing the act of something would be illegal

­ Concurrence: 

­ Mental state has to trigger the act, but the mental state also has to trigger the cause ­ Have to “want” to have that cause to create a harm

­ The act has to cause the harm

Actus Reus:

­ The first principle of liability: all crimes require a voluntary act or omission or possession ­ Voluntary act: 

­ Rule: one voluntary act is enough; it need not be the last act

­ Finger on the trigger = voluntary act

­ Accidental firing

­ Enough for criminal liability under these circumstances**

­ Fault­based defenses: “it wasn’t my fault” (non­voluntary acts):

­ Automatism­ no control over something

­ Slipping ­ accidentally slips on the trigger of a gun

­ Vomiting

­ Sleep driving

­ Only if a person knows that they have a sleep condition will they be charged with  negligence

­ Seizure

­ Can be charged with the decision to drive in the first place

­ Status: not an act, just a status of who you are (gay, alcoholic, addict, etc)

­ Being an alcoholic is not a crime, but being drunk in public is.

­ Lawrence v. Texas

­ Omission: failure to report or failure to intervene

­ Can only be an Actus Reus if there is a legal duty to help

­ Legal Duty: an obligation forced by law

­ Created by statutes, contracts, special relationships.

­ Duty to aid victim or report a crime

­ Any person who knows that a crime is being committed and that a victim is 

having bodily harm must provide assistance to victim and report the crime

­          Good Samaritan Doctrine: 

­ Bystander has legal duty to help or call for help for imperiled strangers

­ This is what Wisconsin has

­ American bystander rule: no duty, even if no risk to the bystander

Possession: 

­ Knowing Possession: the person knows that what they are possessing is a controlled  substance

­ Mere Possession: person does not know that what they possess is a controlled  substances and does not know that they possess it

­ The burden is on the defense to prove by the evidence that the substance was  possessed unwittingly

­ Actual Possession: physical control somewhere on your body 

­ Constructive Possession: not on your body, but in a place that you control

Mens Rea: Mental state

­ Thoughts are free → Thoughts that turn into criminal acts are punishable by law ­ Mens rea and fault: mental elements

­ Intentionally 

­ On purpose, willfully

­ Recklessly 

­ Person creates an unreasonable risk of death or great bodily injury to another  person and the person KNOWS that risk

­ Aware of the risk

­ Whoever recklessly causes the death of a person is a class D felony

­ Person did not intend to kill, but knew the risk

­ Negligently 

­ Person creates an unreasonable risk of death or great bodily injury to another  person and the person SHOULD have been aware of the risk

­ Not aware of the risk

­ Strict liability 

­ No fault required ­ don’t care about what your mental state says

­ Disorderly conduct, OWI, sexual assault

­ Mens rea and fault continued:

­ Subjective fault: actor has some personal awareness (bad mind)

­ Aware of the crime i’m committing (reckless)

­ Intentionally

­ Knowingly

­ Purposefully 

­ Objective fault: actor does not have any personal awareness but should have  (negligence)

­ No bad mind

­ There is no bad mind in strict liability as well

­ Cannot use the defense of a “mistake”, because you are aware that something is occurring if you claim to make a mistake

­ How to discover and prove mens rea?

­ Usually relies on inferences made from action and attendant circumstance ­ Definitions have been vague and incomplete

­ Hard to tell what is inside a person’s mind

­ Mens Rea: Direct Evidence 

­ Confessions: two kinds of false confessions

­ Coerced­compliant false confessions

­ Coerced­internalized false confessions

­ Video 

­ Eye­witness

­ Circumstantial evidence: not necessarily better or worse than direct evidence ­ Mens Rea and Motive:

­ Mens rea not the same as motive 

­ State is not required to prove motive as long as other elements are proven ­ Motive is considered circumstantial evidence**

­ Even if motive is absolutely horrible, it doesn’t always bring a conviction

­ Example: guy infected as many people as possible with HIV and he got charged  with assault with intent to murder

­ Ended up being found not guilty 

­ Circumstantial evidence is not the same as attendant circumstances*** ­ Attendant circumstance elements are facts or conditions connected to or relevant to other elements of crime

­ May be listed in statute: “under the circumstances”

­ Consent

­ Intoxication

­ Possession of household cleaners required the attendant circumstance of an  illegal purpose

