×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UW - LINGU 101 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UW - LINGU 101 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UW / Linguistics / LINGUIS 101 / What are the sub-areas of linguistics?

What are the sub-areas of linguistics?

What are the sub-areas of linguistics?

Description

School: University of Wisconsin - Madison
Department: Linguistics
Course: Human Language
Professor: Rebecca shields
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: Linguistics and phonetics
Cost: 50
Name: Study Guide Exam 1
Description: This study guide is for Exam 1, which covers the first 5 weeks of class, Phonetics 1-6
Uploaded: 10/06/2017
18 Pages 53 Views 3 Unlocks
Reviews


Introduction to Human Language: Exam #1 10/9/17 Study Guide #1 


What are the sub-areas of linguistics?



Questions: 

1. What are some careers that utilize linguistics? 

2. What are the 5 subfields of Linguistics?  

3. What is the difference between descriptive grammar and prescriptive grammar? Why is  it important to know that in this course?

4. What are the 2 main states of the glottis?  

5. What does pulmonicà egressive pertain to?  

6. Name 9 articulators. 

7. What is the difference between consonants and vowels (degree of constriction)?  8. Name and describe the 4 key factors that help you determine consonant sounds.

9. Name and describe all 10 places of articulation.  

10. Name and describe all 5 manners of articulation.  


What are the nine articulators?



11. What are the 2 different types of Liquids?  

12.  Name and describe the 4 key factors that help you determine vowel sounds. 

13. What is the difference between monophthongs and diphthongs?  

14. How can you tell what a syllabic consonant is?  

15. What is the difference between broad and narrow transcriptions?  

16. What is the difference between aspirated and unaspirated? What signifies an aspirated  sound when writing in IPA?

17. Name and describe the 3 Suprasegmentals (Include 2 subcategories of Pitch & Tone). 

18. What type of language are most languages in the world? (Hint: has to do with pitch) 19. What do we use to make speech production more simple, efficient and clear? 20. Name and describe the 6 basic types of Articulatory Processes.  


What are the five classifications of manner of articulation?



Don't forget about the age old question of What is the state of membrane in the fluid mosaic model?

21. Why is it not necessary to describe unrounded vowels as “unrounded”?  22. Describe the non­English stops, trills and fricatives. 

23. Describe the articulation of a click.

24. Why is sound not necessary for human language?  

25. What are the 5 articulatory parameters of Sign Articulation?  

Answer Key: 

1. A few linguistics­related careers include: Speech Therapist, Audiologist, Computational  Linguist, Language Researcher and Language Professor.

2. 5 subfields of Linguistics: Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology, Syntax, Semantics  (Remember PMS)

3. Descriptive grammar is natural grammatical rules that we don’t even realize we know  and follow naturally; linguists study and describe these. Prescriptive grammar is  grammatical rules that are predetermined and need to be taught in order to be  “grammatically correct”; these are not naturally occurring in our everyday speech and  are used to attempt to change one’s linguistic behavior. We also discuss several other topics like Which propositions a positional view of a system?

4. The 2 main states of the glottis are voiceless and voiced. Two additional states are the  “whisper” and “murmur” states. 

5. Pulmonicà egressive pertains to Airstream mechanism; pushing/pressing air out of  lungs/diaphragm.

6. Articulators: Lips, Teeth, Tongue, Alveolar ridge [behind teeth], Palate (hard palate)  [hard, boney dome­like roof of mouth], Velum (soft palate) [soft, further back in mouth],  Uvula [dangly thingy], Pharynx [back of the throat, root of tongue], Glottis

7. Consonants have high degree of constriction in vocal tract, meaning that the  articulators are very close together or touching. Vowels have low degree of constriction,  meaning that the vocal tract is relatively open and passage for air is wide.  8. Voicing­ voiced or voiceless 

Nasality­ oral (velum raised) or nasal (velum lowered) 

Place of Articulation­ point where air is constricted the most (place of stricture, ie:  bilabial, alveolar, velar, etc)

Manner of Articulation­ how narrow the air channel is (degree of stricture, ie: stop,  fricative, affricate, liquid, glide) If you want to learn more check out What are examples of mature defenses?

