×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UNLV - AST 104 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UNLV - AST 104 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UNLV / Astronomy / AST 104 / unlv astronomy

unlv astronomy

unlv astronomy

Description

School: University of Nevada - Las Vegas
Department: Astronomy
Course: Astronomy
Professor: David jeffery
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: astronomy, 104, study, and guide
Cost: 50
Name: Astronomy 104 Exam #2 Study Guide
Description: This is a study guide for the second exam in Astronomy 104.
Uploaded: 10/15/2017
17 Pages 12 Views 5 Unlocks
Reviews


1. Stellar classification (spectral): O, B, A, F, G, K, M, Sun’s type (G)  


What is Stellar Classification?



Stellar Classification 

∙ Spectral classification

∙ Luminosity classification

∙ Full classification

Class                        Temperature                               Stellar Color O                             30,000­60,000 K                             Blue

B                             10,000­30,000 K                             Blue­White A                             7,500­10,000 K                               Blue­White F                              6,000­7,500 K                                Yellow­White G                             5,000­6,000 K                                 Yellow (Sun) K                             3,500­5,000 K                                 Yellow­Orange M                             2,000­3,500 K                                  Red

Annie Jump Cannon (1863­1941) 

∙ Oh, (Only)

∙ Be (Boys)


What is the temperature of a K type star?



∙ A (Accepting

∙ Fine (Feminism)

∙ Girl (Get)

∙ Kiss (Kissed)

∙ Me (Meaningfully)

2. Stellar classification (luminosity): I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, Sun’s type (V)  

Luminosity Classification 

∙ I: Supergiant

∙ II: Bright giant

∙ III: Giant

∙ IV: Subgiant

∙ V: Main sequence or “dwarf”

∙ VI: Subdwarf

∙ VII: White dwarf

∙ Examples:

­ Sun: V

­ Mintaka: II

­ Rigel: I

­ Betelgeuse: I

Full Classification: Examples 

∙ Sun: G2 V

∙ Mintaka: O9.5 II

∙ Rigel: B8 I

∙ Betelgeuse: M2 I

∙ Sirius: A1V

∙ Proxima Centauri: M5.5V

3. Fraction of single stars and binary/multiple stars (~1/2)  

4. Density of interstellar medium: 1 proton (hydrogen) per cm^3; nebular: 100­1000  protons (hydrogen) per cm^3; and cold dark clouds (molecular clouds): 10,000­1  million protons (hydrogen) per cm^3


What is the color of a O type star?



We also discuss several other topics like concordia egypt

5. Most abundant molecule (Hydrogen) and the easiest to trace molecule (CO) 6. Nuclear fusion: 4 H to convert to 1 He (two channels: p­p chain & C­N­O cycle)  7. Helium flash (triple alpha process): 3 He to convert to 1 C 

8. White dwarf (size of Earth, Chandrasekhar limit ­ 1.4 solar masses)  9. Neutron star (size R ~ 10 km, upper limit ­ 3 solar masses) 

10. Neutron star zoo (pulsars, millisecond pulsars, magnetars, X­ray pulsars, X­ray  bursters, double pulsars) 

Neutron Stars and Pulsars 

∙ Predicted in 1932 (Lev Landau)

∙ Discovered in 1967 (Jocelyn Bell and Antony Hewish) – LGMs (little green men) ∙ Pulse in radio band (later: optical, x­ray, gamma­ray)

∙ Period: typically 1 second or less (1.5 ms­8s)

∙ Period is the rotational period

∙ Pulses are lighthouse beams

Pulsars 

∙ A pulsar is a neutron star that beams radiation along a magnetic axis that is not  aligned with the rotation axis

∙ The radiation beams sweep through space like lighthouse beams as the neutron  star rotates

Normal Pulsars 

∙ Period from 20­30 milliseconds to 1­2 seconds

∙ Isolated neutron stars born in supernova explosions If you want to learn more check out gsu math

∙ Bright radio emitter, also gamma­ray, x­ray and optical emitter

∙ Spin down (period becomes longer and longer – slow down), powered by spin down

∙ Precise clocks

∙ Magnetic fields 10^7­10^9 Tesla (Sun spot 0.4 Tesla)

Millisecond Pulsars 

∙ Period 1.5­20 milliseconds (spin very fast)

∙ “Low” magnetic fields (10^4­10^6 Tesla)

∙ Also spin down

∙ “Recycled” during accretion phase with a companion – spun up

Magnetars 

∙ Period 5­12 seconds (slow rotators)

