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FSU - FAD 3432 - FAD 3432 Exam 1 Study Guide - Study Guide

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Schools > Florida State University > Child and Family Studies > FAD 3432 > FSU - FAD 3432 - FAD 3432 Exam 1 Study Guide - Study Guide

FSU - FAD 3432 - FAD 3432 Exam 1 Study Guide - Study Guide

School: Florida State University
Department: Child and Family Studies
Course: Stress and Resilience in the Family
Professor: Kristen Greene
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: resilience and stress
Name: FAD 3432 Exam 1 Study Guide
Description: This study guide covers the powerpoint, book, video, pdf, and quiz notes for exam 1.
Uploaded: 02/08/2018
This preview shows pages 1 - 7 of a 43 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image FAD 3432 Exam 1 Study Guide 
PowerPoint, Book, Video, PDF, and Quiz Notes
       Chapter 1: Stress and Resilience  In 2009 the American Psychology Association did a survey of  1,500 adults and 1,200 children aged 8-17 about stress in their lives Adult Stress Levels Many of the adults reported worrying about money,  jobs, the economy, yet many (55%) said they worry 
about family relationships and (51%) said they worry 
about relationships 
25% of the adults reported high stress levels in the  previous month 51% of the adults reported moderate stress levels in the previous month  Children Stress levels  14% of 8-12 yr olds and 28% of 13-17 yr olds said they  worried a lot or a great deal, mostly about their 
appearance and doing well in school, but also 
relationships with peers, siblings, and their parents
The work of Han Selye, Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, Ronald Glaser, and  others has proven that too much stress puts a tremendous amount of 
strain on the body and leave us vulnerable to both short term and long 
term problems ranging from stomach ulcers and sleeplessness to 
premature aging and even death
Defining Stress Two ways to think about what stress is: physiologically 
and psychologically
o Physiologically - Our body’s reaction to some change  or challenge in our environment.  The series of chemical
and bodily changes as a result of a wide variety of 
causes. The non-specific response of the body to any 
demand.
Any environmental, social, or internal demand 
which requires the individual to readjust his/her 
usual behavioral patterns
o Psychologically - A particular relationship between the person and the environment that is appraised by the 
person as taxing or exceeding his or her resources and 
possibly endangering his/her well being
What makes some people more resilient in the 
face of stress than others 
Physiological Stress Response 
background image FAD 3432 Exam 1 Study Guide 
PowerPoint, Book, Video, PDF, and Quiz Notes
General Adaptation Syndrome (GAS) -three stages of 
physiological changes. 
Stage 1: Alarm Reaction The body releases hormones and energy in order 
to prepare for action 
Stage 2: Resistance or Adaptation Body recovers from action and restores energy 
reserves 
Stage 3: Exhaustion The body becomes fatigued and overwhelmed 
from prolonged or extreme alarm reaction
This third stage can lead to irreparable harm or 
even death
This stage is rarely reached, unlike stages one and
two 
Equifinality- the principle that in open systems a given end  state can be reached by many potential means Human Stress Response  Threatening Event  Leads to: Fight or Flight  Stress Circuit Activated  Cortisol, Adrenaline, and Noradrenaline 
released 
Heart rate, breathing, perspiration increased Immune system suppressed Fats and Sugar released for energy  Blood flow diverted from non-essential 
systems 
When Threat is removed:
background image FAD 3432 Exam 1 Study Guide 
PowerPoint, Book, Video, PDF, and Quiz Notes
Body slows down Acetylcholine released Cortisol, Adrenaline, and Noradrenaline levels 
lowered 
Body returns to normal  Neurobiological Response  The fight/flight response is associated with the heightened 
activation of certain lower parts of the brain, such as 
amygdala. However, this essentially shuts down parts of the 
prefrontal cortex that allow for rational decision-making
This brings about PATTERNED BEHAVIOR STRESS UP, OPTIONS DOWN Physiological Stress Response  Autonomous Nervous System (ANS)-governs the 
functioning of the heart, lungs, stomach, blood vessels, and 
glands that operate automatically without conscious thought; 
involuntary 
Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS)-engages during  times of stress Takes over by activating the hypothalamus-
pituitary-adrenal axis (aka brains stress circuit) 
Pituitary gland produces ACTH 
(andrenocortochtropin) 
Fight or Flight Response  Saliva flow decreases Blood vessels constrict; chills & sweating  Heart beats faster and harder  Output of digestive enzymes decreases  Muscles become more tense; trembling can 
