Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

W&M - RELG 203 - RELG 203 - Study Guide

Created by: Ashley Brenton Elite Notetaker

> > > > W&M - RELG 203 - RELG 203 - Study Guide

W&M - RELG 203 - RELG 203 - Study Guide

School: The College of William & Mary
Department: OTHER
Course: History/Relg Ancient Israel
Professor: Robin McCall
Term: Fall 2017
Tags:
Name: RELG 203
Description: Since midterm for next quiz
Uploaded: 10/21/2017
0 5 3 87 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 4 of a 18 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image 1&2 Kings ­ 10/20 Nathan condemns David Bathsehba's son dies Temar's brother, Absalon kills Amnon, their half­bro who raped him Abslaom comes back and declares himself king; revolts Absalom sleeps with al of his family's concubines Absalom has long hair which gets caught in a tree during battle, he is killed David mourns Absalom's death David ­ most well­rounded character in the bible ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~end of Midterm material Written from a Southern Judah Perspective Norther Kings were awful, Southern kings weren't much better Solomon Associated with wisdom (street smart) Successor to David Kills people to eliminate threats to the throne YHWH asks Solomon what he wants and Solomon asks for an understanding mind to rule the  people o Good answer o YHWH grants this and gives him riches and power Hyperbolic Golden Age ­ building projects Queen of Sheba brings him riches Was actually just a local chiefdom Building of the Temple Solomon's most important building project Same layout as tabernacle Permanent temple God was enthroned upon the cherubim The promise of the Davidic kingship is now conditional Corrupt King Solomon offered sacrifice at high places Married foreign women and worshipped their foreign Gods Enslaves his own people to further his building projects God raised up enemies against Solomon Negative versus positive view of Solomon ­ 2 narratives Divided Monarchy Rehoboam succeeds Solomon Rehoboam turns to this friends for advice Rehoboam is even more harsh on his people than Solomon Jeroboam I and people decide to rebel in the North
o
YHWH sides with them Jeroboam I is an awful king
o
Sets up 2 golden calves: crime o Promotes sacrificial worship outside of Jerusalem: sin of Jeroboam Move through several kings in the South 1
background image Omride Dynasty Omri: first king in the North after Jeroboam
o
Leaves extra biblical evidence o Ahab (Omri's son) and Omri show up in extra biblical records o Mesha Stele mentions Omri o Politically powerful, theologically awful Ahab: Omri's son, married Jezebel (Phoenician princess), worshipped Ba'al with his wife
o
Outlawed the worship of YHWH in Israel o Were hated Jehu: coup
o
Slaughters Jehoram, Ahaziahu, etc. (people who worship Ba'al) Kills Jezebel, creates war between Phoenicia and Israel Introducing Prophecy ~ 10/25 Catch­up: Jeriboam II in North, very good politically ­ 40 year reign, economic prosperity, ended wars
o
Theological disaster, Amos had scathing critique 6 Kings in 20 years after Jeriboam II ­ four were assassinated Common to have this political unrest Common to have this political unrest Tiglaf Pelzer ­ Assyrian king Nation of Arim, King Razon Syro­Ephraimite Alliance: between Arim and Israel, last ditch effort to stave off Assyrians Judah doesn't feel threatened yet, alas, they attack him ­ calls to Tiglaf Pelizer for help, yes if you  pay tribute and taxes o Ahas agrees, bad for other dudes, overrun Assyrians destroy capital of Arim at Ddamascus Tiglaf Pelezer dips into the North of Israel and takes some people back as capties Ahas begins to realize made a bad move and gets nervous Time of the North/Samaria ­ flee to South, size of Jerusalem doubles
o
Brief mention in bible, 2 Kings 5­6, says because North sinned Syncrinism ­ fuse their worship and other, Jerusalem with othe people that Assyrains conquered  an moved there Samaria conquered because paying tribute to Assyria Lecture Outline:  I Review: Some Prophets and their Functions a Samuel i Communicated God's message about the coming destruction of the house of Eli (1 Sam 
3)
ii Communicated to Israel YHWH's concerns about taking an earthly king (1 Sam 8:6­7) iii Anointed both Saul (1 Sam 10) and David (1 Sam 16) 1 Authority fromGod ii Advised the king on YHWH's will (1 Sam 28) b Nathan (2 Sam 12) c Gad (2 Sam 24) d Summary: Prophets advise kings and priests about YHWH's will, anoint kings, and 
communicate God's will to the people of Israel
2
background image II What is Prophecy? a Early Years i Moses is called Nabi (Hebrew for prophet), Sister Miriam and Deborah are called  Nabia b A Basic Definition of Prophecy i Proclaim justice and divinity of covenants ii Kings who fail covenant requirements are particularly condemned because they put  people in danger, people follow the king's example b The Prophet's Role as a messenger from the Divine Government i Representative of the divine king to human kings (and to the community) ii Proclaimer of God's justice and the requirements of covenant iii Herald and interpreter of the Lord's interventions b What Prophecy is NOT i Not seeing the future in Israel ii Not Nostradamus but Colbert before late night iii More of political spin doctors with commentary on politics b Ancient Near Eastern Archaeological Evidence (including the Mari texts) i 1800 BCE­ish, discovered in 1934, writings from Mari (modern­Syria) ii Talks about people delivering messages form a God iii Could be called on to help with other stuff, reading animal entrails (most Israelite 