∙ Super strong magnetic fields (10^10­10^11 Tesla)

∙ Strong x­ray emitters, repeating gamma­ray bursters (Soft gamma­ray repeaters) ∙ Also spin down

∙ Powered by decay of magnetic fields

Pulsar period is the period of

a. Neutron star vibration

b. Neutron star rotation We also discuss several other topics like chem 1a sjsu

c. White dwarf vibration

d. White dwarf rotation

e. Orbit in neutron star binary system

People haven’t found an isolated neutron star pulsar spinning with roughly this period a. 5 millisecond

b. 50 milliseconds

c. 0.5 seconds

d. 5 seconds

e. 50 seconds

Which of the following has the strongest magnetic fields?

a. A normal pulsar

b. A millisecond pulsar

c. A pulsar in the binary system

d. A magnetar

e. Pulsar A in the double pulsar system

A magnetar is powered by its spin­down energy

a. True

b. False

Neutron Stars in Binary Systems 

∙ X­ray pulsars (strong­field NSs accreting from a companion)

∙ NS­NS binaries

­ PSR 1913+16 (first pulsar – NS binary, discovered 1975, testing general  relativity)

­ PSR J0737­3039 (first pulsar – pulsar binary, discovered late 2003)

Accreting Neutron Stars 

∙ Accreting matter adds angular momentum to a neutron star, increasing its spin ∙ Episodes of fusion on the surface lead to x­ray bursts

Double Pulsars 

∙ Two neutron stars whose radiation beams both sweep the earth

X­ray pulsars are powered by accretion of a neutron star from a massive companion a. True

b. False

The double pulsar system includes one neutron star and one white dwarf a. True

b. False

11. Black hole (radius for different masses: 1 solar mass 3 km, 1 earth mass ~1 cm;  10^8 solar masses 2 AU)

12. No hair theorem (mass, spin, charge)

“Black Hole Has No Hair” 

∙ Matter forming a BH loses almost all of its properties We also discuss several other topics like john sepikas

∙ A black hole is completely determined by three quantities

­ Mass

­ Angular momentum

­ Electric charge – usually small

13.

Apparent Magnitudes 

∙ The smaller, the brighter

∙ A difference of 5 magnitudes corresponds to a factor of 100 in brightness ­ A firm mathematical footing is due to N.R. Pogson, 1856

­ A 6th magnitude star is 100 times fainter than a 1st magnitude star ­ A difference of 1 magnitude is a factor of 100^0.2=2.512

­ HST images regularly detect 26th magnitude objects: factor of 100 x 100 x 100 x 100 = 10^8 times too faint to see with the naked eye

∙ Examples:

­ Sirius: ­1.46 mag.

­ The Sun: ­26.7 mag

­ The full Moon: ­12.6 mag

Which of the following stars appear the brightest?

a. The star with apparent magnitude 25

b. The star with apparent magnitude 12

c. The star with apparent magnitude 5

d. The star with apparent magnitude ­1.5

e. One cannot tell

Luminosity 

∙ Intrinsic brightness

∙ Luminosity = Energy/time

∙ It reflects how much energy is released from the source (stars, galaxies, etc) per  unit time

∙ Apparent brightness is not a measure of the luminosity (in watts) of a star ∙ Star of given brightness could be dim but close, or luminous and distant ∙ In fact, apparent brightness = luminosity/4(Pi)x(distance)^2

∙ Twice the distance 1/4 of the apparent brightness

∙ Need to measure distance independently of the apparent brightness

Absolute Magnitudes 

∙ Absolute Magnitude: The apparent magnitude that a star would have if it were  located at a standard distance We also discuss several other topics like What four conditions are necessary and sufficient for evolution to occur?
If you want to learn more check out What’s the difference between coinsurance and copayment?

∙ The standard distance was chosen to be 10 parsec

∙ 1 parsec is equivalent to 3.26 light years (The basis of a parsec will be described  later)

∙ Examples:

­ Sirius: ­1.46 mag (absolute mag +1.42)

­ The Sun: ­26.7 mag (absolute mag +4.2)

­ Overall, the absolute magnitudes of stars range from ­10 to +17 (form about  10^­6 to a few 10^5 times that of the Sun)

Which of the following stars appear the brightest?

a. The stat with absolute magnitude ­10

b. The star with absolute magnitude ­5

c. The star with absolute magnitude 5

d. The star with absolute magnitude 1.5

e. One cannot tell

Which of the following stars is intrinsically the brightest (has the highest luminosity)? a. The star with absolute magnitude ­10

b. The star with absolute magnitude ­5

c. The star with absolute magnitude 5

d. The star with absolute magnitude 1.5

e. One cannot tell

Measure the Distance: Parallax 

∙ Parallax is the apparent shift in position of a nearby object against a background  of more distant objects