­ Cause = mental element/result crimes 

­ Must have the mental desire to cause harm

­ Cause can include mental purpose

­ Intentionally cause

­ Recklessly cause

­ Negligently cause

­ Strict liability

­ Cause in fact: “but for” the person’s conduct, the result would not have happened ­ Objective determination as to whether the person’s act started a chain of events  that ended up in a harmful result

­ Legal Case: proximate cause

­ Legal judgement as to whether it is fair and just to blame 

­ Mistake of fact: supplying alcohol to someone who is under the legal age

­ Only if they present an ID that said they were 21

­ Mistake of Law: the state has to prove that the defendant intended that a crime be committed Multiple Choice Practice Exam on Next Page**********************************************************

Criminal Law Study Guide Created by Megan:

1. The quote, “if all you have is a hammer, all you see is a nail” would be an example of which bias? a. Irrational Escalation

b. Group Attribution Error

c. Law of Instrument

d. Fundamental Attribution Error

2. An example of Truth in Sentencing Laws would be:

a. An offender serving 5 out of his/her 10 year sentence because of early release due to  good behavior

b. An offender who receives the sentence of probation with an imposed sentence of 4 years c. An offender who gets sentenced 4 years in prison and must serve all 4 years with no  chance of early release

d. An offender who serves 3 years in prison and then gets to attend boot camp to get early  release

3. In the Wisconsin Sentencing book explains that from 2008­2011, there was a clear discrimination  against African Americans and Hispanics in certain locations when trying to get house loans,  bank loans, car loans, etc., this discrimination is an example of:

a. Radical loan racism

b. Redlining

c. Managerialism

d. Condemnation of crime

4. According to the Wisconsin Sentencing book, the idea that most offenders are not morally corrupt and they must be a part of the community is the idea of:

a. Populism

b. Managerialism

c. Egalitarianism

d. Discretion 

5. There are ____ parts of the First Principle of Criminal Law:

a. 1

b. 2

c. 3

d. 4

6. All of the following are a part of the First Principle of Criminal Law except:

a. Rule of Law

b. Ban on ex post facto laws

c. Rule of lenity

d. Void for Vagueness Doctrine

7. No conviction or punishment unless the law has defined the crime and prescribed the punishment before the person engaged in the behavior is the defined as:

a. Ban on ex post facto laws

b. The First Principle of Criminal Law

c. The Second Principle of Criminal Law

d. Void for Vagueness Doctrine

8. Match these parts of The First Principle of Criminal Law with their definitions: a. Ban on ex post facto laws

b. Void for Vagueness Doctrine

c. Rule of Lenity

1. If you make a law that nobody really understands, then it would be 

considered vague and you will not be held criminally responsible for it

2. Cannot make a law today and charge someone from last week

3. If there is something in the law that is ambiguous, the defendant gets the win if there is a tie.

9. Why were the ban on ex post facto laws created?

a. It protects individuals by ensuring that the legislature provide fair warning about what is  criminal or not

b. It prevents the legislature from passing arbitrary and vindictive laws

c. It helps defendants win if there were ever a tie in the courtroom

d. Both “A” and “B”

10.  The case of _______ v. _______ that won in the Supreme Court after 8 years of trying to change to law that you can be stopped at any time for no apparent reason and must show your ID in the  state of California is:

a. Cooper v. Pate

b. Anderson v. Klonder

c. Kolender v. Lawson

d. Calkins v. Edwards

11. The void­for­overbreadth doctrine falls under which amendment?

a. 1st Amendment

b. 2nd amendment

c. 8th amendment

d. 4th amendment 

12.  Which one of the following is TRUE about the 2nd amendment?

a. The 2nd amendment allows the carrying of dangerous and unusual like weapons b. The 2nd amendment allows a person to conceal and carry in government buildings c. Felons are allowed to carry a weapon only if their probation agent allows it d. The 2nd amendment laws were applied to the states in 2010 through the 14th  amendment

13. The Lawrence v. Texas case had a ruling that their right to liberty under the due process call was  being violated. Why?

