×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to The U - COMM 3690 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to The U - COMM 3690 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

THE U / Communications / COMM 3690 / Do return strategies truly make consumers happy?

Do return strategies truly make consumers happy?

Do return strategies truly make consumers happy?

Description

School: University of Utah
Department: Communications
Course: Making Brands Stick
Professor: Jakob jensen
Term: Spring 2018
Tags: communication, Strategic, Branding, Design, meaning, and concepts
Cost: 50
Name: COMM 3690 – Exam I Study Guide
Description: These notes cover all of the course material that will be on the first exam, including assigned readings (news of the day) and lectures.
Uploaded: 01/26/2018
26 Pages 172 Views 5 Unlocks
Reviews


COMM 3690 – Exam I Study Guide


Do return strategies truly make consumers happy?



Definitions Key Concepts 

­ News of the Day ­

 ­ "Should Retailers Prioritize Return Strategies to Keep Consumers Happy?" ­ Note: January 3rd is National Returns Day

∙ UPS estimated in December 2017 that 1.4 million packages will be sent back on that day  alone

∙ National Retail Federation predicted a 13% return rate for the 2017­2018 season  According to NRF, 64% of shoppers who have issues with returns are hesitant to  shop at that retailer ever again

∙ According to Optoro, a tech company that helps retailers with returns, 46% of online  shoppers leave behind a full cart due to a fee­based return shipping policy


Which companies have effective return startegies today?



Note: companies need a strong return experience in an age where there are so many retail  options for consumers, and experts say that retailers who focus on easy returns can hold an  advantage over their competitors—particularly when online shopping, not just purchasing, is  becoming increasingly common.

Note: Amazon and Kohl's teamed up

∙ You can buy secondary Kohl's products through Amazon and return them for free ∙ Free return shipping is a perk that not even customers who shop online at Kohl's receive

Note: “The companies that open their arms and welcome these returns exceed their expectations  and strengthen the relationship with the client,” said retail strategist Kevin Kelly. “When you  celebrate returns, you gain that small competitive edge that will lead to customer loyalty long  term.”


Which trends have taken mobile ad creativity into a new era?



∙ If your competitor is offering free returns, you should do the same

∙ If paying for return shipping isn't a viable business strategy ­ companies need to think  about how to incentivize people to bring products back to a store or store affiliate ∙ One way to cut down return shipping costs ­ giving consumers the ability to virtually "try it on" before buying a garment We also discuss several other topics like Where are microglia produced?

 ­ "Ikea Wants You to Pee on this Ad. If You're Pregnant, it Will Give You a Discount on a Crib" ­

Note: apply your urine on an attached strip, and if you are pregnant, receive a cheaper price for a crib 

∙ Made by Swedish agency Åkestam Holst (Adweek's International Agency of the Year)  Ad was created in collaboration with Mercene Labs We also discuss several other topics like How did the south exhibit economic resistance?

∙ Ikea is still a big believer in paper ads and catalogs

∙ Ad is running in Amelia magazine ­ one of Sweden's most influential magazines for  women

∙ Why create this ad?

 Draws attention to the media

 Highlights a product Ikea wants to push more

 Entry level marketing ­ new parents are a key demographic

 ­ Diet Coke Gets a New Look, Adds Flavor in Move to Overcome Slump ­ Note: Diet Coke today introduced the biggest product and marketing makeover in its 36­year  history as it looks to regain momentum in the struggling diet soda category by more aggressively targeting millennials

∙ Challenges include:

 Logo redesign

 Four new flavored varieties, that will be sold in slim cans

 Flavor recipe stays the same

 Sticking with aspartame ­ artificial sweetener is often under the  cross­hairs of health activists that have linked it to health issues; evidence  is mixed Don't forget about the age old question of What was ranching like in the late 19th century?

 Diet Pepsi removed aspartame in late 2015, only to see the move  backfire as consumers complained and sales dropped

 Diet Coke added another artificial sweetener called acesulfame  potassium, or Ace­K, along with aspartame

 New flavors: twisted mango, feisty cherry, zesty blood orange, and ginger  lime

 Originally tested 30 flavors, including one combination that had tea  Focus groups with more than 10,000 people across the country  Process was driven by desire to find varieties that match the 

affinity of younger consumers to bold flavors

∙ Backed by an aggressive marketing campaign by Anomaly featuring the tagline "because  I can" that seeks to inject Diet Coke with a new swagger and growth the brand beyond its  loyalist following of female baby boomers

∙ Ads will feature a blend of male and female B­list celebrities and influencers  The intent is to keep the focus on the product If you want to learn more check out What is the difference between oedipus complex and electra complex?

∙ Diet Coke is pretty traditional in branding, and does not make big moves like this very  often

 Historically, has not needed to make dramatic changes

 Soda sales have begun to decline in the last 10­15 years We also discuss several other topics like Can evolution occur without genetic variation?
We also discuss several other topics like What is the unhealthy condition that would motivate pursuing having a child with two genetic mothers?