∙ Apparent positions of nearest stars shift by about an arcsecond as Earth orbits Sun ∙ Parallax angle depends on distance

Parallax 

∙ The annual parallax: the angle between Sun, star, and Earth in the right­angled  triangle formed by these three objects

∙ One parsec is the distance at which a star would have an annual parallax of 1  arcsecond

∙ The smaller the parallax, the larger the distance

∙ P = parallax angle

∙ D (in parsecs, or pc) = 1/p (in arcseconds)

∙ 1 pc = 3.26 light years

∙ Example

­ Proxima Centauri: parallax = 0.772 arcsec distance = 1/0.772 = 1.3 parsec ­ Smallest parallaxes measured from the Earth is 0.02 arcsec (50 parsec) ­ The satellite Hipparcos (High precision parallax collecting satellite) (1989­

1993, European Space Agency): measure parallaxes of a million stars to  accuracies of 0.01 arcsec

Which of the following stars is the farthest?

a. The star with a parallax 2 arcseconds

b. The star with a parallax 0.75 arcseconds

c. The star with a parallax 0.01 arcseconds

d. None of the above

e. One cannot tell

14. Hertzprung­Russell Diagram  

Hertzprung­Russel Diagram 

∙ Luminosity against color (temperature)

∙ Luminosity classification against spectral classification

∙ Horizontal: temperature high to low (left to right)

∙ Vertical: luminosity low to high (bottom up)

∙ H­R diagram depicts: Temperature, color, spectral type, luminosity, radius ∙ Most stars fall somewhere on the main sequence of the H­R diagram

∙ Stars with lower T and higher L than main­sequence stars must have larger radii:  giants and supergiants

∙ Stars with higher T and lower L than main­sequence stars must have smaller radii: white dwarfs

A Real H­R Diagram 

∙ A real H­R diagram using distances measured by Hipparcos satellite ∙ Stars usually don’t scatter randomly across the H­R diagram

∙ Most stars with the same surface temperatures have similar luminosities

Stars in the upper right corner of H­R diagram are

a. Blue and bright

b. Red and bright

c. Blue and dim

d. Red and dim

e. None of the above

Stars in the lower left corner of H­R diagram are

a. Blue and bright

b. Red and bright

c. Blue and dim

d. Red and dim

e. None of the above

15. Parallax, red­shift vs. blue­shift  

∙ Larger distance, smaller angle

16. Binary stars: visual binaries, spectroscopic binaries, eclipsing binaries 

Binary and Multiple Stars 

∙ Over half of all stars are members in the binary or multiple systems ∙ Binaries

­ Visual binaries

­ Spectroscopic binaries

­ Eclipsing binaries

Visual Binaries 

∙ Two stars could be resolved

∙ Physically related, revolve around each other (in contrast to optical double) ∙ Primary and secondary (companion)

∙ Method to weigh stars

Spectroscopic Binaries 

∙ Doppler effect

∙ The stars in the binary system have different spectrum at different phases of the  orbit

Eclipsing Binaries 

∙ The binary orbit is edge­on 

∙ What appears a single star will vary in brightness in a regular, periodic fashion ∙ Total eclipse and partial eclipse

Two optical stars appear to be close together must be visual binaries a. True

b. False

17. Variable stars: intrinsic vs. extrinsic, pulsating variables  

Variable Stars 

∙ Stars varying in brightness

­ Periodically

­ Irregularly

­ Abruptly

∙ Intrinsic vs. extrinsic (e.g. eclipses)

∙ Lightcurve: Brightness plotted against time

Examples of Extrinsic Variables 

∙ Eclipsing binaries

­ Each star does not vary

­ The lightcurve varies because of eclipses

Pulsating Variables 

∙ Intrinsic, periodic variables

∙ Expand and contract in a periodic fashion (cannot achieve proper balance) ∙ Example: Cepheid variables – period – luminosity correlation, ruler to measure  distance

∙ Other examples: RR Lyrae stars, Mira, etc.