occur 
background image FAD 3432 Exam 1 Study Guide 
PowerPoint, Book, Video, PDF, and Quiz Notes
Pupils dilate  Quick, deep breathing occurs  Food movement flows down  Blood pressure increases as major vessels 
dilate 
Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS)-engages during recovery Releases neurotransmitter Ach (acetylcholine) 
which tells the body to slow down 
Rest and Digest  Heart rate decreases Breathing returns to normal Digestive tract gets back into action  Psychological Stress Response  Cognitive Appraisal Process-the process we go through 
when evaluating a stressful encounter. 
Primary- Determine if the encounter is irrelevant  (outcome has no implication on our well being), benign-
positive (outcome has the potential to preserve or 
enhance our well being), or stressful (outcome has 
resulted in or threatens to result in some harm or 
challenge to us) 
Secondary- Determine what coping options are  available, if any, and the likelihood that we can take 
action
Reactions to stress depend on our appraisal of the stressor. o Appraisals can be conscious and deliberate or at  a lower level of consciousness Reactions to stress depends on one’s beliefs about  his/her abilities Psychologist look at stress in two ways 1. Stimulus approach 
background image FAD 3432 Exam 1 Study Guide 
PowerPoint, Book, Video, PDF, and Quiz Notes
Look at stress as an event that impinges on us 
This approach ignore the way people respond to stress 
2. Relational View Takes into account the reason for the variety of ways  people respond to stress  Dimensions Stressors: Two Dimensions of Stressors 1. Valance Valance (eustress vs. distress). Eustress-Know as “good stress” or “healthy 
stress”, eustress enhances our ability to function 
during times of need. 
Helps us to feel safe Helps us reach higher goals Can leave us with a sense of excitement Healthy Tension  Planning a wedding Having a baby  Viewing a stressor as eustress can: Improve physical health  Improve our ability to cope with 
stress 
Help families cope successfully  Distress-Know as “bad stress”, distress occurs 
when we experience a certain level of stress, 
frequent stress, or stress that lasts too long.  
Distress is a negative psychological 
response to a stressor; we believe the 
situation exceeds our ability to cope with 
stress. 
background image FAD 3432 Exam 1 Study Guide 
PowerPoint, Book, Video, PDF, and Quiz Notes
Unmanaged distress can lead to: Serious health issues Interferences in our close personal 
relationships
2. Duration  o Discrete- This type of stressor involves sudden changes that occur in a short period of time requiring 
readjustments
Also known as acute stress Have specific onset and offsets  Examples that require substantial life 
adjustments: 
Death of a spouse Death of a child Examples that require minor life adjustments:  Promotion at work  o Continuous- Ongoing chronic problems that permeate  our daily lives. Readjustments are required over a 
prolonged period of time
Continuous  Ongoing stressors that permeate our daily lives  Sometimes referred to as “background stressors”  Two types of chronic stressors: Hassles  Relatively minor annoyances or 
irritants
Ex: work deadlines, caring for 
children, broken appliances
Chronic Strains
background image FAD 3432 Exam 1 Study Guide 
PowerPoint, Book, Video, PDF, and Quiz Notes
Of larger magnitude and often drain 
our coping mechanisms, leaving us 
more vulnerable to the negative 
effects 
Ex: bullying (can lead to lowered self 
esteem, self harm, etc.), resource 
deprivation 
Types of Stressors  Ambiguous loss Physically absent but still part of the family (divorce,  missing in action) Physically present, but emotionally absent (drug  /alcohol addiction). Family conflict, daily hassles Demoralizing events -job loss, unwanted pregnancy, poverty, 
homelessness, having one’s child in foster care, mental 
illness, and criminal prosecution.
Natural disasters, catastrophic events Types of Stressors Internal vs. External  Precipitate onset vs. Gradual onset Intense vs. Mild Random vs. Expectable Perceived solvable vs. Perceived unsolvable Myth that happy families should be stress free All families experience stress as a result of change Change brings disturbance and pressure (often termed 
“stress”.)

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School: Florida State University
Department: Child and Family Studies
Course: Stress and Resilience in the Family
Professor: Kristen Greene
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: resilience and stress
Name: FAD 3432 Exam 1 Study Guide
Description: This study guide covers the powerpoint, book, video, pdf, and quiz notes for exam 1.
Uploaded: 02/08/2018
43 Pages 104 Views 83 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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