a. Because it was against their right to privacy

b. Because the state cannot write laws about how to have sex with another individual c. Because prisons were overcrowded and there were unfair practices happening on the  inside

d. Both “A” and “B”

e. All of the above

14.  Juveniles cannot be sentenced to life in prison for a non­homicidal crime a. True

b. False

15. According to the 8th amendment in regard to the death penalty, what is TRUE? a. Death must be painless and instant

b. There must be no means of mutilation

c. It would be considered cruel and unusual punishment for the death penalty to be  sentenced for the rape of a child

d. It would be considered cruel and unusual punishment for the death penalty to be  sentenced to one who is mentally challenged

e. All of the above

16. The first principle of criminal liability (also known as the “physical element”) is:

a. Mens rea

b. The principle of legality

c. Ban on ex post facto laws

d. Actus reus

e. Both “A” and “D”

17. A voluntary act that is triggered by the mental state of an offender is considered to be: a. Conduct crime

b. Specific intent crime

c. Result crime

d. Concurrence

18.  A Voluntary act with NO mens rea is considered to be:

a. General intent

b. Result crime

c. Strict liability

d. Conduct crime

19. A voluntary act that is triggered by a mental state and an intent to cause harm is considered to  be:

a. Concurrence

b. Strict liability

c. Result crime

d. General intent

e. Both “B” and “C”

20.  A person had a gun and had their finger on the trigger while pointing it at someone. The shooter  decides to change his mind and by complete accident, they pulled the trigger which shot and  killed the person in front of them. What would this be an example of?

a. Fault­based defense and the person would not be charged

b. Voluntary act; the rule is that one voluntary act is enough to be criminally liable c. Voluntary act; the rule is that two voluntary acts must be present in order to be charged d. Automatism; there was no control over something

21. Being an alcoholic is not a crime, but being drunk in public is. Why is being an alcoholic not a  crime?

a. Being an alcoholic falls under the omission rule

b. Being an alcoholic falls under the status of a person

c. Being an alcoholic falls under the good samaritan doctrine

d. Being an alcoholic falls under the American bystander rule

22.  Match up the following possession terms concerning drugs:

a. Knowing possession

b. Mere possession

c. Actual possession

d. Constructive possession

1. The drugs are not on your body, but in a place that you control

2. The person does not know what they possess is a controlled substance  and also does not have knowledge that they possess it

3. The person knows that what they are possessing is a controlled 

substance

4. The person has physical control of the drugs on their body

23. In regard to mens rea, match up the mental elements with their definition: a. Reckless

b. Negligence

c. Strict liability

1. Person creates an unreasonable risk of death or great bodily injury to 

another person and the person should have been aware of the risk

2. There is no fault required, the mental state of a person does not come to 

play

3. Person creates an unreasonable risk of death or great bodily injury to 

another person and the person knows that risk.

24. When using the defense of mens rea, one cannot make the defense of making a “mistake”.

a. True 

b. False

25. The following list are examples of direct evidence EXCEPT:

a. Video

b. Eye­witness

c. Foot prints going into a garage

d. Both “A” and “C”

26. Circumstantial evidence is the same concept as attendant circumstances

a. True

b. False

27. If a bartender went to their shift on a Friday night and a customer ordered a beer and showed the  bartender their ID which stated that they were 21. Come to find out, the customer obtained a fake  ID and purchased liquor illegally. The bartender however, does not get charged. This is an  example of:

a. Mistake of Law

b. Mistake of Fact

c. Mistake of Circumstance

d. None of the above

Answer Key:

1. C

2. C

3. B

4. C

5. C

6. A

7. B

8. A = 2, B = 1, C = 3

9. D

10. C

11. A

12. D

13. D

14. A

15. E

16. D

17. A

18. C

19. C

20. B

21. B

22. A = 3, B = 2, C = 4, D = 1 23. A = 3, B = 1, C = 2 24. A

25. C

26. B

    Criminal Law     Quiz #2 Study Guide: Made by Megan 

Blue Highlight = Key Concepts 

Yellow Highlight = Key Terms (Definitions) 

Purple Highlight = Wisconsin Sentencing  

Wisconsin Sentencing notes: Chapter 1: 

­ Prosecutorial discretion: Policies

­ It is an abuse of their discretion if they charge someone without enough evidence ­ It is also abuse of their discretion if they charge someone with a more serious crime with  the motive to scare the public 

­ (charges of doubtful merit to get the D to plead to a less serious offense)

­ Example of charging decision: battery, disorderly conduct, criminal damage to property, bail  jumping, endangering safety by reckless use of a weapon

­ If someone is in a bar fight, the prosecutor could charge the defendant with every single  one of these charges!

