×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UCalgary - SOCI 365 - Class Notes - Week 4
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UCalgary - SOCI 365 - Class Notes - Week 4

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UCALGARY / Sociology / SOCI 365 / What is the notion of a patriarchal dividend?

What is the notion of a patriarchal dividend?

What is the notion of a patriarchal dividend?

Description

School: University of Calgary
Department: Sociology
Course: Social Stratification
Professor: Thomas langford
Term: Fall 2017
Tags: sociology
Cost: 25
Name: Sociology 365: Week 4
Description: These notes cover the week of October 2nd-6th.
Uploaded: 10/07/2017
7 Pages 41 Views 5 Unlocks
Reviews


Sociology 365 – 01: Social Stratification


What is the the notion of a patriarchal dividend?



Fall 2017

October 2 – Social Stratification Slides & Class and Higher Education Questions – Week 4 ∙ The Relational Approach to Social Stratification Continued

o Characteristics of Canada’s Patriarchal Gender Order

 Uneven across institutional domains.

 Character is changing.

 Overlain by other types of social stratification.

 Men’s experiences of patriarchal privilege are variable.

o The Notion of a “Patriarchal Dividend”

 Men sometimes benefit from patriarchy regardless of their own beliefs or  intentions since gender inequalities are built taken­for­granted system of  meaning and social institutions.

∙ Men from no action of their own can gain benefits from a male


How do affluent families assist their children in succeeding in the educational system?



dominated system because of stereotypes and institutional practices 

which they benefit from. If you’re advantaged in this way, you don’t 

experience the advantage as “someone helped me out”, rather it’s just 

“living your life.”

o There are doors that are opened that you don’t always notice 

unless you are looking for it. If you want to learn more check out How many branches the government has?

∙ Example of a patriarchal dividend. We also discuss several other topics like What is a nuclear envelope?

o Think of male professors and female professors. 

 A male professor has the advantage that he can come to

class without thinking of his wardrobe, wearing casual 

clothes. The dividend that the male professor has is that

‘people don’t look at him as less qualified because he 


What is the income and wealth inequalities in canada?



dresses casually.’

∙ It can be argued that female professors are 

judged more harshly if they were to do this.

 The way that patriarchy works is not uniform.

∙ It can both harm and benefits males and females. 

 There are systemic advantages of all different types.

∙ ‘For Poor, Leap to College Often Ends in a Hard Fall’ Reading Questions

o (1) Compare the educational successes and failures of Melissa, Bianca and Angelica  since they graduated from Ball High School in Galveston, Texas in 2008 up until the  end of 2012.

 Melissa

 Bianca

 Angelica

∙ Top of her class in high school with a GPA of 3.9. Went to Emory 

where she had to take out a loan of $40,000 as she missed the deadline 

for financial aid. She got A’s and B’s in her first year. In her second 

year she again didn’t get the aid she needed as of a misunderstanding, 

and had to take up a part­time job to support herself. We also discuss several other topics like What role does the ecosystem play in the evolution of behavior?

o (2) Stanford sociologist Sean Reardon is quoted in the article as asserting, "It's  becoming increasingly unlikely that a low­income student, no matter how  intrinsically bright, moves up the socioeconomic ladder." What are the major  obstacles that these three students faced as they contemplated and attempted using  post­secondary education to begin moving up the socioeconomic ladder?

 Some of these obligations included:

∙ Generational obligation

∙ Financial limitations

∙ Boyfriends and personal life

o The author puts a harsh look onto all of the boyfriends, some 

deserved and some not. Fred for example wasn’t terrible.

o The idea made is that none of these girls had a father in their 

life, and because of this they latch on to an older boyfriend and 

it holds them down.

∙ Family lacked knowledge of post­secondary

∙ Campus isolation/alienation

October 4 – Class and Higher Education Questions – Week 4

∙ ‘For Poor, Leap to College Often Ends in a Hard Fall’ Reading Questions Continued We also discuss several other topics like What is a tie-beam truss?

o (3) What could have Emory University done differently in its dealings with Angelica  so as to improve her chances of academic success?