Note: Diet Coke started in 1982

∙ Designed to go after Baby Boomers

 Now shifting to millennials

∙ Brand continues to dominate the diet soda category with 26.3% dollar market share; some 20,000 Diet Cokes are consumed every minute in the United States

 Diet Coke's sales fell 3.7% in the 52 weeks ending Dec. 2nd (Diet Pepsi dropped  8%)

New Design 

∙ Executives refer to the new can shape as "sleek"

 The 12­ounce cans, which are the same format now used by Coke­owned Dasani sparkling water, are meant to give Diet Coke a more contemporary feel

∙ New logo features a vertical stripe that Coke executives call a "High Line" that is meant  to represent motion

∙ Coke's in­house team designed the logo with help from a London­based agency called  Kenyon Weston

∙ New look and flavors will get a significant support, including a sizeable TV buy during  the Winter Olympics

∙ The new tagline replaces the "Get a Taste" line that debuted in 2014

 ­ Sundance Film Festival ­

Note: tons of branding and communication happens at Sundance Film Festival ∙ Rich assortment of brand associations available at Sundance

 Ex. Amazon, Netflix

­ "The 3 Trends That Will Take Mobile Ad Creativity into a New Era" ­ Trends 

1 Sophisticated user IDs will finally, truly personalize ads

 Avatars and animojis

 Through Apple's ARKit, developers and artists gain access to the face  meshes that are generated for animoji

 If advertisers were granted access, they could personalize ads by  importing the avatar so that the user's likeness was part of that ad

 Reimagined mobile shopping (ex. "placing" a couch in your living room)  With an avatar, you could pick out your size, put clothes on, turn around  for a 360­degree view, or zoom in for a closer look

 Branded emojis

 With every new entertainment release that includes characters, we're going to see branded emojis that users can download and use in their daily 

communications with friends

2 VR (virtual reality) will be home to "product placement 2.0"

3 Augmented reality will save retail

 Retailers spent about $450 million on AR and VR in 2017, but over the next four  years, they are projected to spend as much as $3.2 billion showcasing their products  AR will also transform in­store experiences

 ­ Notes ­

Brand: "A set of associations linked to a name, mark, or symbol associated with a product or  service. The differences between a name and a brand is that a name doesn't have associations; it  is simply a name. A name becomes a brand when people link it to other things. A brand is like a  reputation."

∙ Definition = Calkins quote

∙ Ex. Harley­Davidson

 The idea of Harley today is not necessarily the portrayal found in its history (more focused on safety and fun in the past)

 Core associations

1. Renegade

2. American

3. Classic 

4. Leather 

5. Biker

 Key demographic for Harley­Davidson

1. Middle aged Caucasian males (mid 40s to early 50s)

 Bye bye baby boomers…

1. Problem = Harley sales are down

2. Reason = baby boomers are now older than 50

3. Gen X'ers are smallest generation

 Target population will decline in number from 2010­2030

4. Gen Y'ers are too young for product

 Strategy

1. Younger, more diverse, females

 Harley­Davidson's message to investors

1. The U.S. population of young adults ages 18­34, women, Hispanics and  African­Americans, which is three times larger than our traditional consumer  base today ­ projected to grow

 These are the same outreach demographic segments in which 

Harley­Davidson has established a clear leadership position

2. Strategy to focus on growth among young adults, women, Hispanics,  African­Americans, lines up extremely well with population trends

 Rebranding 

1. Harley­Davidson for women

 Not necessarily new, just revamped

 Bikes for women

 New clothing lines

2. Harley­Davidson for Hispanics

 Harlistas

3. Harley­Davidson for African­American men

 Iron Elite

 Not new

 Branding Rules

 Effective brands are consistent over time 

1. Especially when they re­brand

 Perception matters more than the absolute truth

1. Note: how much would you expect to pay?

 For a pair of gold earrings? ($550 on average)

 For a pair of gold earrings from Walmart ($81 on average)

 For a pair of gold earrings from Tiffany's ($873 on average)

2. Brands add value, and convey expectations about quality

Challenges to Building Great Brands 

1 Cash

 Brands are long­term assets but the pressures of short­term profits often  undermine decision making

 Virtually all of the brand's value resides in the future

 Branding doom loop

 Short­term pressures lead brand managers to utilize price promotion  strategies and reduce brand building programs

 Price­promotion: buy one get one free, 30% off, etc.

 Trigger competitor response ­­> change in customer expectations ­­>  dwindle in brand presence

 Brand manager responds with more price­promotion

2 Consistency

 Effective brands have a clear identity that is consistent over time and across the  organization

 How to get employees to buy in and understand?

 How to avoid the doom loop?

3 Clutter

 People are bombarded by messages every day

 How to make brand stand out?

 How to make your brand stick?

 Go narrow or go big?

Branding + History 

∙ Students of branding should also be students of history

 Most things make sense, if you know the whole story

∙ S. Duncan Black & Alonzo G. Decker

 In 1910, two young entrepreneurs found a small machine shop in Baltimore, MD.  They call it Black & Decker

 Their first big product is a machine that makes milk bottle caps (they no  longer make this product)

 Black & Decker logo

 Hexagonal nut that looked like a universal fastener symbolic of the  machine tool trade

 1916 ­ patented portability

 The company files its first patent for 1/2" portable electric drill with pistol  grip and trigger switch

 This innovation transformed a stationary tool into a portable one and set  the cornerstone for today's power tool industry

 Note: portability is key to brand

 1921 ­ Black & Decker mass media advertising

 Full page Black & Decker advertisements appeared in print, signaling the  beginning of Black & Decker's use of mass media advertising to reach  mainstream consumers everywhere

 1946 ­ DIY (do it yourself) revolution

 Black & Decker introduces the world's first portable electric drill for  consumers ­ a true market breakthrough

 After learning that workers in factories were taking portable drills home  for personal use, Black & Decker started the do­it­yourself revolution within its  home utility line of drills and accessories

 1962 ­ portability = cordless

 Black & Decker introduces the world's first cordless electric drill powered  by nickel­cadmium cells

 This is followed in 1962 with the world's first cordless outdoor product, a  cordless hedge trimmer