­ Sentencing law and sentencing outcomes: (what legislature has passed; penalties that come  with it)

­ There are 72 counties in Wisconsin and almost ½ of them have only one judge.

­ Sentencing hearing:

­ Pre­sentence report

­ Protection of the public

­ Gravity of offense

­ Rehabilitative needs of the defendant

­ Recommendations of the parties

­ The DA and the defense attorney

­ Right to allocution

­ At a sentencing, the defendant has the right to say something

­ Condemnation of crime

­ Responsibility to others

­ Probation and conditions

­ Very intricate and complex part of the sentencing process

­ Fine

­ Incarceration

­ Redlining 

­ Discriminated from 2008­2010 against black and hispanic borrowers in Wisconsin,  Illinois, and Minnesota

­ Definition: different sections of an area get discriminated against solely based on  location of a person.

­ 3 ideas about crime and punishment 

­ Populism ­ what the people want 

­ Usually based on emotion “everyone should be punished.”

­ Managerialism ­ probation and parole officers, criminologists

­ Would decide who would get off early and who would not

­ We now have truth in sentencing so it doesn’t really exist anymore

­ Judicialism ­ judge has broad discretion

­ Egalitarianism ­ pg. 43 ­ criminals are to be really a part of the community, and are not  morally screwed.

­ There are some crimes that will not allow offenders to be back in the community  and they will sit their life in prison

­ First principle of Criminal Law: 

­ “The principle of legality”

­ Definition of the first principle of criminal law: No conviction or punishment unless the  law has defined the crime and prescribed the punishment before the person  engaged in the behavior (on exam) 

­ Rule of law and principle of criminal liability are DIFFERENT (will have to know the  difference between the 3 for the exam)

­ 3 parts of the first principle of criminal law:

­ 1. Ban on ex post facto laws

­ Can’t make a law today and charge someone from last week

­ U.S. Constitution

­ 2. Due process void­for­vagueness doctrine

­ If you make a law that nobody really understands, then it would be considered  vague and you will not be held criminally responsible for it

­ 3. Rule of lenity

­ If there is something in the law that is ambiguous, the defendant gets the win if  there is a tie.

­ Ban on ex post facto laws: where does it come from? 

­ U.S. Constitution states that there will be no bill or ex post facto law that can ever be  passed.

­ Wisconsin Constitution prohibits it as well

­ Date of conduct of act that determines whether or not we get to use the ban on ex post  facto laws

­ Cannot be passed retroactively

­ Punishment must be written out before put into law

­ Takes away a defense for that conduct

­ Applies to self­defense laws as well

­ Why do we have a ban on ex post facto laws?

­ 1. Protecting individuals by ensuring that the legislature provide fair warning about what  is criminal or not

­ 2. Prevents the legislature from passing arbitrary and vindictive laws

­ Second Part of the first principle of criminal law: Void­for­Vagueness Doctrine ­ Concept of Due Process**

­ Two purposes:

­ Fair warning

­ Prohibit arbitrary and discriminatory enforcement

­ If one has to guess on a law’s meaning and it could be interpreted differently between  two people, it would be considered vague and unconstitutional.

­ Kolender v. Lawson

­ San Diego had a law that made it ok for police to stop ANY pedestrian for 

absolutely no apparent reason to check their ID.

­ Even if there is no crime or problem happening, literally can be a person walking  down the street, they can be stopped and asked for an ID

­ Lawson challenged the Supreme court that it was unconstitutional and he ended  up winning after 8 years of trying

­ Third part of the first principle of criminal law: The Rule of Lenity 

­ The rule of lenity requires courts to resolve every ambiguity in a criminal statute in favor  of the defendant 

­ Federal statute was passed as a result of massive accounting fraud in Enron case ­ If there is a tie, it goes to the defendant ­ always.

