×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Towson - PSYC 461 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup
Get Full Access to Towson - PSYC 461 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

TOWSON / Psychology / PSYC 461 / What is the main definition of short ­term memory?

What is the main definition of short ­term memory?

What is the main definition of short ­term memory?

Description

School: Towson University
Department: Psychology
Course: Cognitive Psychology
Professor: John webster
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: Cognitive Psych
Description: These notes will be on the upcoming exam.
Uploaded: 11/04/2017
8 Pages 122 Views 3 Unlocks
Reviews


Cognitive Psychology 


What is the main definition of short ­term memory?



Chapter 5: Short­Term and Working Memory

Key concepts:

∙ Memory is storing, retrieving, and using information. 

∙ Short­term memory: information that stays in the memory for 10­15 seconds o George Keppel and Underwood explain why participants lost information not by  decay of information but from….

 Retroactive interference: new information interferes with old learned  information

 Proactive information: old learned information interferes with new 

information

o George Miller’s 1956 paper­ 

 Hold 7 +­ 2 items 

 Chunking increases the amount of information we can hold in short­term  memory


Who are george keppel and underwood?



  ∙        William James “Primary and Secondary” memory  

o Primary memory: interacting with the world

o Secondary memory: long term memory

    Brown­Peterson task: person read a strand of 3 random letters, then count backwards  from 1000 to prevent rehearsal. When I say recall, tell me the first 3 random letters in the  same order I said it in.


Retroactive interference refers to what?



If you want to learn more check out How are fats useful to the body?

 Counting the number of errors that were made 

 The findings were in a half of minute, the information was gone due to  proactive interference.

∙ Atkinson & Shiffrin ( next generation model)

o Modal Model ( Baddely)­ working memory 

 Fixed memory structures: sub sequential, memory as a whole is made up  of distant distinguish parts (sensory memory­ sensory info come in and 

hold for 3 seconds/engaging with the info we are paying attention to it, 

→short­term memory­ to make sense of the information: encoding (label 

and figure out what comes in : encode through language) and rehearsal­ 

time limits, feedback loop, keep info in the system or drops out  go to  →

long­term memory, and long­term memory: storage of information for 

long period of time ), the information from long­term memory can be 

brought back to short­term memory to be remembered. 

o store in short­term memory, rehearsal occurs.  If you want to learn more check out Why do conflicts arise in a democracy?

∙ Sensory Memory/Working Memory

o Is the retention of information and sensory stimulation for a brief period of time.  Can be loss in 1/20 sec

o Persistence of vision is seeing a something after it is no longer presence.  For example, after staring at the light and still perceiving the light bulb  after its been turned off. 

o Sperling: wonder how long information is store after a brief stimulus is presented  He shown a flash of letter on the screen and tell people to recall what they  seen. 

 Whole­report method: people trying to remember all the letters 

∙ Participants only able to recall 4 letters out of 12 (Span of 

Apprehension)

 Partial report method: reporting letters in a single 4­letter row and 

listening to high, medium, and low­pitched tones

∙ The tones were played after the letters were shown

∙ Participants recalled 3.5 letters out of 4

 Delayed partial report method: flashing the letters off and on, then the cue  tines were played. 

∙ Participants only remembered one letter Don't forget about the age old question of How are non-silicates formed?

 Results

∙ Decay of information: loss of sensory memory over time

o Iconic memory (visual icon): quick sensory memory from a

visual stimulus

o Echoic memory (auditory): brief sensory memory from an 

auditory stimulus

 Information can be loss under 3 secs

∙ Interference (Masking): new information takes over previous 

information 

Chapter 6­ Long­term memory

 Long­term memory: information is stored for an extended period of time o Unlimited capacity, complex coding 

o To keep information If a person forgets something in long­term memory,  the information is not really gone but inability to retrieve information we  want when we want it/ it can be forgotten  We also discuss several other topics like What is it called when data collected from each and every individual in a population?

o Types of long­term memory

 Explicit memory: consciousness memory

∙ Semantic memory – facts or information (dictionary)/ using

this time of information to learn how to play an instrument Don't forget about the age old question of Do metals make positive cations?

o Language – temporal lobe

∙ Episodic memory­time and place (remembering the where 

you first kiss was at)

∙ The blend of episodic and semantic memory is 

autobiographical

∙ Erosion over time  

 Implicit memory: unconscious­ habits

∙ Priming­ not a physiological thing/ a word triggers a 

memory / do not notice people with pink hats but then you 

do anyway

∙ Procedural memory: automatically know how to play an 

instrument­ doesn’t have to think about it

o Cerebellum 

o Mostly motor skills/memory

∙ Classical condition (elicit) no reward involved ­operant 

(omitted)

 Traditional experimental; psychology

o Serial position effect: performing a task in sequential order, curious trend  emerges (a pattern). 