 1970s ­ enter Makita

 Black & Decker was dominant in two areas 

1. DIY'ers 

2. Large industrial customers

 Makita, a Japanese power tool company founded in 1915, carved out a  new market

1. Small to medium size contractors who buy equipment for retail  outlets

 1990 ­ "Acura Concept" to Black & Decker

 Michael Hammes, former executive at Chrysler, joins Black & Decker 1. Brings the Acura Concept to Black & Decker

 Acura Concept: when a company uses a different brand name to enter a  market

 Hammes realized that Black & Decker had a perfect brand to pursue the  Acura Concept ­ DeWalt

1. Black & Decker purchased DeWalt Inc. in 1960 from American  Machine & Foundry Co. Inc. (AMF)

 AMF owned Harley­Davidson at the time

 DeWalt

1. Started in 1922 by Raymond E. DeWalt

 He built the first radial arm saw ­ dubbed the "wonder  worker"

2. Famous for really durable radial arm saws; the sort many  tradesmen were trained on in shop class

3. Black & Decker purchased the brand in 1960, but didn't do much  with it

4. Hammes discovered something interesting

 Before its reintroduction, the DeWalt name was recognized  by 70% of tradesman in a nationwide market survey

 Better yet, of those who knew the name, 90% had a  favorable reaction

 Positioning DeWalt

1. Hammes decided to relaunch DeWalt as a brand for small to  medium size contractors (he needed to position the brand)

 Brand positioning: the specific, intended meaning for a  brand in consumer's minds

2. Position to: the tradesman who uses his power tools to make a  living and cannot afford downtime on the job (target) 

 DeWalt professional power tools (frame of reference) are  more dependable than other brands of professional power tools  (point of difference) because they are engineered to the brand's 

historic high quality standards and are backed by Black & Decker's  extensive service network and guarantee to repair or replace any tool within 48 hours (reasons to believe) 

 Targeting the tradesman who needs to generate a reliable  income and cannot afford downtime

 Original slogan = "No downtime with DeWalt"

3. Who positions a brand?

 Typically developed by the brand manager 

 It [positioning statement] should be based on 

insights about the target markets

 It should cultivate a shared vision of the brand 

throughout the organization

 It is an internal document

4. Components to a good positioning statement

 Brief description of the target consumer (target)

 Target's goal that will be served by the brand (frame of  reference)

 Why the brand is superior to alternatives (point of  difference)

 Supporting evidence for 2 & 3 (reasons to believe) 2. Growth strategy

 Seek additional targets when demand within the initial  target becomes saturated

 Ex. DeWalt could target DIY'ers

 Growth strategy concerns

 Does pursuing multiple groups damage the brand  positioning?

 Do tradesmen like to think of their 

professional tools as akin to DIY'ers?

3. DeWalt positioning for DIY'ers

 To the do­it­yourselfer who takes pride in achieving a 

professional result when doing home improvement projects (target), 

DeWalt power tools (frame of reference) are superior to other power 

tools (point of difference) in helping you create a high­quality finish 

because they are engineered for and chosen by tradesman, who 

depend on their tools to make a living (reasons to believe)

Creative Suite 6 (CS6) or CC: a software suite ­ collection of programs ­ currently owned and  managed by Adobe

∙ Photoshop

 Used to enhance and digitize photos, and to create original art

 You can learn Photoshop in COMM 4570: Visual Editing

 Photoshop, like most CS6 programs, allows users to position materials across  layers

 Layers allow you to blend, add effects, and combine images

∙ Illustrator

 Creating or enhancing artwork

∙ Flash

 Creating animations or dynamic interactive content

∙ Dreamweaver

 Creating and managing webpages

Basics of Design 

∙ Memorable brands = understanding design

 Brands should strive to be consistent

∙ Unity

 All design elements related

 Ex. "Outlaw Josey Wales" movie

 Use of blacks and browns

 Use of paint visuals

 Everything looks like it "belongs together"

 In strategic communication

 Billboard, magazine campaigns, etc.

∙ Eye patterns

 Where does the eye go without help?

 Optical center of the page

5/8ths of the way up the page

 G is true center; O is optical center (refer to image on presentation 3a,  slide 13)

 Follows predictable patterns

 Gutenberg Diagram: describes a general pattern the eyes move through  when looking at evenly distributed, homogenous information

 Pattern applies to text­heavy content

 Think pages in a novel or a newspaper; pattern isn't meant  to describe every possible design

 4 quadrants

 Pattern suggests that they eye will sweep across and down the page in a series of horizontal movements, called axes of orientation ­ reading  gravity path

 Important elements should be placed along the reading gravity path  Z­pattern

 Follows a Z­shape

 Readers will start in the top/left, move horizontally to the top/right  and then diagonally to the bottom/left before finishing with another 

horizontal movement to the bottom/right

 Note: the main difference with the Gutenberg Diagram is that the  z­pattern suggests viewers will pass through the two fallow areas, if there  is a visual element of interest in position #2

 F­pattern

 Follows an F­shape

 Describes how people might process test­heavy information

 As with the other patterns the eye starts in the top/left, moves  horizontally to the top/right and then comes back to the left edge before  making another horizontal sweep to the right

 Eye tracking

∙ Visual hierarchy

 Guide the eye by crafting information with a clear visual hierarchy  Where should they start? Then what?

