Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

USC - CLAS 220 - Clas 220, Week 1-3 Notes - Class Notes

Created by: Delaney Hopkins Elite Notetaker

> > > > USC - CLAS 220 - Clas 220, Week 1-3 Notes - Class Notes

USC - CLAS 220 - Clas 220, Week 1-3 Notes - Class Notes

School: University of South Carolina
Department: Classical Studies
Course: Introduction to Classical Mythology
Professor: Osborne
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Classics, Greek Mythology, and introductiontogreekmythology
Name: Clas 220, Week 1-3 Notes
Description: These notes are about material covered in class on weeks 1 (1/17), 2 (1/22, 1/24), and 3 (1/29, 1/31).
Uploaded: 02/01/2018
0 5 3 60 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 12 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Classics 220­ Introduction to Classical Mythology­ Week 1 (1/17) Introduction­ (1/17) Myth­ an authoritative story about the world accepted with in a given community as true o Truths involved can be: Spiritual Cosmological Political Social Psychological o Whether true or not, in a factual sense, they “work” as a way of understanding the world Mythos vs. Logos o Originally: Mythos­ authoritative story about the world Logos­ just one of many stories; not authoritative o Later: Mythos­ marked as “not true” Logos­ marked as true, not because it works, but because it’s right Greek and Roman myths presented in sculptures, paintings, vases, oral storytelling, song 
and dance
The Origins of Myth o Myth comes from sources including: Personifying and explaining natural forces Personifying psychological forces Memorable historical events Ritual o Regularly occurring action o Done for symbolic value o Special places, times, words, objects, people o Set apart from daily life Religion = Myth + Ritual o Myth explains ritual and gives it context o Ritual brings myth into the here and now o In the case of Greece and Rome, the rituals are gone (though we know a little  about them) o What remains are the myths or their representations in literature o This is why ancient Greek texts about mythology are not scripture Must be performed/reenacted in ritual to be sacred Greek Religion
background image o No word for “religion” in Greek or Latin because it is not separable from the rest  of life o Myth and ritual are part of daily family life, citizenship, business, sports, and the  arts o Both a “PanHellenic” (All Greek) and local dimension PanHellenic myth and ritual o Greece divided into many city­states (“polis”) o They share many cultural institutions Olympic Games Delphic Oracle Homeric Epic PanHellenic Gods o Greeks had many gods: 12 Olympic Gods were the most important o Worshipped everywhere in Greek world In different names and in different ways throughout Greece o Associated with various forces of natural/human life (sun, moon, rain, sea, love,  food, death, etc) o Not necessarily good, or concerned with human problems Local Religion o Olympian gods important locally o Gods of local places such as springs, rivers, trees, mountains important as well o Most important aspect of local religion: the Hero Doesn’t necessarily have to be a “good guy”
background image Classics 220­ Introduction to Classical Mythology­ Week 2 (1/22), (1/24) The Goddesses­ The Homeric Hymns (1/22) Polytheists­ worshipped as many gods as possible Women in ancient Greece o Not of equal status o Women married after puberty and divorce was unattainable o Men could marry a little later o If a man had no sons, daughter had to marry his closes male relative to keep  wealth in the family o Women did not receive education o All adult males participated in government, women did not o Could not leave home without a chaperone o In wealthy homes, slaves did work while wives did weaving (while supervised) o Exceptions for religious rituals and priestesses Hera (Roman: Juno) o Wife and sister of Zeus o Name connected to Greek word for “season” o Goddess of marriage/readiness for marriage o Represented seducing her husband o Always seeking vengeance for husband’s infidelities o Frequently antagonistic to the heroes her husband’s mistresses bear o Mother of Ares, Hephaestus, and minor deities­ Hebe (youth) and Eileithyia  (childbirth)  o Worshipped in temples everywhere, especially Argos Demeter (Roman: Ceres) o Name makes her a mother goddess o Possibly means “grain mother” o Goddess of grain and harvest o Known from myth of her daughter, Persephone, who becomes queen of the  underworld after being kidnapped by Hades by the arrangement of her father, 
Zeus
o Worshipped in secret festivals like the Eleusinian Mysteries and the  Thesmophoria (women only) Athena (Roman: Minerva) o Daughter of Zeus and Metis (cunning), who was foretold to bear a child more  powerful than her father; o Zeus swallows Metis disguised as a fly and Athena is born out of Zeus’s head  fully armed o Goddess of: the City, especially Athens; the Parthenon

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of South Carolina who use StudySoup to get ahead
12 Pages 32 Views 25 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of South Carolina who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of South Carolina
Department: Classical Studies
Course: Introduction to Classical Mythology
Professor: Osborne
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Classics, Greek Mythology, and introductiontogreekmythology
Name: Clas 220, Week 1-3 Notes
Description: These notes are about material covered in class on weeks 1 (1/17), 2 (1/22, 1/24), and 3 (1/29, 1/31).
Uploaded: 02/01/2018
12 Pages 32 Views 25 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to USC - Clas 220 - Class Notes - Week 3
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to USC - Clas 220 - Class Notes - Week 3

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here