 Primacy effect: easy to remember at the beginning, long­term  Don't forget about the age old question of What you mean by discrete?

memory effect. Jump in the beginning because if they ask the 

people to do something, they won’t remember what’s at the end 

but remember what is in the beginning 

 Recency effect: easy to remember at the end; short­term memory 

effect: write down what they just saw and then write down what is 

first.

 Hard to remember what is in the middle

 Coding in memory

o Visual coding occurs in short­term memory 

o Auditory coding occurs in long­term memory 

o Semantic coding in short­term memory: The Wicker’s Experiment

 Recalling information after hearing it

o Semantic coding in long­term memory: The Sach’s experiment

 Remembering the exact wording of a sentences after listening to it 

 Measured recognition memory (identifying a stimulus after it was 

encounter earlier. 

 Location of long­term memory

o In the hippocampus 

o Anterograde amnesia: unable to produce new memories (H.M case)

o Retrograde amnesia: unable to recall old memories 

Chapter 7­ Long­term Memory: Encoding, Retrieval, and Consolidation

 Steps to get information to long­term memory

1. Encoding: receiving information and transferring it to long­term memory

 Maintenance rehearsal: repeating information over and over; easily  forgettable 

 Elaborative rehearsal: applying meaning to the information that you want  to remember; better option to remember things

 Level of processing theory

∙ Shallowing processing: little knowledge of meaning that was  attached to a specific information 

∙ Deep processing: close attention to meaning

∙ Craik & Lockhead: Levels of processing in memory

∙ Meaning through Associations: critical factor for enhancing  encoding (and subsequent Retrieval) 

o Visual imagery(Mnemonics): oldest mnemonics – physical 

location to things we try to remember­. Visual: things 

bizarre

o Self­reference effect: the degree to how you can 

something relates to yourself

o Organization & meaning helps improve memory

2. Retrieval: getting information out of memory 

 Retrieval cues: a stimulus that helps a person remember information   Retrieval can increase by matching the conditions to the information that  was in the encoding stage

∙ Encoding specificity: take information in with the context

∙ State­depending learning: learning information while applying  internal state (emotions) to it. 

∙ Transfer­appropriate processing: including both the internal state  and context in retaining information

3. Consolidation: putting information in a permanent state

 Synaptic consolidation: storing information in a permanent state over  minutes or hours 

 System consolidation: storing information in a permanent state in months  or years’ time. 

*these two system occurs together but at different speeds*

 Consolidation occurs during sleep

Cognitive Psychology 

Chapter 5: Short­Term and Working Memory

Key concepts:

∙ Memory is storing, retrieving, and using information. 

∙ Short­term memory: information that stays in the memory for 10­15 seconds o George Keppel and Underwood explain why participants lost information not by  decay of information but from….

 Retroactive interference: new information interferes with old learned  information

 Proactive information: old learned information interferes with new 

information

o George Miller’s 1956 paper­ 

 Hold 7 +­ 2 items 

 Chunking increases the amount of information we can hold in short­term  memory

  ∙        William James “Primary and Secondary” memory  

o Primary memory: interacting with the world

o Secondary memory: long term memory

    Brown­Peterson task: person read a strand of 3 random letters, then count backwards  from 1000 to prevent rehearsal. When I say recall, tell me the first 3 random letters in the  same order I said it in.

 Counting the number of errors that were made 

 The findings were in a half of minute, the information was gone due to  proactive interference.

∙ Atkinson & Shiffrin ( next generation model)

o Modal Model ( Baddely)­ working memory 

 Fixed memory structures: sub sequential, memory as a whole is made up  of distant distinguish parts (sensory memory­ sensory info come in and 

hold for 3 seconds/engaging with the info we are paying attention to it, 

→short­term memory­ to make sense of the information: encoding (label 

and figure out what comes in : encode through language) and rehearsal­ 

time limits, feedback loop, keep info in the system or drops out  go to  →

long­term memory, and long­term memory: storage of information for 

long period of time ), the information from long­term memory can be 

brought back to short­term memory to be remembered. 

o store in short­term memory, rehearsal occurs. 

