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Temple - CJ 2501 - Class Notes - Week 5

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Temple - CJ 2501 - Class Notes - Week 5

School: Temple University
Department: Criminal Justice
Course: Introduction to Criminal Law
Professor: Metzger
Term: Winter 2016
Tags:
Name: Criminal Law Week 5 Notes
Description: Notes from the fifth week of class
Uploaded: 02/14/2018
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background image Criminal Law Week 5 Notes 2/12/18 Roper v. Simmons­ from a policy perspective, the first time neuroscience is injected 
in the criminal justice system
Atkins. V. Virginia­ before 2002 the court did not look at intellectual disabilities Baze v. Rees­ important and the next issue that the Supreme Court has to look at; 
older methods of execution include hanging, electric chair, firing squad, and gas 
chamber; lethal injection is a combination of three drugs and was considered the 
most humane way to execute someone; lately executions are being botched 
because we cannot get all three drugs and because the drugs are not effectively 
working since the people being executed may have been IV drug users (cannot find 
a vein and the drugs are not working on them); still “good law”­ lethal injection does 
not violate the 8
th  amendment according to the court Virginia says that they would use firing squad if they cannot get the drugs for 
lethal injection
United States v. Germentera Shaming punishments­ does creative sentencing have merit?; may be more effective
with children
Chapter 4: Actus Reus Actus Reus & Mens Rea Actus reus is the criminal act (or failure to act/“omission”) required for a crime to 
occur
Only voluntary acts are punished (product of a conscious choice) Note­ bad intent or thoughts alone are not enough (important, on the exam) Example: a person fires a gun or takes a computer from someone else or failure to 
act when there is a legal duty to act (a parent not taking a child to the doctor when 
they refuse to eat or a lifeguard not saving someone who is drowning when their 
shift is over) Involuntary Acts­ Result in Harm Example: A hits B, B dies
a. A reflex, spasm, or convulsion
b. A bodily movement during unconsciousness or sleep
c. Conduct during hypnosis or resulting from hypnotic suggestion
Epileptic Seizure (People v. Decina p. 74) Knew of medical condition and knew it could interfere with driving (killed 4  children); was this voluntary? Yes, if you did not take the medicine voluntarily and
knew that you could get a seizure, you are criminally liable
Example: hit and kill someone while texting and driving; criminally negligent 
homicide, not a premeditated or unpremeditated homicide (1
st  degree or 2 nd  degree  murder) Omissions to Act An omission is a failure to act or a “negative act”

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School: Temple University
Department: Criminal Justice
Course: Introduction to Criminal Law
Professor: Metzger
Term: Winter 2016
Tags:
Name: Criminal Law Week 5 Notes
Description: Notes from the fifth week of class
Uploaded: 02/14/2018
2 Pages 41 Views 32 Unlocks
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