9. Places of articulation:  

a. Bilabial: 2 lips (big) 

b. Labiodental: 1 lip + teeth (find) 

c. Interdental: tongue through teeth (thick)

d. Alveolar: tongue + alveolar ridge (den) 

e. Post­alveolar: tongue + front of palate (shell)  Don't forget about the age old question of What does slow delta wave do to brain activity?

f. Palatal: tongue + palate (yes) 

g. Velar: tongue + velum (go) If you want to learn more check out As a sex therapy method, what does sensate focus?
If you want to learn more check out What kind of sleep disorder is parasomnia?

h. Uvular: tongue + uvula (french R sound)  

i. Pharyngeal: constriction of pharynx (arabic sounds) 

j. Glottal: vocal folds (house) 

10. Manner of articulation 

a. Stop: max type of constriction; complete stop of air flow by closing either oral  cavity or glottis; like a dam, air pressure builds up, then is released (p­ pass) b. Fricative: air flow never stops, is continuous out of mouth; articulates are very  close together, even slightly touching, create very narrow channel for air (s­ slow) c. Affricate: starts with complete closure like a stop, but ends with a slow release  like a fricative; must move/2 sagittal pictures (ch­ chill) 

d. Liquid: air flow less restrictive; articulators are close together but not touching e. Glide: almost a vowel, small amount of tongue constriction; lowest type/amount  of constriction 

f. Flap­ articulators make contact, but not a stop because articulators move past  each other so fast

11. Lateral Liquid: air is curving around and coming out side of mouth, rather than middle;  sides of mouth are open b/c sides of tongue are lowered (l­ lower)

Retroflex Liquid: tongue is curled back in mouth (r­ ride) 

12. Tongue height­ how high the tongue is [high, mid, low]  

Tongue advancement­ where the tongue is in the mouth (front to back) at the highest  point [front, central, back]

Tenseness­ whether the tongue gesture is peripheral (extreme) [tense vs. lax];\  Rounding­ whether or not the lips are rounded [rounded vs. unrounded] 13. Monophthongs­ tongue stays in one position; Diphthongs­ tongue moves position to  create vowel sound, vowel w/ change in quality

14. Syllabic consonants are signified by a small line under the letter(s)/sound. Liquids and  nasals can make a syllable w/o a vowel (a syllable is usually centred around vowel,  however some consonants can be syllables by themselves).  

15. Broad transcriptions show only info that is important for encoding meaning of the word.  Narrow transcriptions show detail that is not relevant to meaning; only pronunciation  details

16. Aspirated­ there is a delay before vocal folds start vibrating when saying a vowel;  remain voiceless for a short time into the articulation; breathy sound after consonant Unaspirated­ Vocal folds start vibrating as soon as you start to say vowel; no breathy  sound after consonant, before vowel

In order to signify an aspirated consonant, insert raised “h” → [ ph ]  17. Suprasegmentals: Pitch, length, loudness 

Pitch­ voice on a scale (high to low); speed of vibration of vocal folds (faster = higher)

a. Intonation­ Pitch modulation that signals diff grammatical/semantic info; doesn’t  change fundamental meaning of word(s); use when asking a question ? b. Tone­ In some languages, changing pitch of (single syllable) word can change  meaning of word itself

i. Register: pitch stays even and steady throughout syllable 

Limited number within a language, up to 5 

ii. Contour: either rise, fall or both (change in pitch) over course of syllable Many more options within a language 

Length­ only 2 (short and long); in some languages, segment length can change word  meaning; Can lengthen vowels (more common) and consonants

Loudness­ No language uses loudness by itself (contrastingly) to change meaning of a  word; can be used as component of indicating stressed vs. unstressed syllables 18. Most languages in the world are tone languages.  

19. We use East of Articulation to make sounds more similar (“neighboring”) and efficient;  and Ease of Perception to maximize the distinction between sounds and communicate  more clearly. 