∙ Psychology of color

 High­arousal colors = red, yellow, and orange

 Low­arousal colors = blue, green, and most violets

 Groups have different associations with colors 

 Goth = black

 Color ads are read 61% more than black and white ads

 Favorite color varies by generation and age (when in doubt, choose blue) ∙ Brands and color

 Most brands have 1­2 stock colors

 Ex. Fed Ex ­ purple and orange

 There are research companies that just study color trends

 Pantone Color Institute

 Color Association of America

∙ White space: empty copy

 Basic rule ­ keep it to the outside of the advertisement

 Too much white space in the miracle can destroy unity by pushing the eye in  several directions

∙ Creative teams

 It is very common to work in 2­person teams

 Copywriter: responsible for creating the words and maybe the concept  Create a creative brief (background, objective, target audience,  competition, reasons to act or believe, sources, what do we want to say?)

 Art director: responsible for the visual, layout, and graphics

 Rough visual idea

 Layout: a working drawing showing how an advertisement might work  Storyboard: series of drawings used to present a proposed sequence ∙ Ex. McDonald's "Dynamic Design"

 McDonald's marketing leadership, which included Mr. Easterbrook, began  discussing how they could make the packaging more exciting. 

 After all, it is something millions of customers see and touch every day. It  was time for McDonald's to have a new "billboard for the brand."

 CEO, Mr. Easterbrook, is leading the early stages of a turnaround and often  speaks about his desire to make McDonald's into a "modern, progressive burger  company"

 Quantitative and qualitative feedback from consumers shows "how much our  consumers wanted McDonald's to be McDonald's." 

 Some attempts that really pushed the design envelope perhaps pushed the  brand further than customers were comfortable with. 

 The updated packaging coincides with the 25th anniversary of McDonald's doing  away with styrofoam "clamshell" containers. 

 It still aims for all of its fiber­based packaging to come from recycled or  certified sustainable sources by 2020. 

 By the end of 2014, McDonald's U.S. was sourcing about 27% of its fiber based packaging from such sources.

 While the environmental impact of the new bags has not been publicly disclosed,  in some cases, the overhaul means less of the bag is printed with ink, compared to the prior "Brand Ambition" design that focused on McDonald's people, food and  community. 

 The brand will continue the use of brown paper, which includes post consumer recycled content. 

Storyboarding 

∙ Strategic communication professionals need to understand the basic tools used to create  visual products

 Storyboards are the best way to draft moving/animated/interactive content  Most brands are launched with this type of content, so you should know  something about it

∙ Storyboard: series of drawings/images used to present a proposed 

commercial/multimedia concept

∙ Types

 Conceptual: rough drawings; for brainstorming

 Pitch: finished drawings; for client

 Final: finished drawings with technical info; for production team

 Photoboard: a storyboard built with actual images from the finish product (used  for marketing purposes)

∙ Elements

 Framing

 Close up, medium shot, long shot, extreme close up, extreme long shot  Aspect ratio: screen format (i.e., dimensions) used in the film

 Academy (1:1.44)

 Widescreen (1:1.83)

 Cinemascope (1:2.34)

 Eye line: where the subject's line of sight is in relation to the camera  Normal eye line: camera looks directly at subject

 Low eye line: camera looks up at subject

 High eye line: camera looks down at subject

 The line: an imaginary line that gives us our sense of direction or perspective for  the scene

 Line of action: the line along which our subjects are moving

 Line of interest: the line along which our subjects are looking

 Note: really good editing stays on one side of the line

Brands as Concepts 

∙ Whenever we encounter a brand, we attempt to categorize it as a concept  Via cues

 This process is automatic, and typically outside of our conscious awareness ∙ A brand manager should identify several desired product categories  Focus on how cues can help customers to identify the product as belonging to  those categories

∙ Both the brand and product name help customers to identify the product category  Ex. Red Iguana Cayenne Sauce ­ what product categories does this belong to?  (Mexican hot sauce)

∙ Philadelphia Cream Cheese

 "A touch of heaven every day"

 Categories

 Rich, creamy

 Authentic

 Special reward

 Accessible every day

 Creative

 Brand = Philadelphia

 Historical name of the brand

 City of Philadelphia is authentic

 Product category

 Cream cheese is the product category

 Products must be categorized on the packaging (or they face trademark  loss)

 Product categories also serve as a cue about how to categorize the product  Visuals, colors, and functional form

 Clouds/ovals

 Creamy and classic

 Silver and white

 Accessible as second place, attainable

 White = creamy

 Shaped like a brick

 Like butter ­­> suggests authentic

∙ Evaluating brand design

 Allow individuals from the target market to experience the brand design… briefly  A quick exposure to the design, then ask their thoughts ­ this will capture  their immediate perceptions

 Don't let them spend too much time with the brand design

∙ Extending the concept

 Brand extension: taking an established brand and using it to sell different products  Can be effective if the new products also fit the concept

 Philadelphia is trying this with other things that are rich, creamy,  authentic, accessible (ex. dipping chocolate) 

Brand Meaning 

∙ Another way to think about branding is that you are cultivating meaning independent of  your product

∙ Archetype: primordial image, character, or pattern of circumstances that recurs  throughout literature and thought consistently enough to be considered universal  Branding is about identifying one of these enduring archetypes, and trying to  communicate it

 Literary critics adopted the term from Carl Gustav Jung's theory of the collective  unconscious

 Because archetypes originate in pre­logical thought, they are held to evoke startlingly similar feelings in reader and author

 Examples of archetypal symbols include the snake, whale, eagle, and  vulture

 An archetypal theme is the passage from innocence to experience  Archetypal characters include the blood brother, rebel, wise grandparents,  and prostitute with a heart of gold

 Alternative definition of archetype

 The original pattern or model of which all things of the same type are  representation or copies

 Ex. Nike = hero; Harley = outlaw

∙ Frame of reference

 Mark Shapiro argues that we need to pay more attention to the frame of reference  when developing our brand

