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NYU - CAS 10 - Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences Exam 2 Study

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NYU - CAS 10 - Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences Exam 2 Study

School: NYU School of Medicine
Department: OTHER
Course: Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
Professor: Elizabeth Bauer
Term: Fall 2017
Tags: Statistics
Name: Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences Exam 2 Study Guide and Practice Problems
Description: These set of notes contains a study guide and set of practice problems for the second exam of the course.
Uploaded: 10/23/2017
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background image Statistics for the Behavioral Science Exam 1   Practice Problems   Chapter 5  Section A:  1. 1a. If the calculated z for an experiment equals 1.35, what is the corresponding one-tailed p 
value? The two-tailed p value?  
b. Find the one- and two-tailed p values corresponding to z = −.7.   c. Find one- and two-tailed p values for z = 2.2.                2. a 1 . If alpha were set to the unusual value of .08, what would be the magnitude of the critical  for a one-tailed test? What would be the values for a two-tailed test?    b. Find the one- and two-tailed critical z values for α = .03.    c. Find one- and two-tailed z values for α = .007.                    
background image 4. a 1 . As alpha is made smaller (e.g., .01 instead of .05), what happens to the size of the critical  z?    b. As the calculated z gets larger, what happens to the corresponding p value?                    5. An English professor suspects that her cur- rent class of 36 students is unusually good at 
verbal skills. She looks up the verbal SAT score for each student and is pleased to find that the 
mean for the class is 540. Assuming that the general population of students has a mean verbal 
SAT score of 500 with a standard deviation of 100, what is the two-tailed p value corresponding 
to this class? 
                       
background image Section B:   2.  Can repressed anger lead to higher blood pressure? In a hypothetical study, 16 college 
students with very high repressed anger scores (derived from a series of questionnaires taken in 
an introductory psychology class) are called in to have their blood pressure measured. The mean 
systolic blood pressure for this sample (X) is 124 mmHg. (Millimeters of mercury is the standard 
unit for measuring blood pressure.) If the mean systolic blood pressure for the population is 120 
with a standard deviation of 10, can you conclude that repressed anger is associated with higher 
blood pressure? Use alpha = .05, two-tailed. 
                                         
background image 4. A psychologist has measured the IQ for a group of 30 children, now in the third grade, who 
had been regularly exposed to a new interactive, computerized teaching device. The mean IQ for 
these children is X = 106.  
a. Test the null hypothesis that these children are no different from the general population of 
third-graders (μ = 100, σ = 
16) using alpha = .05. 
 
                  b. Test the same hypothesis using alpha = 
.01. What happens to your chances of attaining 
statistical significance as alpha becomes smaller (all else being equal)? 
 
                   
background image 5. Referring to Exercise 4, imagine that you have read about a similar study of IQs of third-
graders in which the same sample mean (106) was obtained, but the z score reported was 3.0. 
Unfortunately, the article neglected to report the number of participants that were measured for 
this study. Use the information just given to deter- mine the sample size that must have been 
used.  
                  6. The following are verbal SAT scores of hypothetical students who were forced to take the test 
under adverse conditions (e.g., construction noises, room too warm, etc.): 510, 550, 410, 530, 
480, 500, 390, 420, 440. Do these scores suggest that the adverse conditions really made a 
difference (at the .05 level)? Report your p value. 
                     
background image Advanced Exercises: 
  12. In
the last few years, an organization has conducted 200 clinical trials to test the 
effectiveness of antianxiety drugs. Suppose, however, that all of those drugs were obtained from 
the same fraudulent supplier which was later revealed to have been sending only inert substances 
(e.g., distilled water, sugar pills) instead of real drugs. If alpha = 0.05 was used for all hypothesis 
tests, how many of these 200 experiments would you expect to yield significant results? How 
many Type I errors would you expect? How many Type II errors would you expect? 
                                         

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School: NYU School of Medicine
Department: OTHER
Course: Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
Professor: Elizabeth Bauer
Term: Fall 2017
Tags: Statistics
Name: Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences Exam 2 Study Guide and Practice Problems
Description: These set of notes contains a study guide and set of practice problems for the second exam of the course.
Uploaded: 10/23/2017
36 Pages 78 Views 62 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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