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BYU - PHY S 100 - Chapter 9 Notes, Week 5 - Class Notes

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BYU - PHY S 100 - Chapter 9 Notes, Week 5 - Class Notes

School: Brigham Young University
Department: OTHER
Course: Physical Science
Professor: Patricia Ackroyd
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: Energy and conservation
Name: Chapter 9 Notes, Week 5
Description: Mechanical and internal energy, mass-energy conservation (E=mc^2)
Uploaded: 10/13/2017
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background image Chapter 9: Energy What is Energy? Energy: ability to exert force on a moving object; object's capacity to change  things around it Potential energy: depends on the object's position Kinetic energy: depends on the object's motion Mechanical: either kinetic or potential energy of large objects Internal: energy of microscopic objects Measure in Joules   Types of Mechanical Energy Kinetic The more massive and the faster the object is, the greater its kinetic energy K = (1/2)m * v^2 Gravitational Potential Energy that depends on gravity's pull The greater the height for the object and the greater the weight (gravitational pull depending on mass), the greater the gravitational potential energy P = weight * height When it comes to measuring gravitational potential energy among planets,  the greater the distance between them, the greater the gravitational potential 
energy 
o Their "weight" may decrease as they travel farther from each other,  but remember that this is POTENTIAL energy. These objects have greater 
potential energy the farther apart they are (move faster to reach each 
other than if they were right next to each other)
Electrical Potential Energy Greater for opposite charges the farther apart they are (would you be more  excited to see your significant other if they had stayed right next to you the 
whole time or if they lived far away? You'll hurry to see them faster if they 
visited you all the way from NYC.)
BUT it's the flip-side for same charges--they WANT to repel and spread  distance o Greater energy the closer they are to each other (would you rather  stand next to your nemesis or stand 500 feet away? You'll run faster from 
them if you're standing right next to them)
  Work and Internal Energy Energy is useful because it can transfer and change into other forms, but the  total amount of energy remains conserved o Ex: a falling basketball's gravitational potential energy transforms into  kinetic energy as it falls Work: energy transferred as an object moves in direction of a force o W = force * distance (parallel to force) o If gravitational potential energy or kinetic energy change, work is being done!  

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School: Brigham Young University
Department: OTHER
Course: Physical Science
Professor: Patricia Ackroyd
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: Energy and conservation
Name: Chapter 9 Notes, Week 5
Description: Mechanical and internal energy, mass-energy conservation (E=mc^2)
Uploaded: 10/13/2017
2 Pages 27 Views 21 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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