×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UNT - MRTS 1320 - Study Guide - Final
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UNT - MRTS 1320 - Study Guide - Final

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UNT / Art / MRTS 1320 / What are the responsibilities of director of photography?

What are the responsibilities of director of photography?

What are the responsibilities of director of photography?

Description

School: University of North Texas
Department: Art
Course: Perspectives on Film
Professor: Travis sutton
Term: Fall 2017
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: MRTS 1320: Perspectives on film FA2017
Description: This a study guide for the final exam.
Uploaded: 12/05/2017
18 Pages 17 Views 3 Unlocks
Reviews


Cinematography


What are the responsibilities of director of photography?



­ Responsibilities of Director of

Photography 

● To transfer the other aspects of filmmaking into moving images.  

● Bringing imagination to reality. 

● Director of photography also known as the cinematographer  

o Camera Team

one group of technicians concerned with the camera and another concerned with electricity and  lighting. 

camera operator, assistant camerapersons 

o Lighting Team

group that concerns itself with the lighting of the sets. 

­ Film stock, gauge, and speed If you want to learn more check out What is a standard deviation?

● The medium chosen by the cinematographer that is best suited to the project as a whole. ● Film stock is available in different versions of this. 8mm, Super 8mm, 16mm, etc. ● Another variable aspect of stock. The degree to which it is light­sensitive. ­ Lighting


What is the three­point lighting?



If you want to learn more check out In biology, denaturation means what?

o Low/High Key

● High Key Lighting is soft, even lighting. Dramas, musicals, comedies, and adventure  films.

● Low Key Lighting is hard, high­contrast lighting. horror films, mysteries, dramas, crime  stories, film noirs. Low­key lighting is typically used when the director wants to either  isolate a subject or convey drama. 

o Color Temperature

Color Temperature can be used to optimize film quality in different settings. o Three­point lighting: used to cast a glamorous light on the studio's' most valuable stars and it  remains the standard by which movies are lit today. If you want to learn more check out What does it mean to say that gender is a social construction?

Key: the primary source of illumination and therefore is customarily set first. 


What are the four types of actors?



Fill: positioned at the opposite side of the camera from the key light, adjusts the depth of the  shadows created by the brighter key light. Fill light is any source of illumination that lightens  (fills in) areas of shadow created by other lights 

Back: the least essential of the three. 

Usually positioned behind and above the subject and the camera. 

o Aspects of lighting: 

quality:whether the light is hard or soft. 

direction:the angle of light that helps produce the contrasts and shadows that suggest the location of the scene, its mood, and the time of day. 

Source: natural and artificial. 

Natural­ sun 

Artificial­ focusable spotlights, flood lights, etc. 

 Color: property of light 

Understanding the temperature of this is useful for cinematography. 

­ Camera

o Lens

§ Wide Angle: makes the subjects on screen seem farther apart than they actually are. § Telephoto: brings distant objects close, makes subjects look closer together than they do in real life. §Zoom: permits the cinematographer to shrink or increase the focal length of the lens. o Aperture (adjustable iris):an adjustable iris that limits the amount of light passing through a lens. We also discuss several other topics like How do you calculate covalent bonds?

o Tonality: range of

tones/contrast: distinguishing quality of black and white film stock

manipulation of colors

o Focal Length: the distance from the optical center of a lens to the focal point when the lens is focused  at infinity. Don't forget about the age old question of What are the 4 basic resources?

o Depth of Field: the distance in front of a camera and its lens in which objects are in apparent sharp  focus

­ Framing

o Aspect Ratio: the relationship between the frame's two dimensions: the width of the image related to its height.

o Rule of Thirds is a principle composition that enables filmmakers to maximize the potential of the  image, balance its elements, and create the illusion of depth. Don't forget about the age old question of How do we know the structure of atoms?

o Shots (Medium Shot, Long

Shot, etc.)

