Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

Virginia Commonwealth University - BLAW 323 - Class Notes - Week 3

Created by: Iga Kazmierczak Elite Notetaker

> > > > Virginia Commonwealth University - BLAW 323 - Class Notes - Week 3

Virginia Commonwealth University - BLAW 323 - Class Notes - Week 3

School: Virginia Commonwealth University
Department: Business Law
Course: Legal Environment of Business
Professor: Kenneth Hardt
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Tort Law, Criminal, Law, and negligence
Name: BUSN 323 Week 3
Description: These notes cover chapter 7,8 and 9. The last three chapters before the first exam.
Uploaded: 02/02/2018
0 5 3 13 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 12 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Hypothetical Case #1 Neighbor A is playing really loud music, neighbor B asks him to turn it down. The next day same thing happens, 
neighbor B asks again, neighbor A keeps playing music. The next morning neighbor B is clearly frustrated and tells 
his wife that he's going to kill the neighbor. She freaks out and calls the police. Was she right in doing so?
Hypothetical Case #2 Delaney set up a spring load shot gun that would go off the moment someone would enter his home it would 
shoot them. He comes home to his cabin to find a dead body at his door step. He calls the police to let them know 
that someone tried to break in. The police arrives and arrests Delaney. Did he commit murder?
Elements of a Crime Actus reus-wrongful behavior (guilty act) Mens rea-wrongful state of mind, such as purpose, knowledge, recklessness, or negligence (guilty mind) Criminal law usually requires both of the above Strict liability laws do not consider mens rea Regulatory statutes § Classification of Crimes Felonies-serious crimes punishable by imprisonment for greater than one year, or death (murder, distribution of 
drugs)
Misdemeanors-less serious crimes punishable by fines, or imprisonment for less than one year (possession of 
small amount of drugs
Petty offenses- minor misdemeanors punishable by small fines or short jail sentences (speeding) Crimes Affecting Business: Property Crimes Robbery Taking of property through use of force or fear If this isn't done by force then it's just petty theft Burglary Taking of property after unlawful entry of building or structure Larceny Secretive taking of property w/intent to deprive rightful owner of use or possession Arson Intentional burning of a dwelling or other real property Crimes Affecting Business: White-Collar Crimes (Nonviolent) Extortion (blackmail) Making threats to obtain money Threats to injure to extort money, property or pecuniary benefit § Fraud A false representation, made with intent to deceive, reasonably relied upon by the victim, causing damage Embezzlement Wrongful conversion of another's property when you lawfully possess it Computer Crimes Liability in Corporate Crimes Corporations van be held criminally accountable for almost any crime except those punishable only by a prison 
sentence
Corporate executives may be personally liable for business crime Responsible corporate officer doctrine Vicarious crime is when employers are liable for wrongful acts of employees in some instances Defenses to Crimes Infancy Mistake-of-fact Being drunk and "breaking and entering" into a house you thought was yours Involuntary intoxication Duress Serious harm of loss of life Threat more serious than crime Immediate or inescapable Insanity Entrapment Police suggest crime Must not be predisposed Necessity Justifiable use of force (i.e., self defense) Constitutional Safeguards: The Fourth and Fifth Amendments Fourth Amendment Protection from unreasonable search and seizure (probable cause) Restriction on warrants Fifth Amendment Prohibition on double jeopardy Right not to incriminate oneself Right to due process Constitutional Safeguards: The Eight and Fourteenth Amendments Eight Amendment Freedom from excessive bail Freedom from excessive finess Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment Fourteenth Amendment Extension of the right to due process to all state matters Extension of most constitutional rights to defendants at the state level Exclusionary Rule Definition: The exclusionary rule is a legal principle in the United States, under constitutional law, which holds 
that evidence collected or analyzed in violation of the defendant's constitutional rights is sometimes inadmissible 
for a criminal prosecution in a court of law. This may be considered an example of a prophylactic rule formulated 
by the judiciary in order to protect a constitutional right
Criminal Pretrial Procedure Miranda Rights "You have the right to remain silent and refuse to answer any questions" "Anything you say may be used against you in a court of law" "You have the right to consult an attorney before speaking to the police and have an attorney present during any 
questioning now or in the future"
"If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you before the questioning begins" "If you do not have an attorney available, you have the right to remain silent until you have an opportunity to 
consult with one"
"Now that I have advised you of your rights, are you willing to answer any questions without an attorney 
present?"
