Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

FSU - CLP 4143 - STUDY GUIDE - Study Guide

Created by: Chichi Ofokansi Elite Notetaker

> > > > FSU - CLP 4143 - STUDY GUIDE - Study Guide

FSU - CLP 4143 - STUDY GUIDE - Study Guide

School: Florida State University
Department: OTHER
Course: Abnormal Psychology
Professor: Natalie Sachs-Ericsson
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: Abnormal psychology
Name: STUDY GUIDE
Description: This guide entails what will be on exam 3
Uploaded: 11/01/2017
This preview shows pages 1 - 4 of a 16 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Learning Objectives for:  Fear and Anxiety Overview Panic Disorder Fear & Anxiety Overview
1)
               What is the “fight or flight” response? What sorts of physiological effects does it      involve? Cognitive effects? What behaviors often come along with the fight­or­flight  response?  Fight or Flight:  This is a set of physical and psychological responses that help us fight a threat or  flee from it. Physiological Effects:  The physiological effects of fear and arousal by this response result from  the activation of two systems controlled by the hypothalamus. First is the  autonomic nervous  system , which includes the sympathetic nervous system and the parasympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic nervous system­  “fight or flight” primes us to fight or flee the situation;  regulates stress response  increased heart rate, activates sweat glands,  constricts blood  vessels, dilate pupils, inhibits digestion. Parasympathetic nervous system­  “rest­and­digest”, regulates activities that occur when  the  body is at rest; when the perceived danger passes, the parasympathetic NS helps  the body  return to body processes to normal. Second is the  Endocrine system  (hormone system) also activated by the hypothalamus:  It  promotes the release of endorphins (epinephrine & norepinephrine) = adrenalin; gets released 
during fight­or­flight response and is crucial component (increased hr, metabolic shifts)
It also promotes the release of cortisol: increases blood sugar (so we have more energy to fight or
run away from danger), also suppresses immune system so energy of body can be used toward 
other functions. The hypothalamus activates the sympathetic nervous system, which primes the body’s organs to 
react to threat by doing things like dilating pupils and opening up lungs. The hypothalamus also 
activates the hypothalamic­pituitary­adrenal (HPA) pathway by releasing corticotropin­release 
factor.  This causes the release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), the body’s major stress 
hormone. ACTH causes the release of cortisol and adrenaline which in turn leads to changes in 
internal organs and muscles.
Cognitive Effects:  Anticipation of harm, exaggeration of danger, problems concentrating, hyper  vigilance, worried thinking, fear of losing control, fear of dying, and sense of unreality.
background image Behaviors that come with it:  Escape, avoidance, aggression, freezing. 2)                What are three questions we can     ask ourselves to determine whether fear is adaptive or  maladaptive? (CLASS) 1) Are concerns realistic given the circumstances?
2) Is the amount of fear in proportion to the threat?
3) Does the concern persist in the absence of the threat?
3)                How can negative reinforcement maintain anxiety?      Negative
reinforcement
maintains  anxiety by  avoidance Avoidance is effective in decreasing anxiety in  the short term and it is  reinforced through  negative reinforcement. This serves to maintain the anxiety in  the long term. 4)                What is exposure therapy? How does it reduce anxiety over time?    
background image Exposure Therapy:  This form of therapy reduces anxiety by having clients encounter feared  situations and stimuli multiple times. 
It reduces anxiety because over time they habituate to feared situations (feared reaction 
diminishes) and reduce avoidance.
5)                When the physiological effects of anxiety are reduced by taking a drug or medication,      what effect does that usually have on the physiological effects of anxiety when the drug or 
medication is removed? 
They can actually set back your ability to cope with anxiety in the future, and if you take them 
for anything other than an anxiety disorder they can be very problematic. You can build a 
physiological dependence which is when the body has adapted to its effects and require the 
medicine. If you stop taking the medication, you'll suffer from intense side effects. You have to 
wean off it slowly, and you have to take it every day even if you're not feeling anxious that day. Panic Disorder 6)                What is a panic attack? What are the physical and psychological symptoms? When do we     consider panic attacks “cued” or “uncued?” Panic Attack:  This is a short (peaks within 10 minutes) but intense period of intense fear that can  occur within the context of any disorder (or no disorder). Physical and Psychological Symptoms:   Racing heartbeat or palpitations, numbness or tingling,  chills, sweating, trembling, feedings of choking or being smothered, chest pain, nausea or upset 
stomach, dizziness, feelings of unreality, fear of losing control or going crazy, fear of dying.
Cued panic attacks  are those that occur following exposure to some kind of trigger such as a very frightening experience or thought. For example, someone who is scared of public speaking may  have a panic attack when placed in front of an audience.
An 
uncued panic attack  (or a spontaneous or unexpected panic attack) is one that occurs “out of  the blue” and is the defining feature of panic disorders. 7)                What makes panic disorder (PD) different from panic attacks? Is it possible to have one      without the other? Panic disorder is marked by recurrent unexpected panic attacks. Meaning, they are not in  situations that the person thought they would be anxious (when confronted by actual danger, 
when a person with a phobia sees the feared object, when a person with social anxiety disorder 
background image has to speak in front of a group). These are out of the blue attacks. A person with panic disorder 
will develop concern about future attacks, they will worry that these attacks mean something 
serious (losing control, having a heart attack, “going crazy”) and they may change behavior due 
to the attacks. *If someone has a panic attack everyday, but they aren’t concerned by it and don’t
do anything differently because of it, there’s no disorder! Making it possible to have one without 
the other.
8)                About how many people have PD? Is it more common in certain ethnic groups? Are there     gender differences? Why do people usually seek treatment for PD? 3­5% of people will develop panic disorder at some point in their lifetime and Panic Disorder is  2­3x more common in women. People usually seek treatment because if left untreated, people 
with the disorder may become demoralized and depressed.
9)                What biological factors likely contribute to PD?     Panic disorder clearly runs in families so there is a  genetic role  but no specific genes have been  consistently identified as causing panic disorder. Neuro­imaging studies show differences 
between people with panic disorder and those with out it in several areas of the limbic system, 
which includes the hypothalamus (we know this is involved in the stress response!).   Those  people with PD have overactive norepinephereine/adrenaline.  Fight­or­Flight response appears to be poorly regulated in people who develop panic disorder due to  poor regulation of several  neurotransmitters,  including norepinephrine, serotonin, gamma­aminobutyric aside (GABA) and  cholecystokinin. 10)              What is anxiety sensitivity? According to cognitive theories of PD, how does it increase      risk for developing PD? Anxiety Sensitivity (AS):  This is a fear or anxiety related physical sensations and belief that  these sensations have harmful somatic or psychological consequences. 
People high is anxiety sensitivity are more likely than people low in it to already have panic 
disorder, to have more frequent panic attacks, or to develop panic attacks over time. Cognitive 
theorists argue that people prone to panic attacks tend to:
­Pay very close attention to their bodily sensations
­Misinterpret these sensations in a negative way
­Engage in snowballing catastrophe thinking, exaggerating their symptoms and their 
consequences (anxiety sensitivity)
This constant arousal makes further attacks more likely.

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Florida State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
16 Pages 24 Views 19 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Florida State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Florida State University
Department: OTHER
Course: Abnormal Psychology
Professor: Natalie Sachs-Ericsson
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: Abnormal psychology
Name: STUDY GUIDE
Description: This guide entails what will be on exam 3
Uploaded: 11/01/2017
16 Pages 24 Views 19 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to FSU - CLP 4143 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to FSU - CLP 4143 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here