Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

Temple - CJ 2501 - Study Guide - Midterm

Created by: Kayleigh Sprague Elite Notetaker

> > > > Temple - CJ 2501 - Study Guide - Midterm

Temple - CJ 2501 - Study Guide - Midterm

School: Temple University
Department: Criminal Justice
Course: Introduction to Criminal Law
Professor: Metzger
Term: Winter 2016
Tags:
Name: Criminal Law Exam 1 Study Guide
Description: This study guide covers material on the first exam
Uploaded: 02/16/2018
This preview shows pages 1 - 2 of a 5 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Criminal Law Exam 1 Study Guide Chapter 1: The Nature, Purpose, and Function of Criminal Law  Criminal law­ the foundation of the criminal justice system and a set of legal codes 
that govern behavior and maintain social order
Crime­ declared by law to be a criminal offense States condemn a range of acts in their crimes code Civil law­ a dispute between parties in which one party seeks monetary damages or 
financial compensation
Burden of proof­ preponderance of the evidence (51% certainty) Criminal law­ protects public interest Legal action is brought by a prosecutor Burden of proof­ proof beyond a reasonable doubt (a much higher burden of 
proof than the civil burden of proof)
 Felony­ a crime that is punishable by death or by imprisonment for more than one 
year
 Misdemeanor­ a crime that is punishable by imprisonment for less than one year Mala in se­ acts that are considered inherently evil Examples: murder, rape, robbery, etc.
Would be considered evil acts even if they were not prohibited by law
 Mala prohibita­ acts that are not considered inherently evil, but are wrong because 
they are prohibited by a statute
Includes acts like carrying a concealed weapon, leaving the scene of an 
accident, drug offenses, mercy killing, and being drunk and disorderly in public
Sources of criminal law:
1. Common law­ judge­made laws
o Foundation of American law, which was adopted from the English o      Judges rely on     precedent     from previous cases to rule on future cases 2.  State criminal codes (statutory law)­ a set of comprehensive laws that each U.S.  state develops 3. State and federal constitutions (constitutional law)
4. Administrative law­ government agency regulations (example: EPA, FDA) 
(regulatory)  Model penal code­ established to encourage states to adopt a uniform set of laws 
and corresponding definitions
States rely heavily on the code States that most closely follow the code are New Jersey, New York, 
Pennsylvania, and Oregon
 Uniform crime reporting (UCR)­ divides offenses into two groups: Part I and Part II 
crimes
The UCR collects data about Part I offenses to measure the level and scope of 
crime occurring throughout the nation
Part I offenses:
background image BARRT HAM­ burglary, arson, rape, robbery, theft, homicide, aggravated  assault, and motor vehicle theft
Criminal homicide (murder)­ the killing of one human being by another
Rape­ unlawful sexual intercourse
Robbery­ the taking of the personal property of another by force
Aggravated assault­ an unlawful attack by one person upon another for the 
purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury
o
This type of assault is usually accompanied by the use of a weapon or by 
means likely to produce death or great bodily harm
Burglary (breaking and entering)­ the unlawful entry of a structure to commit a 
felony or a theft
Larceny­theft­ the unlawful taking of the personal property of another
Motor­vehicle theft­ the theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle
Arson­ any willful or malicious burning of a dwelling or property of another Part II offenses­ all crimes not listed in Part I Chapter 2: Constitutional Limitations The U.S. has a constitutional democracy, a system of government based on a 
constitution that limits the powers of the government
Individual rights and liberties must be balanced against the need for social order  Rule of legality­ interpreted to mean that an individual may not be criminally 
punished for an act that was not clearly condemned by statute before the 
commission of the act The first principle of American criminal law jurisprudence Developed by common law judges
This concept is reflected in two constitutional principles: bills of attainder and ex 
post facto  Bills of attainder­ a legislative act that punishes an individual or a group of persons 
without the benefit of a trial
Prohibited Established to protect Americans from arbitrary punishment Ex post facto­ the statute must be in place before an action is criminalized
     
   Protects against retroactive laws  Void for vagueness­ individuals must receive notice of criminal conduct and police 
must be provided with a clear statement of prohibited behavior
Statutes that fail to meet these standards are considered unconstitutional and  void for vagueness
Example: State v. Stanko 974 P.2D 1132 (MONT. 1998)­ 
“A person operating or  driving a vehicle of any character on a public highway of this state shall drive the 
vehicle in a careful and prudent manner and at a rate of speed no greater than is 
reasonable and proper under the conditions existing….” Equal protection (5 th  and 14 th  amendments to the U.S. Constitution)          No state shall deprive any person of life, liberty, or property without due process  of law, or deny any person equal protection of the law

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Temple University who use StudySoup to get ahead
5 Pages 57 Views 45 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Temple University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Temple University
Department: Criminal Justice
Course: Introduction to Criminal Law
Professor: Metzger
Term: Winter 2016
Tags:
Name: Criminal Law Exam 1 Study Guide
Description: This study guide covers material on the first exam
Uploaded: 02/16/2018
5 Pages 57 Views 45 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Temple - CJ 2501 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Temple - CJ 2501 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here