 Clearer communication with Angelica, such as an improved student 

orientation program.

 Not made assumptions of her family’s income, and if they did they could have confirmed this change.

∙ Corrected error after situation was cleared up.

 Free counselling offered to students.

 Academic advising opportunities.

o (4) How do affluent families (upper quartile on the income distribution) assist their  children in succeeding in the educational system in ways that are often beyond the  resources and capacities of poorer families (lower quartile on the income  distribution)?

 Financial help (tuition/living/emergencies)

 Insider knowledge about universities

 Parents advocating and using networks to solve problems If you want to learn more check out What is the function of american colonization in society?

 Resources to help with admission, standardized tests, etc.

 Family has more time available to help

 No need to work, giving more time to the student

o (5) Click on the multimedia graphic display at the end of the article ("Related  Coverage: Affluent Students Have an Advantage and the Gap in Widening"). Be sure  that you understand and can explain the patterns and trends reported in the graphs.

 As family income increases, the completion rate of college increases greatly. 

∙ This is true when it comes to students with both above average and  below average test scores.

o However, students with below average test scores who come 

from high income families have a completion rate equal to 

students with above average test scores with lower family 

income.

o If you have the combination of above average test scores and 

high family income, you’re completion rate is at the highest  Don't forget about the age old question of What is the primary factor in business success?

(nearly 70%).

October 6 – Income and Wealth Inequalities in Canada – Week 4

∙ Social researchers can measure material inequality, as they have quantitative measures. ∙ Income and Wealth Inequalities in Canada Handout (Graphs and Handouts on D2L) o Table 1: ‘Average Total Family Income in Canada (Inflation accounted for)’

 It’s clear that total family income has increased over double in the last 50  years.

∙ 1951 ­ $33K; 1961 ­ $42K; 1971; ­ $62K; 1981 ­ $78K; 1991 ­ $80K;  2001 ­ $90K; 2011 ­ $99K

o 1951­1961; there are still very few women in the work force, 

especially if you consider married women where it’s only near 

20%. This large increase is mainly due to an increase in 

productivity and innovation.

o Later on there is an increase in the amount of families who 

have two earners, as married women are entering the work 

force at a much larger rate.

o 1971; there had been a doubling of family income since the 

‘50s.

o 1981; following 1981 there was a huge recession, but this was 

remedied with the introduction of neoliberalism.

∙ However, this is not perfect as the average is drastically increased by  including very rich families into the account. This is the mean, not the 

median.

o Table 2: ‘Distribution of total income of families and unattached individuals, by  quintiles.’

 Everyone is included, whether they live with others or individually. 

∙ All of these units are rank ordered by their income, and their rows are  then divided into 5ths; creating 5 quintiles.

Lowest

Quintile

Second 

Quintile

Third 

Quintile

Fourth 

Quintil

e

Highest  Quintile

2015

3.9%

9.3%

15.4%

24%

47.4%

 If income was equally distributed, the pattern in a row would be 

20/20/20/20/20.

o Table 3: ‘Gini Coefficients for Categories of Income by Family Type’

 When the Gini coefficient is equal to 1 the inequality is as high as possible,  and when the coefficient is equal to 0 there is no inequality.

∙ This is a measurement of inequality.

 When looking at a graph which demonstrates the income different quintiles  take home, you may calculate the Gini Coefficient.

∙ Shaded area / lower triangle area = Gini Coefficient

o P90­P10 Ratio

 When I look at the row, the unit at the 90th% tile is compared to the 10th% tile,  creating a ratio representing inequality. Comparing the poorest to the richest.

∙ Everyone benefits from a growing economy. Even if you get a smaller portion, if the entirety  which is being shared increases than you still will benefit.

o This is an appeal to the middle­class, and an example of trickle­down economics.

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here