­ Very rare that this happens

Rule of Law: (definitions) 

­ Government power defined and limited by law

­ Everyone is equal before the law

­ Laws are transparent and enforced

­ Rules that define procedures and remedies

­ Constitutional democracy

­ Majority cannot make a law that violates the constitution (the law must be constitutional) ­ Bill of Rights protects minority from tyranny of the majority

­ Bill of Rights were the amendments to the constitution

The Bill of Rights and Criminal Law: 

­ Laws are presumed to be constitutional

­ The challenger must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that something is unconstitutional ­ The rule of law applies even when it allows guilty people go free and when innocent people are  convicted

Proving Criminal Conduct: because the stakes are high (we do not want to convict someone who is  innocent)

­ Presumption of innocence

­ Right to remain silent/right to testify

­ Jury trial/ order of trial

­ Unanimous verdict

­ Burden of proof

­ Counsel

­ Compulsory process

­ confrontation/cross examination

­ Jury instructions: law applied to the facts

First Amendment:

­ Rights to free speech; religion and association

­ Fundamental rights: compelling government interest narrowly tailored and least restrictive ­ Void­for­overbreadth doctrine

Second Amendment:

­ Right to bear arms

­ Prohibits:

­ Felons and mentally ill people from possession

­ No dangerous and unusual like weapons

­ Cannot carry in areas like schools or government buildings

­ Applied to the states in 2010 through the 14th amendment

­ Terry Stop: police can stop and question a person

­ In 2011, it was passed that you cannot give someone disorderly conduct just because  they have a gun on them

Right of privacy:

­ Not specifically stated in the U.S. Constitution

­ Griswold v. Connecticut (on exam)

­ There is a fundamental right to privacy within:

­ 1st amendment, 2nd amendment, 4th amendment, 9th amendment, 5th amendment, and 14th amendment

­ Lawrence v. Texas: (right of privacy)(on exam) pg. 62

­ Cops walked in on two men having sex with each other and end up getting arrested for sodamy  ­ Ruling: violated right to liberty under the due process clause

­ Cannot write laws about how to have sex with another individual

8th Amendment and Punishment:

­ Amendment VII: no excessive bail or excessive fines imposed and also no cruel and unusual  punishment

­ All against the 8th amendment:

­ Must be painless and instant

­ No mutilation

­ Cruel to use death penalty against anyone who is mentally retarded

­ Cruel for rape or even rape of a child

­ Cruel for any non­homicide offense

­ Felony murder

­ Cruel for person who is a juvenile

Death Penalty:

Buck v. Davis (2017)

­ Death penalty case

­ Jury decides whether this person gets the death penalty

­ A clinical psychologist went up to the stand (called by the defense attorney) ­ Identified that race and violence are correlated (black men)

Hurst v. Florida (2016)

­ Only a jury can decide on the death penalty as a sentence

Wisconsin Sentencing:

­ “Seventies synthesis”

­ End of the golden age of deliberative policy­making in Wisconsin

­ Pg. 60 : broad based worries are misplaced and blamed on criminals

­ Super easy to blame people that commit crimes and easy to put all of our problems on  them 

­ Just get rid of criminals and we’ll be fine

­ 1966: nothing works: exactly the answer populism was looking for

­ Wisconsin: less probation and parole and more judicial discretion, temper discretion with  guidelines (after the seventies synthesis)

­ 1977 Wisconsin Court of Appeals and Public Defender’s office was born

­ Difference between offend and reoffend

­ What might cause someone to offend in the first place might be different that why they  reoffend in the future

­ The twelve people who saved rehabilitation

­ RNR: risk/need/responsivity

Corpus delicti: a body of a victim of homicide

­ Also can be defined as the facts and circumstance or the “body” of the crime

Crime: 

­ Voluntary act (actus reus): first principle of criminal liability also known as physical element  ­ Physical element is the action

­ Every single case MUST have actus reus

­ Also includes omission and possession

­ Mens rea: mental state

­ Not all crimes need to have this

­ Concurrence: pg. 97, 126, 146

­ Attendant circumstances

­ Causation

­ Harm

General and Specific intent: 

­ Concepts that refer to the relationship between mental states and other elements of a crime ­ Conduct crimes = general intent

­ Result crimes = specific intent

­ Conduct crime = general intent: a voluntary act triggered by mental element (same as general  intent)

­ All the prosecutors have to prove is that the mental state triggered the voluntary act ­ Specific intent crime = result crime: must prove that there was a voluntary act, mental element, and an intent to cause harm.