Medium Shot: a shot showing the human body, usually from the waist up

Long Shot: a full body shot

Low Angle Shot: a shot that is made with the camera below the action and typically places the observer  in a position of inferiority.

High Angle Shot: a shot that is made with the camera above the action that typically implies the  observer's sense of superiority to the subject

Insert Shot: a shot containing visual detail.

Dolly Shot: a traveling shot

Establishing Shot: a shot whose purpose is to briefly establish the viewer's sense of setting in the scene.

o Movement: Pan, Tilt, Dolly,

Zoom, Crane, Handheld

Acting

­ “Persona”: a character played by an actor. The word is derived from Latin, where it originally referred  to a theatrical mask.

­ Four Types of Actors

Actors who take their personae from role to role (personality actors)

Actors who deliberately play against our expectations of their personae

Actors who seem to be different in every role (chameleon actors)

Actors, often nonprofessionals or people who have achieved success in another field, who are cast to  bring verisimilitude to a part.

­ Lillian Gish: “invented the art of

screen acting

o Sound Bridge: using a similar sound to bridge two separate scenes

­ Discontinuity: Discontinuous editing is a unique editing style in film that is antithetical to that of  normal cinema, or continuous editing. In a discontinuous sequence, the filmmaker will deliberately use an arrangement of shots that seem out of place or confusing relative to a traditional narrative.

o Freeze Frame: a still image within a movie

o Jump Cut: the removal of a portion of a film

an advance in the action.

­ Transitions (Fade, Dissolve …)

Sound

­ Kinds of sound in the movies

Ÿ Vocal Ÿ Environmental

Ÿ Music ŸSilence

­ Diegetic vs non diegetic

Diegetic sound is sound that is a part of the films world. Non diegetic sound is music added during the  post production stage of filmmaking.

­ On screen or off screen

­ The Jazz Singer (1927): The first

movie with synchronized sound.

­ Phases of Sound Production: Design

à Recording à Editing à Mixing

­ Sound Designer: Sound designer" are an artist who are brought on staff during the planning stages of a  film, along with the set and costume designers, and who do their own mixing.

o Sound Recorder: mechanism that records sound tracks for sound motion pictures on a separate film  from the picture film.

o Sound Mixer: the member of a film crew or television crew responsible for recording all sound  recording on set during the filmmaking or television production using professional audio equipment, for  later inclusion in the finished product,

o Foley Artist: Foley (named after sound­effects artist Jack Foley) is the reproduction of everyday sound  effects that are added to film, video, and other media in post­production to enhance audio quality. o Boom Operator: The principal responsibility of the boom operator is microphone placement, usually  using a boom pole (or "fish pole") with a microphone attached to the end (called a boom mic), their aim  being to hold the microphone as close to the actors or action as possible without getting in the shot. ­ Elements of Sound

Ÿ Pitch ŸLoudness

Ÿ Quality ŸFidelity

Making Movies

­ Production à Distribution à

Exhibition

o “the negative cost”:

The amount of money it took to produce and distribute the movie.

o “dailies”: Picture/sound work prints produced by the end of the say for analysis by the crew/director  before the next day's shooting.

o Movie ratings

Rated G­ General Audience, All ages

Rated PG­Parental Guidance Suggested, some material may not be suitable for children. Rated PG 13­Some material maybe inappropriate for children under the age of 13 Rated R­Restricted, Under 17 requires parental guidance.

o Platforming vs Wide release

Platforming­ Released in select theaters

Wide Release­Released everywhere on the same day

­ Role of Producer vs Director: Directors oversee most artistic aspects of a production, whereas  producer’s handle organization aspects/financial.

o Assistant Directors: tracking daily progress against the filming production schedule, arranging logistics, preparing daily call sheets, checking cast and crew, and maintaining order on the set

o Unit Production Manager: the top below­the­line staff position responsible for the administration of a  feature film

Film History

­ Cinematic approaches of George

Melies (fantasy) and the Lumiere

brothers (reality)

­ Thomas Edison, the kinetograph, and

the Edison Trust

Thomas Edison Invented the motion picture

The Kinetograph:The first motion picture camera

The Edison Trust: Trust group between film companies, Edison, and film stock producers on regulation of film industry

­ Method Acting: realism, challenges actors to do things as they would in real life

­ Improvisational Acting: most or all of what is performed is unplanned or unscripted: created  spontaneously by the performers.