∙ Sensory Memory/Working Memory

o Is the retention of information and sensory stimulation for a brief period of time.  Can be loss in 1/20 sec

o Persistence of vision is seeing a something after it is no longer presence.  For example, after staring at the light and still perceiving the light bulb  after its been turned off. 

o Sperling: wonder how long information is store after a brief stimulus is presented  He shown a flash of letter on the screen and tell people to recall what they  seen. 

 Whole­report method: people trying to remember all the letters 

∙ Participants only able to recall 4 letters out of 12 (Span of 

Apprehension)

 Partial report method: reporting letters in a single 4­letter row and 

listening to high, medium, and low­pitched tones

∙ The tones were played after the letters were shown

∙ Participants recalled 3.5 letters out of 4

 Delayed partial report method: flashing the letters off and on, then the cue  tines were played. 

∙ Participants only remembered one letter

 Results

∙ Decay of information: loss of sensory memory over time

o Iconic memory (visual icon): quick sensory memory from a

visual stimulus

o Echoic memory (auditory): brief sensory memory from an 

auditory stimulus

 Information can be loss under 3 secs

∙ Interference (Masking): new information takes over previous 

information 

Chapter 6­ Long­term memory

 Long­term memory: information is stored for an extended period of time o Unlimited capacity, complex coding 

o To keep information If a person forgets something in long­term memory,  the information is not really gone but inability to retrieve information we  want when we want it/ it can be forgotten 

o Types of long­term memory

 Explicit memory: consciousness memory

∙ Semantic memory – facts or information (dictionary)/ using

this time of information to learn how to play an instrument

o Language – temporal lobe

∙ Episodic memory­time and place (remembering the where 

you first kiss was at)

∙ The blend of episodic and semantic memory is 

autobiographical

∙ Erosion over time  

 Implicit memory: unconscious­ habits

∙ Priming­ not a physiological thing/ a word triggers a 

memory / do not notice people with pink hats but then you 

do anyway

∙ Procedural memory: automatically know how to play an 

instrument­ doesn’t have to think about it

o Cerebellum 

o Mostly motor skills/memory

∙ Classical condition (elicit) no reward involved ­operant 

(omitted)

 Traditional experimental; psychology

o Serial position effect: performing a task in sequential order, curious trend  emerges (a pattern). 

 Primacy effect: easy to remember at the beginning, long­term 

memory effect. Jump in the beginning because if they ask the 

people to do something, they won’t remember what’s at the end 

but remember what is in the beginning 

 Recency effect: easy to remember at the end; short­term memory 

effect: write down what they just saw and then write down what is 

first.

 Hard to remember what is in the middle

 Coding in memory

o Visual coding occurs in short­term memory 

o Auditory coding occurs in long­term memory 

o Semantic coding in short­term memory: The Wicker’s Experiment

 Recalling information after hearing it

o Semantic coding in long­term memory: The Sach’s experiment

 Remembering the exact wording of a sentences after listening to it 

 Measured recognition memory (identifying a stimulus after it was 

encounter earlier. 

 Location of long­term memory

o In the hippocampus 

o Anterograde amnesia: unable to produce new memories (H.M case)

o Retrograde amnesia: unable to recall old memories 

Chapter 7­ Long­term Memory: Encoding, Retrieval, and Consolidation

 Steps to get information to long­term memory

1. Encoding: receiving information and transferring it to long­term memory

 Maintenance rehearsal: repeating information over and over; easily  forgettable 

 Elaborative rehearsal: applying meaning to the information that you want  to remember; better option to remember things

 Level of processing theory

∙ Shallowing processing: little knowledge of meaning that was  attached to a specific information 

∙ Deep processing: close attention to meaning

∙ Craik & Lockhead: Levels of processing in memory

∙ Meaning through Associations: critical factor for enhancing  encoding (and subsequent Retrieval) 

o Visual imagery(Mnemonics): oldest mnemonics – physical 

location to things we try to remember­. Visual: things 

bizarre

o Self­reference effect: the degree to how you can 

something relates to yourself

o Organization & meaning helps improve memory

2. Retrieval: getting information out of memory 

 Retrieval cues: a stimulus that helps a person remember information   Retrieval can increase by matching the conditions to the information that  was in the encoding stage

∙ Encoding specificity: take information in with the context

∙ State­depending learning: learning information while applying  internal state (emotions) to it. 

∙ Transfer­appropriate processing: including both the internal state  and context in retaining information

3. Consolidation: putting information in a permanent state

 Synaptic consolidation: storing information in a permanent state over  minutes or hours 

 System consolidation: storing information in a permanent state in months  or years’ time. 

*these two system occurs together but at different speeds*

 Consolidation occurs during sleep

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here