Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

RPI - PSY 1200 - General Psychology Exam 4 Study Guide - Study Guide

Created by: Steven Cano Elite Notetaker

> > > > RPI - PSY 1200 - General Psychology Exam 4 Study Guide - Study Guide

RPI - PSY 1200 - General Psychology Exam 4 Study Guide - Study Guide

School: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Department: Psychology
Course: General Psychology
Professor: Hubbell
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: personality, Psychotherapy, and psychological disorders
Name: General Psychology Exam 4 Study Guide
Description: Covers most of the material for exam 4
Uploaded: 12/08/2017
0 5 3 12 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 4 of a 15 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Exam 4 Study Guide   
 
Chapter 13 
Traits​ are enduring qualities or attributes that predispose individuals to behave consistently  across situations. 
•Psychologists define
 personality​ as the complex set of psychological qualities that influence  an individual’s characteristic patterns of behavior across different situations and over time.  
Theories of personality​ are hypothetical statements about the structure and functioning of  individual personalities.  - The theories try to understand the uniqueness of each individual with respect to the 
structure, origins, and correlates of personality. Second, they attempt to understand how 
each unique personality yields characteristic patterns of behavior. 
- Some trait theorists think of traits as  predispositions​ that cause behavior, but more  conservative theorists use traits only as descriptive dimensions that simply summarize 
patterns of observed behavior. 
Gordon Allport​ (1897–1967) - Viewed traits as the building blocks of personality and the  source of individuality.traits produce coherence in behavior because they connect and unify a 
person’s reactions to a variety of stimuli. Traits may act as intervening variables. 
- Intervening variables - relating sets of stimuli and responses that might seem, at first 
glance, to have little to do with each other 
•Allport identified three kinds of traits: cardinal traits, central traits, and secondary traits.  - Cardinal traits ​ - traits around which a person organizes his or her life.  - Central traits ​ - traits that represent major characteristics of a person, such as honesty  or optimism  - Secondary traits ​ - specific personal features that help predict an individual’s behavior  but are less useful for understanding an individual’s personality.  •Allport saw personality structures, rather than environmental conditions, as the critical 
determiners of individual behavior. 
Raymond Cattell ​(1979) - ​16 factors​ underlie human personality. Cattell called these 16  factors source traits because he believed they provide the underlying source for the surface 
behaviors we think of as personality. 
•Hans Eysenck (1973, 1990) - derived just three broad dimensions from personality test data: 
extraversion, neuroticism, and psychoticism. 
Five-factor model​ - A comprehensive descriptive personality system that maps out the  relationships among common traits, theoretical concepts, and personality scales; informally 
called the Big Five. Best characterizes personality structure. 
- Extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, openness to experience.  •Heritability studies show that  almost all personality traits are influenced by genetic factors​.  •in the 1920s, several researchers who set out to observe trait-related behaviors in different 
situations were surprised to find little evidence that behavior was consistent across situations. 
Consistency paradox​ - The observation that personality ratings across time and among  different observers are consistent while behavior ratings across situations are not consistent. 
background image - The paradox fades away once theorists can provide an appropriate account of the 
psychological features of situations. 
•Trait theories have been criticized because they  do not generally explain how a behavior is  generated or how personality develops ​.  Psychodynamic personality theory​ - Theory of personality that shares the assumption that  personality is shaped by and behavior is motivated by inner forces. 
Libido​ - The psychic energy that drives individuals toward sensual pleasures of all types,  especially sexual ones. 
•According to Freud, impulses within you that you find unacceptable still strive for expression. A 
Freudian slip
​ occurs when an unconscious desire is betrayed by your speech or behavior.  •Fixation - A state in which a person remains attached to objects or activities more appropriate 
for an earlier stage of psychosexual development. 
id​ - The primitive, unconscious part of the personality that represents the internalization of  society’s values, standards, and morals. 
Superego​ - The aspect of personality that represents the internalization of  society’s values, standards, and morals. 
Ego​ - The aspect of personality involved in self-preservation activities and in directing  instinctual drives and urges into appropriate channels. 
Repression​ - The basic defense mechanism by which painful or guilt-producing thoughts,  feelings, or memories are excluded from conscious awareness. 
Ego defense mechanism​ - Mental strategy (conscious or unconscious) used by the ego to  defend itself against conflicts experienced in the normal course of life. 
•Freudian theory is good history but bad science. It does not reliably predict what will occur; it is 
applied retrospectively—after events have occurred. 
- Freud retains his influence on contemporary psychology because  some of his ideas  have been widely accepted. Others have been abandoned.  Alfred Adler​ (1870–1937) rejected the significance of Eros and the pleasure principle. Adler  (1929) believed that as helpless, dependent, small children, people all experience feelings 
of 
inferiority​.  •Karen Horney (1885–1952) was trained in the psychoanalytic school but broke from orthodox 
Freudian theory. She challenged Freud’s phallocentric emphasis on the importance of the penis, 
hypothesizing that male envy of pregnancy, motherhood, breasts, and suckling is a dynamic 
force in the unconscious of boys and men. 
Carl Jung​ (1875–1961) -  The unconscious was not limited to an individual’s unique life  experiences but was filled with fundamental psychological truths shared by the whole human 
race, a collective unconscious. 
