×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Towson - PSYC 461 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Towson - PSYC 461 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

TOWSON / Psychology / PSYC 461 / What is the main definition of short ­term memory?

What is the main definition of short ­term memory?

What is the main definition of short ­term memory?

Description

School: Towson University
Department: Psychology
Course: Cognitive Psychology
Professor: John webster
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: Cognitive Psych
Description: These notes will be on the upcoming exam.
Uploaded: 11/04/2017
8 Pages 46 Views 3 Unlocks
Reviews


Cognitive Psychology 


What is the main definition of short ­term memory?



Chapter 5: Short­Term and Working Memory

Key concepts:

∙ Memory is storing, retrieving, and using information. 

∙ Short­term memory: information that stays in the memory for 10­15 seconds o George Keppel and Underwood explain why participants lost information not by  decay of information but from….

 Retroactive interference: new information interferes with old learned  information

 Proactive information: old learned information interferes with new 

information

o George Miller’s 1956 paper­ 

 Hold 7 +­ 2 items 

 Chunking increases the amount of information we can hold in short­term  memory


Who are george keppel and underwood?



  ∙        William James “Primary and Secondary” memory  

o Primary memory: interacting with the world

o Secondary memory: long term memory

    Brown­Peterson task: person read a strand of 3 random letters, then count backwards  from 1000 to prevent rehearsal. When I say recall, tell me the first 3 random letters in the  same order I said it in.


Retroactive interference refers to what?



 Counting the number of errors that were made 

 The findings were in a half of minute, the information was gone due to  proactive interference.

∙ Atkinson & Shiffrin ( next generation model) We also discuss several other topics like How are fats useful to the body?

o Modal Model ( Baddely)­ working memory 

 Fixed memory structures: sub sequential, memory as a whole is made up  of distant distinguish parts (sensory memory­ sensory info come in and 

hold for 3 seconds/engaging with the info we are paying attention to it, 

→short­term memory­ to make sense of the information: encoding (label 

and figure out what comes in : encode through language) and rehearsal­ 

time limits, feedback loop, keep info in the system or drops out  go to  →

long­term memory, and long­term memory: storage of information for 

long period of time ), the information from long­term memory can be 

brought back to short­term memory to be remembered.  Don't forget about the age old question of Why do conflicts arise in a democracy?

o store in short­term memory, rehearsal occurs. 

∙ Sensory Memory/Working Memory

o Is the retention of information and sensory stimulation for a brief period of time.  Can be loss in 1/20 sec

o Persistence of vision is seeing a something after it is no longer presence.  For example, after staring at the light and still perceiving the light bulb  after its been turned off. 

o Sperling: wonder how long information is store after a brief stimulus is presented  He shown a flash of letter on the screen and tell people to recall what they  seen. 

 Whole­report method: people trying to remember all the letters 

∙ Participants only able to recall 4 letters out of 12 (Span of  Don't forget about the age old question of Is bedrock breakable?

Apprehension)

 Partial report method: reporting letters in a single 4­letter row and 

listening to high, medium, and low­pitched tones

∙ The tones were played after the letters were shown

∙ Participants recalled 3.5 letters out of 4

 Delayed partial report method: flashing the letters off and on, then the cue  tines were played. 

∙ Participants only remembered one letter

 Results

∙ Decay of information: loss of sensory memory over time

o Iconic memory (visual icon): quick sensory memory from a

visual stimulus

o Echoic memory (auditory): brief sensory memory from an 

auditory stimulus

 Information can be loss under 3 secs

∙ Interference (Masking): new information takes over previous 

information 

Chapter 6­ Long­term memory Don't forget about the age old question of What is it called when data collected from each and every individual in a population?

 Long­term memory: information is stored for an extended period of time o Unlimited capacity, complex coding 

o To keep information If a person forgets something in long­term memory,  the information is not really gone but inability to retrieve information we  want when we want it/ it can be forgotten 

o Types of long­term memory

 Explicit memory: consciousness memory

∙ Semantic memory – facts or information (dictionary)/ using

this time of information to learn how to play an instrument

o Language – temporal lobe

∙ Episodic memory­time and place (remembering the where 

you first kiss was at)

∙ The blend of episodic and semantic memory is 

autobiographical

∙ Erosion over time   We also discuss several other topics like Do metals have a higher electronegativity than nonmetals?
We also discuss several other topics like What you mean by discrete?