­ Ensemble Acting: emphasizes the interaction of actors, not the individual actor ­actors working together in a continuous shot.

­ Naturalistic vs Non­naturalistic

Acting Styles

o Bertolt Brecht and “the

alienation effect”: 

wanted every element of theatrical production to limit the audiences identification with the characters and events; creating a psychological distance

 ­ Casting

o “Screen test”

trial filming

o Typecasting: the process by which an actor is strongly identified with a specific character, role, or trait. ­ Roles

Ÿ Main/Featured Ÿ Minor

Ÿ Character Actors Ÿ Bit Player

Ÿ Extra Ÿ Cameo

Ÿ Stunt person ŸStand­in

­ Analyzing an actor’s performance:

o Appropriateness

o Inherent thoughtfulness or

emotionality

o Expressiveness coherence

o Wholeness and unity

Editing

Responsibilities of the Editor 

­makes suggestions for composition, blocking, lighting, and shooting that will help the editing ­selecting and arranging the shots

­spatial relationships between shots

­temporal relationships between shots

­the overall rhythm of the film

o Spatial Relations

when multiple shots are put together, it helps the audience to create a mental map and have a fairly  complex sense of the overall space

­it can also manipulate our sense of spatial relationships among characters, objects, and surroundings. o Temporal Relations

Manipulates the presentation of plot­time on screen

­the overall story may be not presented to us in order

o Rhythm

the pace at which the film moves forward by varying the duration of the shots in relation to one another ­the movie narrative that its own internal requirements that signal to the editor how long to make each  shot

§ “Content Curve”:

the point at which we have absorbed all we need to know in a particular shot and are ready to see the next  shot

­ Cross Cutting vs Intercutting

Crosscutting is cutting together two or more lines of action that occurs at the same time at different  locations

intercutting: the editing of two or more actions that take place at different locations and/or at different  times but give the impression or one scene.

­ Master Scene Technique (Master

Shot Based on the principle of coverage

­directors usually begin shooting with a long shot that covers everything in one continuous take)

­ Continuity

logic, smoothness, sequential flow and the temporal and spatial orientation to viewers to what the see on  screen

o 180 Degree Rule

depends on 3 factors working together in any single shot

­the action in a scene must move along a hypothetical line that keeps the action on a single side of the  camera

­the camera must shoot consistently on one side of that line

­everyone on the production set­ particularly the director, cinematographer, editor, and actors, must  understand and adhere to this system

o Cut on Motion: A cut done in the middle of an action

o Match Cut:. It is a cut within a scene that makes sense spatially

o Shot/Reverse Shot: Shot reverse shot (or shot/counters shot) is a film technique where one character is  shown looking at another character (often off­screen), and then the other character is shown looking back  at the first character.

­ The Studio System: is a method of film production and distribution dominated by a small number of  "major" studios in Hollywood

­ The Production Code: Image result for the production code definition

The Motion Picture Production Code was the set of industry moral guidelines that was applied to most  United States motion pictures released by major studios from 1930 to 1968.