Arrest Booking First Appearance Arraignment Trial Appeal Information
(for misdemeanor
Indictment by a Grand Jury
(for felony)
Chapter 7: Crime and Business Community  Thursday, February 1, 2018 7:03 PM
background image Hypothetical Case #1 Neighbor A is playing really loud music, neighbor B asks him to turn it down. The next day same thing happens, 
neighbor B asks again, neighbor A keeps playing music. The next morning neighbor B is clearly frustrated and tells 
his wife that he's going to kill the neighbor. She freaks out and calls the police. Was she right in doing so?
Hypothetical Case #2 Delaney set up a spring load shot gun that would go off the moment someone would enter his home it would 
shoot them. He comes home to his cabin to find a dead body at his door step. He calls the police to let them know 
that someone tried to break in. The police arrives and arrests Delaney. Did he commit murder?
Elements of a Crime Actus reus-wrongful behavior (guilty act) Mens rea-wrongful state of mind, such as purpose, knowledge, recklessness, or negligence (guilty mind) Criminal law usually requires both of the above Strict liability laws do not consider mens rea Regulatory statutes § Classification of Crimes Felonies-serious crimes punishable by imprisonment for greater than one year, or death (murder, distribution of 
drugs)
Misdemeanors-less serious crimes punishable by fines, or imprisonment for less than one year (possession of 
small amount of drugs
Petty offenses- minor misdemeanors punishable by small fines or short jail sentences (speeding) Crimes Affecting Business: Property Crimes Robbery Taking of property through use of force or fear If this isn't done by force then it's just petty theft Burglary Taking of property after unlawful entry of building or structure Larceny Secretive taking of property w/intent to deprive rightful owner of use or possession Arson Intentional burning of a dwelling or other real property Crimes Affecting Business: White-Collar Crimes (Nonviolent) Extortion (blackmail) Making threats to obtain money Threats to injure to extort money, property or pecuniary benefit § Fraud A false representation, made with intent to deceive, reasonably relied upon by the victim, causing damage Embezzlement Wrongful conversion of another's property when you lawfully possess it Computer Crimes Liability in Corporate Crimes Corporations van be held criminally accountable for almost any crime except those punishable only by a prison 
sentence
Corporate executives may be personally liable for business crime Responsible corporate officer doctrine Vicarious crime is when employers are liable for wrongful acts of employees in some instances Defenses to Crimes Infancy Mistake-of-fact Being drunk and "breaking and entering" into a house you thought was yours Involuntary intoxication Duress Serious harm of loss of life Threat more serious than crime Immediate or inescapable Insanity Entrapment Police suggest crime Must not be predisposed Necessity Justifiable use of force (i.e., self defense) Constitutional Safeguards: The Fourth and Fifth Amendments Fourth Amendment Protection from unreasonable search and seizure (probable cause) Restriction on warrants Fifth Amendment Prohibition on double jeopardy Right not to incriminate oneself Right to due process Constitutional Safeguards: The Eight and Fourteenth Amendments Eight Amendment Freedom from excessive bail Freedom from excessive finess Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment Fourteenth Amendment Extension of the right to due process to all state matters Extension of most constitutional rights to defendants at the state level Exclusionary Rule Definition: The exclusionary rule is a legal principle in the United States, under constitutional law, which holds 
that evidence collected or analyzed in violation of the defendant's constitutional rights is sometimes inadmissible 
for a criminal prosecution in a court of law. This may be considered an example of a prophylactic rule formulated 
by the judiciary in order to protect a constitutional right
Criminal Pretrial Procedure Miranda Rights "You have the right to remain silent and refuse to answer any questions" "Anything you say may be used against you in a court of law" "You have the right to consult an attorney before speaking to the police and have an attorney present during any 
questioning now or in the future"
"If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you before the questioning begins" "If you do not have an attorney available, you have the right to remain silent until you have an opportunity to 
consult with one"
"Now that I have advised you of your rights, are you willing to answer any questions without an attorney 
present?"
Arrest Booking First Appearance Arraignment Trial Appeal Information
(for misdemeanor
Indictment by a Grand Jury
(for felony)
Chapter 7: Crime and Business Community  Thursday, February 1, 2018 7:03 PM
background image Hypothetical Case #1 Neighbor A is playing really loud music, neighbor B asks him to turn it down. The next day same thing happens, 
neighbor B asks again, neighbor A keeps playing music. The next morning neighbor B is clearly frustrated and tells 
his wife that he's going to kill the neighbor. She freaks out and calls the police. Was she right in doing so?