­ More of a burden on the prosecutor

­ Battery charge would be a specific intent crime

­ Actus reus: punching someone

­ Mens rea: intent

­ Harm: actually hit the person

­ If the person swings and misses, they would not be charged with a 

battery charge

­ Whoever recklessly causes great bodily harm to another human being would be  a specific intent crime 

­ Must cause harm on top of intent

­ Strict Liability: voluntary act with NO mens rea

­ No mental state required

­ Just doing the act of something would be illegal

­ Concurrence: 

­ Mental state has to trigger the act, but the mental state also has to trigger the cause ­ Have to “want” to have that cause to create a harm

­ The act has to cause the harm

Actus Reus:

­ The first principle of liability: all crimes require a voluntary act or omission or possession ­ Voluntary act: 

­ Rule: one voluntary act is enough; it need not be the last act

­ Finger on the trigger = voluntary act

­ Accidental firing

­ Enough for criminal liability under these circumstances**

­ Fault­based defenses: “it wasn’t my fault” (non­voluntary acts):

­ Automatism­ no control over something

­ Slipping ­ accidentally slips on the trigger of a gun

­ Vomiting

­ Sleep driving

­ Only if a person knows that they have a sleep condition will they be charged with  negligence

­ Seizure

­ Can be charged with the decision to drive in the first place

­ Status: not an act, just a status of who you are (gay, alcoholic, addict, etc)

­ Being an alcoholic is not a crime, but being drunk in public is.

­ Lawrence v. Texas

­ Omission: failure to report or failure to intervene

­ Can only be an Actus Reus if there is a legal duty to help

­ Legal Duty: an obligation forced by law

­ Created by statutes, contracts, special relationships.

­ Duty to aid victim or report a crime

­ Any person who knows that a crime is being committed and that a victim is 

having bodily harm must provide assistance to victim and report the crime

­          Good Samaritan Doctrine: 

­ Bystander has legal duty to help or call for help for imperiled strangers

­ This is what Wisconsin has

­ American bystander rule: no duty, even if no risk to the bystander

Possession: 

­ Knowing Possession: the person knows that what they are possessing is a controlled  substance

­ Mere Possession: person does not know that what they possess is a controlled  substances and does not know that they possess it

­ The burden is on the defense to prove by the evidence that the substance was  possessed unwittingly

­ Actual Possession: physical control somewhere on your body 

­ Constructive Possession: not on your body, but in a place that you control

Mens Rea: Mental state

­ Thoughts are free → Thoughts that turn into criminal acts are punishable by law ­ Mens rea and fault: mental elements

­ Intentionally 

­ On purpose, willfully

­ Recklessly 

­ Person creates an unreasonable risk of death or great bodily injury to another  person and the person KNOWS that risk

­ Aware of the risk

­ Whoever recklessly causes the death of a person is a class D felony

­ Person did not intend to kill, but knew the risk

­ Negligently 

­ Person creates an unreasonable risk of death or great bodily injury to another  person and the person SHOULD have been aware of the risk

­ Not aware of the risk

­ Strict liability 

­ No fault required ­ don’t care about what your mental state says

­ Disorderly conduct, OWI, sexual assault

­ Mens rea and fault continued:

­ Subjective fault: actor has some personal awareness (bad mind)

­ Aware of the crime i’m committing (reckless)

­ Intentionally

­ Knowingly

­ Purposefully 

­ Objective fault: actor does not have any personal awareness but should have  (negligence)

­ No bad mind

­ There is no bad mind in strict liability as well

­ Cannot use the defense of a “mistake”, because you are aware that something is occurring if you claim to make a mistake

­ How to discover and prove mens rea?