­ Italian Neorealism: The neorealist movement began in Italy at the end of World War II as an urgent  response to the political turmoil and desperate economic conditions affecting the country. ­ The Paramount Consent Decrees: United States v. Paramount Pictures, Inc., 334 US 131 (1948) (also  known as the Hollywood Antitrust Case of 1948, the Paramount Case, the Paramount Decision or the  Paramount Decree) was a landmark United States Supreme Court antitrust case that decided the fate of  movie studios owning their own theatres and holding

­ The French New Wave: Shooting on location, a type of film form from France in the 50's and 60's that  was never a conscious movement

o Jean Luc Godard:

The most radical French Filmmaker of the 60's and 70's, the face of French New Wave ­ The New American Cinema: American New Wave, breaking out of the studio system as directors  started to have more artistic control over movies

­ The Nostalgic Hollywood

Blockbuster

. Big­budget Hollywood film that uses stories and genres from earlier times for modern audiences.

Cinematography

­ Responsibilities of Director of

Photography 

● To transfer the other aspects of filmmaking into moving images.  

● Bringing imagination to reality. 

● Director of photography also known as the cinematographer  

o Camera Team

one group of technicians concerned with the camera and another concerned with electricity and  lighting. 

camera operator, assistant camerapersons 

o Lighting Team

group that concerns itself with the lighting of the sets. 

­ Film stock, gauge, and speed

● The medium chosen by the cinematographer that is best suited to the project as a whole. ● Film stock is available in different versions of this. 8mm, Super 8mm, 16mm, etc. ● Another variable aspect of stock. The degree to which it is light­sensitive. ­ Lighting

o Low/High Key

● High Key Lighting is soft, even lighting. Dramas, musicals, comedies, and adventure  films.

● Low Key Lighting is hard, high­contrast lighting. horror films, mysteries, dramas, crime  stories, film noirs. Low­key lighting is typically used when the director wants to either  isolate a subject or convey drama. 

o Color Temperature

Color Temperature can be used to optimize film quality in different settings. o Three­point lighting: used to cast a glamorous light on the studio's' most valuable stars and it  remains the standard by which movies are lit today. 

Key: the primary source of illumination and therefore is customarily set first. 

Fill: positioned at the opposite side of the camera from the key light, adjusts the depth of the  shadows created by the brighter key light. Fill light is any source of illumination that lightens  (fills in) areas of shadow created by other lights 

Back: the least essential of the three. 

Usually positioned behind and above the subject and the camera. 

o Aspects of lighting: 

quality:whether the light is hard or soft. 

direction:the angle of light that helps produce the contrasts and shadows that suggest the location of the scene, its mood, and the time of day. 

Source: natural and artificial. 

Natural­ sun 

Artificial­ focusable spotlights, flood lights, etc. 

 Color: property of light 

Understanding the temperature of this is useful for cinematography. 

­ Camera

o Lens

§ Wide Angle: makes the subjects on screen seem farther apart than they actually are. § Telephoto: brings distant objects close, makes subjects look closer together than they do in real life. §Zoom: permits the cinematographer to shrink or increase the focal length of the lens. o Aperture (adjustable iris):an adjustable iris that limits the amount of light passing through a lens.

o Tonality: range of

tones/contrast: distinguishing quality of black and white film stock

manipulation of colors

o Focal Length: the distance from the optical center of a lens to the focal point when the lens is focused  at infinity.

o Depth of Field: the distance in front of a camera and its lens in which objects are in apparent sharp  focus

­ Framing

o Aspect Ratio: the relationship between the frame's two dimensions: the width of the image related to its height.

o Rule of Thirds is a principle composition that enables filmmakers to maximize the potential of the  image, balance its elements, and create the illusion of depth.

o Shots (Medium Shot, Long

Shot, etc.)

Medium Shot: a shot showing the human body, usually from the waist up

Long Shot: a full body shot

Low Angle Shot: a shot that is made with the camera below the action and typically places the observer  in a position of inferiority.

High Angle Shot: a shot that is made with the camera above the action that typically implies the  observer's sense of superiority to the subject

Insert Shot: a shot containing visual detail.

Dolly Shot: a traveling shot

Establishing Shot: a shot whose purpose is to briefly establish the viewer's sense of setting in the scene.

o Movement: Pan, Tilt, Dolly,

Zoom, Crane, Handheld

Acting

­ “Persona”: a character played by an actor. The word is derived from Latin, where it originally referred  to a theatrical mask.