20. 6 Basic Types of Articulatory Processes 

Assimilation­ (Speech) begins to look similar; one segment becomes more like a  neighboring segment

a. Progressive: feature/sound spreads forward 

b. Regressive: feature/sound spreads backward 

c. Intervocalic/Interconsonantal: segment picks up feature of surrounding vowels  or consonants

Dissimilation­ When 1 segment becomes less like a neighbor 

Deletion­ A sound (or even syllable) is deleted 

Insertion­ New sound that appears 

Metathesis­ Reordering of segments 

Vowel reduction­ Weakening: unstressed vowel is articulated more toward the center of the vowel space, typically as schwa

21. It is not strictly necessary to describe vowels as “unrounded” because: All front vowels  are unrounded; There are only 4 rounded vowels = back non­low; Not pertinent  information in order to identify vowel; Rounding feature is predictable, redundant 22. Non­English trills: alveolar (rolling “r”s) and uvular 

Stops: Retroflex alveolar and uvular (voiceless, voiced and nasal) 

Fricatives: Bilabial, velar and pharyngeal (voiceless and voiced), “sh” ­ type sounds (retroflex and palatal)

23. Articulation of a click:  

Dual (stop) closure with 2 separate parts of mouth  

a. One part is always velar, then additional closure further front 

i. Front of tongue makes stop closure in front of mouth 

ii. Alveolar, bilabial, dental, etc. 

b. Air is trapped between 2 closures 

Body of tongue is lowered, increasing enclosed space and rarifying air 

c. Air pressure decreases/goes down 

d. Expansion of enclosed space 

Front closure is released, causing air to rush into mouth 

e. Air inside mouth has low pressure, outside mouth has high pressure 

f. Air gets sucked into mouth w/o using lungs, only movement of tongue 24. Sound is not necessary for human language due to Linguistic modality: the  mechanism used to produce and perceive language. This includes Spoken and Signed  languages­ they are similar structurally, grammar and cognitively. 

25. The 5 articulatory parameters of Sign Articulation are: Hand shape, Palm orientation,  Location, Movement, Non­manual markers (facial expressions)

Terms to know: 

(Focus on bolded terms first)

1. Linguistics­ (Theoretical) the scientific study of human language, not simply 1 specific  language; structure of language itself and grammatical properties

2. Mental grammar­ the set of knowledge/rules/concepts (in your mind) which allow you to speak and understand language; not consciously aware of these everyday rules  3. Phonetics­ the study of speech sounds themselves 

4. Phonology­ how sounds pattern in language and are (cognitively) organized in our mind  5. Morphology­ the structure of words 

6. Syntax­ the structure of sentences 

7. Semantics­ the meaning of words and sentences 

8. Descriptive grammar­ goal is to discover what rules people actually know and learn  how to describe them; linguists use this

9. Prescriptive grammar­ goal is to tell people what rules they should know; prescribed  rules of a language; attempt to change people’s linguistic behavior so that it is “correct”

10. Articulatory Phonetics­ what we do to make the sounds (mouth, tongue, etc) 11. Acoustic Phonetics­ physical properties of the sound waves themselves 12. Auditory Phonetics­ perception of speech sounds (brain, ears, nerves, etc) 13. Airstream mechanism­ moving air/something to get the air moving (out); 

lungs/diaphragm, pressing/squeezing air out of the body; pulmonicà egressive 14. Sound source­ pressing air through larynx  

15. Filters­ the moveable parts (in your mouth)­ tongue, lips, nasal cavity, etc; creates a  cavity in which the sounds bounce around

16. Vocal folds­ Muscles and ligaments that move the structure and effects the folds and  opening as air passes through

17. Glottis­ the opening/hole which air passes through; different shapes create different  types of sounds

18. Voiceless­ muscles pull vocal folds far apart, large hole/glottis; folds do not vibrate 19. Voiced­ muscles push vocal folds close together (but not completely closed), vibrating  as air is pushed over/through them

20. Whisper state­ press vocal chords together so they do not vibrate; pull back end/back of  vocal folds, creates small hole that small amount of air can pass through 21. Sagittal section­ the side view of the mouth to see the different cavities and shapes 22. Articulators­ important parts of your body (mouth) that you use to make speech sounds 23. Consonant­ a high degree of constriction in vocal tract; articulators are very close  together or touching