­ Usually relies on inferences made from action and attendant circumstance ­ Definitions have been vague and incomplete

­ Hard to tell what is inside a person’s mind

­ Mens Rea: Direct Evidence 

­ Confessions: two kinds of false confessions

­ Coerced­compliant false confessions

­ Coerced­internalized false confessions

­ Video 

­ Eye­witness

­ Circumstantial evidence: not necessarily better or worse than direct evidence ­ Mens Rea and Motive:

­ Mens rea not the same as motive 

­ State is not required to prove motive as long as other elements are proven ­ Motive is considered circumstantial evidence**

­ Even if motive is absolutely horrible, it doesn’t always bring a conviction

­ Example: guy infected as many people as possible with HIV and he got charged  with assault with intent to murder

­ Ended up being found not guilty 

­ Circumstantial evidence is not the same as attendant circumstances*** ­ Attendant circumstance elements are facts or conditions connected to or relevant to other elements of crime

­ May be listed in statute: “under the circumstances”

­ Consent

­ Intoxication

­ Possession of household cleaners required the attendant circumstance of an  illegal purpose

­ Cause = mental element/result crimes 

­ Must have the mental desire to cause harm

­ Cause can include mental purpose

­ Intentionally cause

­ Recklessly cause

­ Negligently cause

­ Strict liability

­ Cause in fact: “but for” the person’s conduct, the result would not have happened ­ Objective determination as to whether the person’s act started a chain of events  that ended up in a harmful result

­ Legal Case: proximate cause

­ Legal judgement as to whether it is fair and just to blame 

­ Mistake of fact: supplying alcohol to someone who is under the legal age

­ Only if they present an ID that said they were 21

­ Mistake of Law: the state has to prove that the defendant intended that a crime be committed Multiple Choice Practice Exam on Next Page**********************************************************

Criminal Law Study Guide Created by Megan:

1. The quote, “if all you have is a hammer, all you see is a nail” would be an example of which bias? a. Irrational Escalation

b. Group Attribution Error

c. Law of Instrument

d. Fundamental Attribution Error

2. An example of Truth in Sentencing Laws would be:

a. An offender serving 5 out of his/her 10 year sentence because of early release due to  good behavior

b. An offender who receives the sentence of probation with an imposed sentence of 4 years c. An offender who gets sentenced 4 years in prison and must serve all 4 years with no  chance of early release

d. An offender who serves 3 years in prison and then gets to attend boot camp to get early  release

3. In the Wisconsin Sentencing book explains that from 2008­2011, there was a clear discrimination  against African Americans and Hispanics in certain locations when trying to get house loans,  bank loans, car loans, etc., this discrimination is an example of:

a. Radical loan racism

b. Redlining

c. Managerialism

d. Condemnation of crime

4. According to the Wisconsin Sentencing book, the idea that most offenders are not morally corrupt and they must be a part of the community is the idea of:

a. Populism

b. Managerialism

c. Egalitarianism

d. Discretion 

5. There are ____ parts of the First Principle of Criminal Law:

a. 1

b. 2

c. 3

d. 4

6. All of the following are a part of the First Principle of Criminal Law except:

a. Rule of Law

b. Ban on ex post facto laws

c. Rule of lenity

d. Void for Vagueness Doctrine

7. No conviction or punishment unless the law has defined the crime and prescribed the punishment before the person engaged in the behavior is the defined as:

a. Ban on ex post facto laws

b. The First Principle of Criminal Law

c. The Second Principle of Criminal Law

d. Void for Vagueness Doctrine

8. Match these parts of The First Principle of Criminal Law with their definitions: a. Ban on ex post facto laws

b. Void for Vagueness Doctrine

c. Rule of Lenity

1. If you make a law that nobody really understands, then it would be 

considered vague and you will not be held criminally responsible for it

2. Cannot make a law today and charge someone from last week

3. If there is something in the law that is ambiguous, the defendant gets the win if there is a tie.

9. Why were the ban on ex post facto laws created?

a. It protects individuals by ensuring that the legislature provide fair warning about what is  criminal or not

b. It prevents the legislature from passing arbitrary and vindictive laws

c. It helps defendants win if there were ever a tie in the courtroom

d. Both “A” and “B”

10.  The case of _______ v. _______ that won in the Supreme Court after 8 years of trying to change to law that you can be stopped at any time for no apparent reason and must show your ID in the  state of California is:

a. Cooper v. Pate

b. Anderson v. Klonder

c. Kolender v. Lawson

d. Calkins v. Edwards

11. The void­for­overbreadth doctrine falls under which amendment?

a. 1st Amendment

b. 2nd amendment

c. 8th amendment

d. 4th amendment 

12.  Which one of the following is TRUE about the 2nd amendment?

a. The 2nd amendment allows the carrying of dangerous and unusual like weapons b. The 2nd amendment allows a person to conceal and carry in government buildings c. Felons are allowed to carry a weapon only if their probation agent allows it d. The 2nd amendment laws were applied to the states in 2010 through the 14th  amendment