­ Four Types of Actors

Actors who take their personae from role to role (personality actors)

Actors who deliberately play against our expectations of their personae

Actors who seem to be different in every role (chameleon actors)

Actors, often nonprofessionals or people who have achieved success in another field, who are cast to  bring verisimilitude to a part.

­ Lillian Gish: “invented the art of

screen acting

o Sound Bridge: using a similar sound to bridge two separate scenes

­ Discontinuity: Discontinuous editing is a unique editing style in film that is antithetical to that of  normal cinema, or continuous editing. In a discontinuous sequence, the filmmaker will deliberately use an arrangement of shots that seem out of place or confusing relative to a traditional narrative.

o Freeze Frame: a still image within a movie

o Jump Cut: the removal of a portion of a film

an advance in the action.

­ Transitions (Fade, Dissolve …)

Sound

­ Kinds of sound in the movies

Ÿ Vocal Ÿ Environmental

Ÿ Music ŸSilence

­ Diegetic vs non diegetic

Diegetic sound is sound that is a part of the films world. Non diegetic sound is music added during the  post production stage of filmmaking.

­ On screen or off screen

­ The Jazz Singer (1927): The first

movie with synchronized sound.

­ Phases of Sound Production: Design

à Recording à Editing à Mixing

­ Sound Designer: Sound designer" are an artist who are brought on staff during the planning stages of a  film, along with the set and costume designers, and who do their own mixing.

o Sound Recorder: mechanism that records sound tracks for sound motion pictures on a separate film  from the picture film.

o Sound Mixer: the member of a film crew or television crew responsible for recording all sound  recording on set during the filmmaking or television production using professional audio equipment, for  later inclusion in the finished product,

o Foley Artist: Foley (named after sound­effects artist Jack Foley) is the reproduction of everyday sound  effects that are added to film, video, and other media in post­production to enhance audio quality. o Boom Operator: The principal responsibility of the boom operator is microphone placement, usually  using a boom pole (or "fish pole") with a microphone attached to the end (called a boom mic), their aim  being to hold the microphone as close to the actors or action as possible without getting in the shot. ­ Elements of Sound

Ÿ Pitch ŸLoudness

Ÿ Quality ŸFidelity

Making Movies

­ Production à Distribution à

Exhibition

o “the negative cost”:

The amount of money it took to produce and distribute the movie.

o “dailies”: Picture/sound work prints produced by the end of the say for analysis by the crew/director  before the next day's shooting.

o Movie ratings

Rated G­ General Audience, All ages

Rated PG­Parental Guidance Suggested, some material may not be suitable for children. Rated PG 13­Some material maybe inappropriate for children under the age of 13 Rated R­Restricted, Under 17 requires parental guidance.

o Platforming vs Wide release

Platforming­ Released in select theaters

Wide Release­Released everywhere on the same day

­ Role of Producer vs Director: Directors oversee most artistic aspects of a production, whereas  producer’s handle organization aspects/financial.

o Assistant Directors: tracking daily progress against the filming production schedule, arranging logistics, preparing daily call sheets, checking cast and crew, and maintaining order on the set

o Unit Production Manager: the top below­the­line staff position responsible for the administration of a  feature film

Film History

­ Cinematic approaches of George

Melies (fantasy) and the Lumiere

brothers (reality)

­ Thomas Edison, the kinetograph, and

the Edison Trust

Thomas Edison Invented the motion picture

The Kinetograph:The first motion picture camera

The Edison Trust: Trust group between film companies, Edison, and film stock producers on regulation of film industry

­ Method Acting: realism, challenges actors to do things as they would in real life

­ Improvisational Acting: most or all of what is performed is unplanned or unscripted: created  spontaneously by the performers.

­ Ensemble Acting: emphasizes the interaction of actors, not the individual actor ­actors working together in a continuous shot.