 The frame of reference exerts strong influence on brand meaning ∙ Frame of reference ­ examples

 BMW = automobile, Budweiser = American pilsner, Costco = membership­based  big­box store, ESPN = sports news provider

∙ DeBeers

 Frame of reference could be diamonds

 But they already lead that category, so limited growth potential  Or wedding rings, but limited growth as well

 Instead, DeBeers pursues "gift" as their frame of reference

 More correctly, "premium gift for women"

 DeBeers = premium wedding rings

 Secondary campaign ­ premium self­gift for women

COMM 3690 – Exam I Study Guide

Definitions Key Concepts 

­ News of the Day ­

 ­ "Should Retailers Prioritize Return Strategies to Keep Consumers Happy?" ­ Note: January 3rd is National Returns Day

∙ UPS estimated in December 2017 that 1.4 million packages will be sent back on that day  alone

∙ National Retail Federation predicted a 13% return rate for the 2017­2018 season  According to NRF, 64% of shoppers who have issues with returns are hesitant to  shop at that retailer ever again

∙ According to Optoro, a tech company that helps retailers with returns, 46% of online  shoppers leave behind a full cart due to a fee­based return shipping policy

Note: companies need a strong return experience in an age where there are so many retail  options for consumers, and experts say that retailers who focus on easy returns can hold an  advantage over their competitors—particularly when online shopping, not just purchasing, is  becoming increasingly common.

Note: Amazon and Kohl's teamed up

∙ You can buy secondary Kohl's products through Amazon and return them for free ∙ Free return shipping is a perk that not even customers who shop online at Kohl's receive

Note: “The companies that open their arms and welcome these returns exceed their expectations  and strengthen the relationship with the client,” said retail strategist Kevin Kelly. “When you  celebrate returns, you gain that small competitive edge that will lead to customer loyalty long  term.”

∙ If your competitor is offering free returns, you should do the same

∙ If paying for return shipping isn't a viable business strategy ­ companies need to think  about how to incentivize people to bring products back to a store or store affiliate ∙ One way to cut down return shipping costs ­ giving consumers the ability to virtually "try it on" before buying a garment

 ­ "Ikea Wants You to Pee on this Ad. If You're Pregnant, it Will Give You a Discount on a Crib" ­

Note: apply your urine on an attached strip, and if you are pregnant, receive a cheaper price for a crib 

∙ Made by Swedish agency Åkestam Holst (Adweek's International Agency of the Year)  Ad was created in collaboration with Mercene Labs

∙ Ikea is still a big believer in paper ads and catalogs

∙ Ad is running in Amelia magazine ­ one of Sweden's most influential magazines for  women

∙ Why create this ad?

 Draws attention to the media

 Highlights a product Ikea wants to push more

 Entry level marketing ­ new parents are a key demographic

 ­ Diet Coke Gets a New Look, Adds Flavor in Move to Overcome Slump ­ Note: Diet Coke today introduced the biggest product and marketing makeover in its 36­year  history as it looks to regain momentum in the struggling diet soda category by more aggressively targeting millennials

∙ Challenges include:

 Logo redesign

 Four new flavored varieties, that will be sold in slim cans

 Flavor recipe stays the same

 Sticking with aspartame ­ artificial sweetener is often under the  cross­hairs of health activists that have linked it to health issues; evidence  is mixed

 Diet Pepsi removed aspartame in late 2015, only to see the move  backfire as consumers complained and sales dropped

 Diet Coke added another artificial sweetener called acesulfame  potassium, or Ace­K, along with aspartame

 New flavors: twisted mango, feisty cherry, zesty blood orange, and ginger  lime

 Originally tested 30 flavors, including one combination that had tea  Focus groups with more than 10,000 people across the country  Process was driven by desire to find varieties that match the 

affinity of younger consumers to bold flavors

∙ Backed by an aggressive marketing campaign by Anomaly featuring the tagline "because  I can" that seeks to inject Diet Coke with a new swagger and growth the brand beyond its  loyalist following of female baby boomers

∙ Ads will feature a blend of male and female B­list celebrities and influencers  The intent is to keep the focus on the product

∙ Diet Coke is pretty traditional in branding, and does not make big moves like this very  often

 Historically, has not needed to make dramatic changes

 Soda sales have begun to decline in the last 10­15 years

Note: Diet Coke started in 1982

∙ Designed to go after Baby Boomers

 Now shifting to millennials

∙ Brand continues to dominate the diet soda category with 26.3% dollar market share; some 20,000 Diet Cokes are consumed every minute in the United States

 Diet Coke's sales fell 3.7% in the 52 weeks ending Dec. 2nd (Diet Pepsi dropped  8%)

New Design 

∙ Executives refer to the new can shape as "sleek"

 The 12­ounce cans, which are the same format now used by Coke­owned Dasani sparkling water, are meant to give Diet Coke a more contemporary feel

∙ New logo features a vertical stripe that Coke executives call a "High Line" that is meant  to represent motion

∙ Coke's in­house team designed the logo with help from a London­based agency called  Kenyon Weston

∙ New look and flavors will get a significant support, including a sizeable TV buy during  the Winter Olympics

∙ The new tagline replaces the "Get a Taste" line that debuted in 2014

 ­ Sundance Film Festival ­

Note: tons of branding and communication happens at Sundance Film Festival ∙ Rich assortment of brand associations available at Sundance

