×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to ASU - HPS 322 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to ASU - HPS 322 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

ASU / History and Philosophy of Science / HPS 322 / How will you describe the ptolemaic world system?

How will you describe the ptolemaic world system?

How will you describe the ptolemaic world system?

Description

School: Arizona State University
Department: History and Philosophy of Science
Course: History of Science
Professor: Brad armendt
Term: Fall 2017
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: History of Science HPS 322
Description: Study Guide Exam 2
Uploaded: 10/25/2017
14 Pages 32 Views 5 Unlocks
Reviews

Eric Nino (Rating: )

. Other: Material will not download



Briefly describe an early version of the impetus theory. 


How will you describe the ptolemaic world system?



­ How did the theory you describe explain the phenomena that were such problems for  Aristotelian theory? (Hipparchus, Philoponus)

Be able to describe the Ptolemaic world system, 

­ What reasons did Ptolemy offer in support of the key element of its geocentric  cosmology?

­ What geometric devices did Ptolemy use in his account of the motions of celestial bodies, and how successful was the account? 

Use of Apollonius and Hipparchus devices (which were already using deferents and epicycles  and eccentrics) and he introduced something of his own called EQUANTS. Don't forget about the age old question of What is contingent behavior?

His theory has to be complex in order for his theory to be as accurate as possible (which is a  good thing)

 An Equant is a circular orbit where the orbiting body moves with uniform angular velocity  around point A, and not E. (so kinda off centered of the E, which I think in the diagram is Earth)   which is to make up for the Irregularities of the sun’s motion! SO the speed of the orbiting sun  varies when you are observing it from the earth. 


What reasons did ptolemy offer in support of the key elements of its geocentric cosmology?



The three devices (eccentric, epicycle, and equant) can then be combined. 


Why was copernicus dissatisfied with ptolemaic astronomy?



We also discuss several other topics like What is order cycle?

So these three devices (geocentric) devices used for his account of the motions of the celestial bodies).

So the reasons was to account for the motions of the celestial bodies that the previous theories were not able to explain. 

In terms of it being successful…  

Ptolemy’s Almagest Book  

In this book he presents ideas about the actual physical stuff that the heavens is made up of, so he combines his mathematical theory with a system of Real Physical Spheres made of Aether, 

In other areas of his book, he tended to be more cautious about the physical spheres and also cautious about the principle of no empty space. 

Almagest: Preface 

Aristotle has a division of Theoretical Science: 

Physical  

Mathematical: Can be conceived with and without the senses, and studies attributes of both  changeable things and eternal things. 

Theological If you want to learn more check out What is square pyramidal molecular geometry in chemistry?

His Ideas in the book include:  

● The heavens are spherical 

○ The stars move in circles and they all seem to be the same distance away from  the earth (no parallax effects)

○ Their constant pattern (recurrent) motions are just best explained by circles or  spheres (he is not saying though that these motions have to be uniform in  motion)

● The earth is spherical 

○ Timing of the rising and setting of stars show this 

○ Different stars are seen when one travels North or South 

○ As you approach a mountain, they seem to rise 

● The earth is tiny and point like in comparison to the size of the heavens. ○ Size of stars are not changing and again no stellar parallax If you want to learn more check out What is “availability heuristic”?

○ The horizon splits the sphere of the heavens into equal parts.  

● The earth does not move in any way 

○ We can not tell if it does not spin based on just the stars alone 

○ If it were spinning then the things resting on it (clouds/birds/projectiles) would not  be able to keep up

● There are two different prime movements in the heavens 

○ One is in charge of the daily motion of the heavens 

○ Second is responsible for motion (long term motions) of the planets, sun, moon.  

Be familiar with the spread of Hellenistic learning, including science, into the Middle  East, and with the development of science during the Islamic Renaissance.  ­ What social and religious factors during that period contributed to, or  otherwise influenced, natural philosophy and science in the Islamic world? If you want to learn more check out How can external validity be established?

Hellenistic science: After the conquest of Alexander the great Greek culture spread widely, and  communication and trade with the Mediterranean increase far into the Middle east and asia. 