­ Naturalistic vs Non­naturalistic

Acting Styles

o Bertolt Brecht and “the

alienation effect”: 

wanted every element of theatrical production to limit the audiences identification with the characters and events; creating a psychological distance

 ­ Casting

o “Screen test”

trial filming

o Typecasting: the process by which an actor is strongly identified with a specific character, role, or trait. ­ Roles

Ÿ Main/Featured Ÿ Minor

Ÿ Character Actors Ÿ Bit Player

Ÿ Extra Ÿ Cameo

Ÿ Stunt person ŸStand­in

­ Analyzing an actor’s performance:

o Appropriateness

o Inherent thoughtfulness or

emotionality

o Expressiveness coherence

o Wholeness and unity

Editing

Responsibilities of the Editor 

­makes suggestions for composition, blocking, lighting, and shooting that will help the editing ­selecting and arranging the shots

­spatial relationships between shots

­temporal relationships between shots

­the overall rhythm of the film

o Spatial Relations

when multiple shots are put together, it helps the audience to create a mental map and have a fairly  complex sense of the overall space

­it can also manipulate our sense of spatial relationships among characters, objects, and surroundings. o Temporal Relations

Manipulates the presentation of plot­time on screen

­the overall story may be not presented to us in order

o Rhythm

the pace at which the film moves forward by varying the duration of the shots in relation to one another ­the movie narrative that its own internal requirements that signal to the editor how long to make each  shot

§ “Content Curve”:

the point at which we have absorbed all we need to know in a particular shot and are ready to see the next  shot

­ Cross Cutting vs Intercutting

Crosscutting is cutting together two or more lines of action that occurs at the same time at different  locations

intercutting: the editing of two or more actions that take place at different locations and/or at different  times but give the impression or one scene.

­ Master Scene Technique (Master

Shot Based on the principle of coverage

­directors usually begin shooting with a long shot that covers everything in one continuous take)

­ Continuity

logic, smoothness, sequential flow and the temporal and spatial orientation to viewers to what the see on  screen

o 180 Degree Rule

depends on 3 factors working together in any single shot

­the action in a scene must move along a hypothetical line that keeps the action on a single side of the  camera

­the camera must shoot consistently on one side of that line

­everyone on the production set­ particularly the director, cinematographer, editor, and actors, must  understand and adhere to this system

o Cut on Motion: A cut done in the middle of an action

o Match Cut:. It is a cut within a scene that makes sense spatially

o Shot/Reverse Shot: Shot reverse shot (or shot/counters shot) is a film technique where one character is  shown looking at another character (often off­screen), and then the other character is shown looking back  at the first character.

­ The Studio System: is a method of film production and distribution dominated by a small number of  "major" studios in Hollywood

­ The Production Code: Image result for the production code definition

The Motion Picture Production Code was the set of industry moral guidelines that was applied to most  United States motion pictures released by major studios from 1930 to 1968.

­ Italian Neorealism: The neorealist movement began in Italy at the end of World War II as an urgent  response to the political turmoil and desperate economic conditions affecting the country. ­ The Paramount Consent Decrees: United States v. Paramount Pictures, Inc., 334 US 131 (1948) (also  known as the Hollywood Antitrust Case of 1948, the Paramount Case, the Paramount Decision or the  Paramount Decree) was a landmark United States Supreme Court antitrust case that decided the fate of  movie studios owning their own theatres and holding

­ The French New Wave: Shooting on location, a type of film form from France in the 50's and 60's that  was never a conscious movement

o Jean Luc Godard:

The most radical French Filmmaker of the 60's and 70's, the face of French New Wave ­ The New American Cinema: American New Wave, breaking out of the studio system as directors  started to have more artistic control over movies

­ The Nostalgic Hollywood

Blockbuster

. Big­budget Hollywood film that uses stories and genres from earlier times for modern audiences.

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here