prophets don't do this)
iv Describes how prophets arrive and people's reactions to them, valuable texts because 
give context of specific actions of prophets
II Prophetic Classifications a Former (non­writing) versus Later (writing) Prophets i Some left us lots of writing; major prophets: Isiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, the ones from the
book of 12 (minor prophets)
ii Non­writing were Samuel and Elijah, left stories but not collections of their prophetic 
words, others wrote about them ~ Deuteronomistic history
iii Priests often don't have a great relationship with prophets because they are into social 
justice and priests are not
1 Priests say without worship, social justices is useless 2 Prophets say without social justice, worship is hollow and empty b Kinds of Prophetic Working Circumstances i Roving bands of prophets 1 Samue anointed Saul, become powerful vessel of God/like another person, 
ritualized music and dancing
ii Cultic prophets 1 Professional prayers on behalf of people, YHWH's spokespeople in the cultic  context ­ if sacrifice is good; their names are not preserved ii Court prophets 1 Connection for king to the boss (YHWH); downside/danger because don't want 
to say what the king doesn't want to hear puts them at risk of being 'yes men'
2 King Ahab of Israel was notorious for killing prophets ii Independent ('lone wolf') prophets 1 Elijah, was independent because has no other choice; all other prophets had been 
put to death
3
background image II Oracle: message of God delivered to the people by a prophet, could be written or oral, could be  sung a Usually prophetic speech is marked by 'The Messenger Formula' : "Thus says the Lord:", a  performative utterance = magic words that change circumstances of what you are doing from 
a speech to an act
i Example of saying "I do" in a marriage ceremony ii When prophet says "Thus says the Lord" ­ these words transform the prophet from an  individual/person to the mouthpiece of God a Oracles can come in many different types (won't be a short answer): judgement (could  condemn Israel), salvation, disputation speech (in a cosmic courtroom), vision reports 
(implies prophet was transported into vision of divine council/heavenly conference room)
b Weird because only have one God in Israel, but retain idea of Divine Council because it is so 
deeply engrained in Ancient Near East culture, angels take the place of other gods for Israel's 
Divine Council Prophecy in the Deuteronomistic History ~ 10/27 I Prophets in the DtrH a Non­writing prophets b Only God's prophet if deliver message to the people  i Can't just claim to be a prophet, have to speak a message from God and then it has to 
happen; need to be validated in capacity for prophetic activity
1 Phenomenon of false prophets II Micaiah ben Imlah (1 Kings 22) a The Death of Ahab? i King of Israel and King of Judah (Johasafat) ­ presume King of Israel is Ahab, in story  king is only named in the very end; having conversation about whether or not to go to 
war
1 Typical for Israelite kings to consult their prophets for this; we know Ahab is a 
bad guy who worships his wife's Phoenician gods (including Baal)
2 Johasafat says should consult Ahab's prophets first, ask 400 court prophets ~ 
doesn't say which God they are prophets for, must be of YHWH because of how 
the story unfolds a Say YHWH says to go to battle b Johasafat thinks the 400 all saying yes is suspicious, Ahab says Micaiah 
hates
b Micaiah the Dissident i Johasafat tells Ahab to ask him, even though claims hates him and says never supports  me ii Micaiah says he went to the Divine Council (real prophet), heard a spirit volunteer to  go into the prophets' mouths and tell Ahab to go to war because God wants Ahab to die 
in battle
1 Prophets aren't consciously lying, God through this spirit has said tell Ahab to go 
to battle
ii Micaiah has inside scoop, knows prophets are lying to Ahab ­ don't go into battle iii Ahab ignores him and dies a horrible/gruesome death in battle b What Happens When the False Prophecy Comes from YHWWH i The 400 prophets ­ not consciously trying to lie, God sent the lying spirit ii Alarming idea that you can't trust God to send the truth to the prophets iii Rare to have false prophecy, there were often punishments (sometimes put to death) 4

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at The College of William & Mary who use StudySoup to get ahead
18 Pages 66 Views 52 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at The College of William & Mary who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: The College of William & Mary
Department: OTHER
Course: History/Relg Ancient Israel
Professor: Robin McCall
Term: Fall 2017
Tags:
Name: RELG 203
Description: Since midterm for next quiz
Uploaded: 10/21/2017
18 Pages 66 Views 52 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to W&M - RELG 203 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to W&M - RELG 203 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here