13. The Lawrence v. Texas case had a ruling that their right to liberty under the due process call was  being violated. Why?

a. Because it was against their right to privacy

b. Because the state cannot write laws about how to have sex with another individual c. Because prisons were overcrowded and there were unfair practices happening on the  inside

d. Both “A” and “B”

e. All of the above

14.  Juveniles cannot be sentenced to life in prison for a non­homicidal crime a. True

b. False

15. According to the 8th amendment in regard to the death penalty, what is TRUE? a. Death must be painless and instant

b. There must be no means of mutilation

c. It would be considered cruel and unusual punishment for the death penalty to be  sentenced for the rape of a child

d. It would be considered cruel and unusual punishment for the death penalty to be  sentenced to one who is mentally challenged

e. All of the above

16. The first principle of criminal liability (also known as the “physical element”) is:

a. Mens rea

b. The principle of legality

c. Ban on ex post facto laws

d. Actus reus

e. Both “A” and “D”

17. A voluntary act that is triggered by the mental state of an offender is considered to be: a. Conduct crime

b. Specific intent crime

c. Result crime

d. Concurrence

18.  A Voluntary act with NO mens rea is considered to be:

a. General intent

b. Result crime

c. Strict liability

d. Conduct crime

19. A voluntary act that is triggered by a mental state and an intent to cause harm is considered to  be:

a. Concurrence

b. Strict liability

c. Result crime

d. General intent

e. Both “B” and “C”

20.  A person had a gun and had their finger on the trigger while pointing it at someone. The shooter  decides to change his mind and by complete accident, they pulled the trigger which shot and  killed the person in front of them. What would this be an example of?

a. Fault­based defense and the person would not be charged

b. Voluntary act; the rule is that one voluntary act is enough to be criminally liable c. Voluntary act; the rule is that two voluntary acts must be present in order to be charged d. Automatism; there was no control over something

21. Being an alcoholic is not a crime, but being drunk in public is. Why is being an alcoholic not a  crime?

a. Being an alcoholic falls under the omission rule

b. Being an alcoholic falls under the status of a person

c. Being an alcoholic falls under the good samaritan doctrine

d. Being an alcoholic falls under the American bystander rule

22.  Match up the following possession terms concerning drugs:

a. Knowing possession

b. Mere possession

c. Actual possession

d. Constructive possession

1. The drugs are not on your body, but in a place that you control

2. The person does not know what they possess is a controlled substance  and also does not have knowledge that they possess it

3. The person knows that what they are possessing is a controlled 

substance

4. The person has physical control of the drugs on their body

23. In regard to mens rea, match up the mental elements with their definition: a. Reckless

b. Negligence

c. Strict liability

1. Person creates an unreasonable risk of death or great bodily injury to 

another person and the person should have been aware of the risk

2. There is no fault required, the mental state of a person does not come to 

play

3. Person creates an unreasonable risk of death or great bodily injury to 

another person and the person knows that risk.

24. When using the defense of mens rea, one cannot make the defense of making a “mistake”.

a. True 

b. False

25. The following list are examples of direct evidence EXCEPT:

a. Video

b. Eye­witness

c. Foot prints going into a garage

d. Both “A” and “C”

26. Circumstantial evidence is the same concept as attendant circumstances

a. True

b. False

27. If a bartender went to their shift on a Friday night and a customer ordered a beer and showed the  bartender their ID which stated that they were 21. Come to find out, the customer obtained a fake  ID and purchased liquor illegally. The bartender however, does not get charged. This is an  example of:

a. Mistake of Law

b. Mistake of Fact

c. Mistake of Circumstance

d. None of the above

Answer Key:

1. C

2. C

3. B

4. C

5. C

6. A

7. B

8. A = 2, B = 1, C = 3

9. D

10. C

11. A

12. D

13. D

14. A

15. E

16. D

17. A

18. C

19. C

20. B

21. B

22. A = 3, B = 2, C = 4, D = 1 23. A = 3, B = 1, C = 2 24. A

25. C

26. B

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here