24. Vowel­ low degree of constriction; vocal tract is relatively open, passage for air is wide 25. Nasality­ whether or not air is going through nose (oral or nasal) 

26. Oral­ velum is raised/pressed against back of throat, no airflow through nasal cavity (ie:  b = bud)

27. Nasal­ velum is lowered, air flows through nasal cavity (ie: m = mud)  28. Stop: max type of constriction; complete stop of air flow by closing either oral cavity or  glottis; like a dam, air pressure builds up, then is released (p­ pass)

29. Fricative: air flow never stops, is continuous out of mouth; articulates are very close  together, even slightly touching, create very narrow channel for air (s­ slow) 30. Affricate: starts with complete closure like a stop, but ends with a slow release like a  fricative; must move/2 sagittal pictures (ch­ chill) 

31. Liquid: air flow less restrictive; articulators are close together but not touching a. Lateral: air is curving around and coming out side of mouth, rather than middle;  sides of mouth are open b/c sides of tongue are lowered (l­ lower)

b. Retroflex: tongue is curled back in mouth (r­ ride) 

32. Glide: almost a vowel, small amount of tongue constriction; lowest type/amount of  constriction 

33. Flap: articulators make contact, but not a stop because articulators move past each  other so fast 

34. Tongue height­ how high the tongue is [high, mid, low]  

35. Tongue advancement­ where the tongue is in the mouth (front to back) at the highest  point [front, central, back]

36. Tenseness­ whether the tongue gesture is peripheral (extreme) [tense vs. lax];\  37. Rounding­ whether or not the lips are rounded [rounded vs. unrounded] 38. Monophthongs­ tongue stays in position 

39. Diphthongs­ Tongue moves position to create vowel sound; vowel w/ change in quality 40. Syllabic consonants­ a syllable is usually centred around vowel, however some  consonants can be syllables by themselves 

41. Broad transcription­ shows only info that is important for encoding meaning of word 42. Narrow transcription­ shows detail not relevant to meaning; only pronunciation details  43. Aspiration: result of a lag in Voice Onset Time (VOT); breathy sound after consonant 44. Voice Onset Time­ length of time between the release of a plosive and the beginning of  vocal fold vibration; usually measured in milliseconds (ms) 

45.     Aspirated­ there is a delay before vocal folds start vibrating when saying a vowel;  remain voiceless for a short time into the articulation of vowel (breathy sound)

46.     Unaspirated­ vocal folds start vibrating as soon as you say vowel (no breathy sound) 47. Suprasegmentals­ Phonetic info that may be combined w/ segments in a non­sequential  way; pitch, length, loudness 

48. Pitch­ voice on a scale (high to low); speed of vibration of vocal folds (faster = higher) 49. Intonation­ Pitch modulation that signals diff grammatical/semantic info; doesn’t change  fundamental meaning of word(s); use when asking a question ?

50. Tone­ In some languages, changing pitch of (single syllable) word can change meaning  of word itself

a. Register: pitch stays even and steady throughout syllable 

i. Limited number within a language, up to 5 

b. Contour: either rise, fall or both (change in pitch) over course of syllable i. Many more options within a language 

51. Length­ only 2 (short and long); in some languages, segment length can change word  meaning; Can lengthen vowels (more common) and consonants

52. Loudness­ No language uses loudness by itself (contrastingly) to change meaning of a  word; can be used as component of indicating stressed vs. unstressed syllables 53. Stress­ Perceived prominence of a syllable in a multi­syllable word 54. Ease of Articulation: speaker will change sounds to make them more like each  other/articulation simpler; as a result, sounds become more like “neighboring sounds” 55. Ease of Perception: maximize the distinction of sounds/segments; use to communicate  more clearly

56. Assimilation­ (Speech) begins to look similar; one segment becomes more like a  neighboring segment

57. Progressive Assimilation: feature/sound spreads forward 

58. Regressive Assimilation: feature/sound spreads backward 

59. Intervocalic/Interconsonantal Assimilation: segment picks up feature of surrounding  vowels or consonants

60. Dissimilation­ When 1 segment becomes less like a neighbor 

61. Deletion­ A sound (or even syllable) is deleted 

62. Insertion­ New sound that appears 

63. Metathesis­ Reordering of segments 

64. Vowel reduction­ Weakening: unstressed 

65. Linguistic modality: the mechanism used to produce and perceive language. This  includes Spoken and Signed languages­ they are similar structurally, grammar and  cognitively.

