×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UCLA - MIND 73 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UCLA - MIND 73 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UCLA / OTHER / OTH 73 / What is the definition of synaptic cleft?

What is the definition of synaptic cleft?

What is the definition of synaptic cleft?

Description

School: University of California - Los Angeles
Department: OTHER
Course: Mind Over Matter: History, Science, and Philosophy of Brain
Professor: Sutherland chandler
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: neuroscience, Biology, Psychology, and Physiology
Cost: 50
Name: Mind Over Matter: Midterm Study Guide
Description: This study guide is a summary of all lectures from week 1-week 4. It summarizes the main ideas on the midterm but does not go into detail about readings.
Uploaded: 10/28/2017
9 Pages 41 Views 2 Unlocks
Reviews


Midterm Study Guide 


What is the definition of synaptic cleft?



10/30/17 @ 6 p.m. 

I. Introduction to Brain Organization 

Levine ­ 9/28, 10/3, 10/5 

● Structure of the Nervous System 

○ Brain’s primary functions 

■ Creating a sensory reality 

■ Integrating information 

■ Producing an outcome 

○ Nervous system extends through whole body + has subsystems 

■ Central Nervous System: brain + spinal cord 

■ Peripheral Nervous System: everything else 

○ Directions in the nervous system and body 

■ Anterior ­> posterior 


What is the definition of glial cells?



■ Medial ­> lateral 

■ Dorsal ­> ventral 

○ Looking at brain 

■ frontal/coronal ­>  looking straight at it from front/back 

■ Sagittal/median ­> cut down the middle, parallel to the skull 

■ Horizontal ­> looking top down 

○ Organization of the brain 

■ General 

● Sucli: crevices to add surface area 

● Gyri: bumps in folded surface 

■ Forebrain 

● Telencephalon 

○ Cortex ­> 4 lobes   If you want to learn more check out What are the two kinds of conventional terms?

■ Frontal: intellectual + cognitive activity 


What is nicolaus copernicus known work?



● Precentral gyrus: motor system 

■ Parietal 

● Postcentral gyrus: sensory 

● Central Sulcus: separates frontal + parietal 

■ Temporal ­> hearing 

● Sylvian Fissur e: separates temporal lobe 

■ Occipital: receives visual information 

○ White matter 

○ Subcortnelia 

■ Limbic System: emotion + logic 

● Hippocampus 

● Amygdala ­> fear

● Malfunction ­> schizophrenia 

■ Basal ganglia ­> voluntary motor movements, 

learning

● Subcort nuclei 

● Malfunction ­> Parkinson’s Disease 

○ Loss of dopamine 

● Diencephalon 

○ Thalamus 

○ Hypothalamus 

■ Midbrain Don't forget about the age old question of What is the modal model of memory?

● Mesencephalon 

○ Colliculi 

■ Superior ­> vision 

■ Inferior ­> heating 

■ Hindbrain 

● Metencephalon 

○ Pons ­> bridge­> heart rate 

○ Cerebellum­> little brain­> smooth movements 

● Myelencephalon ­> medulla­> heart rate 

■ Spinal cord 

■ Corpus Callosum ­>  connects two halves of brain 

■ Cerebral ventricles of the brain ­> holes 

● Make cerebrospinal fluid 

○ Brain 

■ White matter ­> fatty myelin 

■ Gray matter ­> neurons + glial cells 

○ Principles of nervous system function 

■ Brain processing: in ­> integrate ­> out 

■ Sensory + motor divisions throughout nervous system 

■ Many of the brain’s circuits are crossed 

■ Brain ­> symmetrical + asymmetrical 

■ Nervous system works through excitation + inhibition 

■ Brain systems are organized hierarchically + in parallel 

■ Functions are both localized + distributed We also discuss several other topics like What are the three main aspects of the system of criminal justice?

● The Cellular and Chemical Machinery of the Brain 

○ Neuron: discrete elementary units of nervous tissue 

■ Camillo Golgi (1843­1926) ­> Golgi stain 

● Neurons physically connected 

■ Santiago Ramon y Cajal (1852­1934) ­> used stain 

● Neuron Doctrine : neurons are separate entities 

○ Separated by synaptic cleft 

○ Correct 

○ Prototypical neuronDon't forget about the age old question of What is the main meaning of definition of symbolic?