Post Hellenistic/Byzantine Period: Disputes and Christian schisms sent refugees eastward from  Christian Byzantium into Persia.  (many refugees were highly educated, accomplished, and  achieved great influence in Persia) 

This furthered the spread of Greek texts and led to many translations into Syriac, a  language widespread in Persia and elsewhere

Philoponus was a Christian Convert who helped introduce Aristotelian ideas into  Christian thought, and had the rediscover early impetus theory (projectiles) .

Science in the early Islamic world: There were centers of learning; complex and varied stories  about the regard for sciences:

­shifting periods of tolerance, strong pursuit of natural science, and also intolerance of  disinterest at others. 

­literacy , and a widely shared common language (Arabic) 

­Extensive trade, communication 

­Concentrations of great wealth 

Decline of the Islamic Renaissance: well, there were stronger influences of conservative  religious views that did not natural science. This created political turmoil and war within and out  of the Islamic world.  Don't forget about the age old question of How do women have high representation in the nordic nations?

Be able to discuss the Integration of Aristotelian/ Ptolemaic cosmology with Christian  theology in the Medieval period.

­ Why did it happen 

­ How well did the two views of the world fit together?In what ways was this  important in the later development of science?

Be able to discuss the impetus theory of Buridan (i.e. the theory he defends, not the  proposals he criticizes)

­ How does it explain the motion of falling bodies and projectiles? ­ (Falling Bodies) Throughout its fall, a dropped body is moved by its natural  gravity. As is falls, it acquires another internal move, impetus, which adds to the  total force moving it down. The impetus accumulates as long as the fall 

continues. 

­ (Projectiles) The amount of impetus is proportional to the strength of the  projecting force. The impetus is slowly diminished by air resistance and the  projectiles natural gravity. As is dies out the movement of the projectile becomes  slower until its natural gravity takes over and moves it downward.

­ What objections did Buridan give to the Aristotelian explanation of acceleration of falling bodies (nearness to the center)?

Buridan states: Acceleration of falling bodies is obvious (but why does it occur?) he is saying  that another moving force is at work.

The mover is not the place toward which the body falls, nor is it a force existing in that place.  A falling body acquires motion from GRAVITY , but also an additional mover an IMPETUS.  GRAVITY and IMPETUS produce the downward motion together.  

The faster the natural motion the greater the acquired impetus. (the greater the impetus, the  faster the ADDITIONAL motion it produces = acceleration) 

What suggestions did Al­Biruni, Buridan, and Oresme make about the possible  application of impetus theory to cosmology (e.g. to the motion of celestial bodies, to  arguments about the possibility of earth’s motion)?

Al­Biruni 

● Guy who made an excellent calculation of the earth’s radius. 

● The earth is rotating eastwards, and everything along with it is moving.  (perceptible) but in the end concludes that the earth does not spin because  additional violent forces would affect things different, depending on whether the  additional motions is eastward (going along with nature) or westward (opposing  nature)

● Heavy objects do not fall straight to the center. Instead they fall diagonally, but  we don’t see that since we are moving along with the earth. 

Buridan 

● The motion of each celestial body is due to an impetus that is has acquired from  God.

● And since there is no resistance to its motion, the impetus does not go away, and the celestial body continues to move indefinitely.

● Says that acceleration of falling bodies is obvious:

○ From Averroes comments, the falling motion is producing heat, making  the air hot and rarefied, and so less resistant.  

Oresme 

● Used the impetus theory saying that the earth might rotate even though it does not seem like it to us. (everything is being carried along by the impetus they have acquired and so  keep spinning with the motion of the earth).

● Endorses the Aristotelian cosmology.  

● Using the impetus to explain the motions of celestial bodies is a step towards unifying  the celestial and terrestrial realms and the laws that govern them. 

● Applying the impetus theory to the heavens opens the door to a more modern idea of  inertial motion. 

How did Western Europeans of the twelfth century and later come to know the details of  physical theories developed by Greek and Hellenistic scientists? 

Scientific developments leading to Copernicus and Renaissance science:  New, improved terrestrial mechanics (impetus theory) 

New geographical knowledge 

Demonstrates flaws in Ptolemy’s geography 

Increase the importance of accurate navigation, which requires good  

Astronomical observations and theory.  