Pulsating stars are

a. Intrinsic variables

b. Extrinsic variables

c. Periodic variables

d. A and c

e. B and c

Nova are not new­born stars.

a. True

b. False

18. HI and HII regions, 21 cm line (probing H)  

Emission Nebula (HII Region) 

∙ HII is ionized Hydrogen (proton and electron apart)

∙ HI is neutral Hydrogen (proton and electron combined)

∙ Hot stars (O­ or B0­ type) ionize gas out to a certain distance called Stromgren  radius

∙ 21 cm (1420 MHz) line (radio band): Hydrogen line: electron spin flip 19. Pre­main sequence, main sequence, zero­age main sequence, red giants,  asymptotic giant branch (AGB), planetary nebulae 

∙ Difference between pre­main sequence and main sequence is hydrogen burning Main Sequence 

∙ Gravity balanced by thermal nuclear reaction

∙ 4 hydrogen nuclei combines to 1 helium nucleus

­ pp chain (discussed in chapter 14 – the sun)

­ C­N­O chain

Zero­age Main Sequence  

∙ The locus of points at which newly formed stars join the main sequence  ∙ The higher the mass

­ The greater the luminosity 

­ The higher the surface temperature

A red giant

a. Has higher temperature than the sun

b. Has lower temperature than the sun

c. Is brighter than the sun

d. A and c

e. B and c

Planet Nebulae 

∙ Most beautiful show of heaven

∙ William Herschel (18th century astronomer) thought that they looked like the discs of planets

∙ In fact, they are the ejecta of the dying stars (red giants/asymptotic giants)

The Formation of Planetary Nebulae 

∙ Two stage processes:

­ Slow wind from a red giant blows away cool, outer layers of the star ­ Fast wind from hot, inner layers catches up with the slow wind and lights it up

Planetary nebulae are the discs where planets form

a. True

b. False

20. Electron degeneracy pressure, neutron degeneracy pressure  

Degeneracy Pressure 

∙ Particles can’t be in the same state in same place

∙ Doesn’t depend on heat content

Thermal Pressure 

∙ Depends on heat content

∙ The main form of pressure in most stars

Electron degeneracy pressure is the agent to balance gravity in

a. Main sequence stars

b. Red giants

c. White dwarfs

d. Neutron stars

e. Black holes

Electron degeneracy pressure is the agent to balance gravity in

a. Main sequence stars

b. Red giants

c. Brown dwarfs

d. Neutron stars

e. Black holes

21. White dwarfs, Chandrasekhar limit  

White Dwarfs 

∙ Destiny of solar­mass stars

∙ Core contraction does not ignite carbon

∙ No more heat generated balance gravity

∙ At the size of earth, another force starts to play the role to balance gravity –  electron degeneracy pressure

∙ The star is stabilized – a white dwarf

∙ ~1 solar mass fits into the size of Earth (recall a Sun can enclose ~1 million  Earths)

∙ Very high density: ~1 billion kg/m^3

∙ Temperature: ~25,000 K

∙ Luminosity: ~0.01 solar luminosity

∙ Keep cooling until becoming black dwarfs (many billions of years) ∙ White dwarfs are the remaining cores of dead stars

∙ Electron degeneracy pressure supports them against gravity

Size of a White Dwarf 

∙ White dwarfs with same mass as sun are about the same size as earth ∙ Higher mass white dwarfs are smaller

The Chandrasekhar Limit 

∙ The more massive a WD, the smaller

∙ The smaller, the larger the electron degeneracy pressure

∙ At 1.4 solar mass, the electron degeneracy pressure can no longer hold the gravity ∙ It will collapse to neutron stars

∙ 1.4 solar mass is the maximum limit for WDs

22. Neutron stars, pulsars (period), millisecond pulsars, magnetars, X­ray pulsars, X ray bursters, double pulsar systems 

Formation of Neutron Stars 

∙ Compact stars more massive than 1.4 solar masses (Chandrasekhar limit) collapse further

∙ Temperature so high, atomic nuclei break up into protons and neutrons ∙ Electrons are pushed into protons to form neutrons

∙ Mainly composed of neutrons, neutron degeneracy pressure balance gravity –  neutron stars

Neutron Stars 

∙ Destiny of intermediate­mass stars

∙ Mass: 1.4­3 solar masses

∙ Radius: ~10 km

∙ Density: hundred­quadrillion (10^17) kg/m^3 – the densest objects in the universe ∙ Magnetic fields: 10^4­10^11 Tesla (Sunspots: 0.4 Tesla) – strongest magnetic  fields in the universe

The size of a neutron star is comparable to 

a. That of earth

b. That of the sun

c. That of Nevada

d. That of a small city

e. None of the above

A neutron star is mainly composed of

a. Electrons

b. Protons

c. Neutrons

d. Quarks

e. Hydrogen

Neutron Stars and Pulsars 

∙ Predicted in 1932 (Lev Landau)