 Implicit memory: unconscious­ habits

∙ Priming­ not a physiological thing/ a word triggers a 

memory / do not notice people with pink hats but then you 

do anyway

∙ Procedural memory: automatically know how to play an 

instrument­ doesn’t have to think about it

o Cerebellum 

o Mostly motor skills/memory

∙ Classical condition (elicit) no reward involved ­operant 

(omitted)

 Traditional experimental; psychology

o Serial position effect: performing a task in sequential order, curious trend  emerges (a pattern). 

 Primacy effect: easy to remember at the beginning, long­term 

memory effect. Jump in the beginning because if they ask the 

people to do something, they won’t remember what’s at the end 

but remember what is in the beginning 

 Recency effect: easy to remember at the end; short­term memory 

effect: write down what they just saw and then write down what is 

first.

 Hard to remember what is in the middle

 Coding in memory

o Visual coding occurs in short­term memory 

o Auditory coding occurs in long­term memory 

o Semantic coding in short­term memory: The Wicker’s Experiment

 Recalling information after hearing it

o Semantic coding in long­term memory: The Sach’s experiment

 Remembering the exact wording of a sentences after listening to it 

 Measured recognition memory (identifying a stimulus after it was 

encounter earlier. 

 Location of long­term memory

o In the hippocampus 

o Anterograde amnesia: unable to produce new memories (H.M case)

o Retrograde amnesia: unable to recall old memories 

Chapter 7­ Long­term Memory: Encoding, Retrieval, and Consolidation

 Steps to get information to long­term memory

1. Encoding: receiving information and transferring it to long­term memory

 Maintenance rehearsal: repeating information over and over; easily  forgettable 

 Elaborative rehearsal: applying meaning to the information that you want  to remember; better option to remember things

 Level of processing theory

∙ Shallowing processing: little knowledge of meaning that was  attached to a specific information 

∙ Deep processing: close attention to meaning

∙ Craik & Lockhead: Levels of processing in memory

∙ Meaning through Associations: critical factor for enhancing  encoding (and subsequent Retrieval) 

o Visual imagery(Mnemonics): oldest mnemonics – physical 

location to things we try to remember­. Visual: things 

bizarre

o Self­reference effect: the degree to how you can 

something relates to yourself

o Organization & meaning helps improve memory

2. Retrieval: getting information out of memory 

 Retrieval cues: a stimulus that helps a person remember information   Retrieval can increase by matching the conditions to the information that  was in the encoding stage

∙ Encoding specificity: take information in with the context

∙ State­depending learning: learning information while applying  internal state (emotions) to it. 

∙ Transfer­appropriate processing: including both the internal state  and context in retaining information

3. Consolidation: putting information in a permanent state

 Synaptic consolidation: storing information in a permanent state over  minutes or hours 

 System consolidation: storing information in a permanent state in months  or years’ time. 

*these two system occurs together but at different speeds*

 Consolidation occurs during sleep

Cognitive Psychology 

Chapter 5: Short­Term and Working Memory

Key concepts:

∙ Memory is storing, retrieving, and using information. 

∙ Short­term memory: information that stays in the memory for 10­15 seconds o George Keppel and Underwood explain why participants lost information not by  decay of information but from….

 Retroactive interference: new information interferes with old learned  information

 Proactive information: old learned information interferes with new 

information

o George Miller’s 1956 paper­ 

 Hold 7 +­ 2 items 

 Chunking increases the amount of information we can hold in short­term  memory

  ∙        William James “Primary and Secondary” memory  

o Primary memory: interacting with the world

o Secondary memory: long term memory

    Brown­Peterson task: person read a strand of 3 random letters, then count backwards  from 1000 to prevent rehearsal. When I say recall, tell me the first 3 random letters in the  same order I said it in.

 Counting the number of errors that were made 

 The findings were in a half of minute, the information was gone due to  proactive interference.

∙ Atkinson & Shiffrin ( next generation model)

o Modal Model ( Baddely)­ working memory 

 Fixed memory structures: sub sequential, memory as a whole is made up  of distant distinguish parts (sensory memory­ sensory info come in and 

hold for 3 seconds/engaging with the info we are paying attention to it, 

→short­term memory­ to make sense of the information: encoding (label 

and figure out what comes in : encode through language) and rehearsal­ 

time limits, feedback loop, keep info in the system or drops out  go to  →

long­term memory, and long­term memory: storage of information for 

long period of time ), the information from long­term memory can be 

brought back to short­term memory to be remembered. 

o store in short­term memory, rehearsal occurs. 