■ Soma: cell body of neuron 

■ Dendrites: Receive signals 

■ Dendritic Spines: tubes on dendrites 

■ Axon: output signals to neurons 

■ Membrane: boundary (plasma)  We also discuss several other topics like How do you calculate gross profit from net sales?

○ Types of neurons 

■ Multipolar: 1 axon + lots of dendrites 

■ Bipolar: 1 axon + 1 dendrite 

■ Unipolar: cell body divides into 2 parts 

○ ALS ­> spinal cord neurons die 

○ Convergence: many axons synapse on a single neuron in order to focus the signal ○ Divergence: single neurons sends many axons to many other neurons to amplify  signal We also discuss several other topics like Is the division of society into groups arranged in a social hierarchy?

○ Synapses 

■ Presynaptic Terminal: end of axon 

● Contains synaptic vesicles 

○ Contain neurotransmitters 

● Dock (attach to membrane) + open 

■ Synaptic Cleft: gap between presynaptic membrane + postsynaptic  

membrane 

○ Neuron structures in common with other cells 

■ Mitochondria 

■ Microtubules 

■ Rough endoplasmic reticulum 

■ Smooth endoplasmic reticulum 

■ Plasma membrane 

○ Classifications of neurons 

■ Biochemically 

● Sensory 

● Motor 

■ Hierarchically 

● Primary 

● Secondary 

● Tertiary 

○ Glial cells 

■ Astrocytes ­> common cause of brain tumors 

■ Oligodendrocytes ­> myelin 

■ Schwann cells ­> myelin 

■ Microglia 

II. Fundamental Principles of Neuronal Communication and Historical Perspective Meldrum ­ 10/10, 10/12

Chandler ­ 10/17, 10/19, 10/24, 10/26

● The Scientific Method: How it was Born in a Crisis of Knowledge 

○ Europe 1300­1400 

■ Broken up, losing ancient roots 

■ Hierarchies 

● King ­> aristocracy ­> knights/scholars ­> people 

● Pope ­> cardinals ­> bishops ­> priests/monks/nuns 

● Heavens ­> stars ­> planets ­> earth 

■ World makes sense socially + cosmologically 

● Hierarchies keep structure 

■ Church + science ­> unified under these beliefs 

● Aristotle: physics of natural philosophies, earth=center of universe ○ Most important 

● Galen: medical writer, Greek, never autopsied a human, relied on  

pigs/dogs 

● Ptolemy: geography, 3 continents, geocentric universe 

○ Pleases church because Noah has 3 sons 

○ Europe 1450­1550 

■ Exploration ­> coffee + tea, plants, animals, no longer 3 continents, wealth ● Coffee shops ­> unregulated academic discussion 

■ Reformation ­> question the church, universities bring prestige and  authority

● Learning is encouraged 

■ Renaissance ­> perspective, geometric relationships (classics) 

■ Black Plague ­> wipes out large percentage of population, shakes 

hierarchy

■ Fall of Constantinople 

■ Printing Press ­> spread ideas 

○ Question all preconceived notions (science, universe) 

■ Nicolaus Copernicus : Polish, clergy 

● Heliocentric universe ­> printed + circulated 

○ Heresy 

■ Couldn’t predict the movement of stars/planets 

● Maintained circular orbits 

■ Johannes Kepler : amends heliocentric universe 

● Orbits are elliptical 

● Speed changes ­> slower near sun 

■ Andreas Vesalius: dissects humans (criminals) 

● Overturned Galen 

○ The Challenge to Knowledge, 1500­1700 

■ Some remained convinced by Aristotle’s ideas 

■ Sceptics ­> mysticism, retreat into self 

■ Embrace empiricism ­> induction + deduction  

● Reasoning + empirical observation

○ Francis Bacon ­> New Atlantis 

■ Inductive reasoning ­> small to big 

○ Rene Descartes ­> deductive reasoning 

■ “I think therefore I am” 

● “Community of reasoning men” 

○ Royal Society of London 

○ Methods: published so people can follow 

● The Scientific Method 

○ Specific observations 

○ Hypotheses 

○ Test by experiments 

○ Detail methods 

○ Specific ­> general 

● Mapping the Brain and the Synapse 

○ The Scientific Method: begin with specific observations, develop hypothesis, test  by experimentations, detail method, build to more general theories 

■ Induction ­> Francis Bacon 

○ Scientific Method to study brain 

■ Anatomical dissection 

■ Localization of function 

● Phrenology 

■ Clinical­anatomical method 

■ Animal experimentation 

● Galvani 

■ Electrophysiological recording 

■ Microscopy: visualizing the neuron + its functions 

○ Questions in 19th century neuroscience 

■ Are specific functions localized in the brain? 