- Archetype ​ - A universal, inherited, primitive, and symbolic representation of a particular  experience or object.  - Analytic Psychology ​ - A branch of psychology that views the person as a constellation  of compensatory internal forces in a dynamic balance.  •Carl Rogers (1902–1987), the self is a central concept for personality. Rogers suggested that 
we develop a self-concept, a mental model of our typical behaviors and unique qualities. 
background image - Self-concept  ​- A person’s mental model of his or her typical behaviors and unique  qualities.  - Self-actualization ​ - A concept in personality psychology referring to a person’s constant  striving to realize his or her potential and to develop inherent talents and capabilities  •Unconditional positive regard - Complete love and acceptance of an individual by another 
person, such as a parent for a child, with no conditions attached. 
•Karen Horney was another major theorist whose ideas created the foundation of humanistic 
psychology. 
- “Tyranny of shoulds,” self-imposed obligations, such as “I should be perfect, generous, 
attractive, brave,” and so forth. Horney believed that the goal of a humanistic therapy 
was to help the individual achieve the joy of self-realization and promote the inherent 
constructive forces in human nature that support a striving for self-fulfillment. 
Psychobiography​ - The use of psychological (especially personality) theory to describe and  explain an individual’s course through life. 
•Psychologists with a learning theory orientation look to the 
environmental circumstances  that control behavior ​. Personality is seen as the sum of the overt and covert responses that  are reliably elicited by an individual’s reinforcement history. 
•Contemporary social-learning and cognitive theories emphasize the importance of cognitive 
processes as well as behavioral ones. 
Walter Mischel ​developed an influential theory of the cognitive basis of personality.  - Encodings, expectancies and beliefs, affects, goals and values, competencies and 
self-regulatory plans. 
Reciprocal determinism​ - A concept of Albert Bandura’s social-learning theory that refers to  the notion that a complex reciprocal interaction exists among the individual, his or her behavior, 
and environmental stimuli and that each of these components affects the others. 
Self-efficacy​ - A belief that one can perform adequately in a particular situation.  - Vicarious experience  - Persuasion  - Monitoring of emotional arousal  •One set of criticisms leveled against social-learning and cognitive theories is that they often 
overlook emotion as an important component of personality. 
•The self-concept is a dynamic mental structure that motivates, interprets, organizes, mediates, 
and regulates intrapersonal and interpersonal behaviors and processes. 
•A person’s 
self-esteem​ is a generalized evaluation of the self.  Self-handicapping​ - The process of developing, in anticipation of failure, behavioral reactions  and explanations 
Women put too much value on effort to engage in self-handicapping​.  •The type of culture from which the Western self emerges—an individualistic culture—is in the 
minority with respect to the world’s population, which includes about 70 percent collectivist 
cultures. 
- Individualistic cultures emphasize individuals’ needs, whereas collectivist 
cultures emphasize the needs of the group
​. 
background image Independent construals of self​ - Conceptualization of the self as an individual whose  behavior is organized primarily by reference to one’s own thoughts, feelings, and actions, rather 
than by reference to the thoughts, feelings, and actions of others. 
Interdependent construals of self ​- Conceptualization of the self as part of an encompassing  social relationship; recognizing that one’s behavior is determined, contingent on, and, to a large 
extent, organized by what the actor perceived to be the thoughts, feelings, and actions of 
others. 
•One type of cross-cultural research on the self has used a measurement device called the 
Twenty Statements Test (TST)
​.  - Culture has an impact on the categories that are most likely for people’s 
responses
​.  •Personality tests must meet the standards of reliability and validity. 
•Objective tests
​ of personality are those in which scoring and administration are relatively  simple and follow well-defined rules.  - Personality inventory ​ - A self-report questionnaire used for personality assessment  that includes a series of items about personal thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.  •The  MMPI​ was developed at the University of Minnesota during the 1930s by psychologist  Starke Hathaway and psychiatrist J. R. McKinley. 
MMPI-2​ - MMPI underwent revision in 1980s and became MMPI-2.  - Clinical scales of  hypochondriasis, depression, conversion hysteria, psychopathic  deviate, masculinity-femininity, paranoia, psychasthenia, schizophrenia, 
hypomania, social introversion
​.  NEO-PI designed the assess personality characteristics in nonclinical adult populations,  unlike MMPI ​.  - Based on five factor model ​.  Projective test​ - A method of personality assessment in which an individual is presented with a  standardized set of ambiguous, abstract stimuli and asked to interpret their meanings; the 
individual’s responses are assumed to reveal inner feelings, motives, and conflicts. 
- Projective tests were first used by psychoanalysts, who hoped that such tests would 
reveal their patients’ unconscious personality dynamics. 
Rorschach test ​- Developed by​ Hermann Rorschach in 1921​. Also called the ​“inkblot test”.  A respondent is shown an inkblot ​ and asked “what might this be?” The second phase is  called inquiry and the respondent is reminded of his responses and asked to elaborate on them. 
Thematic apperception test (TAT)​ - Developed by ​Henry Murray in 1938​. ​Respondents are  shown pictures of ambiguous scenes and asked to generate stories about them ​,  describing what the people in the scenes are doing and thinking, what led up to each event, and 
how each situation will end. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute who use StudySoup to get ahead
15 Pages 119 Views 95 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Department: Psychology
Course: General Psychology
Professor: Hubbell
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: personality, Psychotherapy, and psychological disorders
Name: General Psychology Exam 4 Study Guide
Description: Covers most of the material for exam 4
Uploaded: 12/08/2017
15 Pages 119 Views 95 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to RPI - PSYC 1200 - Study Guide - Final
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to RPI - PSYC 1200 - Study Guide - Final

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here