Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

FSU - ACG 2021 - Professor Jeff Paterson: Chapter 7,10,11 Study Guide

Created by: Audrey Notetaker Elite Notetaker

> > > > FSU - ACG 2021 - Professor Jeff Paterson: Chapter 7,10,11 Study Guide

FSU - ACG 2021 - Professor Jeff Paterson: Chapter 7,10,11 Study Guide

School: Florida State University
Department: Accounting
Course: Financial Accounting
Professor: Ronald Pierno
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: financial accounting
Name: Professor Jeff Paterson: Chapter 7,10,11 Study Guide
Description: ACG 2021 Chapter 7,10,11 Study Guide
Uploaded: 11/24/2017
This preview shows pages 1 - 5 of a 22 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image ACG 2021 Chapter 7  Fraud & Internal Control Fraud: Dishonest act by an employee that results in personal benefit to the employee at a cost to the 
employer
Fraud Triangle: 3 factors that contribute to fraudulent activity by employees: 1. Opportunity: Work place lacks sufficient controls to deter and detect fraud 2. Financial Pressure: Personal financial problems caused by too much debt or want to have a 
lifestyle they can’t have with their current salary
3. Rationalization: Justifying reason for doing fraud. Example: might think they are under paid Sarbanes­Oxley Act (SOX): Requires all publicly traded U.S. corporations are required to maintain 
an adequate system of internal control
a. Independent outside auditors must attest to the adequacy of the internal control system Internal Control: All related methods and measures adopted within an organization to safeguard 
assets, enhance the reliability of accounting records, increase efficiency of operations, and ensure 
compliance with laws and regulations. 5 primary components:
1. A Control Environment: Top management makes it clear that integrity is valued and 
unethical activity will not be tolerated
2. Risk Assessment: Identify and analyze various factors that create risk for the business and 
determine how to manage these risks
3. Control Activities : Design policies and procedures to reduce the occurrence of fraud 4. Information & Communication: Capture and communicate all pertinent information as well
as communicate information to appropriate external parties 
Control Activities: 6 Principles 1. Establishment of Responsibility: Assign specific responsibility to one person 2. Segregation of Duties: work of 1 employee should provide reliable basis for evaluating the work of 
another employee
a. Assign related purchasing and sales activities to different individuals 
b. One accountant should maintain the record of the asset and another should have physical 
custody of the asset 3. Documentation Procedures: Use prenumbered documents and all documents should be accounted 
for. Employees should forward source documents for accounting entries to the accounting department
to ensure timely recording of transactions
4. Physical Controls: Safeguarding of assets by enhancing accuracy & reliability of accounting records 5. Independent Internal Verification: Review of data prepared by employees a. Verify records periodically 
b. Person independent of the person presenting information should make the verification
c. Discrepancies and exception should be reported to a management level that can take  appropriate corrective action  d. Internal Auditors: Company employees who continuously evaluate the effectiveness of the  company’s internal control systems
background image 6. Human Resource Controls: a. Bond employees who handle cash by obtaining insurance protection against theft by them b. Rotate employees’ duties and require employees to take vacations
c. Conduct thorough background checks: check to see if job applicants graduated from school 
listed and look up previous employers ­ do not use telephone number given Limitations of Internal Control Internal controls are designed to provide reasonable assurance of proper safeguarding of assets and 
reliability of the accounting records
Reasoning Assurance : cost of establishing control procedures shouldn’t exceed their expected benefit  Human Element: A good system can become ineffective because of employee fatigue, carelessness, 
or indifference
Collusions: 2 or more individuals work together to get around prescribed controls Size of The Business: small businesses find it difficult to segregate duties or provide independent 
internal verification 