Hypothetical Case #2 Delaney set up a spring load shot gun that would go off the moment someone would enter his home it would 
shoot them. He comes home to his cabin to find a dead body at his door step. He calls the police to let them know 
that someone tried to break in. The police arrives and arrests Delaney. Did he commit murder?
Elements of a Crime Actus reus-wrongful behavior (guilty act) Mens rea-wrongful state of mind, such as purpose, knowledge, recklessness, or negligence (guilty mind) Criminal law usually requires both of the above Strict liability laws do not consider mens rea Regulatory statutes § Classification of Crimes Felonies-serious crimes punishable by imprisonment for greater than one year, or death (murder, distribution of 
drugs)
Misdemeanors-less serious crimes punishable by fines, or imprisonment for less than one year (possession of 
small amount of drugs
Petty offenses- minor misdemeanors punishable by small fines or short jail sentences (speeding) Crimes Affecting Business: Property Crimes Robbery Taking of property through use of force or fear If this isn't done by force then it's just petty theft Burglary Taking of property after unlawful entry of building or structure Larceny Secretive taking of property w/intent to deprive rightful owner of use or possession Arson Intentional burning of a dwelling or other real property Crimes Affecting Business: White-Collar Crimes (Nonviolent) Extortion (blackmail) Making threats to obtain money Threats to injure to extort money, property or pecuniary benefit § Fraud A false representation, made with intent to deceive, reasonably relied upon by the victim, causing damage Embezzlement Wrongful conversion of another's property when you lawfully possess it Computer Crimes Liability in Corporate Crimes Corporations van be held criminally accountable for almost any crime except those punishable only by a prison 
sentence
Corporate executives may be personally liable for business crime Responsible corporate officer doctrine Vicarious crime is when employers are liable for wrongful acts of employees in some instances Defenses to Crimes Infancy Mistake-of-fact Being drunk and "breaking and entering" into a house you thought was yours Involuntary intoxication Duress Serious harm of loss of life Threat more serious than crime Immediate or inescapable Insanity Entrapment Police suggest crime Must not be predisposed Necessity Justifiable use of force (i.e., self defense) Constitutional Safeguards: The Fourth and Fifth Amendments Fourth Amendment Protection from unreasonable search and seizure (probable cause) Restriction on warrants Fifth Amendment Prohibition on double jeopardy Right not to incriminate oneself Right to due process Constitutional Safeguards: The Eight and Fourteenth Amendments Eight Amendment Freedom from excessive bail Freedom from excessive finess Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment Fourteenth Amendment Extension of the right to due process to all state matters Extension of most constitutional rights to defendants at the state level Exclusionary Rule Definition: The exclusionary rule is a legal principle in the United States, under constitutional law, which holds 
that evidence collected or analyzed in violation of the defendant's constitutional rights is sometimes inadmissible 
for a criminal prosecution in a court of law. This may be considered an example of a prophylactic rule formulated 
by the judiciary in order to protect a constitutional right
Criminal Pretrial Procedure Miranda Rights "You have the right to remain silent and refuse to answer any questions" "Anything you say may be used against you in a court of law" "You have the right to consult an attorney before speaking to the police and have an attorney present during any 
questioning now or in the future"
"If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you before the questioning begins" "If you do not have an attorney available, you have the right to remain silent until you have an opportunity to 
consult with one"
"Now that I have advised you of your rights, are you willing to answer any questions without an attorney 
present?"
Arrest Booking First Appearance Arraignment Trial Appeal Information
(for misdemeanor
Indictment by a Grand Jury
(for felony)
Chapter 7: Crime and Business Community  Thursday, February 1, 2018 7:03 PM

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Virginia Commonwealth University who use StudySoup to get ahead
12 Pages 17 Views 13 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Virginia Commonwealth University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Virginia Commonwealth University
Department: Business Law
Course: Legal Environment of Business
Professor: Kenneth Hardt
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Tort Law, Criminal, Law, and negligence
Name: BUSN 323 Week 3
Description: These notes cover chapter 7,8 and 9. The last three chapters before the first exam.
Uploaded: 02/02/2018
12 Pages 17 Views 13 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Virginia Commonwealth University - SCMA 323 - Class Notes - Week 3
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Virginia Commonwealth University - SCMA 323 - Class Notes - Week 3

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here