Be familiar with the influences of humanism and neoplatonism on the development of  late medieval and Renaissance science (challenges to traditional natural philosophy;  significances of the sun, importance of mathematics, and mathematical patterns).  Influences leading to Copernicus and Renaissance Science 

● Influence of humanics movement 

○ Inspired by classical Greek thought     

○ More literary and artistic than scientific 

○ Less emphasis on logic 

○ Challenged the framework of entrenched science, cosmology, theology as basis  for intellectual pursuits

○ Helped make way for new science and for practical investigations of nature ● Rising influence of Plato’s work and Neoplatonism 

○ Emphasized otherworldly, nonphysical reality 

○ Attached importance to abstraction from the physical world and to mathematics  ■ Realms in which real knowledge is possible 

○ Emphasis on God’s  unlimited nature and powers 

○ But not entirely anti­physical; great emphasis on the importance of the SUN ○ The sun as manifestations  

● Challenges to the authority of the Church 

○ The protestant reformation, and the Catholic response 

○ Resentment over abuses (indulgences) and theological issues led to direct  challenges to the Church’s authority

○ Development of centers of trade, commerce, wealth, affected the Church’s  dominance and magnified political differences within it. 

○ The influence on science was complex  

● Improvement of printing (gutenberg, movable type). 

○ Recovered Greek works, and new works in science and other fields, could be  quickly and widely spread to larger reading audiences

○ News and politics promoting more rapid pace of change 

○ Vernacular languages in printed, widely read works 

Briefly describe Copernicus celestial theory.  

­ Why was Copernicus dissatisfied with Ptolemaic astronomy?  

­ Ptolemaic theory does not account for why superior planets are brightest when in retrograde

­ Astronomers cannot determine the length of a year 

­ Ptolemaic systems abandon the “first principles of uniform motion 

­ There is no structure of the universe and the symmetry of its parts 

­ What technical devices employed by Ptolemaic astronomy did Copernicus adopt? ­ Planets circular orbits 

­ Epicycles 

­ Uniform speeds 

­  What devices did he reject in his theory and why?  

­ The Copernican model replaced Ptolemy’s EQUANT circles with more epicycles.  

What motions did Copernicus attribute to the Earth? 

­  Explain the various advantages that Copernicus believed his theory held over its  predecessors (retrograde motion, arrangement and distances of the planets, other harmonies; be able to describe how the theory explains these).

What did Copernicus believe about the natural motion of the heavenly bodies?  ­ And what explanation did he give for terrestrial gravity and the shape of heavenly  bodies?

Discuss the reception of Copernicus theory in the late 16th and early 17th century. ­ What significance did mathematical astronomers attach to it? 

­ Did they all view is as favorably as Digges and Kepler did? 

­ How did non scientists, including various religious authorities, react to it? 

Briefly describe an early version of the impetus theory. 

­ How did the theory you describe explain the phenomena that were such problems for  Aristotelian theory? (Hipparchus, Philoponus)

Be able to describe the Ptolemaic world system, 

­ What reasons did Ptolemy offer in support of the key element of its geocentric  cosmology?

­ What geometric devices did Ptolemy use in his account of the motions of celestial bodies, and how successful was the account? 

Use of Apollonius and Hipparchus devices (which were already using deferents and epicycles  and eccentrics) and he introduced something of his own called EQUANTS.

His theory has to be complex in order for his theory to be as accurate as possible (which is a  good thing)

 An Equant is a circular orbit where the orbiting body moves with uniform angular velocity  around point A, and not E. (so kinda off centered of the E, which I think in the diagram is Earth)   which is to make up for the Irregularities of the sun’s motion! SO the speed of the orbiting sun  varies when you are observing it from the earth. 

The three devices (eccentric, epicycle, and equant) can then be combined. 

So these three devices (geocentric) devices used for his account of the motions of the celestial bodies).

So the reasons was to account for the motions of the celestial bodies that the previous theories were not able to explain. 

In terms of it being successful…  

Ptolemy’s Almagest Book  

In this book he presents ideas about the actual physical stuff that the heavens is made up of, so he combines his mathematical theory with a system of Real Physical Spheres made of Aether, 

In other areas of his book, he tended to be more cautious about the physical spheres and also cautious about the principle of no empty space. 