Cash Controls Cash is the asset most susceptible to fraudulent activities a. Readily convertible into any other type of asset b. Easily concealed and transported and highly desired Cash Receipt Controls The 6 Internal Control principles apply to cash receipt transactions Over­The­Counter­Receipts:  a. Clerk : enters sales & counts cash   send cash & count to  Cashier   b. Cashier : counts cash & prepares deposit slips   sends cash & deposit slip to  Bank                                                                             sends deposit slip copy to  Accounting dept. c. Supervisor : removes locked cash register tape   sends cash register tape to  Accounting dept.   Sometime the amount deposited at the bank will not agree with the cash recorded in the accounting  records based on the cash register tape Cash register tape is reported indicated sales of $6,956.20 but the amount of cash was only $6,946.10.
Account for the cash shortfall related to cash:
Cash $6,946.10   (debit), Cash Over & Short  $10.10   (debit), Sale Revenue $6,956.20   (credit) 6,956.20 – 6,946.10 = 10.10  Cash register tape is reported indicated sales of $6,956.20 but the amount of cash was only $7,000.10.
Account for the cash overage related to cash:
Cash $7,000.10   (debit), Cash Over & Short  $43.9   (credit), Sale Revenue $6,956.20   (credit) 7,000.10 – 6,956.20 = 43.9 A cash shortfall is reported as Miscellaneous Expense while a cash overage is Miscellaneous Revenue
background image Mail Receipts  Mail receipts, usually in the form of checks, should be opened in the presence of at least 2 mail clerks Mail clerks should endorse each check “For Deposit Only.” The bank will not give a mail clerk cash  Mail clerks prepare in triplicate, a list of checks received each day and a copy of the list is sent to 
accounting dept.
1. List must show the name of the check issuer, purpose of payment, amount of the check
Cash Disbursements Controls 6 principles of internal control apply to cash disbursements Cash disbursements happens when expenses & liabilities must be paid and the purchase of assets Internal control over cash is effective when the company pays by check or electronic funds transfer 
(EFT) rather than cash. 
One exception is petty cash Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT): Disbursements system that use wire, telephone, or computers to 
transfer cash from one location to another
Voucher System: Network of approvals by authorized individuals, acting independently, to ensure 
that all disbursement by check are proper
Voucher: Authorization form prepared for each expenditure in a voucher system a. Required for all types of cash disbursements except those from petty cash 
b. Requires journaling 2 entries, one to record the liability of the voucher issued and a second to
pay the liability the liability that relates to the voucher Petty Cash Fund Petty Cash Funds: Cash fund used to pay relatively small amounts 1. Appoint petty cash fund custodian who will be responsible for the fund 2. Determine the size of the fund  If Laird Company decides to establish a $100 fund on March 1 Mar 1: Petty Cash $100   (debit), Cash $100   (credit) If the company want to increase the amount the petty cash account contains simply add the additional 
amount using the same journal entry above
Laird company decides to increase the amount of funds held in petty cash from $100 to  $150  on  March 6 Mar 6: Petty Cash $50   (debit), Cash $50   (credit) On March 15, the petty cash custodian requests a check for $137. The fund contains $13 cash and 
petty cash receipts for postages $59, supplies $63, and miscellaneous expenses $15. Record entry to 
Replenish  petty cash Mar 15: Postage Expense $59   (debit)               Supplies $63   (debit)               Miscellaneous Expense $15   (debit) Cash $137   (credit) The petty cash account is  not affected  since the $137 is used to replace the petty cash receipts with  cash.
background image Since the petty cash account must be  $150 , the $13 balance must be replenished with a $137 check.  The petty cash receipts show that items were paid for using the petty cash account but was not yet 
journalized. The journal entry accounts for the items paid for and the cash is used to replenish the 
account. 137 + 13 = 