 Ex. Amazon, Netflix

­ "The 3 Trends That Will Take Mobile Ad Creativity into a New Era" ­ Trends 

1 Sophisticated user IDs will finally, truly personalize ads

 Avatars and animojis

 Through Apple's ARKit, developers and artists gain access to the face  meshes that are generated for animoji

 If advertisers were granted access, they could personalize ads by  importing the avatar so that the user's likeness was part of that ad

 Reimagined mobile shopping (ex. "placing" a couch in your living room)  With an avatar, you could pick out your size, put clothes on, turn around  for a 360­degree view, or zoom in for a closer look

 Branded emojis

 With every new entertainment release that includes characters, we're going to see branded emojis that users can download and use in their daily 

communications with friends

2 VR (virtual reality) will be home to "product placement 2.0"

3 Augmented reality will save retail

 Retailers spent about $450 million on AR and VR in 2017, but over the next four  years, they are projected to spend as much as $3.2 billion showcasing their products  AR will also transform in­store experiences

 ­ Notes ­

Brand: "A set of associations linked to a name, mark, or symbol associated with a product or  service. The differences between a name and a brand is that a name doesn't have associations; it  is simply a name. A name becomes a brand when people link it to other things. A brand is like a  reputation."

∙ Definition = Calkins quote

∙ Ex. Harley­Davidson

 The idea of Harley today is not necessarily the portrayal found in its history (more focused on safety and fun in the past)

 Core associations

1. Renegade

2. American

3. Classic 

4. Leather 

5. Biker

 Key demographic for Harley­Davidson

1. Middle aged Caucasian males (mid 40s to early 50s)

 Bye bye baby boomers…

1. Problem = Harley sales are down

2. Reason = baby boomers are now older than 50

3. Gen X'ers are smallest generation

 Target population will decline in number from 2010­2030

4. Gen Y'ers are too young for product

 Strategy

1. Younger, more diverse, females

 Harley­Davidson's message to investors

1. The U.S. population of young adults ages 18­34, women, Hispanics and  African­Americans, which is three times larger than our traditional consumer  base today ­ projected to grow

 These are the same outreach demographic segments in which 

Harley­Davidson has established a clear leadership position

2. Strategy to focus on growth among young adults, women, Hispanics,  African­Americans, lines up extremely well with population trends

 Rebranding 

1. Harley­Davidson for women

 Not necessarily new, just revamped

 Bikes for women

 New clothing lines

2. Harley­Davidson for Hispanics

 Harlistas

3. Harley­Davidson for African­American men

 Iron Elite

 Not new

 Branding Rules

 Effective brands are consistent over time 

1. Especially when they re­brand

 Perception matters more than the absolute truth

1. Note: how much would you expect to pay?

 For a pair of gold earrings? ($550 on average)

 For a pair of gold earrings from Walmart ($81 on average)

 For a pair of gold earrings from Tiffany's ($873 on average)

2. Brands add value, and convey expectations about quality

Challenges to Building Great Brands 

1 Cash

 Brands are long­term assets but the pressures of short­term profits often  undermine decision making

 Virtually all of the brand's value resides in the future

 Branding doom loop

 Short­term pressures lead brand managers to utilize price promotion  strategies and reduce brand building programs

 Price­promotion: buy one get one free, 30% off, etc.

 Trigger competitor response ­­> change in customer expectations ­­>  dwindle in brand presence

 Brand manager responds with more price­promotion

2 Consistency

 Effective brands have a clear identity that is consistent over time and across the  organization

 How to get employees to buy in and understand?

 How to avoid the doom loop?

3 Clutter

 People are bombarded by messages every day

 How to make brand stand out?

 How to make your brand stick?

 Go narrow or go big?

Branding + History 

∙ Students of branding should also be students of history

 Most things make sense, if you know the whole story

∙ S. Duncan Black & Alonzo G. Decker

 In 1910, two young entrepreneurs found a small machine shop in Baltimore, MD.  They call it Black & Decker

 Their first big product is a machine that makes milk bottle caps (they no  longer make this product)

 Black & Decker logo

 Hexagonal nut that looked like a universal fastener symbolic of the  machine tool trade

 1916 ­ patented portability

 The company files its first patent for 1/2" portable electric drill with pistol  grip and trigger switch

 This innovation transformed a stationary tool into a portable one and set  the cornerstone for today's power tool industry

 Note: portability is key to brand

 1921 ­ Black & Decker mass media advertising

 Full page Black & Decker advertisements appeared in print, signaling the  beginning of Black & Decker's use of mass media advertising to reach  mainstream consumers everywhere

 1946 ­ DIY (do it yourself) revolution

 Black & Decker introduces the world's first portable electric drill for  consumers ­ a true market breakthrough

 After learning that workers in factories were taking portable drills home  for personal use, Black & Decker started the do­it­yourself revolution within its  home utility line of drills and accessories

 1962 ­ portability = cordless

 Black & Decker introduces the world's first cordless electric drill powered  by nickel­cadmium cells

 This is followed in 1962 with the world's first cordless outdoor product, a  cordless hedge trimmer

 1970s ­ enter Makita

 Black & Decker was dominant in two areas 

1. DIY'ers 

2. Large industrial customers

 Makita, a Japanese power tool company founded in 1915, carved out a  new market

1. Small to medium size contractors who buy equipment for retail  outlets

 1990 ­ "Acura Concept" to Black & Decker

 Michael Hammes, former executive at Chrysler, joins Black & Decker 1. Brings the Acura Concept to Black & Decker

 Acura Concept: when a company uses a different brand name to enter a  market

 Hammes realized that Black & Decker had a perfect brand to pursue the  Acura Concept ­ DeWalt

