×
Log in to StudySoup

Forgot password? Reset password here

AU - PHIL 1020 - Final exam study guide - Study Guide

Created by: Ann Mikell Stewart Elite Notetaker

Schools > Auburn University > Philosophy > PHIL 1020 > AU - PHIL 1020 - Final exam study guide - Study Guide

AU - PHIL 1020 - Final exam study guide - Study Guide

School: Auburn University
Department: Philosophy
Course: Introduction to Ethics
Professor: Stephen Davey
Term: Summer 2015
Tags:
Name: Final exam study guide
Description: study guide for final exam
Uploaded: 11/05/2017
This preview shows pages 1 - 2 of a 5 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Ethics Final Exam Study Guide What is the relationship between religion and morality? o Religions dictate moral views Define divine command theory o What is right is what God commands What is the Euthyphro Dilemma? o Right because loved or loved because right? Define objectivism o Some moral principles apply to everyone Define subjective relativism o What is right for you is what is right Define cultural relativism o What is right for your culture is what is right Define emotivism o A moral claim is merely an emotional expression and therefore,  there can be no right or wrong in the moral sense Define valid o Deductive argument that provides logically conclusive support  for its conclusion Invalid o Deductive argument that does not provide logically conclusive  support for its conclusion Define strong o Inductive argument that gives probable support Weak o Inductive argument that does not give probably support Sound  o Valid + true Cogent o Strong + true What is MP? o If p, then q
o P.
o Therefore, q.
What is MT? o If p, then q.
o Not q. 
o Therefore, not p.
What is HS?
background image o If p then q.
o If q, then r.
o Therefore, if p, then r.
Define slippery slope o Saying this leads to this, which leads to this, etc.
o So we shouldn’t doo the first thing
Define hasty generalization o Generalizing from an undersized sample Straw ban o Misrepresenting someone’s claim so it can be more easily refuted Begging the question o Arguing in a circle Implicit premise o A premise that is not outright stated Ethical egoism o The morally right action is what produces the most good for you Act utilitarianism o Right actions produce the greatest overall good Rule utilitarianism o Right actions are covered by rules that if followed, produces the  most good First formulation o Act only on the maxim that you could will into universal law Second formulation o Always treat humanity as an end in itself and never as a means  to an end Natural law theory o What is right is what humans are naturally inclined to do Doctrine of double effect o It is okay to do a good action with bad side effects but you should never do a bad action with good side effects Virtue ethics o Do what makes you virtuous

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Auburn University who use StudySoup to get ahead
5 Pages 58 Views 46 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Auburn University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Auburn University
Department: Philosophy
Course: Introduction to Ethics
Professor: Stephen Davey
Term: Summer 2015
Tags:
Name: Final exam study guide
Description: study guide for final exam
Uploaded: 11/05/2017
5 Pages 58 Views 46 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to AU - PHIL 1020 - Study Guide
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here