∙ Discovered in 1967 (Jocelyn Bell and Antony Hewish) – LGMs (little green men) ∙ Pulse in radio band (later: optical, x­ray, gamma­ray)

∙ Period: typically 1 second or less (1.5 ms­8s)

∙ Period is the rotational period

∙ Pulses are lighthouse beams

Pulsars 

∙ A pulsar is a neutron star that beams radiation along a magnetic axis that is not  aligned with the rotation axis

∙ The radiation beams sweep through space like lighthouse beams as the neutron  star rotates

Normal Pulsars 

∙ Period from 20­30 milliseconds to 1­2 seconds

∙ Isolated neutron stars born in supernova explosions

∙ Bright radio emitter, also gamma­ray, x­ray and optical emitter

∙ Spin down (period becomes longer and longer – slow down), powered by spin down

∙ Precise clocks

∙ Magnetic fields 10^7­10^9 Tesla (Sun spot 0.4 Tesla)

Millisecond Pulsars 

∙ Period 1.5­20 milliseconds (spin very fast)

∙ “Low” magnetic fields (10^4­10^6 Tesla)

∙ Also spin down

∙ “Recycled” during accretion phase with a companion – spun up

Magnetars 

∙ Period 5­12 seconds (slow rotators)

∙ Super strong magnetic fields (10^10­10^11 Tesla)

∙ Strong x­ray emitters, repeating gamma­ray bursters (Soft gamma­ray repeaters) ∙ Also spin down

∙ Powered by decay of magnetic fields

Pulsar period is the period of

f. Neutron star vibration

g. Neutron star rotation

h. White dwarf vibration

i. White dwarf rotation

j. Orbit in neutron star binary system

People haven’t found an isolated neutron star pulsar spinning with roughly this period f. 5 millisecond

g. 50 milliseconds

h. 0.5 seconds

i. 5 seconds

j. 50 seconds

Which of the following has the strongest magnetic fields?

f. A normal pulsar

g. A millisecond pulsar

h. A pulsar in the binary system

i. A magnetar

j. Pulsar A in the double pulsar system

A magnetar is powered by its spin­down energy

c. True

d. False

Neutron Stars in Binary Systems 

∙ X­ray pulsars (strong­field NSs accreting from a companion) ∙ NS­NS binaries

­ PSR 1913+16 (first pulsar – NS binary, discovered 1975, testing general  relativity)

­ PSR J0737­3039 (first pulsar – pulsar binary, discovered late 2003)

Accreting Neutron Stars 

∙ Accreting matter adds angular momentum to a neutron star, increasing its spin ∙ Episodes of fusion on the surface lead to x­ray bursts

Double Pulsars 

∙ Two neutron stars whose radiation beams both sweep the earth

X­ray pulsars are powered by accretion of a neutron star from a massive companion c. True

d. False

The double pulsar system includes one neutron star and one white dwarf c. True

d. False

23. Black hole, singularity, event horizon, Schwarzschild radius, black hole X­ray  binaries, gamma­ray bursts 

∙ Compact stars more massive than 3 solar masses collapse further – neutron stars  cannot exceed 3 solar masses

∙ We know no mechanism to halt the collapse – no force to balance gravity ∙ It keeps collapsing into a single point – the singularity

∙ The “surface” of a black hole is the radius at which the escape velocity equals the  speed of light

∙ This spherical surface is known as the event horizon

∙ The radius of the event horizon is known as the Schwarzschild radius ∙ Rs=2GM/c^2

∙ The event horizon of a 3Msun black hole is also about as big as a small city ∙ Black holes in binary systems

­ Could be strong x­ray sources

­ Even if dark, one can infer its mass using Doppler effect of the companion ∙ Criterion: a compact object more massive than 3 solar masses

∙ Some x­ray binaries contain compact objects of mass exceeding 3 Msun which  are likely to be black holes

∙ One famous x­ray binary with a likely black hole is in the constellation Cygnus Gamma­Ray Bursts 

∙ Brief bursts of gamma­rays coming from space were first detected in the 1960s ∙ The most violent explosions since the Big Bang

24. Supernova explosions, supernova remnants  

Supernova Explosions 

∙ Four steps (not well understood)

­ Core collapse

­ Infalling gas rebounds

­ Shock wave surges outward

­ Envelope of star blasted into space

∙ The closest supernova in the last four centuries was seen in 1987

Supernovae and Life 

∙ Nearby supernovae (<50 light years) could kill many life forms (gamma­ray and  high energy particles)