∙ Sensory Memory/Working Memory

o Is the retention of information and sensory stimulation for a brief period of time.  Can be loss in 1/20 sec

o Persistence of vision is seeing a something after it is no longer presence.  For example, after staring at the light and still perceiving the light bulb  after its been turned off. 

o Sperling: wonder how long information is store after a brief stimulus is presented  He shown a flash of letter on the screen and tell people to recall what they  seen. 

 Whole­report method: people trying to remember all the letters 

∙ Participants only able to recall 4 letters out of 12 (Span of 

Apprehension)

 Partial report method: reporting letters in a single 4­letter row and 

listening to high, medium, and low­pitched tones

∙ The tones were played after the letters were shown

∙ Participants recalled 3.5 letters out of 4

 Delayed partial report method: flashing the letters off and on, then the cue  tines were played. 

∙ Participants only remembered one letter

 Results

∙ Decay of information: loss of sensory memory over time

o Iconic memory (visual icon): quick sensory memory from a

visual stimulus

o Echoic memory (auditory): brief sensory memory from an 

auditory stimulus

 Information can be loss under 3 secs

∙ Interference (Masking): new information takes over previous 

information 

Chapter 6­ Long­term memory

 Long­term memory: information is stored for an extended period of time o Unlimited capacity, complex coding 

o To keep information If a person forgets something in long­term memory,  the information is not really gone but inability to retrieve information we  want when we want it/ it can be forgotten 

o Types of long­term memory

 Explicit memory: consciousness memory

∙ Semantic memory – facts or information (dictionary)/ using

this time of information to learn how to play an instrument

o Language – temporal lobe

∙ Episodic memory­time and place (remembering the where 

you first kiss was at)

∙ The blend of episodic and semantic memory is 

autobiographical

∙ Erosion over time  

 Implicit memory: unconscious­ habits

∙ Priming­ not a physiological thing/ a word triggers a 

memory / do not notice people with pink hats but then you 

do anyway

∙ Procedural memory: automatically know how to play an 

instrument­ doesn’t have to think about it

o Cerebellum 

o Mostly motor skills/memory

∙ Classical condition (elicit) no reward involved ­operant 

(omitted)

 Traditional experimental; psychology

o Serial position effect: performing a task in sequential order, curious trend  emerges (a pattern). 

 Primacy effect: easy to remember at the beginning, long­term 

memory effect. Jump in the beginning because if they ask the 

people to do something, they won’t remember what’s at the end 

but remember what is in the beginning 

 Recency effect: easy to remember at the end; short­term memory 

effect: write down what they just saw and then write down what is 

first.

 Hard to remember what is in the middle

 Coding in memory

o Visual coding occurs in short­term memory 

o Auditory coding occurs in long­term memory 

o Semantic coding in short­term memory: The Wicker’s Experiment

 Recalling information after hearing it

o Semantic coding in long­term memory: The Sach’s experiment

 Remembering the exact wording of a sentences after listening to it 

 Measured recognition memory (identifying a stimulus after it was 

encounter earlier. 

 Location of long­term memory

o In the hippocampus 

o Anterograde amnesia: unable to produce new memories (H.M case)

o Retrograde amnesia: unable to recall old memories 

Chapter 7­ Long­term Memory: Encoding, Retrieval, and Consolidation

 Steps to get information to long­term memory

1. Encoding: receiving information and transferring it to long­term memory

 Maintenance rehearsal: repeating information over and over; easily  forgettable 

 Elaborative rehearsal: applying meaning to the information that you want  to remember; better option to remember things

 Level of processing theory

∙ Shallowing processing: little knowledge of meaning that was  attached to a specific information 

∙ Deep processing: close attention to meaning

∙ Craik & Lockhead: Levels of processing in memory

∙ Meaning through Associations: critical factor for enhancing  encoding (and subsequent Retrieval) 

o Visual imagery(Mnemonics): oldest mnemonics – physical 

location to things we try to remember­. Visual: things 

bizarre

o Self­reference effect: the degree to how you can 

something relates to yourself

o Organization & meaning helps improve memory

2. Retrieval: getting information out of memory 

 Retrieval cues: a stimulus that helps a person remember information   Retrieval can increase by matching the conditions to the information that  was in the encoding stage

∙ Encoding specificity: take information in with the context

∙ State­depending learning: learning information while applying  internal state (emotions) to it. 

∙ Transfer­appropriate processing: including both the internal state  and context in retaining information

3. Consolidation: putting information in a permanent state

 Synaptic consolidation: storing information in a permanent state over  minutes or hours 

 System consolidation: storing information in a permanent state in months  or years’ time. 

*these two system occurs together but at different speeds*

 Consolidation occurs during sleep

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here