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BYU - PHY S 100 - Class Notes - Week 12

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BYU - PHY S 100 - Class Notes - Week 12

School: Brigham Young University
Department: OTHER
Course: Physical Science
Professor: Patricia Ackroyd
Term: Spring 2017
Tags:
Name: Chapter 26, Week 12 Notes
Description: The mechanical and compositional layers of the earth, including evidence for these layers
Uploaded: 12/10/2017
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background image Chapter 26: the Earth's Interior   Evidence from Direct Observation  •  Places where rocks that were deep within the Earth are now exposed on the surface  •  Crust: uppermost layer, rock foundations of continents and oceans   •  Mantle: layer below earth's curse, peridotites form here (denser than basalt and granite of crust)     Evidence from Meteorites  •  Stony chondrites: made up of same materials from which earth and other planets were made  •  Stony achondrites: pieces from top layers of planets, separated into layers and then broken up     Evidence from Earth's Mass and Density  •  F = GmM/ d^2  •  Mass: 5.973 * 10^24 kilograms  •  Density: 5.5 g/cm^3  (density tells us about the rocks that make up earth!)     Evidence from Seismology  •  Earth's crust is actually pretty elastic  •  Faults: created by elastic rebound (stress of lithosphere makes it rupture and rebound like a 
rubber band) 
•  Seismic waves: produced by earthquakes  Tectonic plates grind against each other. Pressure underneath snaps a section of plate, 
creating shock waves 
•  Compression waves: P-waves  •  Shear waves: S-waves  •  Surface waves: slowest and last to arrive, cause devastating tsunamis, create most earthquake 
damage, only travel in solids 
•  Focus: where earthquake originates    (epicenter: point on surface directly above focus)  •  Seismic discontinuity  Place where velocities of seismic waves change abruptly (proof that density of rock changes 
abruptly with depth) 
•  Shadow zones (no seismic waves) is proof of boundary between solid mantle and liquid layer 
below (outer core) 
   Evidence from Earth's Magnetic Field  •  Curie temperature: at 760 degrees C, iron loses its magnetism…so how is Earth's magnetic field 
produced, if not in the core? 
•  Convection between top and bottom of outer core, iron atoms move as electrical conductors  Electrical currents in outer core --> magnetic field     Mechanical Layers of Earth  •  Refers to the physical behavior of the rocks in the layers  Lithosphere: outermost rigid, brittle, skin-like layer  •  From surface to uppermost part of mantle  •  Granite in continental crust, basalt in oceanic crust, and peridotite in mantle 

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School: Brigham Young University
Department: OTHER
Course: Physical Science
Professor: Patricia Ackroyd
Term: Spring 2017
Tags:
Name: Chapter 26, Week 12 Notes
Description: The mechanical and compositional layers of the earth, including evidence for these layers
Uploaded: 12/10/2017
2 Pages 18 Views 14 Unlocks
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  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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