∙ No star capable of producing a SN is < 50ly away

∙ Most massive star known (~100 solar masses) is ~25,000ly away

Historical Supernovae 

∙ About once per century per galaxy

∙ 1054 SN – Crab nebula (recorded by Chinese astronomers)

∙ Latest: SN 1987A (Feb. 1987), in Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), 170,000 ly  away, progenitor: B3I star

Supernova Classifications 

∙ Massive Star supernova (Type II, Ib, Ic) – core collapses, form neutron stars (or  black holes)

∙ White Dwarf supernova (Types Ia) – Carbon fusion suddenly begins as white  dwarf in close binary system reaches white dwarf limit, causing total explosion

Elements heavier than iron (such as silver, gold, and uranium) are produced a. Inside low mass stars

b. Inside massive stars

c. During supernova explosions

d. During Big Bang

e. None of the above

Which of the following is not a massive­star core­collapse supernova? a. Type Ia

b. Type Ib

c. Type Ic

d. Type Ib/c

e. Type II

Supernova Remnants 

∙ Expanding cloud of debris of supernova

∙ Broad­band emission (radio, optical, x­ray, gamma­ray) – synchrotron emission  (electron radiation in magnetic fields)

∙ Carry heavy (heavier than Fe) elements produced in supernova explosion – solar  system was born in the molecular cloud contaminated by supernova remnants 25. Elements formation (Big Bang: H & He; inside massive stars: up to Fe; supernova  explosions: heavier than Fe)

∙ Big Bang made 75% H, 25% He – stars make everything else

The heavy elements such as Mg and Fe are produced in

a. Low mass stars such as the sun

b. High mass stars

c. Big Bang

d. Supernova explosions

e. None of the above

26. Black hole no hair, time dilation, gravitational redshift  

Time Dilation Near Black Holes 

∙ For a distant observer:

­ The closer to the event horizon, the slower the clock

­ At event horizon, the time stops flowing

∙ The clock attached to the astronaut runs normally

Tidal Effect Near Black Holes 

∙ Stretched vertically and squeezed laterally

∙ Light waves take extra time to climb out of a deep hole in space time leading to  gravitational redshift

27. Inverse square law (apparent brightness, gravity): Apparent brightness =  luminosity/distance^2

28. Stefan­Boltzmann law: Luminosity = Constant x Area x Temperature^4 29. Schwarzschild radius and black hole “density”

∙ 1 solar mass = 3 km

∙ Earth: 0.000003 (Mass) and 0.9 cm (radius)

∙ Radius = constant x Mass

∙ Density = Constant/Mass^2

∙ Galaxy: Mass = 10^8 and Radius = 2AU

∙ Use parallax to measure distance, use redshift/blueshift to infer velocity  ∙ Blackbody emission, color vs. temperature 

∙ Star formation (large to small), planet formation (small to large), methods of  detecting planets (most popular: Doppler)

30. Pre­main sequence evolution, post­main sequence evolution on H­R diagram

Post­Main Sequence 1: Red Giant Branch 

∙ In the later phase of evolution, as the core contracts, H begins fusing to He in a  shell around the core

∙ Luminosity increases because the core thermostat is broken – the increasing  fusion rate in the shell does not stop the core from contracting

∙ Move upwards to the right in H­R diagram

Post­Main Sequence 2: Helium Flash 

∙ He produced at core, continues to contract (no burning, gravity wins) ∙ He burning commences as T~100 million K (triple­alpha reaction) ∙ Core temperature rises rapidly when He fusion begins

∙ Moves slightly downwards and to the left in the H­R diagram

∙ Helium burning stars neither shrink nor grow because core thermostat is  temporarily fixed

Life Track After Helium Flash 

∙ Observations of star clusters agree with those models

∙ Helium­burning stars are found in a horizontal branch on the H­R diagram

Post­Main Sequence 3: Asymptotic Giant Branch 

∙ He burning ceases at the core, He burning continues in the shell ∙ Double layer (H, He) burning

∙ More heat generated

­ Envelope expands

­ Temperature drops

∙ Move upwards and to the rights

∙ Unstable (triple­alpha temperature sensitive)

31. Lifetime of stars with different masses & Destiny of stars with different initial  masses (<8, between 8 and 20, >20 solar masses), destiny of cores with different  masses (<1.4, between 1.4 and 3, > 3 solar masses) 

∙ Refer to table in notes

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here