Introduction to Human Language: Exam #1 10/9/17 Study Guide #1 

Questions: 

1. What are some careers that utilize linguistics? 

2. What are the 5 subfields of Linguistics?  

3. What is the difference between descriptive grammar and prescriptive grammar? Why is  it important to know that in this course?

4. What are the 2 main states of the glottis?  

5. What does pulmonicà egressive pertain to?  

6. Name 9 articulators. 

7. What is the difference between consonants and vowels (degree of constriction)?  8. Name and describe the 4 key factors that help you determine consonant sounds.

9. Name and describe all 10 places of articulation.  

10. Name and describe all 5 manners of articulation.  

11. What are the 2 different types of Liquids?  

12.  Name and describe the 4 key factors that help you determine vowel sounds. 

13. What is the difference between monophthongs and diphthongs?  

14. How can you tell what a syllabic consonant is?  

15. What is the difference between broad and narrow transcriptions?  

16. What is the difference between aspirated and unaspirated? What signifies an aspirated  sound when writing in IPA?

17. Name and describe the 3 Suprasegmentals (Include 2 subcategories of Pitch & Tone). 

18. What type of language are most languages in the world? (Hint: has to do with pitch) 19. What do we use to make speech production more simple, efficient and clear? 20. Name and describe the 6 basic types of Articulatory Processes.  

21. Why is it not necessary to describe unrounded vowels as “unrounded”?  22. Describe the non­English stops, trills and fricatives. 

23. Describe the articulation of a click.

24. Why is sound not necessary for human language?  

25. What are the 5 articulatory parameters of Sign Articulation?  

Answer Key: 

1. A few linguistics­related careers include: Speech Therapist, Audiologist, Computational  Linguist, Language Researcher and Language Professor.

2. 5 subfields of Linguistics: Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology, Syntax, Semantics  (Remember PMS)

3. Descriptive grammar is natural grammatical rules that we don’t even realize we know  and follow naturally; linguists study and describe these. Prescriptive grammar is  grammatical rules that are predetermined and need to be taught in order to be  “grammatically correct”; these are not naturally occurring in our everyday speech and  are used to attempt to change one’s linguistic behavior.

4. The 2 main states of the glottis are voiceless and voiced. Two additional states are the  “whisper” and “murmur” states. 

5. Pulmonicà egressive pertains to Airstream mechanism; pushing/pressing air out of  lungs/diaphragm.

6. Articulators: Lips, Teeth, Tongue, Alveolar ridge [behind teeth], Palate (hard palate)  [hard, boney dome­like roof of mouth], Velum (soft palate) [soft, further back in mouth],  Uvula [dangly thingy], Pharynx [back of the throat, root of tongue], Glottis

7. Consonants have high degree of constriction in vocal tract, meaning that the  articulators are very close together or touching. Vowels have low degree of constriction,  meaning that the vocal tract is relatively open and passage for air is wide.  8. Voicing­ voiced or voiceless 

Nasality­ oral (velum raised) or nasal (velum lowered) 

Place of Articulation­ point where air is constricted the most (place of stricture, ie:  bilabial, alveolar, velar, etc)

Manner of Articulation­ how narrow the air channel is (degree of stricture, ie: stop,  fricative, affricate, liquid, glide)