150 Suppose that, instead of a $13 balance the petty cash balance was  $12 Mar 15: Postage Expense $59   (debit)               Supplies $63   (debit)               Miscellaneous Expense $15   (debit)                Cash Over & Short $1    (debit) Cash  $137   (credit) The  Cash Over & Short  account is used to account for a shortage or overage in the petty cash account Goal: Petty Cash must have a balance of  $150 Used: A check of  $137  to replenish petty cash account used to pay petty cash receipts Balance:  $12 Balance should be: $13 =  150  –  137  Since the balance is  12  and should be 13, there is a  $1   shortage (miscellaneous expense) Suppose that, instead of a $13 balance the petty cash balance was  $15 Mar 15: Postage Expense $59   (debit)                Supplies  $63   (debit)               Miscellaneous Expense $15   (debit)                Cash Over & Short $2    (credit) Cash  $137   (credit) Goal: Petty Cash must have a balance of  $150 Used: A check of  $137  to replenish petty cash account used to pay petty cash receipts Balance:  $15 Balance should be: $13 =  150  –  137  Since the balance is  15  and should be 13, there is a  $2   overage (miscellaneous revenue) Petty cash should be replenished at the end of the accounting period regardless of the cash in the fund Control Features: Use of A Bank The Cash account, maintained by the company, is an asset but to the Bank it’s  viewed as a liability Bank Reconciliation: The process of comparing the bank’s balance with the company’s balance and 
explaining the differences to make them agree
Bank Statement: A statement showing the company’s bank transactions and balances 1. Checks paid and debits (debit card) decreases the depositor’s account
2. Deposits and credits increase the depositor’s account 
Increases the bank liabilities  3. Prepared from the bank’s perspective When the bank fulfills the deposit of a check for a company, there liabilities reduces and the check is 
stamped with “paid” also referred to as a canceled check
NSF: A check not paid by the bank because of insufficient funds in a bank account Reconciling the Bank Account
background image Since the bank and the company maintain independent records of the company’s checking account, 
reconciling the bank the account, to make sure that the per book and per bank balance is equal, is 
necessary. Reasons:
1. Time lags that prevent 1 party from recording the transaction in the same period 2. Errors by either party in the recording transactions The person who has no other responsibility related to cash should prepare the reconciliation Cash Balance Adjustments           Per Bank Statement                                                                               Per Book             Deposits in Transits                                                                           Bank Memoranda:             Outstanding Checks                                                             Notes Collected by Bank   (credit)                Bank Errors                                                                           NSF (bounced) checks   (debit)                                                                                                    Check printing or Service Charges   (debit)    Company Errors Correct Cash Balance (Equal) Deposits in Transit: Deposits recorded by the depositor that haven’t been recorded by the bank yet a. Increase the bank statement balance  Outstanding Checks: Issued checks recorded by the company that haven’t been paid by the bank a. Decrease the bank statement balance Errors: The bank and the company can make errors by mistakenly recording the wrong amounts Bank Memoranda: Cash withdrawals and deposits made by the bank and not the company a. Debit: decreases the book statement b. Credit: increases the book statement Entries from Reconciliation The company must record the adjustment entries for the Cash account Collection of Note Receivable:
Cash 
 (debit) Miscellaneous Expense (Service Charge)   (debit) Notes Receivable   (credit) Interest Revenue  (credit) interest wasn’t previously recorded   Interest Receivable   (credit) interest was previously recorded (interest expense/interest revenue) NFS Check:
Account Receivables 
 (debit) Cash   (credit) Bank Service Charge:
Miscellaneous Expense 
 (debit) Cash   (credit) Reporting Cash o

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Florida State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
22 Pages 25 Views 20 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Florida State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Florida State University
Department: Accounting
Course: Financial Accounting
Professor: Ronald Pierno
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: financial accounting
Name: Professor Jeff Paterson: Chapter 7,10,11 Study Guide
Description: ACG 2021 Chapter 7,10,11 Study Guide
Uploaded: 11/24/2017
22 Pages 25 Views 20 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to FSU - ACG 2021 - Class Notes - Week 15
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to FSU - ACG 2021 - Class Notes - Week 15

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here