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SOC 111 - chapter 1 and lecture notes - Class Notes

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SOC 111 - chapter 1 and lecture notes - Class Notes

School: Abilene Christian University
Department: Sociology
Course: Introduction to Sociology
Professor: C.d. Pruett
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Introduction to Sociology
Name: chapter 1 and lecture notes
Description: chapter 1 and lecture notes, has key concepts from the book
Uploaded: 02/14/2018
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background image Ch. 1 an introduction to sociology  What is sociology? Sociology- the study of group interactions, societies, and social 
interactions from small and personal groups to very large groups
Society- group of people who live in a defined geographic area, interact
with one another, and share a common culture
Micro-level- study small groups and individual interactions Macro level- look at the trends among and between large groups and 
societies
Culture- refers to a group’s shared practices, values, and beliefs Reification- an error of treating an abstract concept as real Social factors- laws, morals, values, religious beliefs, customs, 
fashions, rituals, and all cultural rules that govern social life
The history of sociology? Age of enlightenment philosophers developed general principles that 
could be explain social life (Locke, Voltaire, Keint, Hobbes) 
Creating discipline: Auguste Conte (1798-1857)- named the scientific study of  social patterns positivism, believed using scientific methods 
reveal ways laws and individual interact in a new “positivists” 
age of history
Harriet Martineau (1802-1876)- 1 st  woman sociologists;  addressed wide range of social science issues; 1 st  to translate  Conte’s work to English (women’s rights)  Karl Marx (1818-1883)- German philosopher and economist,  coauthored “Communist Manifesto;” predicted that inequalities 
or capitalism would be so extreme workers would revolt (thought 
with revolt capitalism would collapse and lead to communism 
with no private owner
Herbert Spencer (1820-1903)- British sociologist, rejected  much of Conte’s and Marx’s philosophy, theory and support for 
communism; favored a government that allowed market forces 
to control capitalism
Georg Simmel (1858-1917)- focused on social factors (external  forces that influence individuals); did one of the 1 st  sociology  studies of suicide. Emilie Durkham (1858-1931)- philosopher and social; argued  how an individual comes to view themselves is based to a very 
large extent on interactions with others. 
“significant others” = specific individual impacting a 
person’s life
“generalized others” = organized general attitude of a 
social group 
background image Max Weber (1864-1920)- Iron cage; studied a lot of protestants; Verstehen (German “to understand in a deep way”). Anti-positivism= social researches strived for subjectivity 
to represent social processes, cultural norms, and societal 
values
Qualitative Sociology= seeks to understand human 
behavior by learning through in-depth interview, focus 
groups and analyses of content sources
1.3 Theoretical Perspectives theory= a way to explain different aspects of social interaction Hypothesis= testable proposition Social solidarity-the social ties that bind a group  Grand Theories- attempt to explain large- scale relationships and 
answer fundamental question such as why societies form and why they
change. 
3 Paradigms: Structural Functionalism, Conflict Theory, and Symbolic 
Interactionalism 
Paradigms- philosophical and theoretical frameworks used within a 
disciple to formulate theories, generalizations and experiment 
performed
o Structural Functionalism (Macro or Mid)- the way each part of  society functions together to contribute to the whole o Conflict theory (Macro)-  the way inequalities contribute to social  differences and perpetuate differences in power  o Symbolic interactionism (Micro)- one-to-one interactions and  communications Social institutions- patterns of beliefs and behaviors focused on 
meeting social needs 
Dynamic Equilibrium- stable state which all parts of healthy society 
work
Social Facts- laws, morals, values, religious beliefs, customs, fashions, 
rituals, and all of the cultural rules that govern social life
Manifest functions- consequences of a social process that are sought or
anticipated 
Latent functions- unsought consequences of a social process Dysfunctions- social processes that have undesirable consequences 
(helps in mid-level)
Conflict theory- looks at society as a competition for limited sources Symbolic interactionism- is a micro-level theory that focuses on the 
relationship among individuals within a society 
o George Herbert Mead (1863-1931) considered a founder Dramaturgical analysis- a technique sociologist use in which they view 
society through the metaphor of a theatrical performance

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School: Abilene Christian University
Department: Sociology
Course: Introduction to Sociology
Professor: C.d. Pruett
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Introduction to Sociology
Name: chapter 1 and lecture notes
Description: chapter 1 and lecture notes, has key concepts from the book
Uploaded: 02/14/2018
3 Pages 31 Views 24 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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