9. Places of articulation:  

a. Bilabial: 2 lips (big) 

b. Labiodental: 1 lip + teeth (find) 

c. Interdental: tongue through teeth (thick)

d. Alveolar: tongue + alveolar ridge (den) 

e. Post­alveolar: tongue + front of palate (shell)  

f. Palatal: tongue + palate (yes) 

g. Velar: tongue + velum (go) 

h. Uvular: tongue + uvula (french R sound)  

i. Pharyngeal: constriction of pharynx (arabic sounds) 

j. Glottal: vocal folds (house) 

10. Manner of articulation 

a. Stop: max type of constriction; complete stop of air flow by closing either oral  cavity or glottis; like a dam, air pressure builds up, then is released (p­ pass) b. Fricative: air flow never stops, is continuous out of mouth; articulates are very  close together, even slightly touching, create very narrow channel for air (s­ slow) c. Affricate: starts with complete closure like a stop, but ends with a slow release  like a fricative; must move/2 sagittal pictures (ch­ chill) 

d. Liquid: air flow less restrictive; articulators are close together but not touching e. Glide: almost a vowel, small amount of tongue constriction; lowest type/amount  of constriction 

f. Flap­ articulators make contact, but not a stop because articulators move past  each other so fast

11. Lateral Liquid: air is curving around and coming out side of mouth, rather than middle;  sides of mouth are open b/c sides of tongue are lowered (l­ lower)

Retroflex Liquid: tongue is curled back in mouth (r­ ride) 

12. Tongue height­ how high the tongue is [high, mid, low]  

Tongue advancement­ where the tongue is in the mouth (front to back) at the highest  point [front, central, back]

Tenseness­ whether the tongue gesture is peripheral (extreme) [tense vs. lax];\  Rounding­ whether or not the lips are rounded [rounded vs. unrounded] 13. Monophthongs­ tongue stays in one position; Diphthongs­ tongue moves position to  create vowel sound, vowel w/ change in quality

14. Syllabic consonants are signified by a small line under the letter(s)/sound. Liquids and  nasals can make a syllable w/o a vowel (a syllable is usually centred around vowel,  however some consonants can be syllables by themselves).  

15. Broad transcriptions show only info that is important for encoding meaning of the word.  Narrow transcriptions show detail that is not relevant to meaning; only pronunciation  details

16. Aspirated­ there is a delay before vocal folds start vibrating when saying a vowel;  remain voiceless for a short time into the articulation; breathy sound after consonant Unaspirated­ Vocal folds start vibrating as soon as you start to say vowel; no breathy  sound after consonant, before vowel

In order to signify an aspirated consonant, insert raised “h” → [ ph ]  17. Suprasegmentals: Pitch, length, loudness 

Pitch­ voice on a scale (high to low); speed of vibration of vocal folds (faster = higher)

a. Intonation­ Pitch modulation that signals diff grammatical/semantic info; doesn’t  change fundamental meaning of word(s); use when asking a question ? b. Tone­ In some languages, changing pitch of (single syllable) word can change  meaning of word itself

i. Register: pitch stays even and steady throughout syllable 

Limited number within a language, up to 5 

ii. Contour: either rise, fall or both (change in pitch) over course of syllable Many more options within a language 

Length­ only 2 (short and long); in some languages, segment length can change word  meaning; Can lengthen vowels (more common) and consonants

Loudness­ No language uses loudness by itself (contrastingly) to change meaning of a  word; can be used as component of indicating stressed vs. unstressed syllables 18. Most languages in the world are tone languages.  

19. We use East of Articulation to make sounds more similar (“neighboring”) and efficient;  and Ease of Perception to maximize the distinction between sounds and communicate  more clearly. 

20. 6 Basic Types of Articulatory Processes 

Assimilation­ (Speech) begins to look similar; one segment becomes more like a  neighboring segment

a. Progressive: feature/sound spreads forward 

b. Regressive: feature/sound spreads backward 

c. Intervocalic/Interconsonantal: segment picks up feature of surrounding vowels  or consonants

Dissimilation­ When 1 segment becomes less like a neighbor 

Deletion­ A sound (or even syllable) is deleted 

Insertion­ New sound that appears 

Metathesis­ Reordering of segments 

Vowel reduction­ Weakening: unstressed vowel is articulated more toward the center of the vowel space, typically as schwa

