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UCLA - CHICANO 10 - C10B: week 3 lecture #4 - Class Notes

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UCLA - CHICANO 10 - C10B: week 3 lecture #4 - Class Notes

School: University of California - Los Angeles
Department: Chicana and Chicano Studies
Course: Introduction to Chicana/CHICANO Studies: Social Structure and Contemporary Conditions
Professor: L.j. Abrego
Term: Winter 2016
Tags:
Name: C10B: week 3 lecture #4
Description: covers materials on lecture #4
Uploaded: 01/30/2018
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background image Chicano Studies 10B: Lecture 4// 01/22/18  
 
Review of Systems of Power 
- Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality, Citizenship through the discussion of sexism and the 4 
I’s  
What is sexism?   - A set of beliefs, values, attitudes, and practices that sustain and reproduce the 
inequalities, discrimination, exclusion and oppression of women.  
- Manifests through the ideas and actions of people and institutions: family, religion, 
school/education, media/modes of communication  
- Sexism is both discrimination based on gender and attitudes, stereotypes and 
institutions that promote discrimination  
The Four “I”   - Interpersonal   - Institutional   - Internalized   - Intersectional    
Interpersonal Sexism  
- Having to be incharge of all/most housework   - Earning lower salary/ experience discrimination in workplace   - Feeling obligated to give up aspirations, dreams, desires   - Being intimidated/threatened by man to do something    - Being sexually harassed on street   - Being controlled in every aspect (how you dress, where you go, who you speak 
with, etc)  
- Explains what happens between two people     Institutionalized Sexism   - Schools, churches, family, workplace, laws, media, etc   - Institutions are instruments that we reproduce ideas about gender and power. When 
those ideas are reproduced, they keep women in an inferior position and subordinate to 
men  
- Examples:  -  Double standard on sex roles, school’s dress code.   - An education that re-enforces the traditional roles of men and women   - A work system that discriminates against women that unjustly reduce their 
salaries or give them only access to traditional jobs  
- National laws that limit women’s opportunities to get to leader positions or 
important public positions  
- Health institutions that conduct medical investigations about men or where me 
are treated as the universal subject  
 
background image Internalized Sexism   - Considering it natural for men to be the dominant figure and women to be in subordinate 
figure  
- I.E Many women think they are less valuable or capable than men and may 
believe they deserve less respect or less opportunities  
- Many men are raised to think of themselves as superior to women and think they 
deserve the privileges this superiority affords  
- These ideas are called internalized sexism: sexism and the chauvinism that we 
all have inside of us  
- Examples:   - having to say she's a “female doctor” instead of just “doctor”   - Women objectifying themselves and having a “standard of beauty”  - Women don't trust their capacity or other women’s capacity   - Women criticize women’s who do not stay within gendered stereotypes   - Women base self-esteem on their fulfillment of females stereotypes   - Women educate their children with sexist ideas and transmit chauvinist 
stereotypes  
- Self hatred or shame  - Examples mong men:   - Men think they don't have responsibilities at home in care of their children   - Men can't accept a female boss or female who earns more   - Criticizing other men or boys who express emotions   - Men who criticize other men when they don't fulfill male stereotypes   - Not being drinkers, not dating many women, or controlling women   - Worst insult is being called a “girl” or other feminine words    
Intersectional  
- Challenges the Hierarchy of Oppressions   - An integrative perspective that emphasizes the intersection of several systems of power  - Ex: race, gender, class, and nation   - No one system of power is experiences alone or operates in isolation from another  - We must understand the interlocking forms of oppression that can be sources of 
disadvantage and lack of privilege  
 
A crushing love  
- How do activist do it? How do they advocate and have a family, cook, clean,etc? - Sylvia 
Morales  
- Delano, an active social activist   - Told it was not a “women's place” to be making noise causing “chaos”   - Delano told she was not a “role model” or person her family expected her to be   - Where does social consciousness come from?   - Elizabeth “Betita” Martinez  - People asked her “what she was” and questioned what “mexican was”  

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School: University of California - Los Angeles
Department: Chicana and Chicano Studies
Course: Introduction to Chicana/CHICANO Studies: Social Structure and Contemporary Conditions
Professor: L.j. Abrego
Term: Winter 2016
Tags:
Name: C10B: week 3 lecture #4
Description: covers materials on lecture #4
Uploaded: 01/30/2018
4 Pages 40 Views 32 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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