1. Black & Decker purchased DeWalt Inc. in 1960 from American  Machine & Foundry Co. Inc. (AMF)

 AMF owned Harley­Davidson at the time

 DeWalt

1. Started in 1922 by Raymond E. DeWalt

 He built the first radial arm saw ­ dubbed the "wonder  worker"

2. Famous for really durable radial arm saws; the sort many  tradesmen were trained on in shop class

3. Black & Decker purchased the brand in 1960, but didn't do much  with it

4. Hammes discovered something interesting

 Before its reintroduction, the DeWalt name was recognized  by 70% of tradesman in a nationwide market survey

 Better yet, of those who knew the name, 90% had a  favorable reaction

 Positioning DeWalt

1. Hammes decided to relaunch DeWalt as a brand for small to  medium size contractors (he needed to position the brand)

 Brand positioning: the specific, intended meaning for a  brand in consumer's minds

2. Position to: the tradesman who uses his power tools to make a  living and cannot afford downtime on the job (target) 

 DeWalt professional power tools (frame of reference) are  more dependable than other brands of professional power tools  (point of difference) because they are engineered to the brand's 

historic high quality standards and are backed by Black & Decker's  extensive service network and guarantee to repair or replace any tool within 48 hours (reasons to believe) 

 Targeting the tradesman who needs to generate a reliable  income and cannot afford downtime

 Original slogan = "No downtime with DeWalt"

3. Who positions a brand?

 Typically developed by the brand manager 

 It [positioning statement] should be based on 

insights about the target markets

 It should cultivate a shared vision of the brand 

throughout the organization

 It is an internal document

4. Components to a good positioning statement

 Brief description of the target consumer (target)

 Target's goal that will be served by the brand (frame of  reference)

 Why the brand is superior to alternatives (point of  difference)

 Supporting evidence for 2 & 3 (reasons to believe) 2. Growth strategy

 Seek additional targets when demand within the initial  target becomes saturated

 Ex. DeWalt could target DIY'ers

 Growth strategy concerns

 Does pursuing multiple groups damage the brand  positioning?

 Do tradesmen like to think of their 

professional tools as akin to DIY'ers?

3. DeWalt positioning for DIY'ers

 To the do­it­yourselfer who takes pride in achieving a 

professional result when doing home improvement projects (target), 

DeWalt power tools (frame of reference) are superior to other power 

tools (point of difference) in helping you create a high­quality finish 

because they are engineered for and chosen by tradesman, who 

depend on their tools to make a living (reasons to believe)

Creative Suite 6 (CS6) or CC: a software suite ­ collection of programs ­ currently owned and  managed by Adobe

∙ Photoshop

 Used to enhance and digitize photos, and to create original art

 You can learn Photoshop in COMM 4570: Visual Editing

 Photoshop, like most CS6 programs, allows users to position materials across  layers

 Layers allow you to blend, add effects, and combine images

∙ Illustrator

 Creating or enhancing artwork

∙ Flash

 Creating animations or dynamic interactive content

∙ Dreamweaver

 Creating and managing webpages

Basics of Design 

∙ Memorable brands = understanding design

 Brands should strive to be consistent

∙ Unity

 All design elements related

 Ex. "Outlaw Josey Wales" movie

 Use of blacks and browns

 Use of paint visuals

 Everything looks like it "belongs together"

 In strategic communication

 Billboard, magazine campaigns, etc.

∙ Eye patterns

 Where does the eye go without help?

 Optical center of the page

5/8ths of the way up the page

 G is true center; O is optical center (refer to image on presentation 3a,  slide 13)

 Follows predictable patterns

 Gutenberg Diagram: describes a general pattern the eyes move through  when looking at evenly distributed, homogenous information

 Pattern applies to text­heavy content

 Think pages in a novel or a newspaper; pattern isn't meant  to describe every possible design

 4 quadrants

 Pattern suggests that they eye will sweep across and down the page in a series of horizontal movements, called axes of orientation ­ reading  gravity path

 Important elements should be placed along the reading gravity path  Z­pattern

 Follows a Z­shape

 Readers will start in the top/left, move horizontally to the top/right  and then diagonally to the bottom/left before finishing with another 

horizontal movement to the bottom/right

 Note: the main difference with the Gutenberg Diagram is that the  z­pattern suggests viewers will pass through the two fallow areas, if there  is a visual element of interest in position #2

 F­pattern

 Follows an F­shape

 Describes how people might process test­heavy information

 As with the other patterns the eye starts in the top/left, moves  horizontally to the top/right and then comes back to the left edge before  making another horizontal sweep to the right

 Eye tracking

∙ Visual hierarchy

 Guide the eye by crafting information with a clear visual hierarchy  Where should they start? Then what?

∙ Psychology of color

 High­arousal colors = red, yellow, and orange

 Low­arousal colors = blue, green, and most violets

 Groups have different associations with colors 

 Goth = black

 Color ads are read 61% more than black and white ads

 Favorite color varies by generation and age (when in doubt, choose blue) ∙ Brands and color

 Most brands have 1­2 stock colors

 Ex. Fed Ex ­ purple and orange

 There are research companies that just study color trends

 Pantone Color Institute

 Color Association of America

∙ White space: empty copy

 Basic rule ­ keep it to the outside of the advertisement

 Too much white space in the miracle can destroy unity by pushing the eye in  several directions

∙ Creative teams

 It is very common to work in 2­person teams

 Copywriter: responsible for creating the words and maybe the concept  Create a creative brief (background, objective, target audience,  competition, reasons to act or believe, sources, what do we want to say?)