● Franz Joseph Gall ­> phrenology 

● Paul Broca ­> localization of language 

● Jean ­ Martin Charcot ­> localization of neurologic 

● David Ferrier ­> mapping brain using monkeys 

○ Phrenology: analyzing shapes + “bumps” of people’s skulls to determine the  strength of mental + moral attributes (Gall) 

■ Correct because brain is physiological basis of function 

■ Correct because localization of function 

■ Failed to revise his theories when he discovered a counterexample ○ 1861 ­> Paul Broca ­> Broca’s Area 

■ Treats + dissects brain of mute patient 

● Cyst in left frontal lobe ­> linked to speech 

■ Wernicke's Area: language comprehension 

○ Jean ­ Martin Charcot ­> works with tremor illnesses 

■ Clinical­anatomical ­> identifies scelerotic scarring on brain + spinal cord ■ Tremors only when patient attempts movement

■ MS ­> defect in myelin sheath 

■ ALS ­> degeneration of motor neurons 

■ Parkinson’s ­> death of cells in midbrain 

○ Luigi Galvani ­> frog leg experiments  

■ Revealed electricity within animal nerves 

○ David Ferrier ­> studied monkeys 

■ Methodical 

■ Transposed maps of monkey brains onto human brains 

○ Neuron story: Are nerves composed of cells? How do they transmit information? ■ Santiago Ramón y Cajal ­> Neuron Doctrine 

■ Henry Hallet Dale ­> horses 

■ Otto Loewi ­> chemical neurotransmitters 

■ Alan Lloyd Hodgkin + Andrew Huxley ­> action potential 

● Squid 

○ Camillo Golgi ­> silver stain to produce sharp images of individual nerve cells ○ Santiago Ramón y Cajal ­> used stains 

■ Disagreed with Golgi ­> individual neurons 

● Independence of neuron ­> Neuron Doctrine 

○ How do individual neurons work? 

■ “Spark” ­> electrical transmission (Galvani) 

■ “Soup” ­> chemical transmission 

○ DuBois­Reymond ­> rapid rise + fall in electrical potential = action potential ○ Walter Dixon ­> stimulates vagus nerve + slows heart 

■ Chemical  

○ Henry Dale ­> studies fungi 

■ Extracted substance 

■ Cannot be sure if it is in human body 

○ Otto Loewi ­> frog hearts with and without vagus nerve 

■ Fluid slows heart 

● “Vagosstuff” ­> chemical 

○ Dale ­> acetylcholine from horses 

■ Proven to be a natural substance 

○ “soup “ hypothesis prevails ­> chemical 

■ Still don’t know how chemicals are triggered 

○ Hodgkin + Huxley ­> experiment on squid giant axons 

■ Measuring voltages 

■ Voltage clamp ­> step up axon voltage 

● Observe molecular changes 

● Neurons, Resting Potential and Action Potential 

○ Cellular Neurophysiology: how cells communicate within themselves + between  themselves 

○ The membrane at rest: 

■ Resting Potential: voltage difference between inside + outside of cell (K+  ions leaving)

■ If you don’t have charge separation, no voltage 

● No voltage means no processes 

○ Factors that determine neuronal resting potential 

■ Electrochemical Gradients 

● Concentration force + electrostatic force = net force 

○ Forces are equal and opposite ­> equilibrium 

● Net force = electrochemical gradient 

■ Selective membrane permeability + ion flow 

● Salty fluid on both sides of membrane 

● Membrane (fatty acids) 

● Proteins span membrane (channels) 

○ Some open, some gated 

○ Gated by chemical or electrical changes 

■ Charge separation across membrane 

● Voltage: form of potential energy 

○ Measures difference between two points 

● Current: charge (q) / time (pA) 

● Resistance/Conductance 

○ Cell membranes ­> high resistance 

○ Salty liquids (ions in solution) ­> high conductance 

○ Membrane potential is constant over time ­> resting potential ■ Resting Potential ­> same at all points in cell 