Almagest: Preface 

Aristotle has a division of Theoretical Science: 

Physical  

Mathematical: Can be conceived with and without the senses, and studies attributes of both  changeable things and eternal things. 

Theological 

His Ideas in the book include:  

● The heavens are spherical 

○ The stars move in circles and they all seem to be the same distance away from  the earth (no parallax effects)

○ Their constant pattern (recurrent) motions are just best explained by circles or  spheres (he is not saying though that these motions have to be uniform in  motion)

● The earth is spherical 

○ Timing of the rising and setting of stars show this 

○ Different stars are seen when one travels North or South 

○ As you approach a mountain, they seem to rise 

● The earth is tiny and point like in comparison to the size of the heavens. ○ Size of stars are not changing and again no stellar parallax 

○ The horizon splits the sphere of the heavens into equal parts.  

● The earth does not move in any way 

○ We can not tell if it does not spin based on just the stars alone 

○ If it were spinning then the things resting on it (clouds/birds/projectiles) would not  be able to keep up

● There are two different prime movements in the heavens 

○ One is in charge of the daily motion of the heavens 

○ Second is responsible for motion (long term motions) of the planets, sun, moon.  

Be familiar with the spread of Hellenistic learning, including science, into the Middle  East, and with the development of science during the Islamic Renaissance.  ­ What social and religious factors during that period contributed to, or  otherwise influenced, natural philosophy and science in the Islamic world?

Hellenistic science: After the conquest of Alexander the great Greek culture spread widely, and  communication and trade with the Mediterranean increase far into the Middle east and asia. 

Post Hellenistic/Byzantine Period: Disputes and Christian schisms sent refugees eastward from  Christian Byzantium into Persia.  (many refugees were highly educated, accomplished, and  achieved great influence in Persia) 

This furthered the spread of Greek texts and led to many translations into Syriac, a  language widespread in Persia and elsewhere

Philoponus was a Christian Convert who helped introduce Aristotelian ideas into  Christian thought, and had the rediscover early impetus theory (projectiles) .

Science in the early Islamic world: There were centers of learning; complex and varied stories  about the regard for sciences:

­shifting periods of tolerance, strong pursuit of natural science, and also intolerance of  disinterest at others. 

­literacy , and a widely shared common language (Arabic) 

­Extensive trade, communication 

­Concentrations of great wealth 

Decline of the Islamic Renaissance: well, there were stronger influences of conservative  religious views that did not natural science. This created political turmoil and war within and out  of the Islamic world. 

Be able to discuss the Integration of Aristotelian/ Ptolemaic cosmology with Christian  theology in the Medieval period.

­ Why did it happen 

­ How well did the two views of the world fit together?In what ways was this  important in the later development of science?

Be able to discuss the impetus theory of Buridan (i.e. the theory he defends, not the  proposals he criticizes)

­ How does it explain the motion of falling bodies and projectiles? ­ (Falling Bodies) Throughout its fall, a dropped body is moved by its natural  gravity. As is falls, it acquires another internal move, impetus, which adds to the  total force moving it down. The impetus accumulates as long as the fall 

continues. 

­ (Projectiles) The amount of impetus is proportional to the strength of the  projecting force. The impetus is slowly diminished by air resistance and the  projectiles natural gravity. As is dies out the movement of the projectile becomes  slower until its natural gravity takes over and moves it downward.

­ What objections did Buridan give to the Aristotelian explanation of acceleration of falling bodies (nearness to the center)?

Buridan states: Acceleration of falling bodies is obvious (but why does it occur?) he is saying  that another moving force is at work.

The mover is not the place toward which the body falls, nor is it a force existing in that place.  A falling body acquires motion from GRAVITY , but also an additional mover an IMPETUS.  GRAVITY and IMPETUS produce the downward motion together.  

The faster the natural motion the greater the acquired impetus. (the greater the impetus, the  faster the ADDITIONAL motion it produces = acceleration) 

What suggestions did Al­Biruni, Buridan, and Oresme make about the possible  application of impetus theory to cosmology (e.g. to the motion of celestial bodies, to  arguments about the possibility of earth’s motion)?

Al­Biruni 

● Guy who made an excellent calculation of the earth’s radius. 