 Art director: responsible for the visual, layout, and graphics

 Rough visual idea

 Layout: a working drawing showing how an advertisement might work  Storyboard: series of drawings used to present a proposed sequence ∙ Ex. McDonald's "Dynamic Design"

 McDonald's marketing leadership, which included Mr. Easterbrook, began  discussing how they could make the packaging more exciting. 

 After all, it is something millions of customers see and touch every day. It  was time for McDonald's to have a new "billboard for the brand."

 CEO, Mr. Easterbrook, is leading the early stages of a turnaround and often  speaks about his desire to make McDonald's into a "modern, progressive burger  company"

 Quantitative and qualitative feedback from consumers shows "how much our  consumers wanted McDonald's to be McDonald's." 

 Some attempts that really pushed the design envelope perhaps pushed the  brand further than customers were comfortable with. 

 The updated packaging coincides with the 25th anniversary of McDonald's doing  away with styrofoam "clamshell" containers. 

 It still aims for all of its fiber­based packaging to come from recycled or  certified sustainable sources by 2020. 

 By the end of 2014, McDonald's U.S. was sourcing about 27% of its fiber based packaging from such sources.

 While the environmental impact of the new bags has not been publicly disclosed,  in some cases, the overhaul means less of the bag is printed with ink, compared to the prior "Brand Ambition" design that focused on McDonald's people, food and  community. 

 The brand will continue the use of brown paper, which includes post consumer recycled content. 

Storyboarding 

∙ Strategic communication professionals need to understand the basic tools used to create  visual products

 Storyboards are the best way to draft moving/animated/interactive content  Most brands are launched with this type of content, so you should know  something about it

∙ Storyboard: series of drawings/images used to present a proposed 

commercial/multimedia concept

∙ Types

 Conceptual: rough drawings; for brainstorming

 Pitch: finished drawings; for client

 Final: finished drawings with technical info; for production team

 Photoboard: a storyboard built with actual images from the finish product (used  for marketing purposes)

∙ Elements

 Framing

 Close up, medium shot, long shot, extreme close up, extreme long shot  Aspect ratio: screen format (i.e., dimensions) used in the film

 Academy (1:1.44)

 Widescreen (1:1.83)

 Cinemascope (1:2.34)

 Eye line: where the subject's line of sight is in relation to the camera  Normal eye line: camera looks directly at subject

 Low eye line: camera looks up at subject

 High eye line: camera looks down at subject

 The line: an imaginary line that gives us our sense of direction or perspective for  the scene

 Line of action: the line along which our subjects are moving

 Line of interest: the line along which our subjects are looking

 Note: really good editing stays on one side of the line

Brands as Concepts 

∙ Whenever we encounter a brand, we attempt to categorize it as a concept  Via cues

 This process is automatic, and typically outside of our conscious awareness ∙ A brand manager should identify several desired product categories  Focus on how cues can help customers to identify the product as belonging to  those categories

∙ Both the brand and product name help customers to identify the product category  Ex. Red Iguana Cayenne Sauce ­ what product categories does this belong to?  (Mexican hot sauce)

∙ Philadelphia Cream Cheese

 "A touch of heaven every day"

 Categories

 Rich, creamy

 Authentic

 Special reward

 Accessible every day

 Creative

 Brand = Philadelphia

 Historical name of the brand

 City of Philadelphia is authentic

 Product category

 Cream cheese is the product category

 Products must be categorized on the packaging (or they face trademark  loss)

 Product categories also serve as a cue about how to categorize the product  Visuals, colors, and functional form

 Clouds/ovals

 Creamy and classic

 Silver and white

 Accessible as second place, attainable

 White = creamy

 Shaped like a brick

 Like butter ­­> suggests authentic

∙ Evaluating brand design

 Allow individuals from the target market to experience the brand design… briefly  A quick exposure to the design, then ask their thoughts ­ this will capture  their immediate perceptions

 Don't let them spend too much time with the brand design

∙ Extending the concept

 Brand extension: taking an established brand and using it to sell different products  Can be effective if the new products also fit the concept

 Philadelphia is trying this with other things that are rich, creamy,  authentic, accessible (ex. dipping chocolate) 

Brand Meaning 

∙ Another way to think about branding is that you are cultivating meaning independent of  your product

∙ Archetype: primordial image, character, or pattern of circumstances that recurs  throughout literature and thought consistently enough to be considered universal  Branding is about identifying one of these enduring archetypes, and trying to  communicate it

 Literary critics adopted the term from Carl Gustav Jung's theory of the collective  unconscious

 Because archetypes originate in pre­logical thought, they are held to evoke startlingly similar feelings in reader and author

 Examples of archetypal symbols include the snake, whale, eagle, and  vulture

 An archetypal theme is the passage from innocence to experience  Archetypal characters include the blood brother, rebel, wise grandparents,  and prostitute with a heart of gold

 Alternative definition of archetype

 The original pattern or model of which all things of the same type are  representation or copies

 Ex. Nike = hero; Harley = outlaw

∙ Frame of reference

 Mark Shapiro argues that we need to pay more attention to the frame of reference  when developing our brand

 The frame of reference exerts strong influence on brand meaning ∙ Frame of reference ­ examples

 BMW = automobile, Budweiser = American pilsner, Costco = membership­based  big­box store, ESPN = sports news provider

∙ DeBeers

 Frame of reference could be diamonds

 But they already lead that category, so limited growth potential  Or wedding rings, but limited growth as well

 Instead, DeBeers pursues "gift" as their frame of reference

 More correctly, "premium gift for women"

 DeBeers = premium wedding rings

 Secondary campaign ­ premium self­gift for women

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here