Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

FSU - ARH 2100 - Class Notes - Week 3

Created by: Daniela G Capobianco Elite Notetaker

> > > > FSU - ARH 2100 - Class Notes - Week 3

FSU - ARH 2100 - Class Notes - Week 3

School: Florida State University
Department: Art History
Course: Introduction to Archaeology
Professor: Peres
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Intro to Archaeology and Archaeology
Name: Chapter 2: The Structure of Archaeological Inquiry
Description: These notes cover the powerpoint information as well as discussion info for Chapter 2.
Uploaded: 02/19/2018
This preview shows pages 1 - 2 of a 4 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Introduction to Archaeology- Chapter 2: The Structure of Archaeological
Inquiry
Outline I. What’s an Anthropological approach? II. What’s a Scientific Approach? III.  The Structure of Archaeological Inquiry IV. How Archaeological Inquiry Works Moundbuilders Mound sites: Moundville, Alabama; Cahokia, Missouri; Lake 
Jackson, Florida
Took around 40, 50 years before it was proved via science that 
ancestors of Native Americans built the mounds and not an 
“extinct superior race”
Knowledge of the moundbuilders was lost in the oral histories of 
Native Americans (reminds me of an episode of Doctor Who)
The Scientific Method 1. Define a relevant problem
2. Establish one or more hypotheses
3. Determine the empirical implications of the hypotheses
4. Collect appropriate data
5. Test the hypothes8s by comparing these data with the expected 
implications 6. Reject, revise and/or retest hypotheses as necessary. Scientific Methods components Hypothesis-a proposition proposed as an explanation of some 
phenomenon
Inductive reasoning-working from specific observations to 
more general hypotheses
Deductive reasoning- reasoning from theory to account for 
specific observations or experimental results
Testability-the degree to which one’s observations and 
experiments can be reproduced
Science is Self-correcting  Science insists that we  ask: Do we really know what we think we
know?
Deductive Reasoning is required to uncover these logical 
outcomes
o  The conclusions must be true, given that the premises are  true o Generally take the form of “if”… “then”
background image Science is Reiterative The scientific cycle does begin and end with facts Science is Not Infallible Science is subject to false starts, dead ends, preconceived 
notions and cultural biases
The Structure of Archaeology Inquiry Theory answers the “why” question Low-Level Theory The observations and interpretations that emerge from hands-on 
archaeological field and lab work.
Begins with archaeological objects and generates relevant facts 
or data about those objects.
Data depends on theory much as theory depends on data. Archaeology don’t excavate data but objects, data are 
observations made on these objects.
Middle-Level Theory Necessary to infer human behavior and natural processes from 
archaeological data.
 Hypothesis that links archaeological observations with the 
human behavior or natural processes of the past.
Situations that require  o Observations or ongoing human behavior or natural  processes or o Evidence of the material results of that behavior or those  processes High-level theory Theory that seeks to answer the large “why” questions Goes beyond the archaeology specifics to address the “big 
questions” of concern to many social and historical sciences
Paradigms-overarching framework for understanding how the 
world works.
o A lot like culture; learned, shared and symbolic.
o Are not open to direct open empirical verification, they are 
just useful or not. Paradigms in Modern Archaeology Processual-explains social, economics and cultural change as 
primarily the result of adaptation to  material conditions
o External conditions (i.e. environment) are assumed to take  casual priority over ideational factors in explaining change Culture viewed as a system-general systems theory

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Florida State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
4 Pages 43 Views 34 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Florida State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Florida State University
Department: Art History
Course: Introduction to Archaeology
Professor: Peres
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Intro to Archaeology and Archaeology
Name: Chapter 2: The Structure of Archaeological Inquiry
Description: These notes cover the powerpoint information as well as discussion info for Chapter 2.
Uploaded: 02/19/2018
4 Pages 43 Views 34 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to FSU - ANT 2100 - Class Notes - Week 3
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to FSU - ANT 2100 - Class Notes - Week 3

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here