21. It is not strictly necessary to describe vowels as “unrounded” because: All front vowels  are unrounded; There are only 4 rounded vowels = back non­low; Not pertinent  information in order to identify vowel; Rounding feature is predictable, redundant 22. Non­English trills: alveolar (rolling “r”s) and uvular 

Stops: Retroflex alveolar and uvular (voiceless, voiced and nasal) 

Fricatives: Bilabial, velar and pharyngeal (voiceless and voiced), “sh” ­ type sounds (retroflex and palatal)

23. Articulation of a click:  

Dual (stop) closure with 2 separate parts of mouth  

a. One part is always velar, then additional closure further front 

i. Front of tongue makes stop closure in front of mouth 

ii. Alveolar, bilabial, dental, etc. 

b. Air is trapped between 2 closures 

Body of tongue is lowered, increasing enclosed space and rarifying air 

c. Air pressure decreases/goes down 

d. Expansion of enclosed space 

Front closure is released, causing air to rush into mouth 

e. Air inside mouth has low pressure, outside mouth has high pressure 

f. Air gets sucked into mouth w/o using lungs, only movement of tongue 24. Sound is not necessary for human language due to Linguistic modality: the  mechanism used to produce and perceive language. This includes Spoken and Signed  languages­ they are similar structurally, grammar and cognitively. 

25. The 5 articulatory parameters of Sign Articulation are: Hand shape, Palm orientation,  Location, Movement, Non­manual markers (facial expressions)

Terms to know: 

(Focus on bolded terms first)

1. Linguistics­ (Theoretical) the scientific study of human language, not simply 1 specific  language; structure of language itself and grammatical properties

2. Mental grammar­ the set of knowledge/rules/concepts (in your mind) which allow you to speak and understand language; not consciously aware of these everyday rules  3. Phonetics­ the study of speech sounds themselves 

4. Phonology­ how sounds pattern in language and are (cognitively) organized in our mind  5. Morphology­ the structure of words 

6. Syntax­ the structure of sentences 

7. Semantics­ the meaning of words and sentences 

8. Descriptive grammar­ goal is to discover what rules people actually know and learn  how to describe them; linguists use this

9. Prescriptive grammar­ goal is to tell people what rules they should know; prescribed  rules of a language; attempt to change people’s linguistic behavior so that it is “correct”

10. Articulatory Phonetics­ what we do to make the sounds (mouth, tongue, etc) 11. Acoustic Phonetics­ physical properties of the sound waves themselves 12. Auditory Phonetics­ perception of speech sounds (brain, ears, nerves, etc) 13. Airstream mechanism­ moving air/something to get the air moving (out); 

lungs/diaphragm, pressing/squeezing air out of the body; pulmonicà egressive 14. Sound source­ pressing air through larynx  

15. Filters­ the moveable parts (in your mouth)­ tongue, lips, nasal cavity, etc; creates a  cavity in which the sounds bounce around

16. Vocal folds­ Muscles and ligaments that move the structure and effects the folds and  opening as air passes through

17. Glottis­ the opening/hole which air passes through; different shapes create different  types of sounds

18. Voiceless­ muscles pull vocal folds far apart, large hole/glottis; folds do not vibrate 19. Voiced­ muscles push vocal folds close together (but not completely closed), vibrating  as air is pushed over/through them

20. Whisper state­ press vocal chords together so they do not vibrate; pull back end/back of  vocal folds, creates small hole that small amount of air can pass through 21. Sagittal section­ the side view of the mouth to see the different cavities and shapes 22. Articulators­ important parts of your body (mouth) that you use to make speech sounds 23. Consonant­ a high degree of constriction in vocal tract; articulators are very close  together or touching

24. Vowel­ low degree of constriction; vocal tract is relatively open, passage for air is wide 25. Nasality­ whether or not air is going through nose (oral or nasal) 

26. Oral­ velum is raised/pressed against back of throat, no airflow through nasal cavity (ie:  b = bud)

27. Nasal­ velum is lowered, air flows through nasal cavity (ie: m = mud)  28. Stop: max type of constriction; complete stop of air flow by closing either oral cavity or  glottis; like a dam, air pressure builds up, then is released (p­ pass)