● The earth is rotating eastwards, and everything along with it is moving.  (perceptible) but in the end concludes that the earth does not spin because  additional violent forces would affect things different, depending on whether the  additional motions is eastward (going along with nature) or westward (opposing  nature)

● Heavy objects do not fall straight to the center. Instead they fall diagonally, but  we don’t see that since we are moving along with the earth. 

Buridan 

● The motion of each celestial body is due to an impetus that is has acquired from  God.

● And since there is no resistance to its motion, the impetus does not go away, and the celestial body continues to move indefinitely.

● Says that acceleration of falling bodies is obvious:

○ From Averroes comments, the falling motion is producing heat, making  the air hot and rarefied, and so less resistant.  

Oresme 

● Used the impetus theory saying that the earth might rotate even though it does not seem like it to us. (everything is being carried along by the impetus they have acquired and so  keep spinning with the motion of the earth).

● Endorses the Aristotelian cosmology.  

● Using the impetus to explain the motions of celestial bodies is a step towards unifying  the celestial and terrestrial realms and the laws that govern them. 

● Applying the impetus theory to the heavens opens the door to a more modern idea of  inertial motion. 

How did Western Europeans of the twelfth century and later come to know the details of  physical theories developed by Greek and Hellenistic scientists? 

Scientific developments leading to Copernicus and Renaissance science:  New, improved terrestrial mechanics (impetus theory) 

New geographical knowledge 

Demonstrates flaws in Ptolemy’s geography 

Increase the importance of accurate navigation, which requires good  

Astronomical observations and theory.  

Be familiar with the influences of humanism and neoplatonism on the development of  late medieval and Renaissance science (challenges to traditional natural philosophy;  significances of the sun, importance of mathematics, and mathematical patterns).  Influences leading to Copernicus and Renaissance Science 

● Influence of humanics movement 

○ Inspired by classical Greek thought     

○ More literary and artistic than scientific 

○ Less emphasis on logic 

○ Challenged the framework of entrenched science, cosmology, theology as basis  for intellectual pursuits

○ Helped make way for new science and for practical investigations of nature ● Rising influence of Plato’s work and Neoplatonism 

○ Emphasized otherworldly, nonphysical reality 

○ Attached importance to abstraction from the physical world and to mathematics  ■ Realms in which real knowledge is possible 

○ Emphasis on God’s  unlimited nature and powers 

○ But not entirely anti­physical; great emphasis on the importance of the SUN ○ The sun as manifestations  

● Challenges to the authority of the Church 

○ The protestant reformation, and the Catholic response 

○ Resentment over abuses (indulgences) and theological issues led to direct  challenges to the Church’s authority

○ Development of centers of trade, commerce, wealth, affected the Church’s  dominance and magnified political differences within it. 

○ The influence on science was complex  

● Improvement of printing (gutenberg, movable type). 

○ Recovered Greek works, and new works in science and other fields, could be  quickly and widely spread to larger reading audiences

○ News and politics promoting more rapid pace of change 

○ Vernacular languages in printed, widely read works 

Briefly describe Copernicus celestial theory.  

­ Why was Copernicus dissatisfied with Ptolemaic astronomy?  

­ Ptolemaic theory does not account for why superior planets are brightest when in retrograde

­ Astronomers cannot determine the length of a year 

­ Ptolemaic systems abandon the “first principles of uniform motion 

­ There is no structure of the universe and the symmetry of its parts 

­ What technical devices employed by Ptolemaic astronomy did Copernicus adopt? ­ Planets circular orbits 

­ Epicycles 

­ Uniform speeds 

­  What devices did he reject in his theory and why?  

­ The Copernican model replaced Ptolemy’s EQUANT circles with more epicycles.  

What motions did Copernicus attribute to the Earth? 

­  Explain the various advantages that Copernicus believed his theory held over its  predecessors (retrograde motion, arrangement and distances of the planets, other harmonies; be able to describe how the theory explains these).

What did Copernicus believe about the natural motion of the heavenly bodies?  ­ And what explanation did he give for terrestrial gravity and the shape of heavenly  bodies?

Discuss the reception of Copernicus theory in the late 16th and early 17th century. ­ What significance did mathematical astronomers attach to it? 

­ Did they all view is as favorably as Digges and Kepler did? 

­ How did non scientists, including various religious authorities, react to it? 

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here