● Isopotential 

● Inside is negative with respect to outside 

○ Gradients 

■ K+ ­> low out, high in 

■ Na+ ­> high out, low in 

○ Macroscopic Electroneutrality 

■ # positive ions = # negative ions 

● Human body as a whole has no voltage 

○ Microscopic Electroneutrality 

■ Ions leak across membrane 

● Voltage caused by ions immediately on either side of membrane ○ Electrical correlation 

■ Dr. Kevorkian/Dr. Death 

● Assisted suicide 

● Altered K+ equilibrium potential 

○ Action Potential: (spike) due to ions moving + producing voltage ○ Action Potential waveform 

■ Perturbation in resting potential 

■ Peak ­> repolarization (falling phase) 

■ After hyperpolarization (below rest) 

○ Graded potentials ­> amplitude varies with magnitude of stimulus ■ Decrement with distance

● Further away ­>  less impact 

○ Ionic flow during action potential 

■ Peak is governed by Equilibrium of Na 

■ Resting potential ­> threshold ­> refractory period 

● Absolute/relative refractory period 

○ Impossible/difficult to spark action potential 

● Action Potential and Synaptic Communication  

○ Action Potential: resting potential is perturbed, temporary voltage change across  membrane 

■ In axons 

■ No voltage gated channels in dendrites 

○ Action Potential Propagation 

■ All or nothing 

■ Size of spike stays constant 

■ Max peak of spike = almost Na+ equilibrium potential 

○ Passive Current Flow + Propagation of Action Potential 

■ Longitudinal gradient formed 

● Positive ions go to negative side of axon 

■ Passive current flows in front of action potential ­> depolarization ■ Depolarization to action potential threshold ­> action potential initiated ■ Process repeats down length of axon 

○ Action Potential Propagation 

■ Non­myelinated axon 

● Region in front of action potential 

● Every region has action potential sequentially 

■ Myelinated axon 

● Insulator, modes have high density of channels 

○ Internodes don’t have any ­> no action potential 

● Less leakage, increases conduction velocity 

○ Clinical Correlation 

■ Multiple Sclerosis ­> demyelinating disease 

● Autoimmune disease 

■ Action potential failure 

■ Lidocaine ­> conduction block, action potential failure 

○ Modes of communication at synapses 

■ Electrical 

● Direct connection (physical) 

○ Proteins form gap junctions 

■ Chemical 

● Neurotransmitters at synaptic terminals 

● Apposition between neurons: synaptic cleft 

● Slow but modifiable 

○ Spike threshold  ­> cell becomes less negative ­> action potential 

■ EPSP ­> voltage is becomes negative ­> excitatory

■ IPSP ­> voltage becomes more negative ­> inhibitory 

○ Spatial summation + temporal summation = action potential ■ Small, individual inputs ­> together create voltage + action potential ● Synaptic inputs 

■ One input ­> need multiple transmissions ­> sum of EPSPs 

● Still trigger action potential 

■ Graphically ­> small hump before big spike 

○ Spike Train + Frequency Coding 

■ EPSPs can summate to increase frequency rather than amplitude ● Depolarizing current increases action potential firing rate 

■ Max firing frequency ­> defined by absolute refractory period because  cannot spark another action potential in that time

○ Components of Chemical Synapse 

■ Terminals ­> vesicles with neurotransmitters 

● Amount in each ­> quanta/um 

■ Synaptic cleft ­> 5­20 nanometers 

■ Postsynaptic neuron receptors 

● Specific for neurotransmitter 

● Binding ­> channels open 

○ Synaptic Transmission: General Steps 

■ AP invades terminal 

● Big depolarization ­> Ca influx (out ­> in) 

● Voltage gated Ca channels in presynaptic terminal 

○ Stimulus to activate vesicles to bind to membrane 

■ Exocytosis ­> opens holes for vesicles 

■ Neurotransmitters diffuse through hole ­> bind to postsynaptic cell  receptors

● Ligand gated sodium/potassium channels 

● Conductance change ­> magnitude (how many channels are open) ○ ONLY affected by how many neurotransmitters bind 

○ NOT VOLTAGE DEPENDENT 

■ Active current flow 

■ Postsynaptic voltage change (EPSP/IPSP) 

■ Removal of neurotransmitters 

■ Digital ­> analog : spike ­> EPSPs 

■ Analog ­> digital : EPSPs ­> summation ­> all or no spike 

○ Ionic bases of Synaptic Potentials 

■ Glutamate/Acetylcholine ­> unique binding 

● Opens ligand gated channels 

○ Cl­ in/out

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here