29. Fricative: air flow never stops, is continuous out of mouth; articulates are very close  together, even slightly touching, create very narrow channel for air (s­ slow) 30. Affricate: starts with complete closure like a stop, but ends with a slow release like a  fricative; must move/2 sagittal pictures (ch­ chill) 

31. Liquid: air flow less restrictive; articulators are close together but not touching a. Lateral: air is curving around and coming out side of mouth, rather than middle;  sides of mouth are open b/c sides of tongue are lowered (l­ lower)

b. Retroflex: tongue is curled back in mouth (r­ ride) 

32. Glide: almost a vowel, small amount of tongue constriction; lowest type/amount of  constriction 

33. Flap: articulators make contact, but not a stop because articulators move past each  other so fast 

34. Tongue height­ how high the tongue is [high, mid, low]  

35. Tongue advancement­ where the tongue is in the mouth (front to back) at the highest  point [front, central, back]

36. Tenseness­ whether the tongue gesture is peripheral (extreme) [tense vs. lax];\  37. Rounding­ whether or not the lips are rounded [rounded vs. unrounded] 38. Monophthongs­ tongue stays in position 

39. Diphthongs­ Tongue moves position to create vowel sound; vowel w/ change in quality 40. Syllabic consonants­ a syllable is usually centred around vowel, however some  consonants can be syllables by themselves 

41. Broad transcription­ shows only info that is important for encoding meaning of word 42. Narrow transcription­ shows detail not relevant to meaning; only pronunciation details  43. Aspiration: result of a lag in Voice Onset Time (VOT); breathy sound after consonant 44. Voice Onset Time­ length of time between the release of a plosive and the beginning of  vocal fold vibration; usually measured in milliseconds (ms) 

45.     Aspirated­ there is a delay before vocal folds start vibrating when saying a vowel;  remain voiceless for a short time into the articulation of vowel (breathy sound)

46.     Unaspirated­ vocal folds start vibrating as soon as you say vowel (no breathy sound) 47. Suprasegmentals­ Phonetic info that may be combined w/ segments in a non­sequential  way; pitch, length, loudness 

48. Pitch­ voice on a scale (high to low); speed of vibration of vocal folds (faster = higher) 49. Intonation­ Pitch modulation that signals diff grammatical/semantic info; doesn’t change  fundamental meaning of word(s); use when asking a question ?

50. Tone­ In some languages, changing pitch of (single syllable) word can change meaning  of word itself

a. Register: pitch stays even and steady throughout syllable 

i. Limited number within a language, up to 5 

b. Contour: either rise, fall or both (change in pitch) over course of syllable i. Many more options within a language 

51. Length­ only 2 (short and long); in some languages, segment length can change word  meaning; Can lengthen vowels (more common) and consonants

52. Loudness­ No language uses loudness by itself (contrastingly) to change meaning of a  word; can be used as component of indicating stressed vs. unstressed syllables 53. Stress­ Perceived prominence of a syllable in a multi­syllable word 54. Ease of Articulation: speaker will change sounds to make them more like each  other/articulation simpler; as a result, sounds become more like “neighboring sounds” 55. Ease of Perception: maximize the distinction of sounds/segments; use to communicate  more clearly

56. Assimilation­ (Speech) begins to look similar; one segment becomes more like a  neighboring segment

57. Progressive Assimilation: feature/sound spreads forward 

58. Regressive Assimilation: feature/sound spreads backward 

59. Intervocalic/Interconsonantal Assimilation: segment picks up feature of surrounding  vowels or consonants

60. Dissimilation­ When 1 segment becomes less like a neighbor 

61. Deletion­ A sound (or even syllable) is deleted 

62. Insertion­ New sound that appears 

63. Metathesis­ Reordering of segments 

64. Vowel reduction­ Weakening: unstressed 

65. Linguistic modality: the mechanism used to produce and perceive language. This  includes Spoken and Signed languages­ they are similar structurally, grammar and  cognitively.

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here